Tag Archives: Horse Care

New Retirees Arrive at Old Friends

Bordonaro (left) and Next Shares (Photo Mary Greene)

Graded Stakes Winners Next Shares and Bordonaro

GEORGETOWN, KY – SEPTEMBER 23, 2021 – Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement Facility in Georgetown, KY, has welcomed new retirees.

Next Shares, winner of the 2018 Old Friends Stakes at Kentucky Downs, and multiple graded stakes winner Bordonaro.

A Richard Baltas trainee and owned in partnership, Next Shares (Archarcharch – Two Dot Slew, Evansville Slew) retires after seven seasons with a record of seven wins from 49 starts and earnings of $1.891,971.

A multiple graded stakes winner, Next Shares also captured the 2018 GR1 Shadwell Turf Mile at Keeneland, the GR2 San Gabriel Stakes at Santa Anita, and the GR2 Seabiscuit at Del Mar in 2019.

Bordonaro (Memo – Miss Excitment, Rajab), comes to Old Friends through the United Pegasus Foundation in Tehachapi, CA. A William Spawr trainee, the now 20-year-old gelding won the 2006 GR1 Ancient Breeders’ Cup Stakes at Oak Tree and is a two-time winner of the GR3 Count Fleet Sprint Handicap (2006 and 2007) at Oaklawn Park. He retired with 10 wins from 20 starts and earnings of $938,128.

“We’re so thrilled to have both of these wonderful athletes,” said Old Friends founder and president Michael Blowen. “Richard Baltus, who entered Next Shares in the Old Friends Stakes because it guaranteed his retirement, and Bill Spawr, who trusted us with Amazombie, are two very special old friends.”

Old Friends Welcomes Rocketry

SEPT. 24, 2021 – Old Friends has welcomed multiple graded stakes winner Rocketry.

The son of Hard Spun, now 7, retired from racing in August of this year following a fourth-place effort in the Birdstone Stakes at Saratoga. At that time, he was sent to owner Centennial Farms’ Middleburg, VA facility to unwind.

He retired after five seasons on the track with six wins from 29 starts and lifetime earnings of $811,577.

A fan favorite thanks to his thrilling late-running style, Rocketry truly came into his own as a 4-year-old under conditioner Jimmy Jerkens. He captured the 2018 Temperence Hill Invitational Stakes at Belmont Park by crushing a 98-year-old track record for 1 5/8 miles held by Man o’ War, and, later that year, he earned his first graded stakes victory in the GR2 Marathon Stakes at Churchill Downs, again setting a new track record for the 1 ¾ miles.

In his 6-year-old campaign Rocketry added a third track record to his resume, this time going 1 5/8 miles in 2:42.57 at Keeneland, and picked up another graded victory in the GR2 Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance Stakes.

“Just like the movie character, Rocketry could not have lived up to his nickname of ‘Rocky’ any better,” said Don Little, Jr., President of Centennial Farms. “He consistently campaigned in stakes carrying the Centennial flag with honor every time he set foot on the track. He was sound throughout his career while breaking three track records over a distance of ground. Being involved with a horse like this was truly a joy, thrill, and one that will be cherished by all the partners involved,” Little continued. “While he will be missed on the oval, we look forward to him showing off to visitors at Old Friends.”

“Who doesn’t love Rocketry?” said Old Friends founder and President Michael Blowen. “We’re very fortunate that Centennial Farms trusts us to care for their great marathoner. Thanks to Don Little, Jr. and Jimmy Jerkins for allowing us to showcase him to his many fans.”

For more information, please call (502) 863-1775 or visit www.oldfriendsequine.org.

EQUUS Foundation Awards over $631,000 in Grants in 2021

The EQUUS Foundation announced the award of over $631,000 in grants, including awards of new and gently used riding apparel, valued at $313,864, to individual riders in need, scholastic riding programs, pony clubs, equestrian camp programs, and equine charities through The Rider’s Closet program.

Primary support is awarded to equine charities nationwide that save and re-home increasing numbers of horses from abuse, neglect, and slaughter and charities that partner with horses to improve the well-being of people through the Foundation’s Transparency Awards program. The EQUUS Foundation awarded small grants ranging from $500 to $5,000 to 142 charities that earned the EQUUS Foundation Guardian Seal of Transparency by completing the EQUUS Foundation’s comprehensive and unique verification process.

