Category Archives: *Featured/Spotlights

Special features, spotlights, headlines

National Competitors Take to the Ring at AGDF 6

Devon Kane and Sir Galanto. Photo Credit: ©SusanJStickle.

Wellington, FL – February 20, 2018 – The 2018 Adequan® Global Dressage Festival (AGDF) continued in week six with national competition on February 16-18. Friday’s national grand prix at AGDF 6 saw local rider Devon Kane’s big tour horse Sir Galanto return to the ring — and to winning ways — following an injury. The 13-year-old by Stedinger x De Niro topped the grand prix with 67.717%. The 2018 AGDF continues in week seven with CDI-W competition and more on February 22-25.

Kane, of Diamante Farms, said: “He had some time off over the summer and this was his second show back this year. I wanted to use the opportunity to get him more solid before stepping back into CDIs in two weeks’ time. It was a busy show with a lot going on, especially with the jumpers on the Derby field, so it was a great opportunity to test Galanto’s focus.”

She was delighted with how the stallion, which came from a small barn in Germany on Valentine’s Day three years ago, coped with the atmosphere.

“Everything felt great — we had a little miscommunication in the one-tempis, but the piaffe/passage was stronger than ever. I had his focus and attention, plus energy that I could use to my benefit. He has such softness, but you have so much power available all the time; it’s quite a fabulous feeling.”

Kevin Kohmann, who is German but also based at Diamante Farms, won Friday’s prix st georges on Melanie Pai’s 16-year-old Hanoverian gelding Fritz San Tino with a fantastic score of 74.853%.

Denmark’s Signe Kirk Kristiansen picked up two blue grand prix special ribbons on the talented Her Highness O, a 15-year-old Hanoverian mare by Hohenstein x Weltmeyer. Kristiansen bought the mare from Caroline Roffman three years ago, but an injury to a hind leg shortly thereafter appeared to be career threatening.

“I’ve had her for three years, but it was two years before the first show because of the injury,” said Kristiansen. “I gave up ever riding ‘Hannah’ ever again and tried breeding her, but we didn’t succeed. Then she came sound, and now she’s happy and fit.”

Kristiansen, who is based in Palm Beach Point for the season and home in Denmark over the summer added: “We got our best score [68.51%] this week. In the past we’ve had a problem with the piaffe at X where she spooked every time, but now she’s settling really well with that. I’m so honored to ride her; I didn’t educate her myself and I feel very lucky to have a horse like her who is older and wiser. She’s energetic but feels safe, which for me is the perfect combination as I’m not so brave, but I love her energy. I am learning so much.”

Lisa Wilcox was unbeaten in two starts on the chestnut stallion Gallant Reflection HU, by Galant Du Serein x Rhodiamant. They won the intermediate II with over 71% before logging 68.375% in the developing grand prix class — an impressive feat for a horse who is only nine years old. He is owned by Horses Unlimited, who bred the licensed stallion.

“We spent a year working on his piaffe/passage after the developing prix st georges championship and I’m thrilled with his progress,” said the Olympic rider who has ridden ‘Reef’ since he was five. “The plan is to let him do the national championships this season, then graduate to CDIs at grand prix next year. Our goal long-term is Tokyo. Reef is amazing and has so much potential, I really love him. He’s incredibly smart and talks to me — he whinnies when he sees my car. He has a lot of talent and is a ton of fun.”

Betsy Steiner was a double small tour winner on Swiss W, Whitney Bailey’s 11-year-old mare by Sir Oldenburg, topping both the prix st georges and I-I classes they entered with over 71% — more than 4% clear of the chasing pack in both.

Steiner, who is based at White Fences Equestrian Center with her daughter Jessie, said: “Swiss is extraordinary. She’s the love of my life. She’s very sensitive and can be hot, but in a positive, workmanlike way that you can turn into brilliance. She’s so intelligent that she’s made me into a better rider and trainer by showing me new and better ways to do things. If there are ever mistakes in our tests, they’re mine.”

The mare’s FEI passport is yet to arrive, but once it does, Steiner plans to launch her small tour CDI career.

“We’re also working on a very exciting new I-1 freestyle for her with Terry Gallo [who also does Laura Graves’ music],” she added.

