US Equestrian Announces Para-Dressage Team for World Equestrian Games 2018

Lexington, KY – US Equestrian has named four athlete-and-horse combinations to the U.S. Para-Equestrian Dressage Team presented by Deloitte for the FEI World Equestrian Games (WEG) Tryon 2018, which will take place September 11-23, 2018. Following the 2017-2018 selection period, the US Equestrian Board of Directors approved the following combinations for the FEI Nominated Entry List.

Rebecca Hart (Wellington, Fla.), Grade III, with El Corona Texel, Rowan O’Reilly’s nine-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding

Angela Peavy (Wellington, Fla.), Grade IV, with Royal Dark Chocolate, Rebecca Reno’s 10-year-old Oldenburg mare

Kate Shoemaker (Peoria, Ariz.), Grade IV, with Solitaer 40, the 11-year-old Hanoverian stallion she owns with Craig and Deena Shoemaker

Roxanne Trunnell (Rowlett, Texas), Grade I, and Kate Shoemaker’s Dolton, a six-year-old Hanoverian gelding

For more information about FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon 2018, visit Tryon2018.com.

For more information about the USPEA, please visit www.USPEA.org or contact USPEA President: Hope Hand by e-mail: hope@uspea.org or by phone: (610)356-6481.

Some Tips on Getting Your Horse to Roll Back Perfectly

Practice makes the perfect rollback. Journal photo.

The rollback consists of three separate maneuvers – a stop, a 180-degree turn and a lead departure. The rollback should be one continuous, fluid motion. However, this is easier said than done. National Reining Horse Association $3 million-dollar rider Craig Schmersal describes some of the techniques he uses at home to ensure precise rollbacks.

Getting Started

1. The first thing you need on a horse before teaching the rollback is suppleness. He must be willing to give his face. Using two hands, if I pull his head to the right, I only want him to move his head. I do not want his body to move to the right until I add the left neck rein.

2. The horse needs to know how to yield to leg pressure.

3. The horse has to know how to back up. When I take hold of him and back him up, I don’t want to be pulling him back. I want him to back up on a fairly loose rein.

I want the horse to almost lock in the reverse position in the backup. I then apply the outside rein to see if the horse will step into a turn by himself. If he doesn’t, then I’ll take my direct rein and pull him through a time or two into a good spin and a half or two spins.

I’ll stop, back up and ask him with the neck rein again. I don’t want to crowd my horse too much, especially in the beginning steps of learning the rollback.

I just want him to back up, and when I add the neck rein, to come to me. I don’t want him to pick up his head. I don’t want him to take three more steps backward as soon as he feels the neck rein. When I move my hand, if I’ve done my job properly, the horse goes. He won’t get stuck.

American Quarter Horse Association
1600 Quarter Horse Drive
Amarillo, TX 79104

Moloney Records Second FEI Victory of Week to Conclude Tryon Summer V

Richie Moloney and Merqusio. Photo Credit ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – July 15, 2018 – Just twelve hours after a win in the $70,000 Carolina Arena Equipment Grand Prix CSI 2*, Richie Moloney (IRL) clinched another blue ribbon aboard a different grey mount. Riding the Equinimity LLC’s Merqusio, Moloney was once again awarded first place, besting competition in the $35,000 1.45m Sunday Classic CSI 2*, with a jump-off time of 47.288 seconds.

Samuel Parot (CHI) who also claimed a spot on Saturday night’s podium, stepped up once more, taking the second-place position aboard his own 2004 Selle Francais gelding Quick Du Pottier (Hurlevent de Breka x Cuba), riding to a time of 38.508 seconds, but with eight added faults. Third place was awarded to another Ireland native, David O’Brien, who piloted the Spy Coast Farm LLC entry Kir Royal SCF, a 2010 Belgian Warmblood gelding (Amaretto D’Arco x Nabab de Reve), through the first round in 85.62 seconds and with four added faults.