EQUUS Foundation Horse Whisperers are a select group of individuals and organizations who are committed to ensuring that America’s horses are safe and live with dignity throughout their lives and are recognized by the EQUUS Foundation for their extraordinary kinship with horses by the establishment of an award in their names to honor deserving equine charities.

The EQUUS Foundation Board of Directors honors those charities from among the grant recipients that best align with the interests of the Horse Whisperers with a Horse Whisperer Award.

“The work of the EQUUS Foundation begins each time the career of a horse comes to an end. It is only through engaging passionate supporters and collaboration that we are able to identify and invest in effective programs that are finding homes for at-risk horses and horses in transition, providing a safe haven for aged horses, and increasing opportunities for more people to benefit from the magic and power of horses,” said Lynn Coakley, EQUUS Foundation President.

To learn more about the EQUUS Foundation and their mission, please visit www.equusfoundation.org.

EQUUS Foundation Announces 2021 Platinum Performance Horse Welfare Award Recipients

The EQUUS Foundation is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2021 Platinum Performance Horse Welfare Awards. Five EQUUS Foundation Guardian charities received a $500 cash award and a $500 gift card for Platinum Performance products to be used by the charity for the care of one of their horses. In addition, another five horses received $250 gift cards for Platinum Performance Equine, and 26 horses received gift cards for a bucket of Platinum Performance Equine.

“We are truly honored to support the EQUUS Foundation and the incredible work that they do to keep America’s horses safe with purposeful lives and loving homes. Congratulations to the recipients of the 2020 Platinum Performance Horse Welfare Awards. We celebrate all the deserving applicants for their complete transparency and wonderful effort in protecting horses and appreciating the impact they have on each of us,” said Emily Smith, MS, Platinum Performance.

“We are so proud to be associated with Platinum Performance,” said Lynn Coakley, EQUUS Foundation President. “The Platinum Performance Awards program is really special because it benefits specific horses. It’s wonderful to be able to provide comfort to horses being rehabilitated by charities that are making them ready for their next homes and charities that are partnering with horses to improve the well-being of people.”

Only those charities that undergo the EQUUS Foundation’s comprehensive and unique verification process and receive the EQUUS Foundation Guardian designation are eligible to receive financial support from the EQUUS Foundation.

View all the Platinum Performance Horse Welfare Award Recipients here.

To learn more about the EQUUS Foundation and their mission, please visit www.equusfoundation.org.

Success for Adoptable Horses Spotlighted at Hampton Classic Horse Show

Adoptable equines and volunteers from EQUUS Foundation Guardian Charity, Rising Starr Horse Rescue, with Brianne Goutal-Marteau, Valerie Angeli, Georgina Bloomberg, and Jill Rappaport @ Geoff Tischman Photography.

The sun was shining in full force for the opening Grand Prix at the 2021 Hampton Classic on Sunday, August 29, when adoptable equines paraded before spectators prior to the start of the competition. The parade previewed the equines who would be featured the next day at the Equine Adoption Meet & Greet presented by the EQUUS Foundation.

Leading the parade was EQUUS Foundation EQUUStar, top International rider, and sponsor of the Hampton Classic Animal Adoption Day, Georgina Bloomberg. Bloomberg was joined by renown animal welfare advocate, media personality, and best-selling author, Jill Rappaport, and Valerie Angeli, EQUUS Foundation VP, with a special appearance by super model and horse advocate, Christie Brinkley.

Top equestrian and EQUUS Foundation EQUUStar, Brianne Goutal-Marteau, joined Bloomberg and Rappaport to meet and greet spectators at the Equine Adoption event.

“We are so grateful to the Hampton Classic Horse Show to have this opportunity to showcase adoptable equines and to raise awareness on how horses become at risk and how everyone can help, and to Georgina Bloomberg for making this event possible,” said Angeli.

“The 2021 event was especially rewarding because seven equines from EQUUS Foundation Guardian charity, Rising Starr Horse Rescue in Wilton, CT, found forever homes directly as a result of the event. We can’t say enough about how much we love our partnership with Georgina and the Hampton Classic Horse Show and would like to give a shout out to Shanette Cohen, Executive Director of the Hampton Classic Horse Show, and her staff.”

“It just goes to show that awareness and visibility is everything,” said Kelly Stackpole, Executive Director and Founder of Rising Starr.

Bunny and Turtle are 10-year-old mini donkeys who arrived at Rising Starr when a vet convinced the owner to surrender them instead of euthanizing them. They will live now out the rest of their lives at a private farm in North Salem, NY.

