Category Archives: Competitions

Inaugural Lövsta Future Challenge Series Kicks Off at AGDF

Pablo Gomez Molina and Ulises De Ymas with Swedish Olympic dressage rider Louise Nathhorst and Tinne Vilhelmson Silfven of Lövsta.

Wellington, FL – January 12, 2020 – In the inaugural Lövsta Future Challenge Intermediate II series qualifier for developing grand prix horses, it was winner Pablo Gomez Molina who took the coveted qualifying spot for the final in the Global Arena, which takes place during the 12th and final week (March 25-29) of the 2020 Adequan® Global Dressage Festival (AGDF) at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center (PBIEC) in Wellington, Florida.

The 25-year-old Spanish rider paired up with Ulises De Ymas, a 10-year-old Spanish-bred gelding. He is owned by Gomez Molina’s employers, Yeguada De Ymas, who bred the horse.

“It was only our second inter II,” said Gomez Molina, who has been riding the horse since he was four. “We tried our first one on Thursday to see if we could do the qualifier today and Ulises was really good. It was a good plan to go early in the season to secure the place in the final.

“Ulises really tries all the time and stays with you. It’s great to have the opportunity to do the Future Cup to develop a young horse like him. He’s probably not quite ready for grand prix, but a class like this helps get you to the grand prix little by little.

“He’s a really sweet horse; you can put anyone on him. But when you ask him to work, he’s right there with you and always tries to do everything. Even if he doesn’t understand, he tries to make you happy. It’s so great to have a horse like that to compete,” added Gomez Molina, who rides around 12 horses a day.

Gomez Molina has worked for Yeguada De Ymas for seven years and splits his time, spending winters in Wellington and summer in Europe, competing on both sides of the Atlantic.

Croatia’s Karen Pavicic and Danish rider Rikke Poulsen tied for first place in the Future Challenge Prix St. Georges test with both scoring 69.927%, meaning both now qualify for the final. Pavicic piloted her own eight-year-old Totilas x Donnerhall gelding Totem, while Poulsen rode her own nine-year-old Furstentanz, by Fürstenball.

Poulsen said: “I was really pleased that I showed him Thursday and Friday in the national Prix St. Georges because he can hold his breath in a test. I finally felt him more with me and relaxed so I could enjoy riding the test. Furstentanz has been a really late bloomer, but finally I feel it all coming together.

“Now that he’s pre-qualified in the big ring, if he can mentally take it, then maybe I’ll do a small tour CDI. He is a fresh horse and can be naughty, which is why I want to make sure I don’t push him too hard too fast,” added the 41-year-old who has been based in Wellington since 2008 and trains both dressage and jumping horses.

She also praised the Future Challenge developing horse classes, saying: “You can compare yourself with the other young horses and see where we are at in your training. I’m very excited that they put those classes in the schedule. It’s great to have the final to look forward to and train accordingly now that we qualified this early in the season.

Grand Prix rider Anna Marek (USA) had been knocking at the door all week in the small tour classes and she finally broke through on Sunday to top the FEI Intermediate I Freestyle CDI3*, presented by Triple Crown Nutrition.

Marek, who is 30, rode a challenging floorplan on the rangy and appropriately named Snoopy Sunday on the concluding day of the season’s opening week. The ambitious floorplan included flying changes out of counter-canter and the 11-year-old gelding, by the Sandro Hit son Sungold, was rewarded with 73.8%.

“Yesterday he was very spooky and I’m not sure why,” said the Ocala-based rider. “I was thrilled today after such a tough ride yesterday. He’s really not a spooky horse, but he’s not been in an arena like this and so yesterday I was a little surprised. There were just so many mistakes and he was so scared of the wind and the tent, so I was really excited that he was so good today.

“Karen Robinson put the freestyle together for me and we made it for Snoopy. She matched the music really well to his movements, and what I love about it is that I can hear the transitions into and out of the pirouette or the changes or the trot half-passes,” said Marek, who finished third in the previous day’s FEI Grand Prix Special CDI3* riding Dee Clair.

“I trust Snoopy,” added Marek, who is 6ft tall. “I trained him for the owner a couple of years ago and took him to a few small horse shows, then ended up buying him. We get along really well and I love him, although he’s actually quite small. Anne [Gribbons] told me that he was too small for me and I kept telling her that I thought he was a really nice horse. She didn’t really believe me at first, but I kept showing him to her and saying, ‘I swear this is a good horse!’ And now she believes me and loves him as much as I do.”

