Category Archives: *Featured/Spotlights

Special features, spotlights, headlines

Werth Takes Back-to-Back Grand Prix Special Gold

Isabell Werth. (FEI/Liz Gregg)

Team-mate Schneider pushes her all the way

In a mighty battle between two of the sport’s true greats, Isabell Werth, the lady recognised as the reigning Queen of international Dressage, won through once again in the Grand Prix Special at the Longines FEI Dressage European Championships 2019 in Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Two years ago in Gothenburg, Sweden, Werth pinned team-mate Sonke Rothenberger into silver medal spot, and this time around it was her other German compatriot, Dorothee Schneider, who had to settle for second place. But Schneider chased her right to the line with a brilliant performance from Showtime, and was overwhelmed with emotion afterwards.

“This is the greatest day of my life – my first individual medal!” said the double-Olympian. “I had one mistake in the flying changes because I lost a stirrup – I have to talk to my trainer about doing some lunging again! I’ve been riding this horse for 10 years now and he is so amazing. I’m really proud to be sitting in second place tonight behind Isabell!” she said.

She established the lead with just five left to go on a mark of 85.456 but Werth overtook her with another of her show-stopping rides on the mare she most adores, posting the winning score of 86.520.

“I know that with Bella Rose everything is possible and it is up to me to make it happen. The piaffe/passage could not be better than it was tonight; the feeling was outstanding and the atmosphere was really special!” — Isabell Werth (GER)

Bronze went to Cathrine Dufour and Atterupgaards Cassidy, the pair who really put themselves onto centre stage when also third in the Grand Prix Special and Freestyle at the 2017 Europeans. They posted 81.337 just before Schneider came into the ring but, typically modest, the Danish rider didn’t think that was good enough for a podium placing and headed back to the stables with her little chestnut gelding only to get the call-up to return to the arena. And that took a bit of reorganisation.

“I didn’t think I would get a medal so I told my groom to unplait him, so we had to put the plaits back in again – it was a bit of a surprise – but I’m so happy with Cassidy; he’s now 16 but he’s in such great shape!” she said.

Age is but a number to the horses competing this week, and there was huge excitement in the Irish camp when Judy Reynolds and her 17-year-old gelding Vancouver K separated the two remaining members of Tuesday’s gold-medal-winning German team, Jessica von Bredow-Werndl who slotted into fourth with TSF Dalera BB and Sonke Rothenberger and Cosmo in sixth place. Scoring 78.252, Reynolds finished fifth and set her second Irish record score of the week having helped secure an Olympic team qualifying spot for her country with another brilliant performance on Tuesday.

The evening’s competition had a real buzz about it and Judge a C, Susanne Baarup, said the Ground Jury enjoyed every moment of it. “It was an amazing class and also very exciting to judge because a lot of riders had some problems in there. I think as a judge it’s very emotional; we get goosebumps, and we give 9s and 10s and we think my god where do we end here! It’s really just the small details that separate the riders. We talked afterwards and said we want to do it again, we want to see them again, and of course we will do that on Saturday in the Freestyle, and we are really looking forward to it!”

Results here.

Watch highlights here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Breeders’ Cup World Championships 2018 Race Results

Image Source.

A sport that undertakes a lot of pride, horse racing, continues its legacy to become a well-known sports event in today’s time. Individuals gather yearly to witness the event’s calendar of activities.

While there are people who went to the race to witness and cheer for their favorites and to have fun, most of the individuals who are attending horse racing events are going for the sole reason of betting.

Among the famous horse racing events in the world are the Triple Crown Races; Kentucky Derby, Preakness Stakes, and the Belmont Stakes. Others are the Dubai World Cup, Epsom Derby, and the Breeders’ Cup which will happen this upcoming November 2 & 3, 2019.

The Breeders’ Cup World Championships is a yearly event of horse races for Grade I Thoroughbred racehorses. The venue in which the sport is partaking varies each year. Thus, the attendance differs depending primarily on the host track’s ability to hold a lot of people.