Rising Starr became aware of two black three-year-old Falabella Pony/Mini Horse cross mares, Daphne and Velma, from a Craig’s List ad and acquired them to keep them from winding up at auction and the threat of slaughter as many horses do when sold this way. They were adopted by Laurel Crown Farm, a Long Island show barn, where they will be their much-loved mascots.

Xander, a 13-year-old chestnut Quarter Horse, had been purchased at an auction in Texas, and was transferred to Rising Starr. When Xander’s new owners came to Rising Starr to take him home, they also fell in love with rescues Gunner and Odin, and adopted them as well. So Xander, Gunner, and Odin went to their new home together as pleasure and trail horses at a beautiful, private farm in the New York Catskills.

There was also interest in Violet, a Thoroughbred/Quarter cross from Rising Starr Rescue. Learn more about Violet here.

In addition to Rising Starr, the Retired Racehorse Project participated with a demonstration by Erica E. Rossner aboard the talented Mr. October (“Toby”), a chestnut gelding and son of famous Thoroughbred, Smarty Jones, who won the Kentucky Derby and The Preakness in 2004. With his career as a racehorse having come to an end, Toby, now seven years old, is showing major promise as a hunter/jumper/eventing prospect and is representative of the many off track Thoroughbreds who excel at their second careers and depend on opportunities to be all they can be.

Trainer Rob West from the Mustang Heritage Foundation was also on hand to enlighten spectators on how wild Mustangs are at risk and currently their lives and quality of their lives sadly depend on adoption and second careers as mascots and riding horses. West demonstrated the versatility and bravery of the Mustang with Mocha, only two months out of the wild and who will be available for adoption at the upcoming Mustang Makeover event, and two of his own Mustangs, Lori Darlin and Moonshine Lady.

The close of the 2021 Hampton Classic Horse Show also marked the conclusion of a matching campaign for the EQUUS Foundation, where donations made from August 16 through September 5 would be matched by prize money won by EQUUS Foundation Equine Ambassador, Lafitte De Muze, and donated by his owner, Cheryl Olsten, up to $30,000.

“We are thrilled to announce that Cheryl increased the match to $35,000 on learning that we received $35,000 in donations during the campaign to directly benefit EQUUS Foundation Guardian charities involved with the rescue and re-homing of horses in need of next chapters,” said Lynn Coakley, EQUUS Foundation President. “We are deeply grateful to Cheryl Olsten, Lafitte De Muze, his rider, Amanda Steege, and our donors for helping to make wishes come true for America’s horses in need of help.”

View more photos of Hampton Classic Equine Adoption Day here.

Contact the Hampton Classic at PO Box 3013, Bridgehampton, NY 11932, Tele: (631) 537-3177, E-Mail: Info@HamptonClassic.com, Website: www.hamptonclassic.com.

To learn more about the EQUUS Foundation and their mission, please visit www.equusfoundation.org.

Join Us in Supporting the Emergency Hay Bank

In response to the devastating wildfires currently burning across the western United States, the Equestrian Aid Foundation has made a grant to the Fleet of Angels’ HayThere! Emergency Horse Hay Micro-Grant Program.

Our partnership with this program helps horsemen in crisis to care for their animals in evacuation situations and in the aftermath of natural disaster – from fires to hurricanes and beyond.

Please join us in supporting the Emergency Horse Hay Micro-Grant Program.

Your tax-deductible donation today will help horse owners affected by natural disasters as they face the uncertainty of tomorrow.

For more information, please visit EquestrianAidFoundation.org.

Kentucky Horse Shows Enacts Equine Safety Protocols ahead of Summer Horse Shows

Lexington, KY – July 26, 2021 – The Kentucky Summer Horse Shows are set to begin July 28, 2021, and Kentucky Horse Shows LLC is dedicated to the health, welfare, and safety of all exhibitors both equine and human.

Due to the positive case of Equine Herpesvirus Myeloencephalopathy (EHM) secondary to EHV-1 at the Sonoma Horse Park, horses that attended the horse shows in Sonoma or were in close contact with horses that attended the horse shows in Sonoma between July 19 and 25 will not be permitted at the Kentucky Horse Park.

Complete details of Kentucky Horse Shows Biosecurity Requirements can be found by clicking here.

As a general reminder, nose-to-nose contact between horses should be limited and sharing equipment (tack or feeding) between horses should be avoided unless thoroughly disinfected between uses.

