FEI Judge Cesar Torrente Approved as USEF “S” Judge

Stephen Clarke, Christoff Hess, Lilo Fore, and Thomas Long stand alongside Cesar Torrente. (PHOTO: JRPR)

Wellington, FL (June 17, 2019) – To be successful in the world of dressage, kindness, positivity, and the welfare of the horse are of the utmost importance according to beloved International FEI Judge Cesar Torrente. These characteristics are what continue to drive Torrente in achieving his dreams and goals of working with horses – dreams he has had since he was a boy growing up in Colombia. Now, these dreams are becoming a reality, and after a recent approval by the US Equestrian Federation (USEF) to become an “S” Judge, a permanent move to the USA is in Torrente’s near future.

Torrente is from Bogotá, Colombia and has become well known around the world through his blog and Facebook page where he continuously posts helpful advice, information, and guidance for all levels of dressage riders. “I come from South America where we do not always have all the trainers or the judges to give good advice,” Torrente explains “Sometimes the federations don’t have good ways to communicate what is changing in the FEI rules and what is changing regarding training methods.  So, I started using my blog so that my community around my country would learn things like what rules have changed, or to be aware that if you do this in the ring, the judges will do that.  But interestingly, what has happened is when I go to every single show in America and even in Europe, some people run into me and say, ‘You know what, you probably don’t even know me, but I’m your Facebook friend and I read a lot of your blogs – please keep on doing them!’”  His followers know that Torrente always includes “Feeling blessed” in every one of his Facebook posts, and he has been teased because of it that he must be the most blessed person in The Americas.  “I truly feel that I am,” he smiles. “I get to do what I like while being surrounded by wonderful people and wonderful horses in different places each week.” He goes on to explain that he feels it’s very important to treat everyone, horses, and humans alike, with kindness. “I think it’s very important that we care about the welfare of the horse,” Torrente continues. “I think the welfare of the horse must always be present in our minds when we are training, when we’re helping, when we’re giving recommendations, and you cannot forget that.”

Known in the dressage world as being a “rider’s judge,” Torrente approaches everything in a positive way. He knows firsthand what it’s like to work, ride, train, and show. “I started riding at the age of 12,” he describes. “International competitions were always my dream.  I’ve had good days and bad days,” he continues. “I know the feeling when you go out there and sometimes the horse doesn’t have a good day.  I know how frustrated you can feel no matter the amount of work you’ve done, and I think it’s important that the judges understand that and are a little sympathetic to the effort the riders are giving.”  Torrente goes on, “That does not mean we’re giving away marks, because that’s not correct either, but give the high marks when they come, and also give the low marks when they come, but in the end, I always try to give a little comment and a tip if I can as to how to improve the performance of horse and rider.” As a judge, Torrente has unquestionable integrity. “You have to judge mark by mark,” he says, “regardless of the horse or the person who is riding. It may be a fantastic horse who is always winning, or a horse that nobody knows, and it doesn’t matter the breed. You just have to judge what you see and that’s very important.”

Torrente feels that education and lifetime learning are vitally important aspects of his success.  “I believe continuing education is very important in every profession and that is why I have created, my own personal education program,” he describes. “Fortunately, the FEI organizes amazing courses, and every year I attend at least one of these seminars. I combine this with the fantastic seminars organized here by USEF, which I attend regularly, to the surprise of some of my American national colleagues, because it´s rather unusual that foreign FEI judges attend the national seminar. However, I believe that these seminars are a fantastic opportunity to grow as a judge, to discuss trending in judging, explore concepts and opinions, and obviously to interact with many other judges.”  He continues, “These Seminars can improve one’s skills and are very important because it ensures you continue to be competent in your profession. I see judging as a very important profession and education must continue throughout any professional’s career.”

Torrente was the first judge to be promoted through the new FEI educational system to 4*. As a rider, he has had the honor of standing on the medal podium to receive the team gold medal two times in the Central American Games.

He also won many gold, bronze, and silver medals in Bolivarian and Central American and Caribbean Games. Torrente is also a corporate and arbitration lawyer by profession and despite traveling the globe to judge worldwide, he has maintained the precarious balance between his career and his passion for horses with apparent ease.  He has recently accepted a position in the FEI Tribunal, which decides cases on doping, horse abuse, and all disputes at the FEI level including all disciplines.