Ariana Chia (CAN) won the two small tour CDI3* classes earlier in the week, but in this instance had to settle for second with her own ultra-consistent gelding Fiderflame. The 10-year-old by Fidertanz scored 72.85%.

In the day’s other Intermediate I class, amateur rider Amanda Lopez contested the class on her two horses, clinching the win with her own 16-year-old Quantum, who is by the jumping stallion Quite Easy. The Swedish-bred gelding posted 66.324%.

In the day’s highest-level class, the Intermediate II CDI3*, Susan Dutta (USA) showcased her and her husband Tim Dutta’s 10-year-old Hanoverian Don Design DC. A couple of niggling errors towards the end of the test subdued the score, but they finished on 69.853%, a sign of the horse’s talent. The dark bay gelding is by the stallion Der Designer (since gelded), who was sold as a five-year-old at the PSI auction in 2011 for €1.1 million.

For more information and a full list of results, visit www.globaldressagefestival.com.

Best New Year’s Resolution Ever: Support Your Olympians

It’s an Olympic year. That means Olympic hopefuls from around the globe will come to LRK3DE 2020 to vie for a spot on their Olympic team.

If you haven’t bought yours yet, get your tickets now to watch the best of the best dance, splash, and jump their way into the Olympics.

The “Best Weekend All Year” returns to the Kentucky Horse Park April 23-26, 2020.

It’s the highest level of Eventing in the Americas. Make it your new year’s resolution to come cheer on your favorite competitors.

© 2020 Kentucky Three-Day Event
PO Box 12110
Lexington, KY 40580-2110

Williams Leads an Irish Whitewash in Thrilling Finale

Rhys Williams (centre) in first, Alex Finney (left) in second, and John McEntee (right) in third. (FEI/Dirk Caremans)

Ireland claimed the FEI Jumping Ponies’ Trophy for the third consecutive year and completely dominated the podium when Rhys Williams romped to victory ahead of compatriots Alex Finney and John McEntee at the 2019 Final at Mechelen in Belgium.

At Senior level there is often amazement at how this small island on the edge of Europe can so consistently produce so many athletes of the highest calibre. And the FEI Jumping Ponies’ Trophy Final result suggests that trend will continue well into the future, as the next generation already look equally impressive.

Williams easily made the cut into the Final when finishing fifth at both the first leg of the qualifying series in Herning (DEN) in October and the third leg in Stuttgart (GER) in November.

There were three days of action at Mechelen to decide the eventual champion, and the 15-year-old schoolboy from Ennis in County Clare finished fourth in Friday’s opener which was won by brilliant 12-year-old Anna Szarzewski from France, and was third in Saturday’s class in which 16-year-old Amber Frederick came out on top for Belgium.

A total of 14 pony-and-rider combinations went into the first round of the deciding competition, and with previous results calculated into points Szarzewski and Williams were on level pegging as the action began, each on a zero score. And when they both left all the poles in place first time out then the pressure was even more intense as the top-ten second round got underway.

Fifth to go, Denmark’s Josefine Sandgaard Morup and her 13-year-old mare Rainbows Mocha added nothing to their six-point scoreline when posting a double-clear, and when John McEntee followed suit with Little Smithe then this Irish pair stayed just ahead of the Danish duo with five on the board.

Ireland’s Alex Finney came into the ring carrying just three points, and when she crossed the line clear with the eight-year-old Still Got Me that really put the squeeze on the last three. Emma Meric, a member of the French bronze-medal-winning team at the 2019 FEI European Pony Championships in Strzegom (POL), was also carrying just three as she set off, but when she lowered four fences this time out with her little grey, Venise des Islots, then Finney was already assured of a podium placing as compatriot Williams entered the ring, second-last to go.

Giving the nine-year-old K-Little Hero d’18 a brilliant ride, the Irish contender really put it up to co-leader Szarzewski with a foot-perfect run. And when the diminutive little French girl and her lovely 10-year-old grey pony Vaughann de Vuzit – one of two carrying the supremely successful and very beautiful French-bred Connemara stallion Dexter Leam Pondi bloodline to make it to the closing stages – hit the vertical on the tricky turn to fence five and then also lowered the penultimate fence, they dropped to fifth place just behind Sandgaard Morup in fourth while McEntee moved up to third.

“I’m delighted with the outcome today – Hero was jumping his heart out!” said newly-crowned champion Williams who, riding CES Cruson, took individual gold and team silver in Children on Horses at the 2018 Youth Championships in Fontaintainebleau (FRA). Talking about the Belgian-bred pony that carried him to victory, he explained, “Hero has a horse pedigree but he never grew and he’s all power!”

