Category Archives: *Featured/Spotlights

Special features, spotlights, headlines

Why Horse Racing Is Such a Popular Sport to Bet On

If you are a fan of thoroughbred races, chances are you have been seeing the same spike of attendees in horse racing events. We often must wonder why this is. Is it because horse racing is so popular, do they have money literally riding on these horses, or is it a combination of both? What makes horse racing such a popular sport to bet on? You can try it here and see what all the fuss is about or you can read how we came to the conclusion that horse racing is a popular sport because it stands apart from the rest.

Predictability

The outcome of the race is incredibly hard to predict and this is coming from experts. Horse racing isn’t predictable as there are many factors to take into consideration. The training of the horse is something no one can witness; how the horse has been trained, how often the horse trains, and the speed of the thoroughbred cannot be predicted. Because we are betting on some of the most amazing animals in the world, we don’t know what their current performance is. We can only look at previous races, if there are any, and try deducing which number, name and jockey will win.

The History of Horse Racing

Adding to the popularity of horse racing is the fact that the sport dates back to the 1800s and has most certainly collected appreciative spectators over the centuries. The history of horse racing tells a tale of strength, speed, and some of the most beautiful thoroughbreds in the world.

The Prize Money

Horse sports betting is one of the most lucrative betting industries in the world. Some prizes awards millions of dollars to the winning horse and in some cases there is even a whole ceremony at the end of the race.

An Elite Sport

The biggest horse racing events attract millions of spectators from around the world. There are even celebrities in attendance. The Royal Family attends the Grand National Horse Racing event which is held in Liverpool every year and is attended over a 3 day period. One of the biggest horse racing events is the Kentucky Derby; the race is a part of 3 major races. There are a number of races that have been set apart from the smaller races. The ruler of Dubai has recently created one of the biggest events in the horse racing world and offers one of the largest prize pots.

Betting on the Horses

You can either travel hundreds of thousands of miles to be in attendance to bet on the races or you can opt for the more modernized method of betting: this is using an online sports book to choose your odds ad bet on them. This has also factored into the popularity of horse racers as most online sports books offer this as a betting option. Make sure you get in on the action – get informed about horse racing tips and take part in the most popular sport in the world.

Horse Racing in Michigan

Gambling online is now being legalized in a number of states. It looked like Michigan would be following in the footsteps of New Jersey, Nevada, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Delaware in 2018, but after former Governor Rick Snyder vetoed the legislation, the matter of MI online betting has seemingly been put on hold.

Michigan online gambling has technically been allowed since 2014, when the Michigan Lottery was launched. In addition, Michigan sports betting in the form of horse racing, greyhound racing, and Fantasy Sports have been available for a number of years too. Therefore, it’s not a huge stretch to imagine that the MI online betting legislation will be passed in the near future.

Located in the Detroit suburb of Northville, Northville Downs was the first track in Michigan to offer standardbred, pari-mutual wagering. It has been in existence since 1944, making it the senior pari-mutual racetrack in Michigan.

Farmington Hills-based homebuilder Hunter Pasteur Homes is under contract to buy the Northville Downs horse racetrack and redevelop the 48-acre property for housing.

The harness racetrack’s land has long been sought by developers in upscale Northville, but the project wouldn’t necessarily end horse racing in the area.

Northville Downs, Michigan’s last horse track since Hazel Park Raceway closed earlier this month, will remain open until the development begins. The track’s owners will seek to continue racing and wagering operations “at an area in close proximity to its current location,” according to the statement from Hunter Pasteur Homes.  A race calendar is available on the state’s website.

Northville Downs currently is open seven days weekly for harness and thoroughbred simulcast wagering, and Friday and Saturday evenings for live races which returned March 22nd.

Northville Downs stated that live harness racing and simulcast wagering will continue at their current location through 2020. They are in the process of exploring multiple other locations to develop a first-class, state-of-the-art racing and gaming facility that Michigan will be proud of. They will continue to work closely with state and local representatives to implement the necessary changes that other states around us have, so they can bring racing back to its finest.

