Germany Wins in Boekelo, Sweden Takes Series Title, and Swiss Book Ticket to Tokyo

Michael Jung leads German victory lap. (FEI/Libby Law)

In the thrilling finale to the FEI Eventing Nations Cup™ 2019 series at Boekelo, The Netherlands, Team Germany posted their fourth win of the season while league leaders Sweden held on to take the series title. However, some of the biggest smiles were on Swiss faces when they pulled Olympic qualification out of the bag.

There were three teams in contention for the single ticket to Tokyo 2020, and Dutch hopes were dashed when they found themselves lying eleventh of the 12 competing nations after Saturday’s cross-country phase. But Switzerland and Belgium slugged it out to the very end, with the final series rankings swinging the pendulum in favour of the Swiss.

The new Olympic format led to plenty of head-scratching during the four-day fixture at which the German team took command at the outset and never flinched. Without a drop score, the multi-medalled Sandra Auffarth (Let’s Dance 73), Michael Jung (fischerRocana FST), and Ingrid Klimke (SAP Asha P) put just 78.10 penalty points on the board after Dressage, with Auffarth also leading the individual rankings on her mark of 24.90. And with a hat-trick of Cross-Country zeros, this phenomenal threesome looked all but unassailable going into the final Jumping phase.

There was plenty of movement below them as the cross-country course designed by Adrian Ditcham played its part. Australia climbed from sixth to second thanks to brilliant clear runs inside the time by Chris Burton (Clever Louis) and Kevin McNab (Fernhill Tabasco), and the Belgians rocketed up from seventh to third, thanks in no small part to a great performance from Lara de Liedekerke-Meier (Alpaga d’Arville) and just 3.6 time penalties for Constantin van Rijckevorsel (Beat It). With a two-phase tally of 117.50, they were lying just over three points behind Australia and just ahead of the Japanese who were in fourth going into the final day, while the Swiss also made serious headway when soaring up from 12th to fifth, their running total of 125.90 leaving them just eight points adrift of their Belgian rivals as the action resumed.

And it was a real roller-coaster in the battle for the team placings, with the 84-seconds time-allowed proving difficult for many to get.

The team partnerships were last to go, and the Belgians dropped down the leaderboard when adding 30.80 to their tally. However, despite the addition of just 0.40 for pathfinder Caroline Gerber (Tresor de Chignan CH) for going over the time, the Swiss also lost their grip when putting 30.00 more on the board. Robin Godel (Grandeur de Lully CH) collected 13.20 on his tour of the 12-fence track while Tiziana Realini (Toubleu de Rueire), who had produced one of those precious cross-country clears, posted 16.4 to bring their team total of 155.9, leaving the Swiss just behind their Belgian rivals in seventh place at the end of the day.

The Olympic spot would be earned by the country lying highest of the unqualified nations in the final FEI Eventing Nations Cup™ 2019 standings. The Swiss lay third coming into this seventh and last leg, and their final total of 370 points left them well clear of the Belgians who completed with 355. Meanwhile, with their closest opposition from Italy not lining out this time around, the leading Swedes, carrying 435 points, had a clear run to the 2019 title despite finishing tenth at this last leg.

At the sharp end, Germany held on for a convincing win on a final scoreline of 94.10, while a clear from Burton, 5.20 for McNab, and just four faults for Samantha Birch (Finduss PFB) secured runner-up spot for Australia on a final tally of 123.50. Japan finished an impressive third, Kazuma Tomoto (Bernadette Utopia) and Atsushi Negishi (Ventura de la Chaule JRA) going clear in both of the final two phases while Yoshiaki Oiwa (Bart L JRA), who had been lying individually second after dressage but who was penalised for a cross-country refusal, had a pole down at the penultimate triple combination. The Japanese finished less than a single penalty point behind the Australians, and it is quite clear they will be a force to be reckoned with on home ground in Tokyo next summer. Fourth went to New Zealand (130.00) and fifth to Great Britain (143.00).

The very last rider into the ring, Germany’s Auffarth, had individual glory in her grasp until hitting the last element of the triple combination, which dropped her to fourth and opened the door for Great Britain’s Laura Collett (London 52) to take the individual honours.