His father, Adrian Williams, is a specialist pony-producer at Parc Stables in Ennis and along with Ian Fearon and Marie Burke, both former Irish internationals, trains Rhys who has already enjoyed a lot of success in the sport. He coped admirably with the pressure.

“Going into the final round I just tried my best to keep my cool. I knew that was all I had to do and it’s a dream come true! To come to Mechelen this year and to be at the same show as the 5-Star riders and share the same arenas – it’s such a great experience and I’ll be back again, hopefully!” — Rhys Williams (IRL)

Mechelen Show Director, Peter Bollen, was more than pleased with the development of the series which is going from strength to strength and highlighting talent. Ireland’s Seamus Hughes-Kennedy won the inaugural Final in 2017, and in 2019 scooped European Junior team gold and the Seven-Year-Old Final title at the FEI WBFSH Championships in Lanaken (BEL).

The 2018 champion, Katie Power, has enjoyed a hugely successful 2019 season and the title returns to the Emerald Isle for the third time.

“I wanted to create a World Cup for pony riders and I’m very happy to see the concept is established now and getting more and more support. We have the contract signed for next year again and we will try to get one or two more qualifiers for the new season to make the series even stronger,” Mr Bollen said.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Fuchs on Fire as The Sinner Shines at Olympia

Martin Fuchs with The Sinner. (FEI/Liz Gregg)

Switzerland’s Martin Fuchs scooped his second win of the Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ 2019/2020 Western European League at the London International Horse Show at Olympia, London (GBR), while Austria’s Max Kuhner lined up second ahead of Belgium’s Niels Bruynseels in third.

Partnering his top ride, the lightning-fast grey Clooney, Fuchs took the third leg in Lyon (FRA) by storm last month, and in today’s eighth round of the 14-leg series he galloped to victory with a stunning performance from The Sinner. He’s the reigning European champion, and looks set to take over the No. 1 spot on the Longines World Rankings as 2020 gets underway after an incredible run of recent form.

He also became the first Swiss winner of the Olympia leg of the FEI World Cup™ series in 29 years. The 27-year-old rider wasn’t even born when his uncle, Markus Fuchs, stood top of the podium at the London fixture back in 1990.

Just six horse-and-rider combinations made it through to the jump-off, and Fuchs was fulsome in his praise of Irish course designer, Alan Wade.

“The first round wasn’t crazy big, but Alan set a great course as he always does – it was another of his masterpieces!” — Martin Fuchs (SUI)

It was definitely no walk in the park, with the relatively small Olympia arena jam-packed with fences and an intense atmosphere in the packed Grand Hall adding to the pressure. Only six of the 37 starters qualified for the deciding round but it was a classic, Fuchs, who was second to go, putting it up to the rest with a great ride that saw him take a brave turn to the wall, now the fourth fence on the track, and a super-tight line to the penultimate oxer followed by a great gallop to the last. Throwing down a time of 31.99 seconds he then sat back and watched the remaining four give it their best.

Austria’s Max Kuhner followed with an extraordinary second clear from the hugely promising eight-year-old gelding Elektric Blue P, but their time of 33.83 seconds was no threat. However, as German ace, and three-time FEI World Cup™ champion, Marcus Ehning set off with Cornado NRW, he clearly meant business only to get too close to the penultimate oxer for four faults in 32.17 seconds.

Great Britain’s Scott Brash decided this was the day to put some jump-off pressure on his latest shining star, the 10-year-old Hello Jefferson, but when the second fence fell then there was only Niels Bruynseels and his 10-year-old Delux van T & L standing between Fuchs and victory. And for once things just didn’t go his way, none of the distances coming up nicely for the brilliant Belgian and his big horse with a long stride, so they stayed clear but had to settle for third place behind Kuhner in second and Fuchs at the head of affairs.

“I was early to go so I had to take all the risks to put the pressure on the others and everything worked perfectly today!” Fuchs said. He was of course delighted with The Sinner who belied his name. “It was Denis Lynch (IRL) who gave him his name and he was already a good horse for Denis,” he explained. He’s had the 11-year-old gelding since the beginning of the year, and they made their first major appearance together at CSIO Rome in May.

“At first I found him difficult to ride, but now we definitely have a better partnership; he has better rideabililty and we know each other a lot better now,” he pointed out. And The Sinner can look forward to some nice sunshine as he heads to Wellington, USA for the Winter Equestrian Festival with his rider in the new year.