It has been stated that it is unclear if the track’s ownership will open a new facility regardless of changes in Michigan’s gaming laws, which prevent tracks from adding non-horse gambling like slot machines, or if it will build anew even without more forms of wagering.

Northville Downs is a half mile harness track located in Northville a suburb of Detroit. Opened in 1944, it had been recognized as the first successful harness track outside of New York State. The years have taken their toll on Northville, it does have a winterized, glass enclosed grandstand, and clubhouse. The clubhouse seating 2,000, which includes a dining room with 450 seats, the grandstand seats another 5,200. Live racing is held at night and simulcasting is available year-round. The stables can accommodate 750 horses. There is parking for 2,500 cars.

Northville Downs currently is open seven days weekly for simulcast wagering, and Friday and Saturday evenings for live races.

Thoroughbred Racing in Michigan could return in 2020. AmRace & Sports LLC was granted a conditional license by the Michigan Gaming and Control Board for Thoroughbred racing at Sports Creek in 2019 but due to sale and legislation changes, Thoroughbred racing is now slated to come back to the state in 2020.

Horse Racing in New Jersey

The Meadowlands Racetrack (currently referred to as Meadowlands Racing & Entertainment) is a horse racing track at the Meadowlands Sports Complex in East Rutherford, NJ, United States. The track hosts both thoroughbred racing and harness racing. It is known popularly in the region as “The Big M”. Meadowlands has year-round horse racing as well as a number of bars and restaurants.

Here is a guide to New Jersey betting on sports online to will help you get on your feet. The online sports betting in New Jersey has been legal for almost a year now. The NJ online sportsbooks allow you to bet on games on their website or through the operator’s mobile app if such feature is available. Therefore, you can enjoy the experience of engaging in NJ online sports betting without having to leave the comfort of your home.

Opened in the mid-1970s, Meadowlands Racetrack held its first-ever harness race on September 1, 1976 while thoroughbred racing commenced on September 6, 1977. With the exception of the opening season of 1976, autumn has been dedicated to the thoroughbreds, while the rest of the year features standardbreds, or harness horses.

The Meadowlands Racetrack has been the site of the Hambletonian, the first leg of the Trotting Triple Crown, since 1981. It has also been home to the Cane Pace, the first leg of Harness Racing’s Pacing Triple Crown since 2015 with the Cane run on the same program as the Hambletonian.

Monmouth Park, the Meadowlands, and Freehold Raceway will receive purse subsidies in 2019. The money allocated under the new law will go toward enhancing the winnings, or purses, paid out to the highest finishers at races. In general, higher purses means tracks can attract more horses, which in turn leads to more wagering by spectators and more business for the tracks and ancillary workers.

Monmouth Park, the state’s only thoroughbred track, will receive $10 million for purses in the current fiscal year, which ends June 30, with the Meadowlands Racetrack and Freehold Raceway, both standardbred tracks, getting $6 million and $1.6 million, respectively. The remaining $2.4 million will go toward breeding programs and other purses.

On June 11, 2018, New Jersey became the third state to legalize sports betting, after Nevada and Delaware, with Gov. Phil Murphy signing the legislation into law. Sports betting in New Jersey began when a sportsbook opened at Monmouth Park Racetrack on June 14, 2018.  Following this, sportsbooks opened at the casinos in Atlantic City and at Meadowlands Racetrack.

In June 2018, Paddy Power Betfair announced that it had partnered with Meadowlands to open a sportsbook at the track, following the state’s legalization of sports betting (as facilitated by the result of Murphy v. National Collegiate Athletic Association). The sportsbook opened on July 14, 2018, under the branding of FanDuel, a daily fantasy sports service recently acquired by the company.

In May 2018, the Supreme Court ruled in the case in favor of New Jersey, ruling that the 1992 federal ban on sports betting in most states violated their rights. After the ruling, several states, including New Jersey and Rhode Island, prepared to legalize sports betting.

