Category Archives: Show Jumping

It’s European Team Gold and a Tokyo Ticket for Belgium

Team Belgium. (FEI/Liz Gregg)

Belgium held on tight to the top of the leaderboard to win their first-ever team medals in the 62-year history of the FEI European Jumping Championships – and they were golden ones.

Otto Becker’s German side were firm favourites to take the title for the eighth time, but in the end, they had to settle for silver ahead of Great Britain in bronze. And the icing on the cake from a Belgian perspective was that they are now on the road to Tokyo 2020, because they bagged one of the three spots on offer to teams not already qualified thanks to superb performance from Pieter Devos, Jos Verlooy, Jerome Guery, and Gregory Wathelet. Britain and France bagged the remaining two qualifications.

It was edge-of-the-seat stuff to the very end, Wathelet aware that he could afford a fence down or a time fault when he was last man into the ring, but not both if his country was going to top the podium.

Belgium, Germany, and Great Britain were already in gold, silver, and bronze medal positions as the final day began. The British added eight faults to their scoreline when Ben Maher and Explosion led the way with a clear and both Holly Smith (Hearts Destiny) and Amanda Derbyshire (Luibanta BH) left just a single fence on the floor, Scott Brash (Hello M’Lady) providing an eight-fault discard this time around.

Germany added four when pathfinder Simone Blum (DSP Alice) and anchorman Daniel Deusser (Scuderia 1918 Tobago Z) each had a fence down but both Christian Ahlmann (Clintrexo Z) and Marcus Ehning (Comme Il Faut) jumped spectacular clears.

When Devos and his mare Claire Z were first out for Belgium and collected five faults when hitting the penultimate vertical and going over the time-allowed of 78 seconds their lead began to look a little shaky. But Verlooy and Igor kept a clean sheet and when Guery and Quel Homme de Hus collected just a single time fault then they began to look much more secure.

As Wathelet set off history was hanging in the balance, but he wasn’t going to let that get to him. “I like pressure!” he said after galloping through the timers with the scoreboard showing a nice big fat zero. In the final analysis his country grabbed the gold with a total of 12.07, Germany took silver medal spot on 16.22, and Great Britain finished in bronze with 21.41.

Victorious Chef d’Equipe, Peter Weinberg, said, “It’s unbelievable and I’m very, very proud of my team, four top riders with brilliant horses; they did a fantastic job and I’m very, very happy!” When asked why it has taken so long for Belgium to get on the European team podium, he replied with a laugh, “Maybe it’s because they didn’t have me as a trainer!”

All the Belgian team paid tribute to their back-up crew and the other Belgian riders, including Olivier Philippaerts and Niels Bruynseels, who have supported them every inch of the way this week.

“We’ve been working together for a couple of years now, and today we put everything together. We all think the same way and we are all good friends, and this is why we got the gold.” — Pieter Devos (Team Belgium)

Jerome Guery said, “Yesterday I was a little disappointed with my result – I had to be better today for my horse, and also for my team. We knew after my ride the we would get the silver but then Greg rode a clear and it was gold!” And like all the riders, he complimented the fantastic courses being presented by The Netherlands’ Louis Konickx this week.

“We’ve had three really different classes; the first day was a typical speed class, yesterday was a more delicate round, and today was much bigger. It’s been a really good job from the course design team,” he pointed out.

Germany’s Daniel Deusser reflected on how this team competition played itself out. “We started strong on the first day but lost it a little bit yesterday… it was a very exciting class today and the teams were close. In the end we are very happy with silver.”

All four Belgian team-members have made the cut into Sunday’s top-25 individual final, and Verlooy is lying a very close second to Britain’s Ben Maher at the head of affairs when the action gets underway after a rest day.

Results here.

Watch highlights here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Clear Rounds Carry Belgians to Top of Jumping Team Leaderboard

Pieter Devos and Claire Z. (FEI/Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)

In a thrilling second day of competition at the Longines FEI Jumping European Championships 2019 in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, Team Belgium rocketed up from overnight eighth place into pole position when they were the only side to produce three clear rounds.