For more information and results, visit www.globaldressagefestival.com.

Canadians Claim Clear Victory at Longines Leg in Ocala

Photo: Tiffany Foster and Brighton. (FEI/Shannon Brinkman)

Team Canada won the Longines FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ of the United States of America with more than a touch of class. The six-nation contest was a roller-coaster ride for most of their opponents, but double-clears from both ten-time Olympian Ian Millar (71) and Rio 2016 Olympic individual bronze medallist Eric Lamaze (49) ensured that all they had to add were single errors from team-mates Francois Lamontagne (34) and Tiffany Foster (33) for the winning total of eight faults. Brazil finished second on 16, while Ireland and USA shared third place with 24 faults in a competition filled with unpredictability.

“It sure switched around; it looked one way in the first round but then it changed like crazy in the second when the Germans got into trouble and the Brazilians came steaming out!” — Ian Millar (Team Canada)

Germany and Canada shared the lead with just four faults apiece at the halfway stage, but when Christian Heineking (NKH Caruso) was eliminated at the open water then 12-fault results from Andre Thieme (Conthendrix) and Markus Beerbaum (Cool Hand Luke) had to be added to the four collected by Meredith Michaels-Beerbaum (Daisy), dropping Germany right out of contention. Meanwhile, a second-round clear from Felipe Amaral (Premiere Carthoes BZ) consolidated Brazil’s eight-fault scoreline and they posed a real threat in the closing stages.

The Canadians began to look shaky when Lamontagne’s single second-round mistake with Chanel du Calvaire was followed by 16 faults from Foster and Brighton who had faulted just once first time out. But the amazing Millar, who made his Olympic debut 46 years ago, in Munich (GER) in 1972, steadied the decline with another rock-solid run from his 15-year-old gelding Dixson. And when Lamaze kept a super-cool head to back that up with Coco Bongo then it was a done deal because the Brazilians had added eight more to their tally.

As Millar, who long ago earned the revered title of “Captain Canada”, pointed out, “Eric and I are like the bookends – you just have to put someone in the middle and away we go and do our best to deliver!”

They did just that, each earning a half-share of the €50,000 bonus on offer to riders jumping double-clear this season in the process. And having bagged the maximum 100 points on offer to the three teams chasing points in the North/Central America and Caribbean League, the Canadians will be hoping to maintain their advantage over the next two legs of the series in Coapexpan (MEX) in April and on home ground in Langley (CAN) in June. The target is a coveted qualification spot for the Longines FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ Final 2018 in Barcelona (ESP) in October.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145

Langehanenberg Steals the Limelight on Home Ground in Neumünster

Photo: Helen Langehanenberg and Damsey FRH. (FEI/Stefan Lafrentz)

The extraordinary ups and downs of sport were highlighted once again when Helen Langehanenberg (35) and Damsey sealed a superb victory at the seventh leg of the FEI World Cup™ Dressage 2017/2018 Western European League on home soil in Neumünster, Germany. At the previous round in Amsterdam (NED) three weeks ago, the 2013 FEI World Cup™ Dressage champion had to retire when her 16-year-old stallion got his tongue over the bit and their performance fell apart. However, it was perfect harmony every step of the way as their strong score of 83.800 pinned compatriots Dorothee Schneider (49) and Sammy Davis Jr into runner-up spot while Denmark’s Daniel Bachmann-Andersen (27) and Blue Hors Zack slotted into third.

“This was maybe our best result ever – Damsy felt great; he had the perfect mixture of freshness and motivation and he just performed the way every rider wants; the communication between us was really easy!” — Helen Langehanenberg GER (1st)

The atmosphere in the Neumünster arena is notoriously intense. As runner-up Schneider said, “Everything about this show is brilliant, especially the crowd who is so close that it feels like they are also riding your horse!” That didn’t stop her from posting 81.565 for second place and moving even closer to Sweden’s Patrik Kittel at the top of the Western European leaderboard. With just two qualifiers left to go, in Gothenburg (SWE) next weekend and ’s-Hertogenbosch (NED) two weeks later, that’s a really good place to be, because only two German riders can join defending champion Isabell Werth at the Final in Paris (FRA) in April, and sealing one of those two spots is a battle in itself. A total of nine riders, and a maximum of three from any nation, can make the cut from the Western European series.