Having moved into fourth place on the Western European League table after this brilliant result, Fuchs is now well qualified for the Longines 2020 Final in Las Vegas, USA next April and his biggest headache will be to decide which horse to take – his wonder-horse Clooney or his latest star, The Sinner. His uncle, Markus Fuchs, was runner-up at the series Final in Las Vegas in 2000 and was crowned champion with the great Tinka’s Boy the following year in Gothenburg, Sweden. Martin was runner-up to compatriot Steve Guerdat at the 2019 Final which was also staged in Gothenburg, so could history be about to repeat itself over the coming months?

There are 18 qualifying spots on offer to riders in the Western European series and normally 40 points is enough to make the cut. As it stands, and with six more qualifiers yet to go, the top five riders on the League table have more than enough points: defending champion Switzerland’s Steve Guerdat has 55 but anyway gains automatic qualification, Belgium’s Pieter Devos also has 55, fifth placing for Great Britain’s Scott Brash leaves him with 47, Fuchs has 44, and Italy’s Emanuele Gaudiano is in fifth in the current standings with 43.

For the rest, the next opportunity to collect those precious points will be at the ninth leg of the series in Mechelen, Belgium on Monday 30 December.

Watch highlights here.

FULL RESULTS

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

All Regional Race Finals Will Be Hair Tested in 2020

Beginning in 2020, all horses entering regional final races in the Bank of America Racing Challenge program will be required to pass a hair test, as a condition of entry.

All horses competing in the Bank of America Challenge Championships have been required to pass a hair test as condition of entry for the championship races since 2016, and a committee suggestion approved by the AQHA Executive Committee expanded the rule.

“Our Association is run by its members, and I am proud of those who have stepped up and demanded the expansion of this requirement,” said AQHA Chief Racing Officer Janet VanBebber. “Our membership is dedicated to protecting our American Quarter Horse athletes as they compete in Challenge races around the world.”

The full Bank of America Racing Challenge regional schedule is available at www.aqha.com/racing. The season begins February 23 with the Hipodromo Distaff, and will conclude on October 9 with the Derby, Juvenile, Distaff, and Distance at Will Rogers Downs.

The 2020 Bank of America Challenge Championships will return to The Downs at Albuquerque on October 24.

Review the Bank of America Racing Challenge Condition Book for full rules and policies.

Inside the CHI Geneva: Kent Farrington Wins the Trophée de Genève

Kent Farrington (Photo: Rolex Grand Slam / Ashley Neuhof)

USA’s Kent Farrington produced a lightning fast round aboard his notoriously fast mount, Creedance,  to claim the Trophée de Genève at CHI Geneva. This victory secures Farrington’s spot in Sunday’s Rolex Grand Prix, where he will be hoping to emulate his success of 2017 and become the next Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping live contender.

How did you produce such a fast round?

I brought Creedance here because he is so fast and he does a lot by himself, so I just try to stay out of his way and let him go, which is usually the best plan. He’s actually won this class before, so he really knows what he’s doing and he showed that tonight.

You have had a lot of success at this Major; how does it feel to be back?

Yes, I think this is one of the best, if not the best show of the year. All the top riders, all the greatest horses are here, and every class feels important. Each class is hard to win and, of course, it’s part of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping so it’s very special. I’m just really glad I have started off so well and hopefully we can keep it up.

Looking ahead to Sunday, which horse will you be riding in the Rolex Grand Prix?

The plan is to ride Gazelle. I am going to do the normal routine, let her get some small rounds under her belt for her confidence, and the go for it on Sunday.

© 2019 Rolex – Rolex Grand Slam

Longines Grand Prix of Paris: The French Flair

© Cécile Sablayrolles pour EEM.

What better present for the organizer and the public of the 11th Longines Masters of Paris than this 100% French podium? In front of their fans, French team stalwarts Simon Delestre, Kevin Staut, and Roger-Yves Bost took first, second, and third, respectively, in the Longines Grand Prix of Paris. Believe us, there was noise – a lot of noise! – in the stands while history was made in the arena.

