Category Archives: Show Jumping

Inside the CHI Geneva: Kent Farrington Wins Rolex IJRC Top 10 Final

Photo: Rolex Grand Slam / Ashley Neuhof.

It was another victory for Kent Farrington who claimed the coveted Rolex IJRC Top 10 Final title at CHI Geneva. Partnered with his new bay mare, Austria 2, the fast duo knocked 2.22 seconds off the time set by Ireland’s Darragh Kenny, in spectacular fashion.

That was an incredible performance from Austria 2. What she’s like to ride?

Yes, she’s amazing. I started riding her in May and as soon as I tried her, I thought she was an exceptional horse. She’s really small in stature but she’s got a huge heart and is a tremendous jumper. This is the biggest class she has ever jumped in her life, so to go on and win is amazing; she is unbelievable.

How was the atmosphere?

It was great. It’s my favourite show and maybe even the best in the world; here and CHIO Aachen are very close. The crowd was amazing; everybody wants to win here, especially this class. So it really is a special night.

You have already won two classes here; do you think you can make it a hat trick and win the Rolex Grand Prix on Sunday?

I think I can win! I am going to try my best, give it my all, and hope it all comes together on Sunday.

© 2019 Rolex – Rolex Grand Slam

Inside the CHI Geneva: Kent Farrington Wins the Trophée de Genève

Kent Farrington (Photo: Rolex Grand Slam / Ashley Neuhof)

USA’s Kent Farrington produced a lightning fast round aboard his notoriously fast mount, Creedance,  to claim the Trophée de Genève at CHI Geneva. This victory secures Farrington’s spot in Sunday’s Rolex Grand Prix, where he will be hoping to emulate his success of 2017 and become the next Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping live contender.

How did you produce such a fast round?

I brought Creedance here because he is so fast and he does a lot by himself, so I just try to stay out of his way and let him go, which is usually the best plan. He’s actually won this class before, so he really knows what he’s doing and he showed that tonight.

You have had a lot of success at this Major; how does it feel to be back?

Yes, I think this is one of the best, if not the best show of the year. All the top riders, all the greatest horses are here, and every class feels important. Each class is hard to win and, of course, it’s part of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping so it’s very special. I’m just really glad I have started off so well and hopefully we can keep it up.

Looking ahead to Sunday, which horse will you be riding in the Rolex Grand Prix?

The plan is to ride Gazelle. I am going to do the normal routine, let her get some small rounds under her belt for her confidence, and the go for it on Sunday.

© 2019 Rolex – Rolex Grand Slam

Cynthia Screnci’s Journey from Jumpers to USA Para-Dressage

Cynthia Screnci and Erago VF at the 2019 Tryon Fall Dressage CPEDI3*. Photo by Lindsay Y. McCall.

Wellington, FL – December 11, 2019 – The love for horses has no boundaries. That is what makes the Para-Equestrian discipline so important. It gives riders with physical disabilities (whether they were born with them, occurred over time, or were the result of an injury) a place to compete with the highest goal of becoming a Paralympian and showing at the Paralympics. Cindy Screnci of Wellington, Florida exemplifies an athlete that has not let an injury stop her from achieving international aspirations on the animal she loves.

When Screnci was a child, her mom, a single parent, scraped together $800 to buy her first horse. Screnci and her horse competed in Gymkhana including barrel racing and pole bending. Screnci took a break from riding to do “life” and when her daughter was eight years old, she started riding in the hunter and jumper divisions alongside her daughter. Living in South Florida, Screnci enjoyed competing at a high level with her jumper Kasimir. The pair accumulated top accolades including several year-end awards, a Silver Stirrup Award, finished first in the North American League Jumpers, and many other top honors. In 2015, Screnci sold Kasimir and she was in between horses. Screnci recalled, “I was honestly just playing around in the low adult jumper ring on a friend’s horse for the weekend.  We had won the speed class the day before and went clear again moving us on to the jump-off.  This horse was a small, speedy guy and in the jump-off, we had done a few tidy tight turns so we were ahead by more than four seconds.  The second to the last line was a one stride, then five strides to a decent sized oxer, followed by a quick turn to the last line.  We went over the oxer and my horse spooked at a jump that was not part of the course but was set a bit close to our line. When he jogged left, I went right. I landed on my feet and twisted, breaking my ankle pretty severely. This type of injury would have been a normal 8-12 week recovery; unfortunately I contracted Osteomylitis, a severe bone infection, resulting in 25 surgeries over the next three years and a permanent disability in my left ankle.” Screnci wasn’t sure where her riding was at this point but with a purchase of Sally L from Murray Kessler, her next chapter began. Screnci explained, “Sally had been quite a successful jumper and had a lot of dressage training in her past. My friend Natalie Liebowitz, who sold the mare to me, told me that Robert Dover had wanted Sally for the Para-Dressage program because he loved her so much. With a great horse and my permanent disability, I thought I could be classified as a para-dressage rider, and the rest is history.  I started riding with David Marcus and lessoning on Sally L and absolutely fell in love with para-dressage. Going from the jumper ring to dressage has been great. I have had to change my seat completely and have learned essentially eight years of dressage in what will be a year in December, but I train six days a week and have dedicated myself to becoming a successful Grade V para-dressage athlete.”