Moloney and the 2007 Belgian Warmblood gelding (Cicero Z x Flamenco de Semilly) have been competing at TIEC on and off throughout the spring and summer and maintained a winning streak to round out the weekend. “He was good out there,” commented Moloney, “and I’m very happy to win out here on him today.” Of the gelding, he continued, “I’ve been partnered with him for two and a half years now, so I know him well. This horse is very careful and very scopey.”

Moloney plans to continue with top level FEI competition, as the pair has also contested CSI 5* level classes and previously recorded a third-place finish in the $35,000 1.45m Welcome Stake CSI 2* during Tryon Spring I. “We’ll just keep going and compete in some 1.50m classes with him,” noted Moloney, “and then we’ll add another Grand Prix when he feels ready.”

The morning welcomed fourteen entries to the Derby Field, and Moloney and Parot were the only two to return for a turn on the Catalina Cruz (MEX) designed jump-off track. “The course was great today,” concluded Moloney. “It was nice to get him out and ride here on the field for a change. His next show will be on grass, so it was nice to get out here this week and finish strong.”

Please visit www.tryon.com or call (828)-863-1000 for more information.

Jordan Coyle Races to Victory in Ottawa Speed Derby

Jordan Coyle and Mojo TSP. Photo by Ben Radvanyi Photography.

Ottawa, Ontario –Ireland’s Jordan Coyle riding Mojo TSP blazed to victory in the $7,500 Speed Derby, presented by Millar Brooke Farm, on Sunday, July 15, to conclude the Ottawa National Horse Show at Wesley Clover Parks in Ottawa, ON.

When Coyle entered the grass ring midway through the 17-horse starting field, he was chasing the leading time of 83.30 seconds set by Kelly Soleau-Millar of Wellington, FL and Centre Ice, her 16-year-old grey Canadian-bred gelding.

Coyle and Mojo TSP, a nine-year-old Holsteiner gelding owned by Top Line Sporthorse International, bravely tackled the speed course set on Wesley Clover Parks’ grand prix field, which featured natural obstacles such as a steep bank and intimidating devil’s dyke. The pair left all the rails in place and raced through the timers in 80.18 seconds to move to the top of the leaderboard.

Kelley Robinson of Russell, ON riding Lise came the closest to catching Coyle’s time. They were fast, but not fast enough, settling for second place with a time of 82.97 seconds. Soleau-Millar’s time with Centre Ice held up for third place while 17-year-old Sam Walker of Nobleton, ON took fourth with a time of 83.77 seconds riding Laconia 7 after a four-second penalty was added to his time for a rail down. New Zealand’s Kirk Webby had the fastest time of the day, 77.72 seconds, but an eight-second penalty for a final time of 85.72 left him in fifth with The Irishman.

“I love going fast and speed derbies, especially when it’s four seconds added for each rail, give you a real chance to go fast,” said Coyle, 25, of the format that sees four seconds added to the rider’s time for each rail down.

While the Irish native has jumped numerous derbies in the past, it was the first time his mount had attempted a speed derby course.

“He’s very brave and nothing really fazes him,” said Coyle, who began riding Mojo TSP at the Winter Equestrian Festival in Wellington, FL earlier this year.  “He never did any schooling on the natural obstacles either, so I’m really happy with him today.”

Coyle is making his Ottawa Equestrian Tournaments debut and will continue competing in the nation’s capital during the CSI3* Ottawa International Horse Show, running July 18 to 22.

“Everything here has been great so far, and the field is perfect,” said Coyle, who hails from Northern Ireland.  “The grass here is as good as you’d get anywhere in the world.”

Speed continued to be the name of the game as horses and dogs then took the grass field for the entertaining $2,500 Canine-Equine Relay, presented by Royal LePage TEAM Realty. Horse and rider combinations negotiated a show jumping course before their canine partners from Dogz Canine Sports Centre in Nepean, ON tackled their own agility course.