Results here.

by Louise Parkes

Julie Curtin and Point Being Make Their Mark on $5,000 USHJA National Pro Hunter Derby

Julie Curtin and Point Being ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – October 11, 2019 – Julie Curtin (Woodstock, GA) bookended the podium in Friday’s $5,000 USHJA National Pro Hunter Derby at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC) at Tryon Resort, earning 177 points after two rounds aboard Point Being, and receiving a total score of 171 with Amy Squier Perez’s Commentary (Cooliage x Stutbuch I Quinni). Second place went to Megan Rosenthal (Charlotte, NC), who piloted Ledger, a 2002 Warmblood gelding owned by Five Henry Stables, to a score of 176.

There were 18 entries on hand to test the Joe Carnicom course in the first round, with Curtin earning appearance in the handy aboard four different mounts. “The course rode really nicely!” Curtin emphasized. “There was a lot to look at with the sunlight, shadows, and glares, but the course itself rode very nicely. There were really pretty jumps, and this ring [International Stadium] is great. The footing is really nice. It’s always a lot of fun to ride here.

“He’s an overachiever,” Curtin said of her own 2007 Warmblood gelding (Aachen x Unknown), “but he gets a little nervous sometimes, because he wants to do a good job. The hardest part is keeping him calm and collected so he knows he can do his job. He’s great, and he’s got the best jump in the world! He was so much fun today, and such a good boy.

“Going into the handy, we came in with a 92 and in the lead, so I just wanted to be smooth,” said Curtin of her second-round strategy. “Point Being can be a little nervous sometimes in the handy, so I just wanted to try to be tidy and nice, but smooth. It was almost like doing a different course because it was so bright the second time, and there weren’t as many shadows. He was a good boy and trusted me.”

Curtin was pleased to achieve third aboard Commentary, who is learning the ropes at the national level, she shared. “The horse that I was third on is just a green 3’3” horse, and he’s going to step up and do 3’6” classes next year, so this is really good experience for him. Hopefully we’ll start doing some big derbies! I was proud of him, too. He’s our little baby who we brought along.”

Ryleigh Threat and Asriel Dominate $5,000 USHJA National Junior Hunter Derby

Ryleigh Threat piloted Asriel to a total score of 169 to top the $5,000 USHJA National Junior Hunter Derby at TIEC to represent Concord, NC with the 2010 Holsteiner gelding (Ariadus x Bacci) owned by Crown Sage/Vartech Systems, in his first-ever National Hunter Derby. In second with a score of 167.5, Devon Degen (Water Mill, NY) piloted Luminary, the 2009 Holsteiner gelding (Singulord Joter x Viola XXX) owned by Degenmoor Farm Inc., while Chrissie Catto (St. Augustine, FL) and her own Intuition, a 2004 Warmblood gelding, claimed third on a score of 167.

Sixteen entries competed over the Joe Carnicom course, and Threat also presented Margaret Wolfe’s Embrace, a 2008 Oldenburg gelding (Escapade x Zena), in the handy round to earn fifth on a score of 153. “The course rode amazing,” Threat recounted. “He [Asriel] was so spectacular in the first round. We had some issues in the second round, but he still went around amazing. It was such a fun course. It was probably the most fun I’ve ever had in a handy!

“‘Ace’ is very weird; he has a lot of quirks to him,” Threat admitted. “He’s a very hard ride. He’s hard to figure out, but thankfully I figured him out today. My strategy was just to give him the best ride possible. He’s hard, and it’s his first-ever derby, so I just needed to figure him out and give him some miles.

“I enjoy everything about TIEC,” Threat concluded. “I think it’s such an amazing facility. It’s so nice, and it’s built for horses and riders. There are so many fun things to do, too. Saturday Night Lights is the most fun!”

To learn more, visit www.Tryon.com.

Coyle Wins His First FEI Class with CHS Krooze in Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake CSI 3*

Daniel Coyle and CHS Krooze ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – October 10, 2019 – Daniel Coyle (IRL) and CHS Krooze flew to the $36,000 Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake CSI 3* win at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC) at Tryon Resort, stopping the jump-off timers in a time of 33.448 seconds. Three seconds behind in second place, Kristen VanderVeen (USA) piloted Bull Run’s Almighty, a 2009 Hannoverian gelding (Caspar x Quidam De Revel) owned by Bull Run Jumpers Six LLC, to a 36.552-second jump-off performance, while Rachel Cornacchia (CAN) and Eventyre Farms Ltd’s Valkyrie de Talma, a 2009 Selle Francais mare (Diamant De Semilly x Cento), claimed third with a time of 36.568 seconds over the short course.