Spain’s Morgan Barbancon Mestre, fourth to go with Sir Donnerhall ll, caused a stir when stopped by the Ground Jury because her floorplan had been changed overnight. When this was resolved she was allowed to compete, but it was Marie Emilie Bretenoux and Quartz of Jazz from France who led the way at the halfway stage with a mark of 76.300. This, however, would be improved on again and again, Denmark’s Bachmann-Andersen presenting a lovely picture of relaxation and balance with his 14-year-old stallion that rocketed him into the lead on a big mark of 81.475 with six left to go.

Langehanenberg pushed him off his pedestal immediately, however, and Schneider then pinned him back to third, but the talented Dane has now moved into joint-fourth on the leaderboard and looks set to make a big impression at the Final. Langehanenberg winner won’t make it to Paris. “I’m expecting a baby in June, so this was our last show before that and it’s the perfect result! I hope to be back in the saddle again in July though,” Langehanenberg explained.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145

US Show Jumping Team Begins 2018 FEI Jumping Nations Cup Season at CSIO5* Ocala

Ocala, Fla. – The U.S. Show Jumping Team returns to action this week, taking on six countries in the Longines FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ USA on Sunday, February 18 at HITS Post Time Farm in Ocala, Fla. U.S. Show Jumping Chef d’Equipe Robert Ridland will lead the team of Lauren Hough and Ohlala, Laura Kraut and Confu, Beezie Madden and Darry Lou, and McLain Ward and HH Callas as they compete for a strong start in the North American standings. The U.S. Show Jumping Team will compete second in the order. Devin Ryan and Eddie Blue will serve as the reserve combination.

The U.S. Show Jumping team placed second in the 2017 FEI Nations Cup CSIO4* Ocala.

Hough and Ohlala had a strong start to the 2018 competition year, finishing in the top 10 in the FEI NetJets Grand Prix CSI4* at the Winter Equestrian Festival on Saturday.

Kraut and Confu placed second in the $220,000 Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping Wellington presented by Sovaro® at the Palm Beach Masters earlier this month.

Madden and Darry Lou last competed at the CP National Horse Show in Lexington, Ky., placing third in the $130,000 CP Grand Prix International Open Jumpers CSI4*.

Ward and HH Callas earned fifth-place finishes at the Palm Beach Masters in the $220,000 Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Wellington presented by Sovaro® and $35,000 Sovaro Palm Beach Masters Qualifier CSI3*.

Career Highlights:

  • Hough: Member of the silver-medal winning 2017 Longines FEI Nations Cup Jumping Final team, 2017 member of the first all-women’s FEI Nations Cup CSIO5* Dublin gold-medal winning team and recipient of the Aga Kahn Trophy, team and individual bronze medalist at the 2015 Toronto Pan American Games, and member of the 2000 Sydney Olympics U.S. Show Jumping Team
  • Kraut: Member of the silver-medal winning 2017 Longines FEI Nations Cup Jumping Final team, 2017 member of the first all-women’s FEI Nations Cup CSIO5* Dublin gold-medal winning team and recipient of the Aga Kahn Trophy, 2017 recipient of the “Prize of the Federal Minister of the Interior” award at CHIO Aachen, and two-time Olympian, including a team gold medal at the 2008 Beijing Games
  • Madden: Member of the silver-medal winning 2017 Longines FEI Nations Cup Jumping Final team, 2017 member of the first all-women’s FEI Nations Cup CSIO5* Dublin gold-medal winning team and recipient of the Aga Kahn Trophy, four-time Olympian, including team gold medals at the 2004 Athens and 2008 Beijing Games, and a team silver medal at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games
  • Ward: Member of the silver-medal winning 2017 Longines FEI Nations Cup Jumping Final team, first place at the 2017 Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Final, four-time Olympian, including team gold medals at the 2004 Athens and 2008 Beijing Games, and a team silver medal at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games

Competition begins Sunday, February 18, at 1 p.m. EST at HITS Post Time Farm in Ocala, Fla. The event will be streamed live on FEI TV.