Marcus Davis of Haliburton, ON riding Viekie and his canine partner, the Australian Shepherd Zuni, teamed up to post the winning time of 76.83 seconds. Finishing runner-up with a time of 79.88 seconds was Dutch competitor Frank Hendriks riding Nouvelle Bleue and his canine teammate, Stanley the Border Collie.  Third place went to Christine Carlsen of North York, ON riding Mise le Meas and Antic, an adorable Miniature American Shepherd, with a combined time of 80.80 seconds.

Visit www.OttawaEquestrianTournaments.com for more information on the Ottawa National and CSI3* Ottawa International Horse Shows.

Contact: Jennifer Ward
cell: (613)292-5439
jward@jumpmediallc.com

Moloney Climbs to Top in $70,000 Carolina Arena Equipment Grand Prix CSI 2*

Richie Moloney and Button Sitte. Photo Credit ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – July 14, 2018 – Richie Moloney (IRL) climbed atop the podium in the $70,000 Carolina Arena Equipment Grand Prix CSI 2* during the highlight class of the week at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC), after piloting the Equinimity LLC entry Button Sitte around the night’s jump-off track in 38.336 seconds.

Second place honors were captured by the USA’s Todd Minikus, riding to a final short course time of 38.402 seconds aboard Autumn View Farm’s Excel, a 2009 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Douglas x Quick Star). Samuel Parot (CHI) completed the second round of competition aboard his own 2003 Zangersheide gelding (Andiamo x Royal Bravour L) Atlantis, closing out the top three with the quickest time of 36.297 seconds, but adding four faults.

Moloney and the 2007 Belgian Warmblood stallion (Ogano Sitte x Parco) have been partnered together for nearly two and half years and the duo has maintained a consistent record to date. “He always jumps very well here,” he commented. “He had some very good results in Wellington and he placed in the 1.50m final. He’s a very nice horse and very scopey. He’s lovely to work with and he’s a really sweet horse.

“His strengths are his scope and how easy he is,” he continued. “Even during the week, you don’t have to work too hard before a class. You just need to move him around a little bit. He’s very uncomplicated.”

The pair bested a field of 22 horse-and-rider combinations and returned to contest the Catalina Cruz (MEX) course with five other competitors. Of the course, Moloney said, “It was a good course. The jump three to four sequence was quite difficult in the first round. Apart from that, I thought the course was a good course tonight.”

Moloney has been based at the venue for the majority of the Tryon Summer Series and had positive words for the facility and the “Saturday Night Lights” competition in general. “It’s a great facility and there’s always a great atmosphere and a great crowd here to watch,” he concluded. “He [Button Sitte] also prefers the atmosphere under the lights. He’s good in smaller arenas like this because you have to keep turning and jumps are always in front of you.”

Please visit www.tryon.com or call (828)-863-1000 for more information.

Dutch Win against All Odds at Fabulous Falsterbo

Photo: Maikel van der Vleuten and IDI Utopia. (FEI/Satu Pirinen)

Fierce battle in thrilling four-way jump-off against Ireland, Sweden, and Italy

It wasn’t all smooth sailing as the Dutch swept to victory in the Longines FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ of Sweden at Falsterbo (SWE). Reduced to a three-man team following first-round drama for Michel Hendrix (31) and Baileys, and only making the cut into the jump-off after a successful appeal against four faults at the water for Maikel van der Vleuten (30) and IDI Utopia in round two, it might well have been too much to hope for that it would all come right in the end.

But when you combine great leadership with passion and pride, and you add in the quality of a partnership like Johnny Pals (36) and his super-stallion Chat Botte du Ruisseau Z who produced no less than three spectacular clears, and the final one the quickest of all, then you have all the ingredients for an epic afternoon of sport.

You don’t get days like this too often, and even the Irish who finished second, the Swedes who lined up in third and the fourth-placed Italians couldn’t argue with that. It was a Nations Cup classic, with just fractions of seconds deciding the result.