Most recently, Torrente has been approved by the USEF as an “S” judge, which is the highest rank for judges in the USA.  “I feel very honored that the USEF granted me this status and that now I am allowed to judge all national shows within the US,” he comments. In addition to that, the US government has granted Torrente an O1 Visa which only goes to persons of extraordinary ability. He also explains that he has acquired all permits to work in the US and Canada, and is downsizing his legal practice in Colombia and is now officially planning his move to the US.

Torrente feels fortunate about all the recent developments in his career as a dressage judge, and says he could not be in a better place. Many foreigners who have immigrated to this country have had a tremendous impact on the development of dressage. This including riders, trainers, and of course judges who are a key element for this sport. The country will certainly benefit from Torrente’s experience, fresh ideas, and dedication to the sport.

Cesar Torrente
cesartorrenteb@gmail.com
561-370-2852

Multiple Graded Stakes Winner Hogy Joins Old Friends

GEORGETOWN, KY – JUNE 14, 2019 – Hogy, the multiple graded stakes winner, has been retired from racing and will be pensioned at Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement Farm in Georgetown, KY.

Bred by Dr. John E. Little in Kentucky, Hogy (Offlee Wild – Floy, by Petionvillle), finishes his seven-year career with 55 starts and 19 wins and earnings of $1,339,782.

The near-black gelding launched his career at Arlington Park in 2011 capturing his first three starts, including the Brian Barenscheer Juvenile Stakes at Canterbury Park. He earned his first graded stakes in 2013 in the grade 3 Hanshin Cup Stakes, again at Arlington. In 2017 he set a track record for 5½ furlongs in the Colonel Power Stakes at Fair Grounds, while defeating Old Friends retiree — and that day’s 4-5 favorite — Green Mask.

Claimed from owner William Stiritz and trainer Scott Becker for $80,000 in 2017 following three straight losses, Hogy quickly earned his keep for new owner Michael Hui and trainer Mike Maker when he took the grade 3 Kentucky Turf Sprint at Kentucky Downs, defeating group 1 winner Undrafted in the process.

After a defeat in the grade 1 Breeders’ Cup Turf Sprint at Del Mar, Hogy went on the following year to capture the grade Canadian Turf Stakes at Gulfstream.

“It’s always rewarding to pension one of racing’s great warriors,” said Old Friends founder and President Michael Blowen. “Hogy has seen it all and done it all — multiple tracks, multiple surfaces, competing in claimers up to grade 1 stakes. Now we hope he will just enjoy being loved and admired by his friends and fans.”

Now 10, the gelding arrived at Old Friends on June 14 with owner Hui in tow. “Old Hogy,” Hui noted, “could not be in better hands.”

For more information, please call (502) 863-1775 or visit the website at www.oldfriendsequine.org.

MEDIA CONTACT: Cynthia Grisolia, (347) 423-7322, cindy@oldfriendsequine.org; Michael Blowen (502) 863-1775, michael@oldfriendsequine.org

Kelli Cruciotti and Hadja van Orshof Win $204k Coca-Cola Grand Prix CSI 4* at TIEC

Kelli Cruciotti and Hadja van Orshof ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – June 9, 2019 – Kelli Cruciotti (USA) and Hadja van Orshof enjoyed a first-place finish in Sunday’s $204,000 Coca-Cola® Grand Prix CSI 4* at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC), concluding Tryon Spring 6 TR&HC Charity Horse Show Competition at the venue and taking her second FEI win of the week with a jump-off time of 49.127 seconds. Darragh Kerins (IRL) and Carlos JD Z, a 2009 Zangersheide gelding (Canturo x Baloubet) owned by NRG Farm LLC, claimed second on a jump-off time of 50.332 seconds, while Fernando Cardenas, Jr. (COL) received third for his efforts aboard Quincy Car, a 2004 Oldenburg stallion (Galiani Car x Amour Parfait) owned by Fernando Cardenas and Meredith Cardenas, after their jump-off time of 52.34 seconds.