“Fair,” “perfectly balanced,” “definitely sport and welfare oriented.” A lot of praise went towards French course designer Grégory Bodo’s tracks during the press conference. “The course was interesting and faults occurred everywhere as opposed to a true stumbling block which would have penalized a certain type of horses in particular. Grégory did a very subtle job forcing the riders to ride forward which one of the basis of our sport.” Coming from reigning team Olympic champion Kevin Staut, second of this Longines Grand Prix of Paris, these words were certainly honey to the ears of Bodo who is very much in demand in the horse world and whose courses raise unanimous appreciation wherever he operates. “The tracks of the Longines Grand Prix of Paris and all the weekend’s classes of this 11th Longines Masters of Paris required fluidity, delicacy, accuracy, and rhythm. I nonetheless included two turns to give the competitors a chance to take risks.” Did it mean that the Longines Grand Prix of Paris was to be won on the flat and not over the jumps?

“A champions’ class”
“Hermès Ryan is naturally very fast on the ground,” confirmed the winner Simon Delestre. “I did actually win on the flat and stuck to my plan as far as related distances were concerned but turned very fast. This was a big Grand Prix. Going last in a six-strong jump-off was a rather comfortable position to be in.”

“Walking the course, I really thought that this was going to be a champions’ class and that the winner would be really strong,” added Roger-Yves Bost, third of the Longines Grand Prix of Paris, the other reigning Olympic champion on the podium. “I had to risk it all, take off strides… I knew that the rockets Staut and Delestre were going to be hot on my heels. I haven’t ridden very many jump-offs this fast with Sangria. I’m really pleased with her.”

As far as final placings go, the three French leaders are followed by Ireland’s Darragh Kenny on Classic Dream, France’s Félicie Bertrand, the only lady rider to have qualified for the jump-off of this Longines Grand Prix of Paris 2019 on Sultane des Ibis, and Germany’s Christian Ahlmann riding Take A Chance On Me Z.

55 000 spectators over four days
Christophe Ameeuw, president and founder of EEM, organizer of the Longines Masters of Paris and the Longines Masters Series (Hong-Kong, Lausanne, Paris), commented that this Grand Prix perfectly reflected the sport, passion, and boldness which prevailed in Paris-Villepinte over the weekend. “This 100% French podium is the perfect conclusion. An event like ours must absolutely serve the sport and keep bringing on to new fans the best showjumping has to offer. During this weekend, we have experienced historical moments and kept our good spirits despite external constraint. We also innovated with the introduction of a new competition for the best ponies in the world as our duty is to always challenge ourselves, fly high, experience new things, and pursue our ideas. There is still some way to go and many people have yet to discover this sport which, to my eyes, is the most beautiful in the world. Therefore, we need to cross community borders and create new fans. This actually was one of the bets of this youth oriented 11th edition.”

Find all the results HERE.

© 2019 Blizko Communication

Emanuele Gaudiano Wins Longines Speed Challenge of Paris and Speed Challenge Series Bonus

© Aléa pour EEM.

This amazing pair boasts a fabulous total of sixty plus international wins over the past five years, twelve of which in 2019! Emanuele Gaudiano and Carlotta 232 confirmed their status when they won the much acclaimed 2019 Speed Challenge of Paris in a super time of 60’’48 without a single pole down: a repeat for the winners of the same flagship competition during the Longines Masters of Lausanne, Switzerland this summer. “I’m extremely lucky to ride such an amazing mare. Each round with her is a pleasure – even more so at a show like this one where the stands are packed,” he commented.

The Paris crowd was held spellbound throughout the aptly named Longines Speed Challenge, the fastest class in the world. The spectators who supported each rider unreservedly were treated to the most spectacular show. The special table where one pole down is worth 2 seconds extra time goes toward an increased speed and more suspense.

However, a clear round was definitely a bonus to score the best time to win the class. A goal reached among others by world n°1 Steve Guerdat (Switzerland). Number 13 out of 27 to go, the 2012 Olympic champion set a very fast pace in 61’’98 aboard Ulysse des Forêts. “I rode according to my plan and mostly took advantage of my mare’s natural speed without pushing much,” the rider commented. Enough to win? “I think it’s possible to be faster. If I finish in the top five, or even on the podium, it’ll be a good thing.” He ends up a very creditable third, behind Emanuele Gaudiano and his long- standing friend, Canada’s Eric Lamaze. Riding top mare Fine Lady 5, the 2008 Olympic champion also put down a top performance thanks to a time of 61’’37 at the very end of the class. A lesson in riding and courage greeted by all.

Best of the French is none other than Roger-Yves Bost, a.k.a. “Bosty the Rocket”, who gave it his all with Castleforbes Talitha to finish fourth 62’’22.

Find all the results HERE.

© 2019 Blizko Communication

Riders Masters Cup: Unbeatable Europe

© Jean-Louis Carli / Aléa pour EEM.