“Today was an absolute thriller!” — Rob Ehrens (Rob Ehrens, Chef d’Equipe, Team Netherlands)

It was the triple combination at fence five that led to the withdrawal of The Netherlands’ Hendrix when Baileys stopped and then tipped off his rider when they tackled it again. The Irish, hot favourites to win after a spectacular week of success at the Swedish fixture, held the lead on a zero score at the halfway stage while the Dutch, Swedes and Italians lay close behind with four faults apiece.

When Bertram Allen’s Gin Chin van Het Lindenhof put a foot in the water second time out and then Mark McAuley’s Utchan de Belheme left a pole on the floor the Irish advantage began to slip, however. But clears from Daniel Coyle (Cita) and Paul O’Shea (Skara Glen’s Machu Picchu) steadied the ship and they went into a four-way jump-off with Italy, Sweden, and eventually The Netherlands, all on a two-round four-fault tally.

First against the clock was Italy’s Luca Marziani, setting the target when clear in 42.71 seconds with Tokyo du Soleil, but the Swedish crowd went wild with delight when their hero, Henrik von Eckermann, steered Toveks Mary Lou through the timers more than a second faster in 41.52. As Johnny Pals set off you could hear a pin drop. “Rob said – you go for it – so I went for it!” said the Dutchman whose fabulous chestnut stallion jumped like a cat to put a time of 39.33 on the board. Last man in, Ireland’s Daniel Coyle, gave it his best shot with Cita who broke the beam in 40.47 seconds for runner-up spot. But it was the Men in Orange, and the 2017 Longines FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ champions, who would stand top of the Falsterbo presentation podium for the second year in a row.

The exceptional team spirit of the Dutch has delivered a stream of success for many years now. Maikel van der Vleuten reflected that when he looked back on the story of the day and how it all fell into place. “Michel was a bit unlucky in the first round; his horse just wasn’t feeling it today but that’s why we are a team and we were still strong enough to do the job!” And as Jur Vrieling (48), who produced an all-important anchorman double-clear with VDL Glasgow v. Merelsnest NOP, pointed out, supporting your team-mates is at the core of Nations Cup Jumping. “I’ve had it before where I’ve gone wrong and others have helped, so I was happy today to be able to do my job this time around!”

And as for Johnny Pals, he couldn’t help but be thrilled with the sensational performance of his 10-year-old stallion who never looked like putting a foot wrong all day.

“His breeding is Casall and Darco and he’s the horse of a lifetime!” — Johnny Pals (NED)

“He has so much scope and so careful! I have him two years and at the beginning he was a bit strong but he always had a great mentality,” he said of the horse who seems to have unbounded enthusiasm for his job.

And what now for the Dutch who have moved into sixth place on the Europe Division 1 leaderboard which is still headed by Belgium? “We have two more legs at Hickstead and Dublin left… we are going to try to beat the Belgians and win the League!” Rob Ehrens said.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145

Safe Sport Frequently Asked Questions

US Equestrian has prepared responses to frequently asked questions regarding interim measures issued by the U.S. Center for SafeSport. The following information is an additional resource to help further educate US Equestrian members and the public around these important matters.

Safe Sport

What is the U.S. Center for SafeSport, what is their jurisdiction and how is the Center empowered?
The U.S. Center for SafeSport launched in March 2017 as an independent entity charged with (i) providing education and outreach about athlete abuse; and (ii) investigating and resolving reports of sexual misconduct. Their jurisdiction is exclusive as it relates to allegations of sexual misconduct and it retains discretionary jurisdiction over non-sexual misconduct allegations, i.e. bullying, harassment, physical and emotional misconduct.

The Center was authorized by Congress on February 14, 2018, through S. 534 – Protecting Young Victims from Sexual Abuse and Safe Sport Authorization Act of 2017.