Course designer Kelvin Bywater (GBR) saw 29 entries test the first-round track, with five pairs returning for the jump-off round. Despite heavy rainfall over the past two days and intermittent rain throughout the class, Cruciotti reported that Hadja van Orshof, her own 2007 Belgian Warmblood mare (Cabrio van de Heffinck x Darco), had “one of the best rounds she’s ever jumped,” and won despite adding a stride:

“I actually didn’t know if I was going to show until I walked in the ring. I was going back and forth about it. I saw people going before me and I’m a chicken about any unusual circumstance, so I trusted my horse and tried to ride a smart round, but not do anything too risky,” Cruciotti explained. “I was fortunate to go at the end of the jump-off, so I could watch a few, and it looked like they were being efficient, and not too risky. I thought if I could be a little bit [less conservative] here and there I could get it, and she jumped amazing. I’m so happy with her. It actually was one of her best rounds she’s ever jumped – maybe she should jump more in the rain!”

Despite her speedy performance, besting a competitive field, Cruciotti admitted to adding a stride on course and elaborated that nine is a tricky number for her: “It’s a running joke since I was ten years old – for the life of me I cannot count nine [strides]. I can do eight, I can do ten or seven or 12, but not nine! And so I knew the line was nine, and my brain was like, ‘no, no, no, ten!'” she continued. “And the whole time I’m trying to tell myself to stop pulling, but luckily I was able to clean up the round somewhere else.”

Hadja van Orshof has been a project of Cruciotti’s for the past three years, and her “lionlike” braveness lends itself to the success they’ve achieved together, she emphasized. “When I got her she was very, very green jumping 1.45m, so we had to really take our time because she’s so careful. At the same time, she’s like a lion – she doesn’t think there’s anything she can’t do,” Cruciotti said. “Our partnership has grown through the years. I got to take her to the World Cup Finals this year in Gothenburg, and I feel like she and I both grew up a lot there. We were a little bit overfaced, but it made us a better horse-and-rider combination, and we learned to really dig down deep.”

For full results from the $204,000 Coca-Cola® Grand Prix CSI 4*, click here.

For more information and results, please visit www.Tryon.com.

Emotional Victory for Eric Lamaze at Calgary’s Spruce Meadows

Photo by Sportfot.

Calgary, Alberta – It was an emotional victory for Canada’s Eric Lamaze in the $500,000 RBC Grand Prix of Canada, presented by Rolex, on Saturday, June 8, at the Spruce Meadows ‘National’ tournament in Calgary, AB.

In his first competition since publicly revealing that he has been battling a brain tumour for the past year and a half, Lamaze scored one of the most meaningful wins of his career.  Riding Chacco Kid, Lamaze topped a seven-horse jump-off in dramatic fashion.  Jumping clear in a time of 46.25 seconds, Lamaze moved into the lead with two riders to follow.  2018 World Cup Champion Beezie Madden of the U.S. had the time, 44.62 seconds, with Coach but a rail down at the final Rolex fence dropped her to fourth in the final standings.  The reigning World Cup Champion and one of Lamaze’s closest friends, Steve Guerdat of Switzerland, was the final challenger and looked on target with Albfuehren’s Bianca, but when the clock stopped in 46.96 seconds, the victory went to Lamaze.

“I didn’t get up this morning thinking this was possible,” said an emotional Lamaze, 51. “It shows what a good horse can do for you.  When you don’t have the fight in you, they fight for you.  It’s one the victories I will cherish forever.”

The all-time leading money winner at Spruce Meadows with more than $6 million in career earnings, Lamaze last won the Grand Prix title at the ‘National’ tournament in 2010 riding Hickstead.

“This is an ongoing battle for me and today is a gift,” said the 2008 Olympic Champion.  “With great support from Steve [Guerdat], my owners and clients, my staff, and people all around the world, you keep fighting and the dream came true.  With the great Hickstead was the last time I won this grand prix; he was looking out for me today.”

Lamaze has been partnered with his winning mount, Chacco Kid, a 13-year-old chestnut Oldenburg gelding (Chacco Blue x Come On), for the past three years.  The horse is owned by The Chacco Kid group consisting of Rick and Sara Mershad, Ludi and Carol Sollak, and Andy and Carlene Ziegler.