Live and thrilling standardbred racing at Freehold NJ Raceway was established in 1853. The Freehold Raceway features live standardbred races and thoroughbred racing simulcasts from tracks all over North America.

The raceway is open seven days of the week and the thoroughbred simulcasts schedule can be found here. New to this speed sport? The raceway offers an online betting guide found here and if you can’t experience the race live, just place your bet online or over the phone.

Guerdat Shows Nerves of Steel to Seal His Third Title

Switzerland’s Steve Guerdat (centre) celebrates in style with his compatriot and runner-up Martin Fuchs (left) and third-placed Peder Fredricson from Sweden (right). (FEI/Liz Gregg)

Switzerland’s Steve Guerdat (36) showed exactly why he is the No. 1 rider in the world right now when holding his nerve under the most intense pressure to take the Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ 2019 title at the Scandinavium Arena in Gothenburg (SWE). This was his third time to lift the trophy in the long history of the prestigious series, and his glorious win sees him join an elite group of three-time champions.

He had thrown down the gauntlet when topping Thursday’s opening competition, but a fence down on Friday saw him come into the two-round finale in third place, and two points off Spain’s Eduardo Alvarez Aznar (35) at the head of the leaderboard. Guerdat wondered if his 11-year-old gelding Alamo was ready to step up to the level of sport they faced. The horse had never jumped courses as big as this before. Course designer, Spain’s Santiago Varela, set them an enormous test, but Alamo didn’t crumble.

“I was a bit unsure going to the final today as this is his first championship and I was a little nervous on Friday after the speed class, but in the end he has been amazing all week!” said the man whose won his first title in Las Vegas (USA) in 2015 and his second in Gothenburg a year later.

There were only five first-round clears, and Guerdat moved into pole position when Alvarez Aznar dropped out of contention with two fences down, and second-placed Swede, Peder Fredricson (47), faulted once with Catch Me Not at the bogey water-try vertical at fence 10 on the tough 13-fence track to the dismay of the crowd. But the home hero and reigning European champion was still very much in the hunt, in third carrying five penalty points as round two began with Guerdat at the head of affairs carrying two, but only a single point ahead of fellow-countryman Martin Fuchs (26) and Clooney who had three on the board.

You could hear a pin drop when Fredricson returned to take on the simply colossal second-round track, but there was an explosion of sound when he brought his grey gelding home with nothing to add. The Swiss pair now had no breathing space: any mistake would ensure a Swedish victory, but Fuchs didn’t falter, Clooney showing all the class that secured individual silver for his talented young rider at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ in Tryon (USA) last September.

Now Guerdat had no room for manoeuvre – nothing but a foot-perfect run would do. Alamo showed a little inexperience on the way but there’s nothing quite like a horse that gives you everything it’s got, and the Dutch-bred did just that to bring it home.

“It’s up to the horse to jump the fences, so I really tried to focus on my riding and give the him his best chance, and he responded really well,” Guerdat said. He’s growing ever-fonder of Alamo, although he admitted that the horse he holds closest to his heart will always be his great partner Nino des Buissonnets who carried him to Olympic glory in London seven years ago.

It was a bit of a frustrating result for Fuchs because he has now finished second in two major events, last year’s World Championship and the Longines FEI Jumping World Cup Final. “But if I have to be beaten it is great if Steve wins; he is my friend and training partner. Clooney was amazing; he jumped both rounds easy; he is one of the best horses in the world. Two times second place is already a great achievement, and I am already looking forward to the European Championships this summer!” he said. That top step of the podium will surely come their way very soon.

But it was Guerdat who reigned supreme, and he now joins an elite group of three-time World Cup winners that includes Germany’s Meredith Michaels-Beerbaum and Marcus Ehning, Brazil’s Rodrigo Pessoa, and Austria’s Hugo Simon, the man who won the very first title in Gothenburg in 1979.

“When I was young, I used to dream of winning the World Cup, and when I finished second twice I wondered if it would ever happen. So when I won in 2015 it was very special, and to win here in Gothenburg the next year was even better, because this is such a great show; the crowd is like nowhere else and the atmosphere is unbelievable. To win three times, and to do it in Gothenburg again today – this makes me very proud!” — Steve Guerdat (SUI)

Result here.