From the US Equestrian Communications Department

What We Can Learn from Last Year’s Melbourne Cup

This Photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA.

The 2017 running of the Melbourne Cup was one for the ages. The thrilling finish between winner Rekindling and runner up Johannes Vermeer was the stuff of broadcasters’ dreams. Over 90,000 fans packed the Flemington Racecourse, with the atmosphere simultaneously tense and jubilant during the last few seconds of the race.


Rekindling’s win was the second Melbourne Cup victory for his jockey Corey Brown, who had also won the marquee event back in 2009 on Shocking. It also made six Melbourne Cup victories for owner Lloyd Williams, which is a record in the race.

However, the real headline stealer was Rekindling’s trainer, 24-year-old Joseph O’Brien. Being a son of a sporting legend like Aiden O’Brien is never an easy thing, but the younger O’Brien now has something that his father’s illustrious resume lacks – a Melbourne Cup victory. All the more remarkable given his young age.

Main protagonists should return for Melbourne Cup 2018

Despite being months away, the excitement has already started building for the 2018 Melbourne Cup. There are already early Melbourne Cup free bets available to use on the race and several major bookmakers have released their odds. The betting picture currently looks like this:

Johannes Vermeer 21.00
Rekindling 21.00
Ace High 26.00
Albert 26.00
Idaho 26.00
Stradivarius 26.00
Lord Fandango 26.00
Humidor 34.00
St Michel 41.00
Crocodile Rock 41.00

*Selected runners from Ladbrokes. Others available.

There are plenty of takeaways from the 2017 race that can be applied to betting on the 2018 event, however:

Williams is the owner to watch once again

As mentioned, Lloyd Williams now has a record six winners as an owner in the Melbourne Cup. He first tasted victory back in 1981 with Just a Dash. But, crucially for punters, his grip on the Cup has seems to have intensified in recent years. He is the owner of the last two winners, and four out of the last eleven have been in his colours.

This Photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY-ND

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rekindling and Johannes Vermeer could have special rivalry

The finish to the 2017 race was spectacular. Johannes Vermeer can count himself very unlucky not to have crossed the line ahead of Rekindling, which is evident in the fact that they are neck and neck in the betting markets for 2018. However, for the neutral, it will be wonderful to see them renew their rivalry across the season, culminating in another battle for the Melbourne Cup in November. They should both be at the forefront of punters’ minds when it comes to the betting.

Foreign trained horses becoming the norm

Eight out of the top ten finishers in the 2017 Melbourne Cup were foreign-trained. While it is common sense to follow the horses of the O’Briens, there are other ‘tourists’ who are keen to leave their mark on the event. Willie Mullins, who is at the forefront of jumps racing in the UK and Ireland, had three well-placed runners in the race – Max Dynamite (3rd), Thomas Hobson (6th) and Wicklow Brave (10th). Despite spending the majority of his time training horses for national hunt events, Mullins is a driven winner who will be keen to add a Melbourne Cup to his long list of achievements. Keep an eye on him.

Adrienne Lyle Captures Five-Star Win in Week Five at AGDF

Adrienne Lyle and Salvino. Photo Credit: ©SusanJStickle.

Wellington, FL – February 10, 2018 – Adrienne Lyle and Salvino improved on their Grand Prix performance from Thursday to ride an error-free test and win the Grand Prix Special CDI5*, presented by CaptiveOne Advisors, on Saturday, February 10, at the Adequan® Global Dressage Festival (AGDF).

Lyle and 11-year-old Salvino cruised to victory with 75.319%, representing a new personal best high score for the pair. The top three in the class represented a clean podium sweep for the U.S.A. in the fifth week of AGDF at Palm Beach International Equestrian Center (PBIEC) in Wellington, Florida.

“I was thrilled with him today,” said Lyle, who trains with Debbie McDonald and rides the Sandro Hit stallion for owner Elizabeth ‘Betsy’ Juliano. “It means a ton to win the five-star special; this is huge, especially on a horse who we haven’t even been competing a full year at this level. In the grand prix he was running a little bit through my aids, so today we took the time to make him stay back and wait. He felt like he was right with me throughout the whole test. If he understands what you want, he always does it for you. He has tremendous potential that we’re only just beginning to tap into.”