This year, the competition was open to riders from the whole American continent. This year, the Americas managed a superb first round. This year, true showjumping legends made up the American team. And still, Europe yet again won the Riders Masters Cup, for the fifth time in a row!

On paper, the Americas had serious chances to win the fifth Riders Masters Cup, flagship competition of the Longines Masters of Paris launched in 2017 by EEM with Longines for Founding Partner. Robert Ridland’s troops really seemed in a position to turn the tables on Europe and at last clinch the class that has been eluding them since the beginning. On paper only. Led by Swedish chef d’équipe Henrik Ankarcrona, Europe mercilessly won on a final score of 125 for the Old Continent to 80 for the New World.

The Americas dominated the first round
For the very first time, Robert Ridland’s team stood up to their opponents in the first round. It must be noted that for the sake of sport and suspense, the rules made it possible to select riders from all the Americas. The chef d’équipe could thus pick Canadians and Brazilians. Good choice: Ridland’s team included as many as 3 Olympic champions with the USA’s Laura Kraut, Brazil’s Rodrigo Pessoa, and Canada’s Eric Lamaze. Thanks to Kraut and Pessoa as well as Brazil’s Marlon Modolo Zanotelli, the Americas won three of their five duels. On Europe’s side, Olympic champions Kevin Staut (France) and Henrik von Eckermann (Sweden) both had four penalties. At that point, with a provisional score of 40 to Europe’s 35, Ridland’s five had reasons to hope for a win.

Second round: Europe regains control
Right from the beginning of the second round, Europe recovered some strength… and took advantage of a weakness of the Americans who had all changed rides. Clear in the first round, Modolo Zanotelli was now eliminated for two refusals. The young Canadian Kara Chad was equally unfortunate. Only the legend that is Rodrigo Pessoa managed to win his duel against Henrik von Eckermann. Spearheaded by a reigning European champion and reserve World champion Martin Fuchs in top form, Europe eventually won four of the five duels for a fifth victory in as many editions. First to go in both classes and double clear, Fuchs commented, in front of packed stands: “I’m feeling very well at the Longines Masters of Paris. I won the Grand Prix here five years ago and I hadn’t been back since.”

The Americans only have two days left to win competitions at the Longines Masters of Paris 2019. On top of their triumph in the Riders Masters Cup, the Europeans won most classes so far, leaving only the Masters One Hubside to Modolo Zanotelli. Yes, they can… can’t they?

© 2019 Blizko Communication

Riders Masters Cup: The Duels

© Jean-Louis Carli / Aléa pour EEM

The first “signature” competition of the 11th Longines Masters of Paris, the Riders Masters Cup, will have two original teams of five European riders and five riders from the American continent battle it out on Friday December 6. The draw, which took place in the heart of Paris, at the Cirque d’Hiver, right before the young showjumping champions auction The Auction by Arqana, decided the duels for the first round of a competition which, so far, always smiled on the European side.

A spectacular and strategic competition, the Riders Masters Cup pits five riders from each team against each other in two rounds, or ten duels. The first round is held following timed Table A rules over a Grand Prix course. The starting order and the composition of the duels have been drawn. Each duel won in this first round earns the team 10 points. In the second round, held under Table C rules, the Chefs d’Équipes’ strategies and choices are crucial. In particular, they may, if they so wish, assign riders new mounts more suited to speed classes. The Chef d’Équipe of the losing team in the first set picks the first rider to start out; the leading team then has the advantage of choosing the competitor he wants to pitch against this first rider. The second, third, fourth, and fifth riders are then chosen alternately by the Chefs d’Équipe of the winning and losing teams. In the second set, each duel won earns 20 points.

The duels for the first round
Duel 1 : Kara Chad vs Martin Fuchs
Duel 2 : Marlon Modolo Zanotelli vs Kevin Staut
Duel 3 : Rodrigo Pessoa vs Jos Verlooy
Duel 4 : Eric Lamaze vs Darragh Kenny
Duel 5 : Laura Kraut vs Henrik von Eckermann

The Riders Masters Cup will start at 9h00 pm on Friday December 6. The line-up of riders is entrusted to world renowned Chefs d’Equipe: Robert Ridland, team USA selector, for the Americas, and Henrik Ankarcrona, Sweden’s selector, for Europe. Each team will be supported by a showjumping legend: Marcel Rozier, French Team Olympic Champion in 1976 for the European side, and Nelson Pessoa, the great Brazilian champion who won countless competitions all over the World, for the Americas.

© 2019 Blizko Communication