Watch highlights here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Werth Proves Unbeatable One More Time

Isabell Werth. (FEI/Christophe Taniere)

In a competition that built to an incredible climax, Germany’s Isabell Werth (49) stood firm to win the FEI Dressage World Cup™ title for the fifth time in her extraordinary career. They came from all around the globe to take on the most successful equestrian athlete of all time and gave it everything they had, but she didn’t buckle under the pressure. That’s not her style.

As she entered the arena, second-last to go of the 18 starters, the crowd held its breath in anticipation. They had watched rider after rider throw everything they had at her, piling on the pressure as they also bid for the trophy they all want to win. The spectators were in a frenzy when Sweden’s Tinne Vilhelmson Silfven and Don Auriello drew the first half of the competition to a close with a breathtaking ride on her great Don Auriello, and they went into complete over-drive when it re-started with a new leading score from their own Patrick Kittel and Delaunay OLD.

But Laura Graves (31) blew the competition wide open when strutting to a score of 87.179 with just five left to go. As the American pointed out, her gelding Verdades, one of the five stunning 17-year-old horses who have graced this Final, is just getting better with age and she stayed out in front despite a spectacular ride for Denmark’s Daniel Bachmann Andersen (28) who didn’t hold anything back when steering the stallion Blue Hors Zack to a score of 85.468.

With a beautifully balanced test during which her elegant horse Goerklintgaards Dublet looked like he could do one-tempi changes all day, another of the strong American contingent, Kasey Perry-Glass, slotted in behind him. So, Graves was still holding court at the head of the leaderboard as Werth set off. But it wouldn’t be for long.

“My ride was really fantastic; my mare did a perfect test and she really deserved the win!” said the lady whose trophy cabinet is laden with gold medals, including six from Olympic Games, eight collected at World Games, and 12 from European Championships who put 88.871 on the board. Werth is never altogether pleased when asked what still drives her, at almost 50 years of age, to still be hungry for success, but she replied simply, “I live what I do… and this is what keeps me so competitive!”

Reflecting on her performance she said, “I could take all the risks at extended canter and take her back and the pirouettes were great. We could not have been better!” Except, as she admitted, in the one-tempi changes where there was a little blip. “I was arrogant there, so that was my fault!” she said.

She may have been brilliant once again, but the prize for the most exciting test went, without a shadow of doubt, to her compatriot and 2013 champion Helen Langehanenberg who finished third on a mark of 86.571 after a performance that, quite literally, ended with onlookers gasping in disbelief. None more than Judge at C, Magnus Ringmark, whose expression was priceless as the German rider’s 17-year-old stallion Damsey FRH exploded down the centreline in a massive extended trot, halting only inches from his table. “I thought he was going to end on my lap!” the Swedish Ground Jury member laughed afterwards.

“The sport has changed a lot since I won my first Final,” Werth reflected. That was 27 years ago, also in Gothenburg riding a horse called Fabienne. “We now have such a professional team around us, and there are great improvements on all sides. It is very important for us to keep the respect for the horse for the future and it’s great to see so many older horses still performing at this level; it shows how well they are cared for and how much respect their riders have for them,” she said.

Both runner-up Graves and third-placed Langehanenberg were riding two of those 17-year-olds, still full of the joys of life and still intensely competitive. Langehanenberg said of the hard-pulling Damsey FRH, “I am thankful and really proud of him. The clapping motivated him at the end of the test and I think he would have been quite happy to start all over again!”

This didn’t just mark Werth’s fifth victory; it was also her third in succession and, each time over the last three seasons, it has been Graves who she has had to pin back into runner-up spot.

“Like Isabell said, it is our duty to take care of our horses and try to keep them healthy. My horse likes his job and never puts a foot wrong when I ride him, although at the barn he knows he’s the boss! He was so rideable today, the crowd was amazing, and I hope everyone enjoyed it as much as me!” said the American.