Australian judge Susan Hoevenaars agreed, saying: “There was so much harmony and it was a joy to judge.”

The winner of the grand prix, Olivia LaGoy-Weltz, had to settle for second place on her own Lonoir, a 14-year-old gelding by De Noir, logging 72.851%.

“The goal is clean rides, but I left the ones [the one-time changes] in the warm-up,” she said. “We did a super line right before we went in, but I think we were both a bit over-heated. I was super proud of him; the quality level is coming up and everyone has full confidence that the consistency is going to fall into place. When it does, it’s going to be pretty cool.”

Third placed Arlene ‘Tuny’ Page was pleased to be able to put two sub-70% scores on Woodstock at AGDF in January behind her, and her ever-improving performances elevated her from seventh in the grand prix.

“I was happy with how my horse presented himself and with the quality of his gaits,” she said of the 15-year-old gelding by Havel. “This is only our fourth test back this season and it’s taken four rides to get him back and for him to wait for me. Now it’s a question of developing more inner calmness in the next two months as he settles into the routine again.”

In the Intermediate I CDI3*, presented by Rowan O’Riley, the U.S.A.’s Jennifer Baumert and Handsome were once again the only combination rewarded with over 70% – exactly as per their prix st georges win on Wednesday.

Baumert was also riding a horse owned by Elizabeth ‘Betsy’ Juliano, this one a 13-year-old Hanoverian gelding by Hochadel x Weltmeyer. She was the unanimous winner for all five judges, scoring 70.941%.

For more information and results, visit www.globaldressagefestival.com.

Nicky Henderson Remains Tight Lipped about Terrefort’s Cheltenham Chances

The Cheltenham Festival is looming ever closer, and champion trainer Nicky Henderson has more at stake than anyone. Over the past 40 years, he has trained countless Cheltenham winners, and 2018 looks set to be no different – he has trained three of the favorites from the four showcase festival races.

But while Might Bite, Buveur D’Air and Altior have dominated the racing media to date, there is a growing question mark over one of the most promising five-year-olds in racing. Will the exciting Terrefort even take to the track at this year’s festival?

The view from bookmakers and tipsters

Despite still being a month away, there are new tips available every day in the run up to Cheltenham. The team at Cheltenham Fest provide expert insight for all the races, and feel that the real drama will come from the support races, such as the RSA Chase on Ladies’ Day, and the JLT Novices Chase, which is the first race of the day on Thursday. Both are races in which Terrefort is provisionally entered, but Henderson has warned that this highly promising gelding might miss the festival entirely.

About Terrefort

Henderson is a man who knows a winning horse when he sees one, and Terrefort could be something very special. He only took over training the horse a month ago, but has already seen him win twice, at Huntingdon and Sandown. The Sandown win, in particular, was impressive, and Henderson will be careful not to overwork the youngster.

Henderson commented that Terrefort needs to run on soft ground to avoid risk of injury. He complemented the owners, saying they support his decision either way and added: “He has surprised us a lot, and it might be worth looking after him a bit.”

Who to back?

If Henderson decides to keep Terrefort back till Cheltenham 2019, which horses are the ones to watch in the RSA Chase and the JLT Novice Chase? The Anthony Honeyball trained Fountains Windfall is the horse that has attracted all the early discussion. He beat some high-quality opposition at Kempton last month, to win by five lengths in the 32Red.com Handicap Chase. Bookmakers are now quoting 8/1, and the odds are ever-shortening. Monalee, trained by Henry De Bromhead, is another to watch, after a fabulous win at the Dublin Festival last week.

As for the JLT Novice Chase on St Patrick’s Day, punters, bookmakers and tipsters are all eyeing up Willoughby Court. Trained by Ben Pauling, this horse is undoubtedly another star for the future, and if he doesn’t go up against Terrefort this time around, there will be plenty more opportunities. A six-year-old gelding, he shocked everyone with some big wins at Warwick and Cheltenham last year. The latter was one of the classic races of 2017, as he and Neon Court slugged it out all the way for a near photo finish. Bookmakers have already slashed their odds to 4/1, making him the runaway favorite.