However, the horse racing is held in two days, having a series of races that caters a lot of racehorses depending upon their potentials. The Breeders’ Cup Classes, has a total of $6 million purses. This thing makes every individual feel wanting to join the event.

2018’s Breeders’ Cup has a unique flow of events. Held at Churchill Downs, and for the very first time, Juvenile races happened on the first day of the championships, and “Future Stars Friday” was the theme of the program. As it celebrates its 35 years in the horse racing industry, a new set of notable winners are known and commended.

Breeders’ Cup Classic

Despite the difficulty of loading and breaking the 14th position, Accelerate made his way to win the Breeders’ Cup Classic race.  With a time of 2:02.93, Accelerate contained the one ¼ mile track. The horse’s victory gave his trainer John Sadler’s first win in the Breeders’ Cup, while his jockey Joel Rosario his ninth time to win.

Winning the race, it was Accelerate’s fourth time finishing a race first at a distance of 1 ¼ mile in 2018.

Longines Turf

The two-time Arc heroine Enable fended off famous horse Magical to win the Breeders’ Cup Turf. Enable was drawn around the six or seven turns as both horses made a close fight reaching the finish line.

Frankie Dettori, jockey of Enable, had a hard time making position because all others are competitive enough to win the race. Thus, as Dettori found the perfect pacing, he then did correctly guide Enable to finishing the race first.

Big Ass Fans Dirt Mile

In 1:33.83, the City of Light, trained by Michael McCarthy and guided by Javier Castellano, completed the one-turn mile on a fast track.

City of Light as a 4-year-old picked up his third Grade 1 win out of his ten career starts. It was the third time for the racehorse to win a horse racing event.

Longines Distaff

Winning the $2 million Longines Breeders’ Cup, Monomoy Girl capped an almost perfect season. A distance of 1 ⅛ mile raced by the horse at a time of 1:49.79.

The racehorse once again demonstrated to be the top of her class, beating inferior mares and fillies to win the Churchill Downs Breeders’ Cup Distaff.

Mile

The Breeders’ Cup Mile seemed to have four various horses in the stretch with a full potential winning the race, but Expert Eye rallied won and fought the outside win.

Thus, unleashing a powerful late show under Frankie Dettori, Expert Eye (GB) claimed the $2 million Breeders’ Cup Mile last November 3, 2018.

TwinSpires Sprint

Racehorse Roy H drew away to win the Breeders’ Cup Sprint, becoming the second repeat champion of the day.

Moreover, Roy H made his title defense look like a casual jog in the park on November 3 in the $2 million worth TwinSpires Breeders’ Cup Sprint. It was the racehorse’s third win in five starts in the year 2018, and ninth since his racing career started.

Maker’s Mark Filly & Mare Turf

Sistercharlie, who began her horse racing career in France, went down with pneumonia after coming second in her U.S debut in July 2017.

Despite the situation, the racehorse demonstrated her core in every race in 2018. She bravely ran in the one ⅜ mile racetrack, racing against a lot of competitive horses. Thus, it was the racehorse’s third consecutive Grade 1 win.

Turf Sprint

Stormy Liberal asserted a transcendent fight in repeating his Breeders’ Cup Turf Sprint victory. The horse ran down a lot of driven racehorses, including the pacesetter World of Trouble.

For two consecutive years, Stormy Liberal raced through the event, and fortunately, it was also his second time winning the competition. Furthermore, in the year 2018, the racehorse received the Eclipse Award Champion Male Turf Horse.

Filly & Mare Sprint

Shamrock Rose, trained by Mark Casse and ridden by Irad Ortiz Jr, covered the seven furlongs on a significant fast track in 1;23.13 finishing time.

For the improving racehorse, winning the Breeders’ Cup Filly & Mare Sprint was the horse’s fourth consecutive victory.