The greeting the riders received in the prizegiving suggested that the crowd most certainly did.

Result here.

Watch highlights here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Boyd Martin and Long Island T Lead The Fork after Advanced Dressage

Boyd Martin and Long Island T. ©Shannon Brinkman Photography.

Tryon, NC – April 4, 2019 – Boyd Martin (USA) and Long Island T impressed the judges and put in a top score of 24.50 in Advanced Dressage, commencing The Fork at TIEC presented by Lucky Clays Farm at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC).  Lynn Symansky (USA) and Under Suspection rode into second with a score of 27.70, and Felix Vogg (SUI) moved into third aboard Archie Rocks with a score of 29.50.

Martin and Long Island T, a 2006 Oldenburg/Thoroughbred gelding (Ludwig Von Bayern x Heraldik XX) owned by Peter Barry, executed a solid test, advancing to the top in the Tryon Stadium.

On his strategy for the remaining phases, Martin stated, “My strategy is to jump really well and then ride really well in the Cross-Country. I think it’s a brilliant track and I couldn’t imagine a better place to prepare for a 5* event than this [TIEC]. It’s got magnificent stadiums, beautiful rings and then obviously a world championship Cross-Country course. The horses should be well-prepared come Kentucky.”

Martin mentioned a particular obstacle he’s keeping in mind for Cross-Country, too: “There’s a boat – I’m going to be riding hard to that one, and I’m going to be clucking and flapping my elbows about five strides out of that one – you watch! To me, it’s just one of those brilliant events to come to with the restaurants and shops here and staying in the cabins on-site. Obviously, it’s just a world-class facility and great exposure for the horses. I think it’s going to help produce top performances in the future as well,” he concluded.

Currently sitting in second, Symansky and Under Suspection, a 2004 Holsteiner mare (Contender x Exorbitant XX) owned by Mary Ann Ghadban is also preparing for Kentucky later this month.

“Our test was alright. She [Under Suspection] left a lot of points on the board, but I’m preparing for Kentucky, so I used the test to play around with a few things. I’ve ridden the horse for a year now, so I know her a bit better. She was my backup horse for WEG last year.”

She continued, “She’s such a lovely horse – to get that score when it wasn’t the best you’ve ever done is great. I’m excited to go out on Saturday and ride her around the track I got to ride in September. She knows her job and she’s such a lovely mare. So I’ll use this as a final prep for Kentucky.

I think she’s just a reliable horse all around. She can get a little hot in the ring – she’s a relaxed competitor, but she’s a fighter. She is such a beast Cross-Country. She really would love to just go Cross-Country and gallop forever.”

Vogg, presently in third with Archie Rocks, a 2008 Thoroughbred gelding (Le Monde x Unbridled Jet), admitted to being on a learning curve in the new partnership, but is progressing well. “The test was pretty okay. I think he [Archie Rocks] is not the most talented one in Dressage, but he wants to do the test correctly and tries. Today, he was much more calm and focused,” he said.

“He like Cross-Country and Jumping. Cross-Country is nothing for him – he’s an old racehorse, so he’s used to it, but Dressage is a new thing for him. I’ve only had him since January.”

Commenting on his plan for Cross-Country, Vogg stated, “I make a plan when I get out of the start box and jump the first few jumps based on how he feels. I like that the course will have parts of the WEG course, and it is interesting to ride it once more, and maybe try to do it better than last time!”

For the CCI 3* division, Doug Payne and Starr Witness advanced to first with a Dressage score of 27.60, while Will Faudree and Caeleste sit in second with a score of 29.60. At present, Elisabeth Halliday-Sharp and Flash Cooley are in third with a score of 30.80.

Click here to follow along with live results from The Fork at TIEC.