Screnci’s success in a short amount of time includes training with Marco Bernal. She stated, “Marco has been the other piece of this crazy puzzle. He is an internationally successful Grand Prix rider who is referred to as an ‘Icon in the dressage world’ by everyone I meet. I am very fortunate and blessed to have Marco and his team on my side.  Every single person in his barn is supportive, excited, and a constant inspiration to me.” Outside the barn, Screnci’s husband Stephen and her children Lia and Bradley are key people in her village of support. Screnci recalled, “When I sat down and told them about my dreams and ambitions regarding para-dressage and competing Internationally with the big goal being Tokyo 2020, they were all in.  Finding Eragon VF (with the help of international para-dressage athlete Kate Shoemaker), training six days a week, competing on a regular basis, and now with the purchase of a new edition to the family, Ricci, my superstar school master, they have been with me all the way.”

Not only is Screnci putting in the hours in the ring to reaching her goal of the Tokyo Paralympics in 2020, but she is putting in the time with watching and researching the top athletes in Grade V. Screnci explained, “In a short amount of time I have learned that para-dressage is every bit as competitive as able bodied dressage.  The level of competition internationally even more so.  In my grade (Grade V) there are para-dressage riders that compete able bodied Grand Prix such as the United Kingdom’s Sophie Wells who has competed and won against such riders as Charlotte Dujardin.  I study all of the International riders regularly so I can be a prepared as possible when we eventually meet.”

With the discipline crossover from the hunter jumpers to para-dressage Screnci has noticed that there is a negative connotation with being seen as a para-dressage rider among equestrians. Screnci said, “Para-dressage is so much more than people in the United States seem to understand.  I am hoping to help change that and open doors for the US Para-Dressage program. I don’t want to see new potential riders shy away from para-dressage, especially in the higher grades of four and five.”

Screnci is enjoying helping to educate while doing the sport she loves. Screnci concluded, “Riding is more than my passion; it saved my life.  I grew up riding and owning horses and they are an intrinsic part of me. I wouldn’t be me without horses in my life the way they are. It’s very hard to explain to people who are not horsemen.  When I broke my leg, many doctors and much of my family not only asked but insisted I give up horses and riding.  Not my husband, or my children, but others in my family and of course friends. Three years of surgeries, external fixators, bone graphs, skin grafts, weeks of IVs, physical therapy and pain – what kept me going was knowing that at some point I would find my way back to these amazing creatures and would feel whole once again.”

For more information about the USPEA, please visit www.USPEA.org or contact USPEA President: Hope Hand by e-mail: hope@uspea.org or by phone: (610) 356-6481.

Kent Farrington and Kaprice Win the $25,000 #1 Education Place National Grand Prix

Farrington and Kaprice. ©Anne Gittins Photography.

Wellington, FL – December 8, 2019 – Kent Farrington of Wellington, FL and Kaprice, owned by Kent Farrington & Haity McNerney, dominated the $25,000 #1 Education Place National Grand Prix at Palm Beach International Equestrian Center (PBIEC) on Sunday, scooping up their second win of the week with a jump-off time of 40.616 seconds. In second, Wilhelm Genn of Lebanon, OH and Van Gogh, owned by Wilhelm and Patty Genn, finished the short course in a time of 42.925 seconds, while Luis Larrazabal of Wellington, FL and San Francisco Stables LLC’s Caristina took third after stopping the timers at 43.747 seconds.