Among the Juvenile races, here are the winning racehorses who ranked first in each of the events:

  • Sentient Jet Juvenile – Game Winner, trained by Bob Baffert and guided by jockey Joel Rosario.
  • Juvenile Fillies – Jaywalk, score handed by trainer John Servis and escorted again by famous rider Joel Rosario.
  • Juvenile Fillies Turf – Newspaperofrecord (IRE), having Irad Ortiz Jr. as the jockey.
  • Juvenile Turf – It was Line of Duty who won, ridden by William Buick and upskilled by Charles Appleby.
  • Juvenile Turf Sprint – Won by Bulletin, trained by Todd Pletcher and guided by jockey Javier Castellano.

Germany Gets Dressage Gold Again on Roller-Coaster Day in Rotterdam

(L to R) Sonke Rothenberger, Jessica von Bredow-Werndl, Isabell Werth, and Dorothee Schneider. (FEI/Liz Gregg)

Germany claimed the team title for a staggering 24th time at the Longines FEI European Dressage Championships 2019 in Rotterdam, The Netherlands where the hosts scooped silver and Sweden snatched the bronze.

The battle for medal placings was intense, and so too was the contest for the three available qualifying spots at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games which eventually went to Denmark, Ireland, and Portugal.

On an extraordinary afternoon of high drama, German superstar Isabell Werth posted the biggest score of the competition with 85.652 from Bella Rose to secure the title and collect her 22nd European Championship medal and the 11th European team gold of her illustrious career. The stage looked set for Great Britain to bag the silver, but elimination for the penultimate partnership of Charlotte Dujardin and Mt St John Freestyle under the blood rule dropped her team to fourth, so it was the Dutch and Swedes who filled the lower steps of the podium.

The winning German side consisted of all four gold medallists from last year’s FEI World Equestrian Games™ in Tryon (USA), the only difference being the replacement of Dorothee Schneider’s ride, Sammy Davis Jr, with Showtime. Jessica von Bredow-Werndl and TSF Dalera BB opened the German account, and when Sonke Rothenberger added 79.084, and then Werth and her 15-year-old mare put 85.652 on the board, the defending champions were never going to be overtaken.

It was another masterclass from the legend that is Werth, the most medalled athlete in the history of equestrian sport who said that the win was extra special because she achieved it with her beloved Bella Rose. “She was really brilliant. I’m happy and proud; both of us enjoyed the competition,” she said.

Werth, Schneider, and Rothenberger were also all on Germany’s triumphant 2017 European side along with Helen Langehanenberg, but despite having another European gold medal around his neck, Rothenberger wasn’t entirely satisfied with his own performance.

“We came here with a really strong team knowing all horses scored already over 80%, so we expected quite a bit, but as you will see today it’s always a different story when you have to put it on the day in the ring. I was quite nervous for my own test… I couldn’t ride the perfectly precise round that we had in Aachen, but I’m looking forward to the following days and it was super fun to have such amazing colleagues who put down such amazing rounds!” — Sonke Rothenberger (Team Germany)

Lying second as the day began, it seemed the British would cruise into silver medal spot when Carl Hester and Hawtins Delicato posted 78.323 with Dujardin still to come. But as the riders were preparing for the prizegiving the news of her elimination filtered through and Sweden moved up to bronze and the Dutch into silver medal spot.

Anne Meulendijks (MDH Avanti NOP) was the Dutch pathfinder with a score of 71.801 and Hans Peter Minderhoud (Glock’s Dream NOP) followed with a mark of 75.295. Today Emmelie Scholtens posted 76.087 with Desperado NOP, and when Edward Gal followed that with 78.758 from Glock’s Zonik NOP, then the hosts were always going to take a podium placing.

Gal joked however that his stallion was a little distracted in the warm-up ring. “There were all the mares I think that were in the competition in the same warm-up as me, so he was really wild – in the end they went away and I had five minutes when I could ride normal and then it was quite OK. But then in the ring I felt the concentration was a bit down… but luckily everything went well and the points were also nice so that’s why we are here now!” he explained.