Thank you for your efforts in protecting the health of our equine partners during the Kentucky Summer Horse Shows.

For more information about the Kentucky Horse Shows, please visit www.KentuckyHorseShows.com.

Keeping Cool in Tokyo – Heat and Humidity Measures under the Microscope

Example of monitoring horses in work using thermal imaging cameras at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. © FEI.

Olympic Equestrian Dressage competitions are already well underway and all equine athletes will have settled into their temporary home at the historic Equestrian Park venue in Baji Koen, with the arrival of the final batch of Show Jumping horses. To allow our equine and human athletes to optimise their performance in the Tokyo climate, comprehensive heat and humidity protocols have been put in place by the FEI and the Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic & Paralympic Games (TOCOG).

The FEI has been working on minimising the impact of heat and humidity on performance since before the Atlanta 1996 Olympic Games, and the work on Tokyo 2020 is a continuation of that.

Heat countermeasures in place onsite at both Equestrian venues for equine athletes:

  • Air-conditioned stables at both Baji Koen and Sea Forest Park (Cross Country venue)
  • Training and competitions scheduled for early morning and evening (under floodlights)
  • Constant monitoring of current and forecast climatic conditions, working with the official Tokyo 2020 weather provider, Japan Meteorological Agency
  • Constant monitoring of onsite climatic conditions using the Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) index, which measures heat stress in direct sunlight, taking into account temperature, humidity, wind speed, sun angle, and cloud cover (solar radiation), every 15 minutes during the Cross Country
  • Constant and close monitoring of horses by a world-class veterinary team, multiple cooling facilities (shade tents, cold misting fans, unlimited ice and water, mobile cooling units, etc.)
  • Specific climate mitigation protocols for training and warm-up and also in-competition
  • Monitoring horses in work using thermal imaging cameras, enabling body temperature to be estimated accurately from a distance of 5-10 metres.
    • Allows for monitoring without interfering with athletes
    • Helps with early identification of horses at potential risk of overheating
    • Allows for timely interventions such as rapid cooling during training and warm-up and prior to competing
    • Possibility to stop a horse on the Cross Country course and bring mobile cooling units out to provide rapid cooling. (These mobile cooling units are also available for the arena-based competitions and in the warm-up arenas.)

Stable Manager Patrick Borg is proud of the onsite accommodation provided for the horses by the Baji Koen venue owners, the Japan Racing Association: “We can compare the stables in Tokyo with the Ritz in Paris. It’s five-star stabling for the horses. We try to do the very best for them.”

Baji Koen stables:

  • 333 stalls (4×3 metres)
  • Air-conditioning
  • Rubber matting throughout
  • Washing & drying machines
  • Unlimited supplies of ice and water

Heat countermeasures in place onsite at both Equestrian venues for humans:

  • Provision of shade, special cooling tents/areas (including cold misting fans) for athletes and entourage
  • Facilities and measures for officials/volunteers including rest periods, shade and rest areas, water, etc.

“We have ongoing and direct contact with the Weather Information Centre, which is constantly monitoring the weather specifically for the two Equestrian venues, providing us with detailed information that allows the onsite team to make informed decisions on whether there may be a need to delay or interrupt a competition,” FEI Veterinary Director Göran Akerström said. “If there is bad weather forecast then we receive hourly updates, and this can be more frequent if necessary.”

Official weather data and forecasts (primarily WBGT readings) from the official Tokyo 2020 weather provider, Japan Meteorological Agency, form the basis of decision-making, combined with in-situ readings. In addition, onsite conditions are monitored multiple times a day by the FEI Climate Advisor David Marlin, in liaison with the FEI Veterinary Director, FEI Veterinary Commission, FEI Chief Steward, and Tokyo 2020 Sport team.

To assist National Federations with optimal preparation for the Games, the FEI produced a series of educational Beat the Heat videos, aimed at optimising both human and equine performance in hot and humid conditions. Practical advice has been made available through the FEI Athlete hub, as well as on the dedicated Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic hub.

Alongside its own research, the FEI has made available to its community a number of important documents, including the IOC advice – Beat the Heat – for human athletes preparing for the Games. These are available on the Olympic Hub here and Paralympic Hub here (scroll down to the Medical, Veterinary, & Climate Information sections).