Get Ready for Ladies’ Day at the Cheltenham Festival

Mention the Cheltenham Festival to a non-racing fan, and they will immediately think of glamourous ladies in extravagant dresses and hats, sipping champagne as they watch the action. The showcase event of the day is the Queen Mother Champions Hurdle, a race named in honor of the late wife of King George VI. She was a fanatical racegoer and was a familiar face for TV audiences around the world.

Picking the winners

Her Royal Highness did not just attend for the fun and champagne; she also loved to place wagers on her favorite runners, and thousands will be following in her footsteps this year. There are seven races on Ladies’ Day, and with tips for every race, the tipsters at Cheltenham Fest can give some expert advice to royals and commoners alike! Here are their top tips for what promises to be a thrilling second day at the Cheltenham Festival.

The RSA Chase

The third race of the day, and the one immediately preceding the showcase event is the RSA Chase, and it is well worth catching. The bookmakers have Presenting Percy as the 3/1 favorite, but the tipsters only have eyes for Fountains Windfall. Trained by Anthony Honeyball, the horse shocked everyone with a big win at Kempton last month against some top ranked competition. He is currently available at 8/1.

The Queen Mother Champions Chase

In general, the odds settle and the picture becomes clearer as a race draws closer. For the main event of the day, however, there are still questions to be answered, and the bookmakers’ favorite could change. Currently, Nicky Henderson trained Altior is odds on to win. The horse looks head and shoulders above all others and is currently enjoying an eleven race winning streak.

The complication is that this might be Altior’s first race in almost a year after a long injury. Henderson insists he is fitter than ever, and the bookmakers clearly agree, but all was thrown into disarray by confusion over whether the horse will get a run out at Newbury this weekend. If he doesn’t, it makes the horse something of an unknown quantity, and the odds might start to lengthen.

The tipsters’ advice is to take advantage of the confusion and place an each way bet on 14/1 outsider Great Field. He’s in great form, and a fabulous win in Dublin last year proves he’s well capable of rising to a big occasion.

The Cross Country Chase

With the showcase race out of the way, there is no letup in the action, with more races to come. Next up is the Cross Country Chase. Last year, Cause of Causes won in style and he is the 7/2 favorite to repeat the feat for a second year in succession. Our tipsters can see no better place to bet your money on a winner, but for an interesting each way option, they have singled out Auvergnat. This is a horse with plenty of experience, who has been finishing consistently in the top four over recent outings.

Place Your Bets – A Beginner’s Guide to Horse Race Betting

Horse racing, along with the gambling that goes alongside it, has had a long, varied and sometimes uncomfortable history in American culture. But like other types of gambling, the rise of online sportsbooks and casino sites has been instrumental in changing attitudes and leading to a greater acceptance, both from a social and a regulatory perspective, of placing a wager.

Increased acceptance brings greater popularity, and with every passing month, there are more people logging on to their website of choice to back the horses. Bearing that in mind, we have put together some first-principle tips on horse race betting.

Understanding the odds

We have all heard of backing a 25/1 shots, or a favorite being 3/4 on, and we think we know what it means – but let’s be clear. 25/1 means that for every dollar you bet, if you win, you will make a $25 profit. In other words, you will get your stake back, plus $25. When a horse is “odds on,” it essentially means the bookmakers think it is highly likely to win. A 3/4 bet means that every $4 betted will only bring a $3 profit if you win. Of course, you will still get your stake back, so there is nothing inherently wrong with backing an odds-on favorite.

Picking your winner

Some racing fans study the form for hours every day; others pick a horse because they like the name. As long as you accept that the former will take lots of time and the latter is unlikely to win you money, either of these approaches is fine. But the best plan is always to ask an expert. The internet age means there are plenty of online tipsters, and you can look up today’s racing tips at the RacingTips website. Here, you will also find useful inside information about upcoming races, and even some advice on which bookmakers are offering the best deals.