The bill amended the Ted Stevens Olympic and Amateur Sports Act of 1978 by designating the U.S. Center for SafeSport to serve as the independent national safe sport organization, with the responsibility for developing policies and procedures to prevent the emotional, physical, and sexual abuse of amateur athletes.

What are the reporting requirements?
All USEF members and participants must report to the U.S. Center for SafeSport conduct of which they become aware that could constitute (a) sexual misconduct, (b) misconduct that is reasonably related to the underlying allegation of sexual misconduct, and (c) retaliation related to an allegation of sexual misconduct. This report must be made within 24 hours of learning about the alleged misconduct.

Importantly, the obligation to report requires reporting any conduct that comes to a member’s or participant’s attention, which if true, would violate the U.S. Center for SafeSport Code or USEF Safe Sport Policy.

Individuals should not investigate or attempt to evaluate the credibility or validity of allegations involving sexual misconduct, as a condition of reporting to the U.S. Center for SafeSport.

What happens if I do not report conduct that I am required to report?
The failure to report is a crime under federal law and it is punishable as a criminal offense. In addition, the failure to report is a violation that could result in a sanction against the individual.

Am I required to report about suspected abuse that occurred several years ago?
Yes. There is no statute of limitations applicable to reports of incidents of sexual misconduct made to the U.S. Center for SafeSport.

What resources are available to learn more about Safe Sport?
The USEF website links to the Center with extensive resources, including:

  • Reporting forms and process
  • 24 Hour Helpline
  • Definitions
  • Safe Sport Training
  • Safe Sport Code
  • USEF Safe Sport Policy
  • Safe Sport Sanctions List

Suspensions, Bans, and Enforcement

Who decides whether to issue a temporary suspension for sexual misconduct?
The U.S. Center for SafeSport has exclusive jurisdiction over reports of sexual misconduct and determines whether interim measures, including suspensions should be imposed.

Does the U.S. Center for SafeSport issue a temporary suspension in connection with every report of allegations of sexual misconduct?
No.  The U.S. Center for SafeSport issues a temporary suspension when they deem the facts and circumstances warrant it.

What is the criteria for a temporary suspension?
The U.S. Center for SafeSport may impose interim measures, i.e. a temporary suspension, when they deem it is appropriate to ensure the safety and well-being of the Reporting Party, Athletes, other Non-Athletes or the Responding Party.  Interim measures may be appropriate where an allegation against the Responding Party is sufficiently serious that the Responding Party’s continued participation could be detrimental to the sport or its reputation.

For more information refer to the U.S. Center for Safe Sport Practices and Procedures, please visit: https://www.safesport.org/files/index/tag/policies-procedures.

Is there a process for a person to seek relief from a temporary suspension?
Yes. An individual may request that the U.S. Center for SafeSport stay the temporary suspension in certain circumstances, e.g. participation in a certain event. In addition to, or in lieu of, a request for a stay, the individual may request an interim measures hearing, which will be afforded within 72 hours of such request. The interim measures hearing is conducted before an independent arbitration body.

Can a suspended person request that USEF lift their suspension or permit them to participate in some activities?
No, any request for relief from a suspension must be directed to the U.S. Center for SafeSport, and decisions will be made in accordance with their Practices and Procedures.

How are individuals notified they are under a temporary suspension?
The U.S. Center for SafeSport notifies the Responding Party by e-mail.

What is the scope of an interim measures hearing on a temporary suspension?
An interim measures hearing is limited to determining whether reasonable cause exists to justify the temporary suspension. It is not a full hearing on the merits of the case.

Is there recourse against someone who intentionally makes a false accusation?
Someone who abuses the process, falsifies information or maliciously abuses the process is subject to sanctions.

Does the USEF know the reporting party?
No, the U.S. Center for SafeSport will not identify or use the name of a Third-Party Reporter nor will it publicly release a Reporting Party’s identifying information.