Media contacts:

Grania Willis
Executive Advisor
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 42

Olivia Robinson
Director, Communications
olivia.robinson@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 35

Shannon Gibbons
Manager, Media Relations & Media Operations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46+

Hampton Classic’s Adoption Day on Aug. 30 Offers Hope for America’s Horses in Need of Homes

The EQUUS Foundation will once again partner with the Hampton Classic Horse Show to present adoptable horses at the Hampton Classic’s Animal Adoption Day on Monday, August 30, to promote the welfare of all of America’s horses at all stages of their lives. The gathering will showcase rescued and adoptable horses – from off-track Thoroughbreds to mini horses.

EQUUS Foundation EQUUStar, top international equestrian, and event sponsor, Georgina Bloomberg, will be meeting and greeting horse lovers who attend. Bloomberg will be joined by Jill Rappaport, renown animal advocate and award-winning author and media personality, Valerie Angeli, EQUUS Foundation VP of Engagement, Lynn Coakley, EQUUS Foundation President, and other EQUUS Foundation EQUUStars, including top world-class equestrian, Brianne Goutal-Marteau.

“I am thrilled to sponsor and appear at this important day for animal welfare and adoption at the Hampton Classic once again this year,” said Bloomberg. “I love how the Hampton Classic has embraced the message of responsibility for all horses and the animals we love and has provided this day for us to spread the message and find more animals hope and homes.”

The adoptable horse demos and meet and greet will take place in Hunter Ring 2 from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM and will also feature the HEART Horse Ambulance which will be open to visitors for tours. Parking and admission are free on Monday, August 30th.

Joining the EQUUS Foundation with adoptable horses this year at Hampton Classic Adoption Day will be Rising Starr Horse Rescue, Wilton, CT; Storeybrook Farm, Waterbury, VT; Hidden Pond Farm, Brentwood, NH; and the Retired Racehorse Project, Edgewater, MD. The live event will also have a virtual component featuring the adoptable horses of EQUUS Foundation Guardian charities nationwide on the EQUUS Foundation Next Chapters platform.

“We are so grateful to be back (after COVID) and to have the opportunity to inspire Olympic and world class equestrians and horse lovers of all sorts who are excited to learn how we can all help at risk horses and to meet some rescued/adoptable horses,” said Angeli. “As a community of people who love horses, we need to step up and take care of them – all of them – and make sure they always have a safe and happy place to go.” Social media is encouraged to help spread the word about horses that need homes.

Contact the Hampton Classic at PO Box 3013, Bridgehampton, NY 11932, Tele: (631) 537-3177, E-Mail: Info@HamptonClassic.com, Website: www.hamptonclassic.com.

To learn more about the EQUUS Foundation and their mission, please visit www.equusfoundation.org.

Butter-Stealing Witches and 9 Other Bizarre Superstitions about Horses

People have been interacting with and caring for horses for thousands of years — and over the millennia, some pretty odd beliefs came into being! Horse-keeping practices have evolved over time, but these superstitions and myths continue to be passed down from one generation of horse lovers to the next. If you choose to adopt a horse, keep these 10 silly myths in mind for a laugh when you go to throw out your horse’s old shoes or braid his or her mane.

  1. It’s well known that horseshoes are a symbol of good fortune, but did you know that the way a shoe points supposedly has a lot to do with how lucky they are? Old superstitions say that if you have a horseshoe in your home, make sure the open end is pointing upward to avoid having your luck fall out of the bottom of the shoe.
  2. Speaking of horseshoes, if your adopted #RightHorse is getting a new pair — don’t throw out the old ones! People used to believe that putting one of a horse’s old shoes in a butter churn would keep butter-thieving witches away.
  3. There are a lot of superstitions around horses and colors. In many countries it’s considered bad luck to wear or have anything green around horses.
  4. Among cowboys and the Western disciplines, green isn’t an issue — but keep your horses far away from yellow, which is believed to be unlucky and indicate cowardice!
  5. If you’ve got a cowboy hat on your head, make sure it tips upward for luck. And no matter what you do, don’t ever set your cowboy hat on a bed! It’s a commonly held superstition that a hat set on the bed invites bad luck to enter your home.
  6. If you choose to compete with your adopted horse, avoid wearing new clothes and using new gear — some believe it’s unlucky. Following that wisdom, make sure to bring your new boots to the barn several times before the big show day.
  7. If you find yourself dreaming of horses, there may be something to it. There’s a belief among horse people that a gray horse appearing three nights in a row is an omen of death. Alternatively, a black horse popping into your dreamscape signifies that a wedding might be in your future.
  8. If you’re braiding your horse’s mane, make sure you make an even number — an older superstition, that you’ll still see observed today, dictates that an odd number of braids invites bad luck.
  9. It’s considered bad luck to change a horse’s name, and even though it’s clearly just a superstition, many people to this day refuse to do it.
  10. If during morning feeding or a barn visit, you happen to find your adopted equine with knots and twists in his mane or tail, an old superstition says pixies may have visited and ridden him during the night!