Dutch course designer, Louis Konickx, turned up the heat with a significantly bigger track, and from the 68 starters that included 9 individuals not competing in teams, there were only 11 foot-perfect runs around his 14-fence course.

The first-day leaders from Germany slipped to silver medal spot, the French dropped from second to fourth, and Great Britain climbed from fourth to overtake the third-placed Swedish side. And adding to the heat of excitement, the battle for the three Olympic qualifying spots on offer also saw some shuffling with Belgium, Britain, and France now well-placed going into the medal-decider.

Germany looked set for another great day when reigning World Champion, Simone Blum, kicked off with another lovely clear from DSP Alice. But when Christian Ahlmann and Clintrexo Z hit both the vertical after the open water at fence 8 and the oxer at 11, and Marcus Ehning also double-faulted with Comme Il Faut, then they began to lose their grip. Despite a brilliant last-to-go clear from Daniel Deusser and Scuderia 1918 Tobago Z, they had to add one of those eight-fault scores to their tally.

Both France and Sweden added 12 and dropped off a potential medal position, but the British posted just the four picked up at the water by anchorman Scott Brash and Hello M’Lady, because Ben Maher (Explosion W) and Holly Smith (Hearts Destiny) made no mistake, so Amanda Derbyshire’s eight faults (Luibanta BH) could be discounted.

Meanwhile, the Belgians began climbing up the order with clears from both Pieter Devos with Claire Z and Jos Verlooy and Igor. They faltered with two down for Jérôme Guery and Quel Homme de Hus, but when Gregory Wathelet sailed home with their third foot-perfect run of the day, they suddenly found themselves sitting pretty at the very top of the leaderboard because it’s the best three scores per nation that count.

“We knew that after today we would have quite some changes on the leaderboard… the boys did a fantastic job, and the horses jumped amazing!” — Peter Weinberg (Team Belgium Chef d’Equipe)

Pathfinder Pieter Devos said, “The course designer did a great job today. It was much more technical, you had to ride with a plan to the very last fence, but it was a horse-friendly course. We can go to day three tomorrow with the horses not being in the red, and this is always good,” he pointed out.

Jérôme Guery explained that this is a first championship for his 13-year-old stallion. “I knew the vertical after the water would be difficult, and the triple combination was really short for me, but I am happy and lucky to have a strong team with me. I am only riding this horse for the last six months; he’s a slow horse but with a big canter. I use his big strides to be on time, and I always have to keep an eye on it,” he added.

Wathelet’s horse is also a Championship first-timer, but he’s been riding the 11-year-old grey stallion, MJT Nevados S, since he was six so they know each other very well.  “We now have a team of horses that are more experienced and we feel better and better each year,” he said.

At 23 years of age, Jos Verlooy is by far the youngest in the Belgian side, but he already has plenty of mileage on his career clock and this week his 11-year-old chestnut gelding is competing at Championship level for a second time. “He was in Tryon (at the FEI World Equestrian Games 2018), but he didn’t do too much this year so we could keep him fresh and fit for this Championship,” he explained. It seems that decision is paying off in spade-loads because not only is his team out in front, but he personally sits in sixth place individually and a spot in Sunday’s top-25 individual final looks very much on the cards.

When asked if he thinks his team can hold on to gold medal position at the end of the last round of the team competition in which only the top 10 nations will battle it out, Chef d’Equipe Peter Weinberg said, “We will try very hard, but our first goal is to qualify for Tokyo and anything else will be a bonus on top of that!”

Britain’s Ben Maher has moved up to pole position in the individual rankings ahead of Swiss star Steve Guerdat while Frenchman Alexis Deroubaix is lying third ahead of Germany’s Daniel Deusser in fourth place. First-day leader, Sweden’s Peder Fredricson, dropped to eighth with a fence down, but he’s only a fence off the leader, while in the team rankings there’s less than a fence separating the top three nations.

Results here.

Watch highlights here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Santiago Lambre Claims $25,000 Tryon Resort Grand Prix Win

Santiago Lambre and Con Rouet ©TIEC.