Minderhoud described the afternoon as “really crazy because we were counting all the time for the scores,” and pointed out that this result means a lot to the host nation. “It was four years ago we had a medal, and I can tell you it’s not so nice to travel to Tryon (USA, for the FEI World Equestrian Games 2018) and to travel to Rio (BRA, 2016 Olympic Games) and not have a medal in your suitcase when you come back!” So this felt pretty good.

Sweden’s Patrick Kittel was also delighted to find himself and his team that included Therese Nilshagen and Antonia and Juliette Ramel on the podium. “Today was quite something; like Hans Peter said it was like a roller-coaster. At first I was almost biting the sand – I thought it was going to be another Tryon again, 0.2 away from the medal, but in the end it worked out and we’ve had amazing sport and seen amazing horses!”

The individual standings in the Grand Prix showed Werth, Schneider, and Rothenberger with the top three scores followed by Gal in fourth, Denmark’s Daniel Bachmann Andersen in fifth, and Britain’s Hester just ahead of Kittel in sixth place. The top 30 individuals go through to Thursday’s Grand Prix Special in which Werth and Rothenberger will be defending the gold and silver they won in Gothenburg (SWE) two years ago.

Results here.

Watch highlights here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Germans Already in Command after First Day of Dressage

Dorothee Schneider. (FEI/Liz Gregg)

Team Germany took the first step on the road to their 24th team title when Dorothee Schneider and Jessica von Bredow-Werndl posted the two best scores on the opening day of the Longines FEI Dressage European Championships 2019 in Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Von Bredow-Werndl’s 76.894 with TSF Dalera BB topped the leaderboard until the closing stages when Schneider overtook her with a mark of 80.233 for a fabulous test with Showtime FRH. And with team-mates Sonke Rothenberger riding Cosmo and the legendary Isabell Werth riding Bella Rose still to come when the competition resumes, it seems the destiny of gold is all but already assured.

“I’m very happy to be in this team; I’m proud to be here and I’m very happy with my test!” said double-Olympian Schneider. Talking about her horse’s performance, she said there were “some very, very good parts, and in other parts he was a bit nervous, but altogether I am happy to have this result for the team and to be here and to have a fit horse!”

That’s because the 13-year-old gelding with which she won team gold at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games is making a very significant comeback.

“Showtime was two years out, but at the beginning of this year we started him again and he’s getting better and better – in his concentration he was very good at the German Championships (in June) and he was very, very good in Aachen (in July) so it’s very emotional for me to have this horse under me again, and to feel how motivated he is!” — Dorothee Schneider (GER)

A superb personal-best Grand Prix score of 76.351 from Gareth Hughes with Classic Briolinca helped put Great Britain into silver-medal-spot going into the second day. “I couldn’t be happier!” he said.

“She’s had her injuries as well; she’s had a stop-start career at Grand Prix so she’s still quite inexperienced, but we’ve had a good season up to this. She suffers sometimes from nerves; she’s usually not very good at halting or walking, but today she was excellent; she was focused so I just had to point, keep her head up and use my leg when I needed to, and she took care of the rest!” said the rider who was a member of Britain’s silver-medal-winning team at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ 2014 in Caen, France.

His compatriot, 23-year-old Charlotte Fry, produced a stunning senior championship debut to put 74.317 on the board with Dark Legend earlier in the day, and Hughes said, “Lottie did a great job – her first championship and she’s so young; she has nerves of steel… she’s another Charlotte (Dujardin)! She laid down a really good score to start with, and that always gives the second rider confidence. It’s a long day to hang around and wait; it’s a big build-up to going into the arena but we’re in a good position, and now it’s up to the two famous Brits to come out tomorrow and show what they can do!” he pointed out, referring to the remaining two British team members Charlotte Dujardin and Carl Hester.

And Sweden lies third going into the second day of action following a 74.224 for pathfinders Antonia Ramel with Brother de Jeu and 75.466 from Therese Nilshagen riding Dante Weltino OLD. This leaves Nilshagen in individual fourth spot behind Hughes, “but I’m not super-happy with my own ride today because I made a very big mistake in the one-tempis,” she said. “I think I must have done something wrong, and that cost us a lot of points and that’s a pity… but the rest was quite good and I hope that my team-mates will be much better than I was so we’ll see!” she added.