Best Female Polo Players in the World Go Head to Head in Inaugural Amazon Polo Match on Mar. 24

Wellington, FL – March 22, 2019 – Following the success of the launch of the 2019 Gladiator Polo™ season last week, it’s now time to bring on the women. This Sunday night, for the first time in history, the International Polo Club Palm Beach (IPC) in Wellington, FL will showcase six of the top ten female players in the world in the launch of Amazon Polo™. This stellar gathering of female talent will include Dawn Jones, wife of Tommy Lee Jones, and captain of the San Antonio franchise. Having seen last week’s Gladiator Polo™ spectacle, she is delighted to promote the all-female version this weekend.

“There was so much energy and amazing entertainment featuring polo at the highest level last week and we can’t wait to have our turn. This is the modernization of the sport that fits perfectly with the explosion of female professional athletes,” said Jones.

Gladiator Polo™ and Amazon Polo™ are ushering in a new era for the sport, which focuses on the promotion of the athletes, as well as the development of high-quality sport and entertainment that targets a broad audience including millennials. The events will significantly leverage social media and live streaming to promote both the events and its commercial sponsors.

This Sunday’s teams’ lineups include:

Team San Antonio
Nina Clarkin
Dawn Jones
Sarah Wiseman

Team London
Hazel Jackson
Lia Salvo
Hope Arellano

When asked about her participation, World Number 2 Player Hazel Jackson-Gaona commented, “This is the most exciting thing to happen to women’s polo to date.”

Mark Bellissimo, CEO of Equestrian Sport Productions, renowned and respected for being a game changer in horse sport, introduced his Gladiator Polo™ concept to Wellington in 2017 and it proved an instant hit, attracting huge crowds and diverse new sponsorship relationships. In 2019, with the hosting of the Susan G. Komen U.S. Open Women’s Polo Championship to IPC, he thought it was a perfect time to introduce Amazon Polo™.

A full profile of the players, sponsors, and vision for the league will be introduced over the weekend.

“A very exciting addition to women’s polo and one that I am extremely looking forward to participating in; it will be so much fun to play against the best women in the world!” commented Nina Clarkin.

The inaugural Amazon Polo™ game will take place on Sunday, March 24, at 6:30 p.m. at the U.S. Polo Assn Coliseum at IPC. Gates open at 5:30 p.m. with a Kids’ Game, featuring two chukkers, beginning at 6:00 p.m. prior to the start of the match. General admission and parking are FREE.

To purchase VIP tickets in the Gladiator Marquee, click here.

To learn more about Amazon Polo™, follow on Instagram at @amazonpolo.

American Horse Racing Venues

The blossoming of springtime rosebuds ushers in Kentucky’s Run for the Roses at the historic Churchill Downs in Louisville and the first leg of the Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing — an annual event each spring since 1875.

Though the Triple Crown is the most famous racing series in the U.S., the tradition of thoroughbred racing dates back to 1665. Today, 32 states host live horse racing throughout the year. The Kentucky Derby, the Preakness Stakes at Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore, Maryland, and the Belmont Stakes at Belmont Park in Elmont, New York make up the three-part racing series.

Events such as the Cheltenham Festival in the United Kingdom – which takes place every March – are the highlight of the racing calendar but as an all-year sport there is always going to be a race to bet on and online betting makes it easier.

The Triple Crown series takes place throughout May and June each year. To secure the Triple Crown champion title, a 3-year-old horse must win all three “jewels” in the series. To date, only 12 horses have won the series, including the world-famous racer Secretariat, who still holds the record for the fastest time on the Kentucky Derby track at 1 minute 59.4 seconds.

The Triple Crown title was formally proclaimed in December 1950 at the annual awards dinner of the Thoroughbred Racing Associations in New York and retroactively awarded to Sir Barton, the first horse to win all three races (1919). The title was then given to subsequent pre-1950 winners at following annual dinners of the organization.