“It was his first real grand prix win in the International Ring,” said Lamaze of Chacco Kid.  “I’ve said it many times and I’ll say it again – I do believe Spruce Meadows makes horses.  Chacco Kid arrived here three years ago and he’s a better horse because of it.  I can’t say enough about this facility.  Spruce Meadows is a place to bring young students and see them grow, and to bring young horses and see them grow.  If you win a competition here, you can win anywhere in the world.”

Leaving little doubt as to his will to win, Lamaze also claimed victory on Thursday evening riding his 2016 Rio Olympic bronze medal partner, Fine Lady 5, owned by Artisan Farms and Lamaze’s Torrey Pines Stable.  The pair topped a 14-horse jump-off to win the $36,100 1.50m PwC Cup, beating out Ireland’s Conor Swail riding GK Coco Chanel and Lamaze’s student, Kara Chad of Calgary, AB, who finished third aboard Viva.

Proud of his students and thankful for his friends and supporters, Lamaze had the biggest praise for his equine partners.

“This is our livelihood but we are very close to these animals and what they do for us,” said Lamaze, who is based in Brussels, Belgium.  “The horses are a big part of why I am here today.  I don’t know what level I will continue riding at as the year goes on but I know horses will always be a part of my life.  I want to keep riding and I will keep fighting every day to do this.  The horse is the greatest therapy you can have.”

For more information on Eric Lamaze and his Torrey Pines Stable, visit www.ericlamaze.com.

CONTACT: Jennifer Ward | cell: 613-292-5439 | www.startinggate.ca

Comments Needed on BLM Experiment to Spay Wild Mares

The Cloud Foundation and other wild horse advocate groups are once again fighting to protect the Warm Springs mares. Despite having been stopped time and time again by our legal actions, the Bureau of Land Management has again revived its abhorrent plan to carry out cruel experimentation on the mares rounded up from the Warm Springs HMA.

Your comments are needed, and the deadline to submit is June 12th. BLM had originally scheduled the deadline for Memorial Day. This was an underhanded tactic that allowed for only 9 business days to comment. Thankfully our legal team filed a motion and we were able to get that unreasonable time frame extended.

The link to TCF’s comments is here. We know passions run high on this issue, ours included, but as always, we ask you to remain professional and courteous in your comments.

A step-by-step guide for submitting your comments:

1) Enter a title for your comments.
2) Ignore “Chapter Reference” & “Section Reference”
3) You can enter your comments in the space provided and/or as an attached document.
4) Click “Next” and enter the required personal information on the following page.
5) Click “Next”, agree to the disclaimers on the final page, and click “Submit”.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us!

Read the details of the BLM ovariectomy plan here.

The Cloud Foundation
107 South 7th St
Colorado Springs, CO 80905
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Todd Minikus Charges into June on Amex Z with Multiple Wins in Tryon

Minikus at the $72,000 Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake (photo: JRPR)

Mill Spring, NC (June 7, 2019) — Todd Minikus keeps charging ahead on the feisty Amex Z, and it seems there are no limits to their success at the beautiful Tryon International Equestrian Center in North Carolina.  During Tryon Spring Week 4, Minikus rode to a faultless performance on the 10-year-old Zangersheid mare, Amex Z (Andiamo Z x Landaris) owned by Bit by Bit Group, and won the $36,000 Power and Speed Stake CSI 3* with a time of 28.43 seconds.  Following this up in Week 5, the duo charged ahead again and took home the blue in the $36,000 Sunday Classic 1.45m winning with a jump-off time of 33.065 seconds.  Then, just when you think they’ve reached their limit, the duo claimed the $72,000 Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake CSI 4* with 36.242 seconds on the jump-off clock.

Minikus says he couldn’t be happier about the circuits in Tryon. “Our whole team is having a great time,” he smiles, “and I’m especially happy with Amex Z.”

Contact: Amanda Minikus
minikus2220@gmail.com
www.ToddMinikusShowJumping.com
(561) 762-3762

Strzegom Horse Trials Is Going for the Record Once Again

Paweł Warszawski and Hummer. Photo by Mariusz Chmieliński.

Strzegom, Poland, June 7, 2019: We will have the opportunity to see many great athletes, including seven from the current top 50 of the International Equestrian Federation (FEI) rankings.