Anthony D’Ambrosio saw 28 entries test his course in the first round, with 12 returning for the jump-off. Farrington reflected that the course was well-suited for greener horses or horses that need to build confidence: “You didn’t see any triple combinations today but there were three doubles, which for greener horses or for horses that are building, is a more fair test. For her [Kaprice], it’s great because she’s getting to see multiple types of combinations.

“Kaprice is really a special horse; she’s unbelievably careful. I’ve moved her up and down because of that,” Farrington said of Kaprice. “She’s similar to a lot of the great horses I’ve had in the past where she borderlines on too careful, so it’s all about keeping her confidence level high,” Farrington concluded.

To learn more about the ESP Holiday Series and PBIEC, please visit www.pbiec.com.

World’s Best Riders Return to Rolex IJRC Top 10 Final and Rolex Grand Prix at CHI Geneva

Geneva, Switzerland, 9 December 2019 – From 12-15 December, two of the most prestigious competitions on the show jumping calendar, the Rolex Grand Prix and the Rolex International Jumping Riders Club (IJRC) Top 10 Final, will take place in the Palexpo arena at the Concours Hippique International de Genève (CHIG).

ROLEX GRAND PRIX
On Sunday 15 December, an elite field of international riders will contest the year’s final Major, the CHIG Rolex Grand Prix, which forms part of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping. They will compete on a typically imposing course created by world-renowned designers Gérard Lachat of Switzerland and Louis Konickx of The Netherlands.

A founding supporter of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping in 2013, Rolex is a partner to all four constituent Majors, each one endowed with its own unique history. The Rolex Grand Slam is arguably the most coveted prize in show jumping, awarded to the rider who wins three consecutive Grand Prix at these events. It is also one of the most challenging, requiring unparalleled displays of courage, determination, and precision. Rolex Testimonee Scott Brash of Great Britain is the only person to have achieved the feat to date, starting with victory at the CHIG in 2014, followed by further triumphs at the CHIO Aachen and the CSIO Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ in 2015.

The partnership between Rolex and the CHIG is a key element of the brand’s long-standing commitment to equestrianism that dates back more than 60 years. Inaugurated in 1926, the event is among the most esteemed in the equestrian world, where the relentless pursuit of excellence – by horse and rider combinations and the event organizers – fits perfectly with Rolex’s own quest for outstanding performance in everything it does.

ROLEX TESTIMONEES
After highly successful seasons, Rolex Testimonees Steve Guerdat and Martin Fuchs have both already qualified to contest in the CHIG Rolex Grand Prix. The Swiss riders currently lead the world rankings, Guerdat at No. 1, Fuchs at No. 2, and will endeavour to continue this form in front of an enthusiastic home crowd. Crowned the European champion earlier this year, and second place to Guerdat in the FEI Jumping World Cup Finals, Fuchs will be a formidable opponent for his compatriot. Guerdat, a three-time winner of the CHIG Rolex Grand Prix (2006, 2013, and 2015), who was also victorious in the Rolex IJRC Top 10 Final in 2010 and 2018, said: “Competing in the final Major of the year is always a fantastic experience, particularly as it is hosted in my home country. Entering the arena to the eruption of support from such a patriotic crowd is a feeling like none other, and I can’t wait for the 2019 edition.”

Joining these riders will be Canada’s Eric Lamaze, in a bid to repeat his 2008 victory in Geneva. Aiming to set his sights on the top honours will be Kent Farrington of the United States, winner of the Rolex Grand Prix at the CHIO Aachen this year and the CHIG in 2017. Brash and France’s Kevin Staut, winner of the Rolex Grand Prix at the CHIG in 2010, will be joined by Rolex’s newest Testimonee, Britain’s Harry Charles as they also look to contest the Rolex Grand Prix in Geneva. Dutch rider, Jeroen Dubbeldam, former World and European champion, and Rolex’s longest-standing equestrian Testimonee, Brazilian Rodrigo Pessoa, who won the Rolex Grand Prix at the CHIG in 1993, 2000, 2002, and 2004, will be hoping to complete the strong roster of Testimonees competing.