Mill Spring, NC – August 19, 2019 – Santiago Lambre (Wellington, FL) and Con Rouet claimed Sunday’s $25,000 Tryon Resort Grand Prix at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC) at Tryon Resort to conclude Tryon August 2 competition at the venue, laying down a jump-off time of 36.95 seconds. Taylor Land (Atlanta, GA) and Falco V, the Pinetree Farms Inc.-owned 2010 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Bustique x Montreux), were back on the TIEC podium with a second-place jump-off time of 37.881 seconds, while David Blake (hometown) piloted Don’t Touch Du Bois, the 2009 Belgian Warmblood mare (Kashmir van Schuttershof x Indoctro) owned by Pine Hollow Farm, to third on a short-course time of 38.896 seconds.

Dean Rheinheimer’s course tested 27 entries in the initial round, with eight horse-and-rider pairs welcomed back to challenge the jump-off track. Last to go, Lambre and the 2010 Oldenburg gelding (Conthargos x Balou Du Rouet) owned by Salvador Onate Barron made easy work of the course despite being newly paired teammates.

“This is the second show I’ve had with him [Con Rouet],” explained Lambre. “He’s a new horse to me, and looks very competitive. I think he’s going to be a winner! I showed him in Michigan one week, and this is the second show. He’s very easy to ride, and careful. I got him three weeks ago from Mexico.”

Lambre and Con Rouet were fourth in Friday’s $5,000 Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake, just missing out on the podium, but found their stride in Sunday’s jump-off course, Lambre detailed. “I thought it was a really nice course. Not too big, but difficult lines, so it was not easy for the riders. The jump-off was really nice,” he continued. “You could turn short and get a nice gallop. It was very nice!”

Competition was stiff, as fellow competitor Land has been on a hot streak at TIEC and had posted a tight time to beat, but Lambre utilized his position in the order of go to study where he could make up the time: “I was the last to go, so I saw the other riders. I had to do everything very short and forward, because it was really fast!”

Taylor Land Continues to Dominate the TIEC Podium with $5,000 Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake Win

Taylor Land (Atlanta, GA) and Falco V sped around the short course in 26.077 seconds to earn the win in Friday’s $5,000 Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake at TIEC, also claiming third place aboard Get Go, piloting the Pinetree Farms Inc. entry and 2012 Hanoverian gelding (Grey Top x World Diamond O) to a 27.496-second jump-off round. Santiago Lambre (Wellington, FL) and Chapiletto, a 2009 Oldenburg gelding (Chacco Blue x Pretty Woman) owned by Luis Gerardo Plascencia y Familia, produced a 27.004-second short course to claim second.

Course designer Dean Rheinheimer (Sheridan, IN) had 26 pairs attempt his first-round track, with nine entries earning a chance to compete over the jump-off course. Continuing her recent trend of three-for-three, Land piloted all three of her mounts through to the second round of competition, ultimately bookending the podium. “The course rode really well. There was a lot to do, so it was fun!” Land said of the course.

“He [Falco V] has just been amazing. He’s such a winner, and he always tries his heart out. He was so speedy today!” she said of the 2010 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Bustique x Montreux) owned by Pinetree Farms Inc. “Falco is nine, and I’ve had him almost three years.”

Land has an impressive trio of horses that have truly hit their stride at TIEC recently and continue to collect consecutive podium placings. Land explained: “We rode complicated courses this summer at Spruce Meadows, and I think that really helped me make some strides this summer. All of the horses are just in a really good place with their age and mentality: Falco is nine, Liroy [30] is ten, and Grumbles [Get Go] is seven, and they’re all just in a really good place. They feel like they’re thriving!”

Get Go in particular has stepped up in the last few weeks, Land shared, competing in his first “Saturday Night Lights” Grand Prix in Tryon Stadium and taking first, despite “just starting to jump at this level,” Land revealed. “He’s just been amazing. This [Ring 4] was a new ring for him, and I am so proud of him! This is for sure the biggest he’s jumped in a smaller ring, so it was really nice to feel him jumping so well. I was a little bit more conservative on him in the jump-off because it was his first time jumping bigger in a smaller place, but he was amazing.”