LOTTO Strzegom Horse Trials is one of the biggest and highest ranked eventing shows in Poland. During four days, representatives from 19 countries will compete in eight international classes on all difficulty levels, including a Nations Cup class. A high place in the whole classification of the Nations Cup classes will be the opportunity to qualify for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics for those teams that haven’t qualified just yet.

The audiences will have the opportunity to see, among others, the multimedalist Michael Jung from Germany, the current (and two-time) Olympic Champion; Australian Andrew Hoy, Olympic silver medalist and three-time team Olympic Champion; Karin Donckers from Belgium, two-time bronze medalist of the European Championships; Julia Krajewski, team Olympic silver medalist; and many more talented riders.

The best Polish eventers will also compete, including the current National Champion Paweł Spisak and, recently qualified for the Olympics, Polish team members: Jan Kamiński, Mateusz Kiempa, Mariusz Kleniuk, Joanna Pawlak, and Paweł Warszawski.

The show will start on Thursday, the 27th of June, with the dressage tests, and the winners will be determined on Sunday after the cross-country and showjumping trials.

Contact:
www.strzegomhorsetrials.pl
press@strzegomhorsetrials.pl

Daniel Geitner and One Request Granted $50k USHJA International Hunter Derby Win

Daniel Geitner and One Request ©Sportfot.

Tryon, NC – June 7, 2019 – Daniel Geitner (USA) and Elizabeth Tarumianz’s One Request were awarded top honors in the $50,000 USHJA International Hunter Derby at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC) with an overall score of 371. Holly Shepherd (USA) with Tybee, a 2007 Hanoverian gelding by Black Tie owned by Helen Brown, finished in second place on a total score of 349. Erin Floyd (USA) claimed third place aboard Any Given Sunday, a 2003 Oldenburg gelding by Indoctro x Victoria owned by Hays Investment Corp., with a score of 347.

Out of 21 pairs to take part in the highlight Hunter class of the Tryon Spring 6 Tryon Riding & Hunt Club Charity Show, Geitner and the 2010 Selle Francais gelding impressed the judges over the course set by Dean Rheinheimer (USA) and secured first place after their handy performance. Last to go in the second round, Geitner was able to observe competitors ahead of him and adjusted his strategy accordingly, he explained.

“It was a beautiful course. It rode a little trickier than it walked. It walked relatively simple and it just rode a little bit trickier than I think we first thought,” Geitner said. “My original plan [in the handy] was to go to the inside to the two stride, but once I realized I probably didn’t have to, it made it relatively easy. Honestly, his [One Request] jumping style is just spectacular, so I just tried to stay out of his way.

“The jumps were beautiful and my horse obviously jumped amazing,” Geitner continued. “This is only his third Derby, and he’s won two of them now. Last year he did the first years, green conformation, and the amateurs with his owner. This year we’ve done just a couple shows.”

Despite his horse’s newness to the International Derby ring, Geitner reported that One Request took to the atmosphere of Tryon Stadium well: “He was great [in the atmosphere]. Not much phases him, and actually it really had him jumping. He was not close to any jump, and really rose to the occasion,” he said. “I thought the first round was great, and I thought he was even better in the handy. He just jumped higher and higher the more we went.”

Geitner will keep competing One Request in more Derbies, hoping to continue their success thus far, and plans to aim for Derby Finals ahead of the indoor season, he explained. “We just got back from Devon. We sent some ponies here a couple weeks ago with our assistant, but this is our first week. We are happy to be back.

“Unfortunately, we go back home next week, but we come back in July for a couple weeks and for sure a few weeks in the fall,” concluded Geitner. “I personally won’t come back here for Pony Spectacular [Tryon Summer 3] but I hope my wife and some of the pony kids are!”

For full results from the $50,000 USHJA International Hunter Derby, click here.

For more information and results, please visit www.Tryon.com.

Doable Betting Strategies for the 2019 Belmont Stakes

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Out of all the sports tournament you can find in any given platform, betting on horse racing showdown gives you a wide array of betting types where you can win and earn big. This is due to the fact a horse racing tournament is often attended by more than two or three colts which make every bettor choose more entry they wanted to bet.

Talking about horse racing, the final leg of the Triple Crown Series which is the Belmont Stakes will take place on Saturday, June 8, 2019. This will be held in the race track of Elmont Park, Belmont, New York where it is expected once again that hundreds and thousands of horse racing fans will grace the said event. In fact, some are already excitement even by the time the Kentucky Derby had kicked off.