Efforts to cluster races along the lines of the British Triple Crown began after the American Civil War. In 1875 Meriwether Lewis Clark, Jr. — the founder of Churchill Downs, home of the Kentucky Derby — tried to promote a Triple Crown centered around his Derby. At the turn of the 20th century, race organizers in New York focused on three contests that took place in that state. These efforts failed owing to provincialism among the racing entities, with each one insisting that its own events were preeminent. In fact, it was a long time before the socialites of the Eastern states, who largely controlled the sport, would even allow their horses to run in the “West” at Churchill Downs. It was this stubborn attitude, along with a belief that the Derby was raced too early in the year — before young three-year-old horses had fully matured — that impelled owner Samuel Riddle to keep the great Man o’ War out of the Kentucky Derby in 1920, thereby denying him a probable Triple Crown.

The Breeders’ Cup event is held in late October or early November at different race tracks every year. It receives less attention than the Triple Crown series from the general public but is of great importance in determining the American Horse of the Year and annual Eclipse Award divisional winners. It is normally held at a different track every year, though some racetracks have held back-to-back renewals. It currently consists of thirteen races held over two days with total prize-money of $28 million.

In 1665, the first racetrack was constructed on Long Island. It is the oldest Thoroughbred race in North America. The American Stud Book was started in 1868, prompting the beginning of organized horse racing in the United States. There were 314 tracks operating in the United States by 1890, and in 1894, the American Jockey Club was formed.

Belmont Park is part of the western edge of the Hempstead Plains. Its mile-and-a-half main track is the largest dirt Thoroughbred race course in the world, and it has the sport’s largest grandstand.

One of the latest major horse tracks opened in the United States was the Meadowlands Racetrack opened in 1977 for Thoroughbred racing. It is the home of the Meadowlands Cup. Other more recently opened tracks include Remington Park, Oklahoma City, opened in 1988, and Lone Star Park in the Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex, opened in 1997; the latter track hosted the prestigious Breeders’ Cup series of races in 2004.

The first record of quarter mile length races dated back to 1674 in Henrico County, Virginia. Each race consisted of only two horses and they raced down the village streets and lanes. The Quarter Horse received its name due to the length of the race. The races were indeed “a quarter” of a mile, or 400 meters. The breed of horse was developed so they could get off to a quick start and win the race. You will never miss the excitement of Quarter Horse Racing from Los Alamitos, Lone Star, and other areas where the world’s best athletes compete.

The Pleasanton Fairgrounds Racetrack at the Alameda County Fairgrounds is the oldest remaining horse racing track in America, dating back to 1858, when it was founded by the sons of the Spaniard Don Agustin Bernal.

Thoroughbred horse racing in the United States has its own Hall of Fame in Saratoga Springs, New York. The Hall of Fame honors remarkable horses, jockeys, owners, and trainers.

Cheltenham Gold Cup

Image: Totesport Cheltenham Gold Cup, on display at BBC Wales Sports Personality of the Year 2008 – winning jockey, Sam Thomas, rider of Denman, 2008.

The Cheltenham festival usually consists of 28 races, but of them all, the one to look forward to the most is the Gold Cup which takes place on the last day of the events. The Gold Cup is usually a test of character and strength for not just the runners but the riders as well. During the Gold Cup, the horses have to navigate through 22 different jumps and run a distance of 3 ¼ miles.

This year’s Gold Cup race will take place on the 15th of March and will start at 1:30pm. However, the main and the most interesting race of the Gold Cup day will take place at 3.30pm and is called the Magners Cheltenham Gold Cup Chase. Check out this link if you are looking for horse racing tips for today and tomorrow and every day after that as the Cheltenham offers so much money for not just trainers and riders, but for punters as well.

Might Bite was the favourite for last year’s Gold Cup, but Native River pulled off a surprise to win with Might Bite coming second. Third, fourth, and fifth positions were occupied by Anibale fly, Road to Respect, and Djakadam, respectively.

Native River will be hoping to defend its title, but just as last year is not the favourite for the title. This year’s favourite is Presenting Percy who won 2018’s RSA Chase. Another runner punters will keep an eye on is Kemboy, who has done incredibly well so far this season. He is some bookmakers’ favourite for the Gold Cup as well. Also worth keeping an eye on for the Gold Cup is Clan Des Obeaux who recently won the King George VI Chase.