Land hopes to keep her winning streak alive and will compete at the venue for the duration of the Tryon August Series, giving credit to “Team Land” for her consistent results: “I credit my recent success to having an amazing team, both at home and on the road, including my parents, Jay and Kim, my grooms and rider. They are all incredible and make my job so much easier!”

For full results from the $25,000 Tryon Resort Grand Prix, click here.

For full results from the $5,000 Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake, click here.

For more information and results, please visit www.Tryon.com.

David O’Brien and La Belle SCF Capture Win in $40,000 Bluegrass Festival Grand Prix

David O’Brien and La Belle SCF.

Lexington, Ky. – Aug. 18, 2019 – The final day of the Bluegrass Festival Horse Show at the Kentucky Horse Park concluded with the $40,000 Bluegrass Festival Grand Prix, sponsored by Audi of Lexington. Despite high temperatures, 28 horse-and-rider pairs contested Ken Krome’s course attempting to walk away with the lion’s share of the prize money. At the end of a competitive jump-off, it was David O’Brien and La Belle SCF who walked away with the day’s top honors, in addition to winning the Envisian Leading Rider of the Week award thanks to accumulating the most points in the jumper divisions throughout the week.

Luminosity Shines Bright with Geoffrey Hesslink to Win $5,000 USHJA National Hunter Derby

The Bluegrass Festival Horse Show was bookended by the $5,000 USHJA National Hunter Derby, sponsored by World Equestrian Center and Kentucky Horse Shows, on Sunday to complete a week of exciting equestrian action. In their first ever class together, Geoffrey Hesslink and Luminosity topped the scorecard following two standout rides to top the field of 40 starters and earn the lead spot in the victory gallop.

Website: www.kentuckyhorseshows.com

Contact: Rebecca Walton
phone 561.753.3389
rjw@phelpsmediagroup.com

Great Britain Wins Double Gold in Eventing

Photo: Leszek Wójcik.

British riders have defended their last year’s title and stood on the highest step on the podium twice: individually and as a team. The silver medal went to France, and bronze to Ireland.

The British team won with the following squad: Finn Healy with Midnight Dancer, Ibble Watson with Bookhamlodge Pennylane, Freya Partridge with Master Macky, and Daisy Bathe with SF Detroit. They took the lead after dressage and kept it until the end of the competition.

The best score in the team, and the best one in the individual ranking, belonged to 15-year-old Finn Healy – 31,7. Although he was tenth after dressage, a clear round inside the time on the cross-country course and only one point for time during the showjumping have earned him his gold medal.

“It was a testing cross-country track, very technical; it required some reactive riding; we all did that and got ourselves in the position to win. It didn’t really sink in yet. It’s a dream come true,” said Finn Healy.

Silver went to his teammate Ibble Watson and bronze to Camilla Luciani (ITA) with Camelot Damgaard.

Daisy Bathe had an unlucky round in the jumping and finished the championships on the seventh position.

Dressage

The Danish have won three gold medals at this year’s Pony European Championships in dressage: team, individual, and freestyle, where riders performed their rounds to music of their choosing.

The individual medalists have repeated their success. The highest score belonged to the world ranking number one – Alexander Yde Helgstrand with Adriano B – 82,140.

“It’s totally amazing. I didn’t expect to win three times. I choose my music on my own. I’ve actually had this music for quite some time. My pony knows the program and the music, so I think it really fits Adriano,” said the winner after the prizegiving.

The second silver medal went to his teammate Liva Addy Guldager Nielsen riding D’Artagnan 187, and Germany’s Shona Benner with Der Kleine Sunnyboy WE won the bronze medal again.

Showjumping

The final class of the European championships for ponies in Strzegom determined the individual medals for showjumping.

31 pairs have competed in the two-round competition. 12 of them had a good chance to win gold. Four riders entered the final with a clean slate, and eight with only four penalty points.

The course designer, Szymon Tarant, set up a demanding course in the first round, and only three riders have managed to go clear. The second part of the class, high up to 135 cm, has determined the winner. Max Wachman riding Cuffesgrange Cavalidam became the gold medalist of the 2019 Pony European Championships.