It’s still all very much to play for, with The Netherlands lying a close fourth ahead of Denmark in fifth, Portugal in sixth, Switzerland in seventh, Spain in eighth, and Russia in ninth place. And apart from the European medals up for grabs there is massive tension between the countries as yet not qualified for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games who are battling for the three places on offer in this European team contest.

Chasing down those three spots are Denmark, Portugal, and Switzerland along with Ireland, France, Austria, Belgium, and Finland – the latter five nations holding 10th to 14th places on the team leaderboard going into the medal-deciding second half of the competition. A total of 15 nations started but the three-member side from Luxembourg are now out of contention after elimination for their pathfinder, Nicolas Wagner (Quater Back Junior).

Results here.

Watch highlights here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Great Britain Wins Double Gold in Eventing

Photo: Leszek Wójcik.

British riders have defended their last year’s title and stood on the highest step on the podium twice: individually and as a team. The silver medal went to France, and bronze to Ireland.

The British team won with the following squad: Finn Healy with Midnight Dancer, Ibble Watson with Bookhamlodge Pennylane, Freya Partridge with Master Macky, and Daisy Bathe with SF Detroit. They took the lead after dressage and kept it until the end of the competition.

The best score in the team, and the best one in the individual ranking, belonged to 15-year-old Finn Healy – 31,7. Although he was tenth after dressage, a clear round inside the time on the cross-country course and only one point for time during the showjumping have earned him his gold medal.

“It was a testing cross-country track, very technical; it required some reactive riding; we all did that and got ourselves in the position to win. It didn’t really sink in yet. It’s a dream come true,” said Finn Healy.

Silver went to his teammate Ibble Watson and bronze to Camilla Luciani (ITA) with Camelot Damgaard.

Daisy Bathe had an unlucky round in the jumping and finished the championships on the seventh position.

Dressage

The Danish have won three gold medals at this year’s Pony European Championships in dressage: team, individual, and freestyle, where riders performed their rounds to music of their choosing.

The individual medalists have repeated their success. The highest score belonged to the world ranking number one – Alexander Yde Helgstrand with Adriano B – 82,140.

“It’s totally amazing. I didn’t expect to win three times. I choose my music on my own. I’ve actually had this music for quite some time. My pony knows the program and the music, so I think it really fits Adriano,” said the winner after the prizegiving.

The second silver medal went to his teammate Liva Addy Guldager Nielsen riding D’Artagnan 187, and Germany’s Shona Benner with Der Kleine Sunnyboy WE won the bronze medal again.

Showjumping

The final class of the European championships for ponies in Strzegom determined the individual medals for showjumping.

31 pairs have competed in the two-round competition. 12 of them had a good chance to win gold. Four riders entered the final with a clean slate, and eight with only four penalty points.

The course designer, Szymon Tarant, set up a demanding course in the first round, and only three riders have managed to go clear. The second part of the class, high up to 135 cm, has determined the winner. Max Wachman riding Cuffesgrange Cavalidam became the gold medalist of the 2019 Pony European Championships.

“It’s a great feeling. My pony is top class. The first round was quite tricky, very technical. The second round was less technical and a bit bigger. I’m out of ponies now, so I will focus on big horses and hopefully qualify for the Junior European championships next year,” said the winner.

The audience in Strzegom witnessed a jump-off for the silver medal, between riders from France and Great Britain. Holly Truelove (GBR) was the first one to go. She took a risk riding to the last oxer, which gave her a quick time and made it challenging for her rival. Ilona Mezzadri (ITA) with Callas Rezidal Z took up the glove, but had two down, which gave her a score of 8 penalties, and bronze medal in the final classification.

153 riders from 18 countries competed in three Olympic disciplines during the FEI Pony European Championships in Strzegom.