ROLEX IJRC TOP 10 FINAL
At the Rolex IJRC Top 10 Final, the world’s top 10 riders are invited to compete against one another. This unique concept, supported by Rolex since its inauguration in 2001, acknowledges the achievements of the best show jumpers over the course of the season, and has established itself as a highlight of the equestrian calendar.

Guerdat will contest the 19th edition of the event as World No. 1 and reigning champion, having ridden his horse Alamo to victory over two faultless rounds last year. His success was the fifth in a row for Rolex Testimonees, following in the footsteps of Brash, Farrington, Lamaze, and Staut. He will defend his title against fellow Testimonees Fuchs and Farrington, along with other members of show jumping’s elite group of riders.

IJRC Director, Eleonora Ottaviani, comments: “We are extremely proud to hold our unique event at the CHI Geneva for the 15th time, one of the most iconic shows worldwide. Similar to the ATP Finals in tennis, the Top 10 Final is unrivalled in equestrian sport. It is a privilege to be associated with Rolex, a brand that continuously demonstrates its commitment to equestrianism, providing fundamental support and developing its long-standing success.”

Virginie Chevailler
Rolex SA
virginie.chevailler@rolex.com
+41 (0) 22 302 2619

Merrick Haydon
rEvolution
mhaydon@revolutionworld.com
+44 (0) 7748 186 833

Longines Grand Prix of Paris: The French Flair

© Cécile Sablayrolles pour EEM.

What better present for the organizer and the public of the 11th Longines Masters of Paris than this 100% French podium? In front of their fans, French team stalwarts Simon Delestre, Kevin Staut, and Roger-Yves Bost took first, second, and third, respectively, in the Longines Grand Prix of Paris. Believe us, there was noise – a lot of noise! – in the stands while history was made in the arena.

“Fair,” “perfectly balanced,” “definitely sport and welfare oriented.” A lot of praise went towards French course designer Grégory Bodo’s tracks during the press conference. “The course was interesting and faults occurred everywhere as opposed to a true stumbling block which would have penalized a certain type of horses in particular. Grégory did a very subtle job forcing the riders to ride forward which one of the basis of our sport.” Coming from reigning team Olympic champion Kevin Staut, second of this Longines Grand Prix of Paris, these words were certainly honey to the ears of Bodo who is very much in demand in the horse world and whose courses raise unanimous appreciation wherever he operates. “The tracks of the Longines Grand Prix of Paris and all the weekend’s classes of this 11th Longines Masters of Paris required fluidity, delicacy, accuracy, and rhythm. I nonetheless included two turns to give the competitors a chance to take risks.” Did it mean that the Longines Grand Prix of Paris was to be won on the flat and not over the jumps?

“A champions’ class”
“Hermès Ryan is naturally very fast on the ground,” confirmed the winner Simon Delestre. “I did actually win on the flat and stuck to my plan as far as related distances were concerned but turned very fast. This was a big Grand Prix. Going last in a six-strong jump-off was a rather comfortable position to be in.”

“Walking the course, I really thought that this was going to be a champions’ class and that the winner would be really strong,” added Roger-Yves Bost, third of the Longines Grand Prix of Paris, the other reigning Olympic champion on the podium. “I had to risk it all, take off strides… I knew that the rockets Staut and Delestre were going to be hot on my heels. I haven’t ridden very many jump-offs this fast with Sangria. I’m really pleased with her.”

As far as final placings go, the three French leaders are followed by Ireland’s Darragh Kenny on Classic Dream, France’s Félicie Bertrand, the only lady rider to have qualified for the jump-off of this Longines Grand Prix of Paris 2019 on Sultane des Ibis, and Germany’s Christian Ahlmann riding Take A Chance On Me Z.

55 000 spectators over four days
Christophe Ameeuw, president and founder of EEM, organizer of the Longines Masters of Paris and the Longines Masters Series (Hong-Kong, Lausanne, Paris), commented that this Grand Prix perfectly reflected the sport, passion, and boldness which prevailed in Paris-Villepinte over the weekend. “This 100% French podium is the perfect conclusion. An event like ours must absolutely serve the sport and keep bringing on to new fans the best showjumping has to offer. During this weekend, we have experienced historical moments and kept our good spirits despite external constraint. We also innovated with the introduction of a new competition for the best ponies in the world as our duty is to always challenge ourselves, fly high, experience new things, and pursue our ideas. There is still some way to go and many people have yet to discover this sport which, to my eyes, is the most beautiful in the world. Therefore, we need to cross community borders and create new fans. This actually was one of the bets of this youth oriented 11th edition.”