“It’s a great feeling. My pony is top class. The first round was quite tricky, very technical. The second round was less technical and a bit bigger. I’m out of ponies now, so I will focus on big horses and hopefully qualify for the Junior European championships next year,” said the winner.

The audience in Strzegom witnessed a jump-off for the silver medal, between riders from France and Great Britain. Holly Truelove (GBR) was the first one to go. She took a risk riding to the last oxer, which gave her a quick time and made it challenging for her rival. Ilona Mezzadri (ITA) with Callas Rezidal Z took up the glove, but had two down, which gave her a score of 8 penalties, and bronze medal in the final classification.

153 riders from 18 countries competed in three Olympic disciplines during the FEI Pony European Championships in Strzegom.

Full results: https://zawodykonne.com/zawody/50/tour/84.

Contact:
www.strzegomhorsetrials.pl
press@strzegomhorsetrials.pl

They’re Rearing to Go in Rotterdam!

Bella Rose and German legend Isabell Werth. (FEI/Kim C Lundin)

The horses, riders, back-up teams, and supporters have been descending on the “Het Kralingse bos”, the lovely forested public park located in the village of Kralingse on the outskirts of Rotterdam in The Netherlands, in preparation for the opening of the Longines FEI European Championships 2019 for Jumping, Dressage, and Para-Dressage.

The competition action kicks off Monday 19 August, but the hijinks already started with some of the world’s greatest Dressage horses hot-to-trot and full of beans during the first veterinary inspection in which all were deemed fit to compete.

The No. 1 horse-and-rider combination of German legend Isabell Werth and her brilliant mare Bella Rose put on a show in front of the Ground Jury when Bella couldn’t contain her excitement about what’s going to happen over the coming days. And they are not the only ones anticipating a great week of sport.

A total of 70 athletes from 24 countries and teams from 15 nations will compete in both Dressage and Jumping, while 66 riders from 21 countries will battle it out for Para Dressage medals.

The Rotterdam showground has undergone a major transformation with an expanded grandstand around the main arena. A short walk through the woods takes visitors to the nearby Para Dressage ring where the veterinary inspection took place, and there is an extensive trade-stand area further along the forest pathway.

The Dressage team medals will be decided in the Grand Prix in which the first tranche of riders will compete before the Opening Ceremony takes place. On Tuesday the Grand Prix will conclude and the team medals will be awarded. The Grand Prix Special will take place on Thursday, and then Saturday’s Grand Prix Freestyle will bring this Championship to a close.

Beginning on Wednesday there will be five full days of Para Dressage action, highlighted by the team medals presentation on Friday and the Freestyle finales on Sunday.

The Jumping team medals will also be awarded on Friday after three consecutive days of thrilling competition, and on Sunday a new Jumping champion will be crowned at the end of the two-round individual showdown.

Once available, startlists and results can be found here.

Event website here.

Watch all the action live www.feitv.org.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

2019 Southeast Medal Finals Adds NEW Poles Medal Final

Tampa, Fla. – August 16, 2019 – Entries are filling fast for the 2019 Southeast Medal Finals, held in just a few weeks from August 30 to September 1. This year’s exciting competition will return to the Bob Thomas Equestrian Center in Tampa, Florida. Classes are available for all levels and ages, and entries can be mailed in or submitted online through HorseShowsOnline.

New to this year, competition will feature a Poles Medal Final, presented by MCF Equestrian, held Sunday, September 1. The Poles Medal Final is open to qualified beginner junior and non-professional adult riders who have not shown over anything higher than cross rails. Be sure to submit your entries for this exciting addition.

The Southeast Medal Finals will offer hunter, jumper, and equitation competition for all levels and ages. USEF-rated and sanctioned by the CFHJA, this regional competition is the perfect season culmination for riders seeking an affordable and attainable horse show experience.

For questions regarding this year’s Southeast Medal Finals or to submit stall counts, call (352) 397-9315 or email semedalfinals@gmail.com.

For additional information, please visit www.southeastmedalfinals.com.