Full results: https://zawodykonne.com/zawody/50/tour/84.

Contact:
www.strzegomhorsetrials.pl
press@strzegomhorsetrials.pl

Julio Mendoza Prepares for Tokyo 2020 at Tryon Summer Dressage 5

Julio Mendoza and Rosali ©Susan J. Stickle Photography.

Mill Spring, NC – August 15, 2019 – Tryon Summer Dressage 5 presented by Adequan® at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC) was a good weekend for Columbus, NC resident Julio Mendoza (ECU) and Rosali, where they claimed FEI Grand Prix O/AA/J/Y competition on a score of 66.250%. Second place was earned by Jules Nyssen (USA) aboard Volturnus, the 2002 Dutch Warmblood gelding by Flemming owned by Jennifer Brinkley, with a score of 62.554%.

“Rosie is an 18-hand Danish Warmblood mare owned by Aileen Daly with a heart that is unbelievable. She’s a beautiful mover, with a good brain, a good heart, and I adore her,” said Mendoza of the mare he’s only been riding for four months. “She wants to give everything to you. She is spicy and sassy in a good way, and she’s everything you need for a Grand Prix.”

Though a frequent face at TIEC, Mendoza is chasing big goals on the heels of being the first representative from Ecuador to qualify for and compete in Dressage at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon 2018 (WEG) last September:

“We’re working with Rosali right now towards the Olympics [Tokyo 2020]. That’s our goal if everything goes to plan,” Mendoza continued. “I’ve been to the Pan-American Games, Bolivarian Games, and WEG, so now I’m going for the Olympics. If it doesn’t happen, great, but I’m going to give it everything. Rosie has the potential. We just started to develop a relationship, and I know that it will take time, but with respect and love everything will come together.”

Mendoza emphasized that his success at every level is rooted in the support of his “village” with the whole family behind him: “My wife is my manager, my right hand, and my everything. She manages my students, schedule, shows, and my program. Everything is run through her, and I’m so grateful to have her! And now my son is competing, too, and I’m super excited about that,” Mendoza shared. “It’s taking a village [to reach the Olympics]; I know that. My wife, my grooms, the farrier, the vet, and Rosali’s owner, Aileen. Thank God she’s letting me ride [Rosie]! Aileen is a wonderful client and an amazing friend who’s letting me ride a phenomenal horse,” Mendoza concluded.

For more information and results, please visit www.Tryon.com.

Triple Olympic Gold Medalist Hoy Snatches Lead with Bloom after Cross Country

Andrew Hoy with Bloom Des Hauts Crets. (FEI/Yusuke Nakanishi)

Australia’s triple Olympic team gold medalist Andrew Hoy galloped his way into the top spot with Bloom Des Hauts Crets after cross country, when rising heat and humidity provided a perfect environment to test the onsite cooling facilities for the equine and human athletes.

Sixth out onto Derek Di Grazia’s beautiful 20-fence course at Sea Forest overlooking the heart of Tokyo Bay, the seven-time Olympian and the eight-year-old Selle Français mare flew across the finish line with seven seconds to spare to take the early lead on a score of 27.7.

Hoy was thrilled to move to the top of the leaderboard. “It’s a very nice position to be in and if I win, I’m very happy for this year, but it’s next year I want to win! My horse galloped very well and her heart rate and temperature were very good when I arrived. The cooling facilities here at the venue were absolutely excellent. As an Olympic venue it’s ready one year before because the ground is excellent and the construction of the cross-country fences is very good, but next year will be very different fences.”

As the Australian combination were lying second after the Dressage phase, only overnight leaders Yoshiaki Oiwa and Bart L JRA could challenge them, but the home side star was 14 seconds down on the clock to collect 5.6 time faults and drop to fourth.

German superstar Michael Jung, another triple Olympic gold medalist and heading for Tokyo 2020 as the defending champion, was second last out on the track with the seven-year-old Fischerwild Wave. They too came home through the finish flags clear over the fences and on the clock to move up to second on 28.0.