Why can’t everyone know everything about an investigation?
Sharing details about allegations made, or an investigation, can impede the ability to thoroughly investigate a matter without interference. In some cases, law enforcement may be involved and the fact that an investigation is underway could compromise the ability of law enforcement to secure the evidence necessary to pursue an indictment.

Once a determination is made that a violation occurred, what guidelines does the U.S. Center for SafeSport follow to determine appropriate sanctions?
According to the U.S. Center for SafeSport Practices and Procedures, the following guidelines are used:

Sanctioning Guidelines

Sanctions will be reasonable and proportionate to the Code violation and surrounding circumstances with the intended effect of protecting relevant participants. One or more of the following sanctions may be recommended or imposed singularly or in combination: (a) written warning; b) educational or behavioral programs; (c) loss of privileges; (d) probation; (e) suspension or other eligibility restrictions, up to and including permanent ineligibility. The Officer reserves the right to lessen or broaden any range of recommended sanctions in the case of mitigating circumstances or egregiously offensive behavior.

Factors relevant to determining appropriate sanctions include, without limitation:

  • Seriousness of the Violation;
  • The Responding Party’s prior history;
  • Ages of individuals involved;
  • Whether the Responding Party poses an ongoing threat to the safety of others;
  • Voluntary disclosure of offense and/or cooperation by the Responding Party;
  • Disposition of an investigation by state or federal law authorities;
  • Real or perceived impact of incident on the Reporting Party, NGB(s) or USOC; and
  • Other mitigating and aggravating circumstances.

For more information refer to the U.S. Center for Safe Sport Practices and Procedures, please visit: https://www.safesport.org/files/index/tag/policies-procedures.

What is USEF’s responsibility to enforce sanctions?
Federal Law requires USEF to enforce sanctions imposed by the U.S. Center for SafeSport and interim measures, including temporary suspensions. Communicating the information to members and the media is an important way to ensure protection of our members and participants in equestrian sport.

When did USEF’s Safe Sport program start?
USEF established a Safe Sport Policy, effective December 1, 2013, prior to the Center being created.  The Policy covered the areas of prohibited conduct (sexual misconduct, emotional misconduct, physical misconduct, bullying, harassment, and hazing), training and education, criminal background checks, reporting and enforcement.  Program requirements included Safe Sport Training and criminal background checks for USEF Staff, Licensed Officials, Board Members and Team Chefs and Coaches.

What is the responsibility of USEF Recognized Affiliates and their associated organizations and activities?
A suspended or banned person is prohibited from participating, in any capacity, in any activity or competition authorized by, organized by, or under the auspices of the United States Olympic Committee, the national governing bodies recognized by the United States Olympic Committee, including US Equestrian, and/or any US Equestrian Affiliated Organization.  This prohibition affects a person regardless of whether or not they are a USEF member. Competition licensees and management are responsible for ensuring that no banned or suspended person is on the competition grounds.

From the US Equestrian Communications Department

Moggre Flies to First in $35,000 1.40m U-25 Final at Tryon

Brian Moggre and MTM Flutterby. Photo Credit ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – July 13, 2018 – It was the USA’s Brian Moggre who climbed to the top of the podium in the $35,000 1.40m U-25 Final at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC), as the sun set on day three of Tryon Summer V competition at the venue. Moggre and MTM Flutterby flew through fast track timers in 34.64 seconds, two full seconds ahead of second place finisher Mattie Hatcher (USA) and her own 2009 Swedish Warmblood gelding (Click and Cash x Feliciano) Cristiano, who finished with a time of 36.56 seconds with four added faults. Third place was rounded out by Megan McDermott (USA) and her own 2006 Caballo Deportivo La Silla gelding (Dollar de la Pierre x Polydor), Tizimin LS, who completed their first round of competition in 78.18 seconds and added four faults.

Moggre and the 2007 Dutch Warmblood mare (C-Indoctro x Grace) owned by Major Wagner LLC, are newcomers to the venue and the first experience has boded well for the pair. “She was amazing tonight,” he commented. “Izzy has the best heart out of any horse I’ve ever had. She’s so amazing.”