Each way betting

So far so good, but there is more to horse race betting that simply picking a winner. Many tipsters will recommend placing an each way bet as a more reliable way of seeing some return on your stake. Essentially, you are placing two separate wagers with an each way bet – one for the horse to win and another for it to “place” which means coming in 1st, 2nd, 3rd or sometimes 4th, depending on the race. Placing pays out at either 1/4 or 1/5 of the winning odds. It is easiest to show by example.

Suppose there are eight runners, and the place terms are three places at 1/5 odds. You place a $5 each way bet on Horse X at 20/1 odds.

This means you are actually backing the horse at $5 at odds of 20/1 for it to win and $5 at odds of 4/1 (20/5) for it to place in 1st, 2nd or 3rd. So your total stake is $10.

If Horse X wins, you win $5 at 20/1 + $5 at 4/1 = $100 + $20 = $120 profit.

If Horse X finishes 2nd or 3rd you lose the $5 win stake but win $5 at 4/1 = $20, meaning a net profit of $15.

A Guide to This Year’s Cheltenham Festival Favorites

Racing is big business in the UK, and while the Grand National might be the most famous event in the National Hunt racing calendar where betting is concerned, the Cheltenham Festival beats it in terms of sheer entertainment.

The festival takes place over four days at Prestbury Park, a picturesque racecourse just outside the usually quiet and quintessentially English town of Cheltenham, close to the English and Welsh border. Every March, thousands of racegoers take over the town to witness 28 top class races, culminating in the prestigious Cheltenham Gold Cup at 3:30PM on the final day.

Two nations battle

One of the most compelling factors of Cheltenham is that it is not just a race between horses. There is also national pride at stake between the English and the Irish. Every year, there is an informal battle to see which country can scoop the most trophies. In particular, look out for two of the most famous trainers from either side of the Irish Sea.

Willie Mullins is from an Irish family that has been riding, breeding and training horses for generations. In 2015, he set a festival record with eight of the 28 winners.

However, when it comes to overall festival wins, even his record is surpassed by English trainer Nicky Henderson. He has been in the business for 40 years, and has been particularly successful at Cheltenham.

The battle between Mullins and Henderson is one of the most intriguing sideshows in British horseracing, and it all comes to a head at Cheltenham.

Picking a winner

So much for the trainers, then, but what of the horses? With four days, 28 races and literally hundreds of entrants. It is little surprise that an estimated £500 million ($700 million) will be bet trackside and online in the days up to and including the festival. For the casual observer, it can be hard to know where to start, which is why we have asked the tipsters at Cheltenhamfestival.net to single out the pick of the festival runners. There are certain to be a few surprises along the way, but here are their picks for some of the top races, whether you are looking to back an outright winner or an each way shot.

Champions Hurdle
To win –  Buveur D’Air
To place – My Tent Or Yours

Last year, Nicky Henderson’s Buveur D’Air was an outsider who won the race in relative comfort. This year, the horse has gone from strength to strength, and the bookmakers have him as odds-on favorite to retain the trophy.

Another from the Henderson stable, My Tent Or Yours, came in second last year. This was the third time in four years he had done so, and at 16/1, racing fans are already queueing up to place their each way bets.

Queen Mother Champion Chase
To win – Altior
To place – Great Field

Going into Ladies’ Day and it’s three for three for Nicky Henderson from our expert tipsters. Altior has been unbeatable in his recent outings, with an amazing 11 straight wins, dating back to October 2015. The bookmakers have him at even money to make it a round dozen.

The outsider to watch is Great Field. He is the first Willie Mullins horse to get a mention and is also in winning form.  There’s every chance he could pull off a surprise, and is certainly in with a good chance of placing.

Stayer’s Hurdle
To win – Sam Spinner
To place – L’Ami Serge

This could be one of the most closely fought of the showcase races, but Sam Spinner, trained by Jedd O’Keefe, is the bookmakers favorite. However, our tipsters fancy Nicky Henderson’s L’Ami Serge as the archetypal dark horse, who could easily pull off a surprise win.

Gold Cup
To win – Might Bite
To place – Native River

The romantics might fancy last year’s winner Sizing John, but for the realists, it’s Henderson all the way. Might Bite looks like the class of the field and will be tough to beat.

Outside the main combatants, Native River is coming into form at just the right time. He came third last year and is well capable of doing so again.