Olympian Ben Maher Tops LGCT Grand Prix of London

Maher and Explosion W (Photo courtesy of Stefano Grasso)

Rome, Italy (August 16, 2019) – Olympic Gold Medalist Ben Maher’s show jumping prowess has been the subject of championship stories at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games, the 2012 London Games, and numerous international competitions around the globe. On the famed Longines Global Champion Tour (LGCT) circuit, Maher has consistently topped its destination events over the past two years, and this summer was victorious not only in his nation’s capital of London while representing the home team London Knights, but is well positioned to reclaim his 2018 LGCT Champion of Champions title for 2019.

Maher kicked off the 2019 LGCT season with a second-place finish aboard his anchor KWPN stallion, Explosion W (Chacco Blue x Untouchable), in the LGCT of Doha. Subsequent top finishes for Maher and teammates on the London Knights in Stockholm, Sweden and Casais/Estoril, Portugal further cemented their prestige in the LGCT ranks. From August 2nd to 4th, Maher truly proved his star power, winning the LGCT Grand Prix of London and skyrocketing both himself and his team to top rankings in the tour and league. In a four-horse jump-off and aboard Explosion W, Maher edged out Shane Sweetnam aboard Alejandro and Darragh Kenny aboard Classic Dream to take the win on a time of 38.98. It was double gravy for Maher, who won not only for his home team, the London Knights, but also in his nation’s capital.

Following the LGCT in London and the subsequent LGCT Valkenswaard, Maher sits perfectly poised to pounce at future destinations and be named the 2019 LGCT Champion of Champions for the second year in a row. Maher no doubt has his sights set on further victories and ultimately Tokyo 2020.

Media contact:
holly@equinium.com
www.equinium.com

A Stellar Cast Chases Jumping Gold and Glory

Peder Fredricson. (FEI/Liz Gregg)

There’s a whole lot hanging in the balance as the Longines FEI Jumping European Championship 2019 gets underway in Rotterdam, The Netherlands next Wednesday (21 August). Not only will the best horse-and-rider combinations from all across Europe try to etch their names onto the prestigious Roll of Honour that dates all the way back to 1957. But the competition for the three Olympic qualifying spots up for grabs will also be ferocious, so it won’t all be about who stands on the top step of the podium.

Of course, when it comes to European gold, they all want it. And every two years when this event comes around then the ones they all have to beat are the Germans, because their record is just incredible. Germany has claimed the most team golds with a total of seven, and also tops the individual leaderboard with 14 victories. And with Christian Ahlmann, Daniel Deusser, Marcus Ehning, Maurice Tebbel, and the lady who took the individual title at last year’s FEI World Equestrian Games™ in Tryon, USA, Simone Blum, on call-up this time around, then the rest will have to be at the top of their game to keep them in check.

The very first FEI European Jumping Championship took place in Rotterdam, so we are returning to where it all began. Just 8 riders from 5 nations competed at that inaugural fixture in 1957, but a total of 70 athletes from 24 nations will line out in the 2019 edition, and 15 countries will be represented by teams.

The Irish are defending team champions, but few would deny that the Swedes, who finished second on their home turf in Gothenburg two years ago and who only lost out on gold at last year’s World Championships in a nail-biting jump-off against the clock, will be ones to watch this time around. They’re strong, they’re hungry, and they are on a roll, picking up a series of extraordinary wins in recent months thanks in no small part to sensational performances from Peder Fredricson, the man who brought individual European glory to his country in 2017. Fredricson spearheads an awesome Swedish side that includes Malin Baryard-Johnsson, Fredrik Jonsson, Henrik von Eckermann, and Evelina Tovek.

And the Swiss look a formidable force, Martin Fuchs and World No.1 Steve Guerdat, who took individual silver and bronze at last year’s World Championships, join Paul Estermann, Beat Mandli, and Niklaus Rutschi, and with their best horses in tow you just know they mean business.

It was a golden era for the Dutch when they swept all before them at Aachen (GER) in 2015, and Chef d’Equipe Rob Ehrens, who himself won team bronze in Munich in 1981, sends out Maikel van der Vleuten who was on that 2015 winning side along with Bart Bles, Marc Houtzager, Doron Kuipers, and Frank Schuttert.