A field of 76 entries competing over the Michel Vaillancourt (CAN) course design and 21 pairs qualifying for the jump-off made for stiff competition, causing six pairs to withdraw in advance of the second round. Coyle’s strategy was to go as fast as possible as the first rider to test the short course with his own 2010 Irish Sport Horse mare (Kroongraaf x Cruise Oak):

“There were still a good few clears for the jump-off, and I was first. So, I had to be as fast as possible. Luckily, that horse is incredibly fast! I think sometimes it’s better to go first in a jump-off, because you just stick to your plan and everybody else has to try and beat you,” Coyle posited. “Sometimes it works out better!”

Tryon Fall 4 is Coyle’s first experience as a competitor at TIEC, and dominated his first FEI class at the venue by more than three seconds. Similarly, Coyle is testing the waters with his nine-year-old emerging star, as well as her abilities, he said.

“She’s been incredibly competitive all year anyway. In the beginning of the year, I didn’t know what was her class, or where she belonged, so to speak, but every time I ask her to jump a little bigger, and ask a little more, she keeps giving it to me,” he shared. “I’m going to keep going with her until the time that she says, ‘okay, maybe this is too much for me!’ But right now, I haven’t felt that yet.

“She’s still only nine, and winning 1.50m classes, so I have to be careful and make sure that I don’t ask her too much too soon,” Coyle emphasized. With this in mind, Coyle explained that he is selecting Farrel, the 2010 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Cardento 933 x Becherry) owned by Ariel Grange, to challenge Saturday’s $134,000 Gary Sinise Foundation Jump for Our Heroes Grand Prix CSI 3* presented by Lowe’s. He’ll save CHS Krooze for another 2* week or another venue entirely.

A lengthy entry list meant that CHS Krooze got to take an hour break in her stall between rounds, Coyle relayed, which helped to keep her mentally and physically fresh:

“I sent her back to the barn and she got to cool down and take an hour in the stall. I had Farrel to jump in the meantime. Everything worked out great that I got to keep going and keep myself active by jumping another horse, and then by that point it was time to get going for the jump-off.

“I think it’s always better for the horse to be able to have an hour off and come back between rounds, especially at a show such as this where everything is convenient,” Coyle noted. “Why not give the horse an hour break? Okay, adrenaline keeps them going at the time [if there’s no break], but it always makes it easier if they can have a little down time away from everything, and it freshens them up a little bit for the second round.

“This is my first time here, so it’s cool to win the first FEI class here,” concluded Coyle. “We are staying in a log cabin here onsite, and that’s really convenient and handy. We have lots of horses here, so it’s better if you’re closer.”

Leslie Burr-Howard and Donna Speciale Claim $5,000 Power & Speed Stake CSI 3*

Leslie Burr-Howard (USA) and Donna Speciale sped to win Wednesday’s $5,000 Power & Speed Stake CSI 3* during Tryon Fall 4 at TIEC with a double clear and a speed phase time of 33.617 seconds. Second place was awarded to David O’Brien (IRL) aboard Kir Royal SCF, a 2010 Belgian Warmblood gelding (Amaretto D’Arco x Nabab de Reve) owned by Spy Coast Farm, LLC, with a double-clear effort and a speed phase time of 34.061 seconds, while Lauren Hester (USA) earned third-place honors on Hester Equestrian’s Cooper 166, a 2010 Holsteiner gelding (Cancara x Unknown), with a speed phase time of 36.397 seconds.

Howard and the 2008 Dutch Warmblood mare (Cavalier x Concorde) owned by Laure Sudreau-Rippe and Peter competed against 54 other horse-and-rider pairs over the Michel Vaillancourt-set course, but Howard admitted that her plan was simply “just to let her [Donna Speciale] go at her own pace today.” She continued, “Donna is a very fast horse; she’s won, I think, four Grands Prix this year. She’s naturally fast over the ground, so it worked out.”

To learn more, visit www.Tryon.com.

Scott Brash Won the Major Class of the Day at HUBSIDE Jumping in Saint-Tropez

He was announced as one of the headliners of this penultimate weekend of the HUBSIDE Jumping, launched last April in the renovated stables of the Gulf of Saint-Tropez, in the South of France. Scott Brash, currently rank #27, did not disappoint for his first participation in the competition. He won the major class of the day, qualifier for Sunday’s Grand Prix.

« It is my first time here, in HUBSIDE Jumping. I must say I really like it. It is fantastic for the horses; the arena is really large which is great for the horses. We can be used to smaller arenas, so it is nice to have a bigger arena to ride in and I think the horses really enjoy it.