Prize money

Native River went home with £369,821 for winning the Gold Cup last year. This year will see over £600,000 on offer.

The odds

Skybet has rated defending Native River at 7/2 to win the Gold Cup, same as Unibet, Paddypower, and a host of other bookmakers. Although Native River is the defending champion, most bookmakers have it rated as third favourite. The second favourite is Clan Des Obeaux, who is available at 9/2 via Bet365, Ladbrokes, and Williamhills.

2018’s RSA Chase winner Presenting Percy is rated higher than Native River and is favourite for the Gold Cup, but most bookmakers have him at 7/2 to win, which appears like the bookmakers think it will be: a strong contest between the three horses.

How to Choose the Real Triple Crown Winner

Photo by Jeff Griffith on Unsplash.

The road to the grandest horse racing tournament this year is underway and lots of horse racing fans are on their feet to take part in betting. As you may know, the Triple Crown series is about to unfold. It comprises the Kentucky Derby, Preakness Stakes, and the final leg which is the Belmont Stakes. A lot of horse racing fans have been looking forward to this year’s entry of competent horse racers.

While these horse racing events are attended by lots of competitive horses across the country, it is inevitable the difficulty of picking the right winner deems the first-hand problem even if you are experienced. Bear in mind that in a horse racing show, even if you hold the complete probability and statistics of each horse racer, their destiny won’t be decided until they reach the finish line.

Hence, it is important that before you partake to these horse racing tournaments, you have to understand the whole racing show study each racehorse. So, along with your critical research and study conducted to the possible horse racers which will join the upcoming horse racing competition, here are some realistic tips you can consider on how you should be able to pick the right racehorse winner.

Review the Horse Trainer’s Profile

The whole horse racing show is not all about the horses, the jockeys, and the owners. Take note that each racehorse won’t earn their full stamina on the day of racing if not because of their trainers. Often we forget that horse racers take the highest percentage in the pie with regards to the success of every horse racer.

It’s easy to check the records and backgrounds of each trainer. One is going to sites which records the history of Triple Crown series winners, which is https://www.tvg.com/promos/preakness-stakes/. You can also read reviews from horse racing experts or even talk directly to the trainers of the entries you are betting.  Make sure that you consider in finding a trainer that has recorded a successful career in any horse racing tournament for quite some time.

Examine Each Horse Racer Equipment

The equipment of every horse racer uses can also affect the whole performance of a racehorse. If a racehorse is not trained with updated equipment, he is more likely to fail in reaching the finish line. Through the history of horse racing, those racehorses who finished in the top 5 were racehorse wearing new and state-of-the-art equipment.

It’s best that you have to assess if a horse racer is using a modern and high-end headlight. The headlight is important when a horse is running almost at night because they have the ability to clearly see the course they are running and the distance they need to complete to they will end a place in the finish line.

Scrutinize the Last Ten Races

Looking back to the racing history of your entry means you are carefully studying their ability to win. Also, when we talk about looking back their racing history, we are not talking about two or three racing histories, but the last ten races of your bet.

Your ability to compare their odds in the last ten races will give you a clearer picture as to how they’re going to perform in the upcoming races. Also, this is a wiser way of betting which means that you do not bet for money to lose easily.

Recognize a Healthy-Looking Horse

It’s always a must that once you bet for the right racehorse you have to observe how healthy they are before the competition starts. If you see that a racehorse is tired and exhausted minutes away before the race will start, stay away from betting them. You might end up losing your game and a tired racehorse will not make it to the finish line most probably.

Remember that if a racehorse is healthy, he is ready enough to compete and beat others. He would more likely end up reaching the finish line with flying colors. He is more likely to finish the race course without a hitch and when you bet for a healthy horse racer, you are making a profit in single penny you bet.

Bet for the Race Favorite

Although the Triple Crown series has not started yet, horse racing experts had already come up with their favorites to win in said racing. Though sometimes favorite horse racers rarely finishes the top spot, they would more likely to end in the Top 5. So if you would like a profitable betting, then you should bet for the racing favorites.