With that being said, most horse racing fans are a little disappointed due to the fact that there will be no Triple Crown winner this year. After the disqualification case of Maximum Security which was the real Kentucky Derby winner. He was replaced by the second placer whose name is Country House. It is nice to see these horses supposedly as they take their rematch in the Preakness Stakes, but Maximum Security got demotivated ended up leaving the two racing behind.

Besides, Country House also got sick a day after he won the derby. In that case, he missed the Preakness and will not head on to Belmont. This is the first time that the Triple Crown Series won’t have the presence of the first three finishers of the Kentucky Derby.

Despite the fact that the Triple Crown this year won’t be given, the Belmont Stakes is still making their best to make sure that they can show off an incredible horse racing showdown. In fact, horse racers are more excited for the betting games they can partake since the prize at stake hasn’t changed following the initial controversy mentioned above.

Hence, as you go along and find yourself betting for you best entries in the Belmont Stakes this Saturday, it’s best that you have full knowledge on how to pick the right entry. So, in this article, we’d like to give you some working techniques on how you can join in profitable betting. Betting strategies are also outlined to make sure that you do not put your money directly in to waste. Here are they to get you started.

Refer to the Recent and Favorable Odds

The 2019 Belmont Stakes will have a total of ten thoroughbred horse racers which will be competing in the Grade 1 Stakes category. That said, each bet has its own odds set by the bookmaker. These odds are based on the bets they earned before the racing start and the value is then identified accumulating all the wages.

In that case, even if you are a newbie or pro in betting, it is best that you have to place your wage for a bet with most favorable odds. Through the years that the Belmont Stakes had existed, most winners are more likely coming from the bets with excellent value standings. Going this way will ensure that you have at least 80% chance of winning than placing your bets that has the lowest value.

Don’t Believe in Bookies

Bookies are the ones who arranged and set up odds especially when you bet online. Take note that horse racing is gambling and it’s either you win or lose. But, if you want to get rid of a consistent losing streak, you need to avoid the bookies. There’s nothing wrong with going with your instinct and betting for the ones given by bookies, but in reality, they place the odds in their favor. That means that your chance of winning might be small.

This is the main reason why that even if bookies set their bets, you still need to do your homework of researching the capability and skills of your chosen bets. This is highly needed specifically that the Belmont Stakes this year holds the mightiest horse entries and each entry has a unique running skills to show off this coming Saturday.

The Point System

The easiest strategy you can follow as you bet for the upcoming Belmont Stakes is the point system.  By using this strategy, all you need to do is to pick three horses which do you think will win. Out from these three entries, you need to sort out who’s going to place first, second, and third by placing the right points.

You can either have 10 as the highest or even as much as 5 points. Your criteria of placing the points for the three horses you have chosen in by their previous performances, trainers, jockeys, breeding, and the reviews they get from the horse racing society.

Lynne Clibburn and Apple Jack 12 Win $7,000 Lactanase 1.35m Open Stake at ESP June I

Lynne Clibburn and Apple Jack 12 ©AnneGittinsPhotography.

Wellington, FL – June 5, 2019 – The first week of the ESP Summer Series, June I, was held at Equestrian Village from Friday, May 31, through Sunday, June 2. Lynne Clibburn of Wellington, FL and Apple Jack 12, owned by Cloud Nine, LLC, captured top honors in the $7,000 Lactanase 1.35m Open Stake on Sunday, after stopping the timers at 45.714 seconds. Close behind at 45.776 seconds was Samantha Senft of Wellington, FL aboard her own Desperado, while Antonio Martinez, Jr. of Loxahatchee, FL claimed third place riding Emilio Mantero’s Rebel for Kicks, with a time of 52.087 seconds and one fault added to their score.

Course designer Hector Loyola set the track for this Sunday’s class, which saw a total of 11 entries contest the first round, and seven combinations return for the jump-off. Only the top two finishers completed the class with a double clear effort.

To view full results of the $7,000 Lactanase 1.35m Open Stake, please click here.

To learn more about the ESP Spring Series and PBIEC, please visit www.pbiec.com.

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