“It was hot but it wasn’t really a big problem,” Michael Jung said afterwards. “The grooms and everyone took really good care of the horses and everyone tried to make the job for the horses and the riders as easy as possible. This is really fantastic here.”

Another pair for the host nation, Ryuzo Kitajima and Vick Du Gisors, were almost bang on the optimum time of five minutes 30 seconds to move up from fourth after the Dressage to third ahead of Oiwa and Bart, with compatriot Kazuma Tomoto fractionally behind in fifth on Tacoma d’Horset. Britain’s Georgie Spence and Halltown Harley round out the top six and, amazingly, there’s less than a fence between them and the leaders.

Seven of the 16 starters remain on their Dressage marks, while eight others collected just time faults. The only combination to pick up jumping penalties were cross country pathfinders Kazuya Otomo and Condorcet, who had a runout at the second element of the angled rails double at fence 10 to drop one place to 16th.

“All the horses recovered really well after the cross country, despite the challenging conditions, and they are all now back home in their air-conditioned stables at Baji Koen resting ready for tomorrow’s Jumping,” FEI Veterinary Director Goran Akerström said.

Ready Steady Tokyo test event (placings after cross-country) – 1, Australia’s Bloom Des Hauts Crets (Andrew Hoy), 27.7 penalties; 2, Germany’s Fischerwild Wave (Michael Jung), 28.0; 3, Japan’s Vick Du Gisors JRA (Ryuzo Kitajima), 28.2; 4, Japan’s Bart L JRA (Yoshiaki Oiwa), 30.1; 5, Japan’s Tacoma d’Horset (Kazuma Tomoto), 30.4; 6, Great Britain’s Halltown Harley (Georgie Spence), 30.6.

Media contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Communications
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 42

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 4

 

Home Side Hero Yoshiaki Oiwa Takes Early Lead at Ready Steady Tokyo Test Event

Yoshiaki Oiwa riding Bart L JRA. (FEI/Yusuke Nakanishi)

Japan’s Yoshiaki Oiwa is no stranger to success, having claimed double gold at last year’s Asian Games in Jakarta (INA), and the three-time Olympian has put down a strong marker for the home side by taking the early lead after the Dressage phase at the Ready Steady Tokyo test event.

Riding the talented Bart L JRA, previously ridden by Frenchman Matthieu Lemoine on the gold medal team at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, Oiwa earned top marks from all three judges to lead the field on a mark of 24.5. The 43-year-old has been based in Europe for almost 20 years, but his heart lies in Japan.

“I’m a home country rider and I’ve been based in Europe for the last 18, 19 years,” he said after his Dressage performance here at the Equestrian Park. “So many people are supporting and helping me, but they’ve never seen what I’m doing, so this is a very very good chance to show what I’m doing and what this sport is about. Hopefully we can do the best performance and all the Japanese people do their best and get medals.”

Among a star-studded cast, Australia’s triple Olympic team gold medalist Andrew Hoy is 3.2 penalties adrift in second with Bloom Des Hauts Crets, fractionally ahead of Germany’s double Olympic champion Michael Jung on Fischerwild Wave with 28.0.

The top five are all under 30 penalties, with Japan’s Ryuzo Kitajima and Vick Du Gisors JRA fourth on 28.2 and Germany’s Peter Thomsen with Horseware Nobleman fifth with 29.50.

Kuzuma Tomoto is another of the contingent flying the flag for Japan and he sits in sixth with Tacoma d’Horset on 30.4, a single point but three places ahead of his trainer, British legend William Fox-Pitt with Summer at Fernhill.

The Japanese athletes are increasingly a force to be reckoned with, finishing fourth and just out of the medals at last year’s FEI World Equestrian Games™ in Tryon (USA). Looking ahead to Tokyo 2020, Tomoto commented: “Our team is really tough and has got strong quickly. We’re aiming to get a medal; that’s why we have to improve more and more. We have lots of nice riders so we can do it for sure.”