Of course, the best way to bring good luck into your home is to adopt a horse of your own! Visit our horse-listing platform, myrighthorse.org, to browse hundreds of adoptable horses nationwide.

©2021 ASPCA

EQUUS Foundation Announces Recipients of 2021 Champion of Equine Service Scholarships

Emilie McCann with Drew, a rescue horse at Rising Starr Horse Rescue awaiting his next chapter.

The Champions program, sponsored by Ariat International, rewards volunteerism on behalf of horse welfare with scholarships for volunteers to help further their undergraduate and graduate education and to assist those pursuing certification as a therapeutic horsemanship instructor.

Emilie McCann and Lily Stidham will receive the 2021 EQUUS Foundation Champion of Equine Service Academic Scholarship to further their academic education at an institution of higher learning. Emily Jones will receive the 2021 Champion of Equine Service PATH Certification Scholarship presented by Lessons in TR to cover the certification exam fee.

Despite the significant restrictions on volunteer opportunities resulting from COVID-19, these individuals made it a priority to continue to volunteer and overcome these new barriers. “Access to horses has become more challenging – never mind when there is a pandemic keeping us at home,” said Lynn Coakley, EQUUS Foundation President. “The dedication of incredible volunteers all over the country speaks to the importance of the horse-human bond in people’s lives. During this time of continued uncertainty, I am thrilled that so many volunteers like this year’s recipients were able to find joy and purpose in working with horses.”

Emily McCann
Champion of Equine Service Academic Scholarship Recipient

Emilie found Rising Starr Horse Rescue (RSHR) during a college gap year, and her time spent there quickly became the highlight of her days. Through her volunteer work, she gained invaluable experience and learned about the handling, care, training, and rehabilitation of rescue horses. At RSHR, Emilie was given the opportunity to work with Drew, one of two Thoroughbreds rescued in January 2020. Under the guidance of RSHR’s trainers, her work with Drew became one of the most rewarding experiences of her life, and rekindled her dream of someday becoming a horse trainer.

“Working with rescues is one of the most rewarding experiences I have ever had, and it has given me confidence and direction. I want to do this for the rest of my life, and I could not be more grateful to Rising Starr for providing me with the opportunity to learn and grow.”

Lily Stidham
Champion of Equine Service Academic Scholarship Recipient

No matter if Lily Stidham is on the ground or in the saddle, being around horses always makes her smile. Lily, a senior at the University of Florida (UF) pursuing a Bachelor of Science Degree in Animal Sciences specializing in Equines, plans to graduate this December. At UF, she has had the opportunity to participate in the Equestrian Club, as an undergraduate teaching assistant, in equine research, and in training a weanling and yearling.

Outside of school, she spends her time volunteering at Stirrups n’ Strides Therapeutic Riding Center, where she is able to apply her equestrian knowledge and skills through working as a barn hand, and riding. Lily began volunteering at Stirrups n’ Strides in 2017. In addition to getting the horses ready and interacting with riders in both the veterans and special needs programs, she has also had the opportunity to ride some of the horses and mentor new volunteers. After Lily graduates, she hopes to work in the horse industry. Being able to help others as they work and care for horses is one of the most rewarding parts of her volunteer work, and she hopes to be able to carry that into her future career.

Emily Jones
Champion of Equine Service PATH Certification Scholarship Recipient

Emily Jones has wanted to become a therapeutic riding instructor since she was seven years old. As a child, she loved horses. Her first introduction to the Camelot Center Therapeutic Riding Program came when she started taking lessons there. Years later, when a stall became available, she donated her own horse, Cash, to Camelot to become a therapy horse.

“I have been a volunteer [at Camelot] for over a decade and I have loved every second of it,” said Emily. “Horses have helped me through a lot of hard times, being bullied in school and struggling with serious anxiety. I am eager to become a Certified Therapeutic Riding Instructor (CTRI) – this is something I have dreamt about since my childhood. I am so thankful for this opportunity, because of this I will be able to change and impact many lives.”

To learn more about the EQUUS Foundation and their mission, please visit www.equusfoundation.org.