Find all the results HERE.

© 2019 Blizko Communication

Emanuele Gaudiano Wins Longines Speed Challenge of Paris and Speed Challenge Series Bonus

© Aléa pour EEM.

This amazing pair boasts a fabulous total of sixty plus international wins over the past five years, twelve of which in 2019! Emanuele Gaudiano and Carlotta 232 confirmed their status when they won the much acclaimed 2019 Speed Challenge of Paris in a super time of 60’’48 without a single pole down: a repeat for the winners of the same flagship competition during the Longines Masters of Lausanne, Switzerland this summer. “I’m extremely lucky to ride such an amazing mare. Each round with her is a pleasure – even more so at a show like this one where the stands are packed,” he commented.

The Paris crowd was held spellbound throughout the aptly named Longines Speed Challenge, the fastest class in the world. The spectators who supported each rider unreservedly were treated to the most spectacular show. The special table where one pole down is worth 2 seconds extra time goes toward an increased speed and more suspense.

However, a clear round was definitely a bonus to score the best time to win the class. A goal reached among others by world n°1 Steve Guerdat (Switzerland). Number 13 out of 27 to go, the 2012 Olympic champion set a very fast pace in 61’’98 aboard Ulysse des Forêts. “I rode according to my plan and mostly took advantage of my mare’s natural speed without pushing much,” the rider commented. Enough to win? “I think it’s possible to be faster. If I finish in the top five, or even on the podium, it’ll be a good thing.” He ends up a very creditable third, behind Emanuele Gaudiano and his long- standing friend, Canada’s Eric Lamaze. Riding top mare Fine Lady 5, the 2008 Olympic champion also put down a top performance thanks to a time of 61’’37 at the very end of the class. A lesson in riding and courage greeted by all.

Best of the French is none other than Roger-Yves Bost, a.k.a. “Bosty the Rocket”, who gave it his all with Castleforbes Talitha to finish fourth 62’’22.

Find all the results HERE.

© 2019 Blizko Communication

Nayel Nassar and Martin Fuchs Hand in Hand on Top of the Masters Power Lido de Paris

Nayel Nassar & Can Can Della Caccia © Aléa pour EEM.

High jump contest the Lido de Paris Masters Power was the first highlight of the day at the Longines Masters of Paris. Seven of the seventeen pairs entered came from the Masters Two category and ten from the Masters One. Tied at 1.97 meter, Egypt’s Nayel Nassar and Switzerland’s Martin Fuchs are joint winners of the Masters One while the Netherlands’ Elise van de Mheen, the only rider from her category to clear 1.87 meter, was the best of the Masters Two section.

After an initial round at 1.45m, all riders but Italy’s Filipo Marco Bologni started in the first jump-off at 1.72m. With an extra 27cm, things were getting a bit trickier. Nonetheless, twelve pairs gave the second jump-off (1.87m) a go! Now, the added 15cm proved much more challenging. Of the Masters Two field, only The Netherlands’ Elise van de Mheen managed to clear the line. On the Masters One side, Nayel Nassar, France’s Philippe Rozier, and Martin Fuchs remained in contention. The Egyptian and the Swiss easily cleared the next round at 1.97m while Philippe Rozier’s Prestigio LS La Silla refused to launch himself at the impressive vertical.

The competition was then coming to an end. Both leaders had a final attempt at 2.07m, both a record height and a challenge with a 10 000 euros Super Bonus for all riders clearing over 2.05m at each leg of the Longines Masters Series. Were they going to be able to fly even higher? Despite their determination and the support of the Paris audience, neither managed to clear the huge jump. No Super Bonus, then, but a nonetheless superb victory for the riders who were both partnered with horses who were novices at this type of competition.

“This was a good class in which I had entered my Grand Prix horse Silver Shine. We gave a go at 2.07m and it didn’t work. 2.07m is actually quite high. Especially as it was Silver’s first puissance. I like entering this kind of class before a Grand Prix. The gymnastics are very good preparation,” explained the European champion Martin Fuchs. “It was Can Can Della Caccia’s first puissance. Honestly, I did not know how he would react. I’m not very experienced either at this kind of class. But he got better and better after each round. He felt like he kept growing up.”