Final horse into the arena, GHS Calvaruise ridden by Kazuya (JPN), has now been withdrawn after placing last of the 17 starters in Dressage on 40.8. The rest of the horses have been transported to the stables at Sea Forest where they will spend the night before cross country.

Derek Di Grazia’s 3,025 metre track incorporates 20 fences with 31 jumping efforts, but the American designer is giving nothing away about his track for the 2020 Games. Even so, the 20 National Olympic and Paralympic Committees that are onsite for the official observers programme are making the most of the opportunity to see the terrain at Sea Forest and test the facilities at both venues.

On Wednesday, action returns to the equally stunning new facilities at Baji Koen, site of the Olympic equestrian events at the 1964 Tokyo Games, for Wednesday’s final Jumping phase.

The Baji Koen refurbishment has been funded independently by the Japan Racing Association and will provide an extraordinary legacy for the residents of Tokyo, as will the park that will be created on the reclaimed land at Sea Forest, which also hosts rowing and canoe sprint next year.

Ready Steady Tokyo equestrian test event (placings after Dressage): 1, Japan’s Bart L JRA (Yoshiaki Oiwa), 24.5; 2, Australia’s Bloom Des Hauts Crets (Andrew Hoy), 27.7; 3, Germany’s Fischerwild Wave (Michael Jung), 28.0; 4, Japan’s Vick Du Gisors JRA (Ryuzo Kitajima), 28.2; 5, Germany’s Horseware Nobleman (Peter Thomsen), 29.50; 6, Japan’s Tacoma d’Horset (Kuzuma Tomoto), 30.4.

Media contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Communications
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 42

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

FEI European Championships for Ponies to Begin Soon

Photo by Mariusz Chmieliński.

Strzegom, August 11: Starting from Wednesday, jumpers, eventers, and dressage riders will fight for medals in Strzegom.

153 riders aged from 12 to 16, representing 18 countries, along with their ponies will compete overall. Ponies are horses measuring up to 149 cm. These Championships will be a special event. Riders from three Olympic equestrian disciplines, dressage, eventing, and showjumping, will compete alongside each other at the same place and time.

The championships start on the 14th of August, at the hippodrome in Morawa near Strzegom, Lower Silesia Voivodeship. They will be preluded by a festive opening ceremony, with a presentation of all national teams.

Dressage riders are the first ones to go. The first part of their individual tests starts on Wednesday. The jumpers will begin their classes on Thursday, and eventers will present themselves during dressage on Thursday and Friday. Saturday is cross-country day for them, and showjumping will determine the winners on Sunday.

www.strzegom2019.pl
press@strzegom2019.pl

Tosh and Downey Ride to Championship Rosettes in Green Pony Hunters at USEF Pony Finals

Maddie Tosh and Baroness of Locheil.

Lexington, Ky. – Aug. 9, 2019 – Hunter ponies and their riders returned to the Walnut Ring for the second-to-last day of hunter competition Friday at the 2019 USEF Pony Finals, presented by Collecting Gaits Farm. Two more champions were crowned following successful over fences performances, as Maddie Tosh and Baroness of Locheil hoisted the title in the Medium Green Pony Hunters and Tessa Downey and Sandcastle led the victory gallop as the best partnership in the Large Green Pony Hunters. Additionally, Tosh and Baroness of Locheil were awarded the Grand Green Pony Hunter title as the highest-scoring Green pair of all of the size groups.

Hat Trick for Zone 10 at USEF Pony Jumper Team Championship

Down the road from the action in the Walnut Ring, the pony jumpers took center stage in the Alltech Arena to compete for the USEF Pony Jumper Team Championship title. Young athletes and their ponies returned for the second and final round of team competition, and in the end Zone 10, comprised of team members Hannah Attar, Devi Ferreira, and Tabitha Okistsu, topped the podium to take home gold medal honors for the third year in a row.

Website: www.kentuckyhorseshows.com

Contact: Rebecca Walton
phone 561.753.3389
rjw@phelpsmediagroup.com