The duo rode around the Catalina Cruz (MEX) course in a timely manner and were brought back to contest the two horse jump-off with ease. “If there is one thing that my trainers have taught me,” stated Moggre, “I will hold onto this for the rest of my riding career: playing it safe; if you have a rail, you’re too slow. Every time you walk in the ring you need to go in there with a mission. If you’re going in, you’re fast, you’re going to be clear, and you’re going to win. You can’t win unless you try.”

The seventeen-year-old rides and trains with Tracy Fenney and Mike McCormick, who originally bred the mare and matched the two. “She originally came to our barn when I was young,” he said, “and she was a five-year-old. It wasn’t the best match at the time. I kind of matured as a rider and the horse matured as well. When I was thirteen or fourteen I got the ride and it just clicked. It worked and she’s been amazing ever since.”

He continued, “She’s very opinionated and I think that’s why we get along so well. We are both a little sassy. She just has a sassy attitude and she is so unlike any of my other horses. All of my other horses are big, gentle giants. She’s this spicy little blonde girl.”

Moggre also plans to compete in Saturday’s highlight competition, the $70,000 Carolina Arena Equipment Grand Prix CSI 2*, but noted the importance of also being able to utilize the U-25 series classes. “I’m riding in tomorrow night’s Grand Prix,” he explained. “It’s a little bigger and a little more of a tough crowd, which gets me to push myself a bit. A class like this is also excellent because my mare is just a little race car and I know that if I can be on it than she is on the game. Without an insane 1.60m horse, you can compete in these classes and it helps shine the spotlight on some of the young riders.”

Earlier in the afternoon, David O’Brien (IRL) continued his winning ways aboard Spy Coast Farm LLC mounts, this time riding the 2010 Belgian Warmblood gelding Kir Royal SCF (Amaretto D’Arco x Nabab de Reve) to victory in the $5,000 1.40m Classic CSI 2*. The pair crossed through fast track timers in 37.909 seconds to claim the blue. Callan Solem (USA) achieved second place, piloting Collin McNeil’s 2008 Belgian Warmblood mare (Darco x Cento) Imogen de Regor to a time of 38.642 seconds. Todd Minikus (USA) trailed just behind in third with Juju VDM, a 2009 Belgian Warmblood mare (Toulon x For Pleasure), completing their first round in 82.99 seconds with one added fault.

Please visit www.tryon.com or call (828)-863-1000 for more information.

New York Champion Say Florida Sandy Dies at 24

GEORGETOWN, KY – JULY 13, 2018 – Say Florida Sandy, a multiple graded stakes winner and one of the greatest New York-breds of all time, has died.

The 24-year-old stallion, who was retired with Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement Farm in Georgetown, KY, passed from an apparent heart attack on July 11, but a full necropsy is pending.

Michael Blowen, founder and president of Old Friends, made the announcement.

Bred by Sanford Bacon, the son of Personal Flag out of the Sweet Candy mare Lolli Lucka Lolli was a star of the New York racing circuit for much of his seven-year career. He won several New York-bred championships, including three New York Champion Sprinter titles and New York Horse of the Year honors for 2001.

Raced by Bacon before being lost for $70,000 in a claiming race in 1997, Sandy had several owners and conditioners, but won the lion’s share of his races for trainer Juan Serey and owner John Rotella.

In all, the dark bay stallion won 17 stakes during his 98-race career, including the Grade 2 True North at Belmont Park, the Grade 3 Gravesend at Aqueduct in 1998 and 2000, and the Grade 3 Philadelphia Breeders’ Cup Handicap. He retired from racing in 2003 with a record of 33 wins and earnings of $2,085,408.

Say Florida Sandy entered stud in 2004 at Buckridge Farm in Kinderhook, N.Y. where he stood for 10 years. As a sire he is best represented by stakes winner Say Toba Sandy, who won the Finger Lakes Juvenile Fillies Stakes in 2007.