Find the complete results HERE.

© 2019 Blizko Communication

Riders Masters Cup: Unbeatable Europe

© Jean-Louis Carli / Aléa pour EEM.

This year, the competition was open to riders from the whole American continent. This year, the Americas managed a superb first round. This year, true showjumping legends made up the American team. And still, Europe yet again won the Riders Masters Cup, for the fifth time in a row!

On paper, the Americas had serious chances to win the fifth Riders Masters Cup, flagship competition of the Longines Masters of Paris launched in 2017 by EEM with Longines for Founding Partner. Robert Ridland’s troops really seemed in a position to turn the tables on Europe and at last clinch the class that has been eluding them since the beginning. On paper only. Led by Swedish chef d’équipe Henrik Ankarcrona, Europe mercilessly won on a final score of 125 for the Old Continent to 80 for the New World.

The Americas dominated the first round
For the very first time, Robert Ridland’s team stood up to their opponents in the first round. It must be noted that for the sake of sport and suspense, the rules made it possible to select riders from all the Americas. The chef d’équipe could thus pick Canadians and Brazilians. Good choice: Ridland’s team included as many as 3 Olympic champions with the USA’s Laura Kraut, Brazil’s Rodrigo Pessoa, and Canada’s Eric Lamaze. Thanks to Kraut and Pessoa as well as Brazil’s Marlon Modolo Zanotelli, the Americas won three of their five duels. On Europe’s side, Olympic champions Kevin Staut (France) and Henrik von Eckermann (Sweden) both had four penalties. At that point, with a provisional score of 40 to Europe’s 35, Ridland’s five had reasons to hope for a win.

Second round: Europe regains control
Right from the beginning of the second round, Europe recovered some strength… and took advantage of a weakness of the Americans who had all changed rides. Clear in the first round, Modolo Zanotelli was now eliminated for two refusals. The young Canadian Kara Chad was equally unfortunate. Only the legend that is Rodrigo Pessoa managed to win his duel against Henrik von Eckermann. Spearheaded by a reigning European champion and reserve World champion Martin Fuchs in top form, Europe eventually won four of the five duels for a fifth victory in as many editions. First to go in both classes and double clear, Fuchs commented, in front of packed stands: “I’m feeling very well at the Longines Masters of Paris. I won the Grand Prix here five years ago and I hadn’t been back since.”

The Americans only have two days left to win competitions at the Longines Masters of Paris 2019. On top of their triumph in the Riders Masters Cup, the Europeans won most classes so far, leaving only the Masters One Hubside to Modolo Zanotelli. Yes, they can… can’t they?

© 2019 Blizko Communication

Olympia Announces Live TV and Streaming Schedule

Olympia, The London International Horse Show announced the live TV broadcast and streaming schedule which will take the Show out beyond the four walls of the Olympia halls. High viewing demand is anticipated for the Show which has eight of the world’s top ten show jumpers lined up to compete including British number ones and Olympic Gold medalists Ben Maher (jumping) and Charlotte Dujardin (dressage). Olympia continues to be the most watched show jumping event in the UK.

Olympia Show Director, Simon-Brooks Ward, said: “We are grateful for the BBC’s continued support of the Show. Over the years their coverage has provided an important platform for equestrian sport in the country and is not only hugely beneficial for the Show but for equestrian sport as a whole.

“This year the competition is shaping up to be better than ever and we hope the extensive viewing opportunities on offer will allow fans from around the world to be involved in what is truly a festive equestrian extravaganza.”

Live Coverage

In the UK, the BBC will be showing over 14 hours of live coverage on BBC Two and on their online platforms including the Red Button.

For those wanting to watch live from outside the UK:

All FEI World Cup™ classes can be viewed internationally on FEI TV.

In the US and Canada the full programme of classes with the exception of the FEI World Cup™ classes will be available on Horse & Country TV.

In Scandinavia, the full programme of classes, with the exception of the FEI World Cup™ classes will be shown on Riders Live TV.

To purchase tickets for Olympia, please visit www.olympiahorseshow.com or telephone the box office on 0871 230 5580.

For more information, please contact:
Gayle Jenkins / gjenkins@revolutionworld.com / +44 (0)203 176 0355