« That was a fast class. I was very happy with Senator today. He has done everything I asked to him today. He felt very good and fresh today, and I am very happy with the win. Senator is now 10 years old. I’ve had him for two years now. He is still taking a bit of time to get into the 5-star shows. He is a little bit of a nervous horse with the atmosphere. He feels good in HUBSIDE Jumping because I think there is a big arena, a lot of space; he does not feel claustrophobic. It is a comfortable arena for him. »

Results: https://online.equipe.com/fr/class_sections/463566.

DANIEL KOROLOFF
Relations avec les médias
daniel@blizko-communication.com

This Esme and Teddy the Shetland to Take Centre Stage at Olympia Live Zone

Olympia, The London International Horse Show is thrilled to announce the 2019 line-up for the hugely popular ‘Live Zone.’ Providing a unique opportunity for spectators to meet and interact with some of their favourite equestrian stars, this year’s Live Zone features online influencers as well as talks, Q&A sessions, and rider interviews.

Alongside the exclusive opportunity to meet elite equestrian athletes, the Live Zone will include guest appearances from social media sensations, including Esme Higgs, one of the world’s most popular equestrian influencers. Attending from Friday 20 to Sunday 22 December, Higgs is famous for her YouTube videos of her life with her ponies and donkeys and attracts 3.5 million viewers to her YouTube channel ‘This Esme’ each month.

Teddy the Shetland will be at Olympia on Thursday 19 December and Friday 20 December for a ‘meet and greet’ and photo opportunities. The miniature Shetland who has over 120,000 followers has become a social media superstar and has even been featured in a Dior photoshoot.

Show jumper Kate Lewis, who documents her equestrian journey under the name ‘Blob the Cob’, will be making her Olympia Live Zone debut on Thursday, 19 December. Known for her incredible bareback jumping videos, the 20-year-old from North Yorkshire has over 136,000 Instagram followers and YouTube subscribers.

This year the Live Zone will also see appearances from young eventing rider ‘Pony Nuts,’ Vic Brant, who writes the hugely popular online blog ‘Diary of a Wimpy Eventer’ and vloggers Tina Wallace and Emily Dunstan who make videos as ‘Life on the Left Rein’ and ‘EMD Eventing’. By popular demand, pony producer Megan Elphick of Elphick Event Ponies will be making her Live Zone debut with a Q&A session, answering questions about training tactics and the best confidence-building exercises for ponies.

Olympia’s Official Charity, The Tim Stockdale Foundation, will also be supporting the Urban Equestrian Academy on the Live Zone for Part II of the Olympia Riding Academy – the initiative started earlier this year with an educational trip to the Stockdale’s yard.

The complete 2019 timetable will be announced later this month and will also include top international competitors from show jumping, dressage, and driving as well as specialist equestrian experts, and other stars of the Show.

Olympia Show Director, Simon Brooks-Ward, said: “Olympia recognises the importance of digital bloggers and YouTube stars and we want to build unforgettable experiences for both our visitors and for those people who have such an influence on the equestrian community. The Live Zone at Olympia has been an incredibly successful initiative that brings fans and riders together. This year, it returns better than ever with an extensive list of guests.”

YouTuber ‘This Esme’ is one of the world’s largest equestrian social media stars. “Olympia is definitely one of my favorite times of year. I have been every year since I was 10 years old and it wouldn’t feel like Christmas without it! This year I’m really excited to be back in the Live Zone meeting my viewers and soaking up the special Olympia atmosphere.”

Taking place at Olympia Grand this December, Olympia, The London International Horse Show attracts the world’s best riders and carriage drivers. The West Kensington venue will host seven days of top-class equestrian competition between 16-22 December, thrilling visitors from around the country. Alongside three FEI World Cup legs in Dressage, Show Jumping, and Carriage Driving, 90,000 spectators will also enjoy international performances from The Household Calvary Musical Ride and Jean-Francois Pignon’s new ‘Black and White’ display.

To purchase tickets for Olympia, please visit www.olympiahorseshow.com or telephone the box office on 0871 230 5580.

For more information, please contact:
Gayle Jenkins / gjenkins@revolutionworld.com / +44 (0)203 176 0355

FEI Dressage World Cup: The Clash of the Queens

Their male counterparts had better watch out! The FEI Dressage World Cup leg in Lyon, organised as part of the Longines Equita Lyon Concours Hippique International (30 October to 3 November), will offer its loyal public a line-up of riders, and in particular of lady riders, which has rarely been seen at a French dressage show.