Say Florida Sandy was pensioned by his syndicate and retired to Old Friends in 2014.

“It’s been a privilege to retire one of the top New York-breds of all time,” said Old Friends’s Blowen. “Sandy was a very sensitive stallion, so he was placed at Hurstland Farm in Midway, KY under the watchful eye of owner Alfred Nuckols, who took the greatest care of him,” Blowen added.

“We are grateful to breeder Sanford Bacon and to Walter Downey, who managed Sandy’s syndicate, for allowing us to care for their champion.”

For more information, please call (502) 863-1775 or visit the website at www.oldfriendsequine.org.

MEDIA CONTACT: Cynthia Grisolia, (347) 423-7322, cindy@oldfriendsequine.org; Michael Blowen (502) 863-1775, michael@oldfriendsequine.org

Zenanta and Amy Speck-Kern Victorious in I1 Freestyle Debut

Amy Speck-Kern and Zenanta in their I1 Freestyle (Photo courtesy of Jonna Jodko)

Wellington, FL (July 14, 2018) – A sweltering Florida summer couldn’t stop Excel Dressage’s Amy Speck-Kern and her KWPN mare Zenanta from attaining another milestone in their dressage career. During June’s Gold Coast Summer Solstice, held at the Palm Beach Equine Sports Complex in Wellington, Florida, Speck-Kern and the elegant bay mare topped their debut FEI Freestyle class with a 72.230%. Zenanta (Krack C x Ferro) made her Intermediaire I debut only in beginning of 2018, and her debut Intermediaire I freestyle victory demonstrates the alacrity with which she is successfully progressing up the levels. The pair danced to a selection of violin covers of pop music from Avicii, Kygo, Lindsay Sterling, Justin Bieber, and Selena Gomez, all choreographed to the movements of the Intermediaire I. Winning their first freestyle is a meaningful step as the mare continues to make progress towards the Grand Prix, and Speck-Kern also has her sights set on possibly taking Zenanta to regionals to do the Prix St. Georges, Intermediaire I, and Intermediaire I Freestyle.

The pair’s freestyle was designed by Karen Robinson of Applause Dressage. Beginning with a tribute to the late Avicii in the opening canter song, Gonna Love Ya, the test progressed to a Martin Z cover of Feel It Still by Portugal. The Man for Zenanta’s trot, a Lindsay Sterling cover of It Ain’t Me by Selena Gomez and Kygo for her canter, and Love Yourself by Justin Bieber for her walk. “I chose music that was easy to ride to and upbeat to match her elevated gaits,” said Speck-Kern, who trains out of her Loxahatchee facility with Olympian Ali Brock. “We decided to do the Freestyle as a step towards the winter CDIs next season; I’ve never done a CDI and wanted to practice with her in the summer when there was less pressure. She’s really been stepping up in her training, and our lessons with Ali [Brock] have been going really well. We are preparing her for the Grand Prix, but are very much taking our time and letting Zenanta determine when we are ready. There’s no rush, and the emphasis will be on quality. For now my plans are to show our I1 freestyle one more time this summer, then maybe go to regionals with an eye on nationals before seeing where our training is for the beginning of the 2019 season.”

Speck-Kern closed out her 2018 winter season with successful rides on her two campaign horses, Zenanta and Amadeus (Flemmingh x Welt Hit II). A and Z, as they are known around the barn, put in solid tests at the national level during the 2018 Adequan Global Dressage Festival. Zenanta began by making her Intermediaire I debut just before the start of season and closing AGDF Week 12 with a personal high score at the level; she and Speck-Kern also won the Intermediaire I during the Palm Beach Dressage Derby with a score of 66%. Amadeus, a gelding Speck-Kern scouted and imported from Europe as a 3-year-old, is making currently competing at Intermediaire and making steady progress towards the Grand Prix.

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