The Irish won against the odds last time around when the team was reduced to just three riders in the closing stages. And Cian O’Connor, who clinched it on that memorable night before going on to take individual bronze, is joined by 2017 team-mate Shane Sweetnam, the on-fire Darragh Kenny, Paul O’Shea, and Peter Moloney.

However, the surprise package could well be the British. They’ve been in the doldrums for quite some time now but their winning performance in the Longines FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ in Dublin last Friday was more than convincing. Chef d’Equipe, Di Lampard, has at last got a super-talented and totally committed pool of riders, and the emotional reaction from the relatively young but hardened veterans Scott Brash and Ben Maher who were on the last winning British side in Herning (DEN) six years ago said it all that day. There’s no doubt but that the British, team champions on five previous occasions, are back with a bang, and the side that will also include Amanda Derbyshire, Laura Renwick, and Holly Smith will be gunning for gold next week.

Ladies had their own Championship until 1973, and since they’ve been competing against their male counterparts, they have only twice broken the mould by taking the individual title. Alexandra Ledermann from France was the first to do it with the mighty Rochet M at Hickstead in 1999, and there has only been one other, Germany’s Meredith Michaels-Beerbaum who topped the podium with the great Shutterfly in 2007 at Mannheim (GER). All eyes will be on the reigning World Champion, Simone Blum, to see if she can extend the short list of lady winners.

While gold is the goal for many, those three tantalising Olympic qualifying spots will also be a major focus. So far 14 nations have booked their tickets for Tokyo 2020 – Japan, USA, Sweden, Germany, Switzerland, Netherlands, Australia, Ukraine, Israel, Brazil, Mexico, Canada, New Zealand, and China. Next week, however, 10 more teams will be trying to make the cut, because Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Great Britain, Ireland, Italy, Norway, Portugal, and Spain also have their hopes and dreams, and none are prepared to give up without a serious fight.

The Jumping action gets underway on Wednesday and following two more days of competition on Thursday and Friday the team medals will be decided. Sunday’s finale is bound to be a thriller as the new Longines FEI Jumping European Champion will be crowned, and by then the road to Tokyo 2020 will be more clearly marked.

Event website here.

Full list of entries here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Victoria Colvin and El Primero Lead First Day of USHJA International Hunter Derby Championship

Victoria Colvin and El Primero.

Lexington, Ky. – Aug. 16, 2019 – The 11th edition of the Platinum Performance/USHJA International Hunter Derby Championship returned to the Rolex Stadium at the Kentucky Horse Park on Friday morning, showcasing the best hunter horses and athletes in the country for the first of two days of competition. Offering more than $250,000 in prize money in 2019, the event has become a popular goal for challengers with exceptionally skilled horses that possess noteworthy movement and jumping style. With 76 entries tackling the classic phase of competition, horse-and-rider combinations were in top form, all fighting for a coveted spot in the top 40 to advance to Saturday evening’s championship handy round. Ultimately it was defending champion Victoria Colvin aboard El Primero who stepped up to the plate to earn the highest day one score and lead the pack.

Brian Moggre Notches Another Kentucky Win in $25,000 Hagyard Lexington Classic Grand Prix

Jumper competition took center stage Friday evening at the Bluegrass Festival Horse Show, where 32 exhibitors challenged the course in the $25,000 Hagyard Lexington Classic Grand Prix in an attempt to lead the victory gallop. As the fifth jewel of seven in the Hagyard Challenge Series, the evening class offered competitors a chance to earn a share of the day’s prize money as well as accrue points toward the season-ending $50,000 Leading Rider Award. Adding another victory to his ever-growing collection, Brian Moggre (USA) jockeyed MTM Los Angeles to the swiftest double-clear performance of the night to capture the greatest share of the prize money and extend his domination of the 2019 Hagyard Challenge Series.

Website: www.kentuckyhorseshows.com

Contact: Rebecca Walton
phone 561.753.3389
rjw@phelpsmediagroup.com