Charlotte Dujardin at the FEI World Cup leg in Lyon for the first time
The last (and only) time she appeared in the main arena at Lyon-Eurexpo was back in 2014, at the FEI Dressage World Cup Final, organised by Sylvie Robert’s team. And it was in Lyon that the English rider, at that time partnered by her legendary Valegro, won her first Final. Charlotte Dujardin, two-time winner of the title (Lyon 2014, Las Vegas 2015), three-time Olympic champion (team and individual medallist in London in 2012 and individual medallist in Rio in 2016), World champion in 2014, and five times gold medallist in a European Championship between 2011 and 2015, has made the 2019-2020 FEI Dressage World Cup her objective this winter. After a curtailed European Championship in 2019, where with Mount St John Freestyle she nevertheless beat her own record in the Grand Prix (81.91%), ‘Queen Charlotte’ is aiming to qualify her young ten-year-old mare for the 2020 Final in Las Vegas. Since her titles in Lyon in 2014 and Las Vegas in 2015, Charlotte Dujardin has only competed in three FEI World Cups: London in 2015 and in 2018, and Amsterdam in 2016. This season she should appear on at least three occasions, including Lyon.

Isabell Werth, one of our most loyal riders, heading for a fifth victory in Lyon?
Just as the Lyon ring brought success for the English rider Charlotte Dujardin, other riders have succeeded her since 2014 and in particular Germany’s Isabell Werth. Winner of the FEI World Cup leg in Lyon in 2010, then in 2016, 2017, and 2018, this legend of equestrian sport has nothing but praise when speaking of the only French leg on the circuit. She was also the ‘patron’ of the candidacy of the show when Sylvie Robert’s team was applying to the FEI to organise a Dressage World Cup.  In 2019, the German team is sending another of its brilliant ambassadors in the form of Jessica von Bredow-Werndl, who won the bronze medal this summer at the European Championships, and will also be appearing at the Longines Equita Lyon Concours Hippique International. She will be riding Zaire-E, the horse with which she came second at the FEI World Cup leg in Budapest, at the end of September.

Serious competitors also to be found on the men’s side
Dutchman Hans Peter Minderhoud, the winner of the FEI Dressage World Cup Final in 2016, is expected in Lyon, along with his fifteen-year-old stallion, Glock’s Zanardi.  Sweden’s Patrik Kittel, another horseman loyal to the Lyon leg of the FEI Dressage World Cup, will be riding his gelding Delaunay OLD, the horse with which he leapt up the world rankings this month (from the twentieth to the thirteenth position). The combination also won the FEI World Cup leg in Budapest, ahead of Jessica von Bredow-Werndl.

French riders headed up by Morgan Barbançon-Mestre
In the Hungarian World Cup leg in Budapest, Kittel was the winner, Germany’s Von Bredow-Werndl was second and Mestre came third. Riding Sir Donnerhall II OLD, she finished in the Grand Prix Freestyle with a record score for the combination: 77.75%!  Morgan and ‘Gus’ (the affectionate nickname given to the stallion by his rider) will head up a major French delegation in Lyon. The audience at the Longines Equita Lyon Concours Hippique International will have the chance to show their support for Stéphanie Brieussel and Amorak, Anne-Sophie Serre and Actuelle de Massa, and Alexandre Ayache with Zo What.

In order to showcase dressage to as many people as possible, the organisers of the Longines Equita Lyon Concours Hippique International have decided to open the FEI World Cup leg in Lyon to all the visitors. On Thursday 31 October in the morning and on Friday 1 November in the afternoon, spectators who have “trade show” tickets will discover the best dressage riders in the world, during performances worthy of the greatest specialists. On Thursday, the doors of the trade show will open at 7.30am to let spectators be comfortably seated in the stands at 8am.

  • The FEI World Cup Dressage Grand Prix presented by the Comité Régional d’Equitation Auvergne Rhône-Alpes: Thursday 31 October, at 8am
  • The FEI World Cup Dressage Grand Prix Freestyle presented by FFE Generali: Friday 1 November, at 4pm

Press contact: Blizko Communication
Daniel Koroloff, Juliette Feytout – Mob.: +33(0)6 11 02 18 12
Email: daniel@blizko-communication.com

4 Breeders’ Cup 2019 Contenders to Make an Epic Comeback This Year

Image source.

Horse racing tournaments never get old as they are celebrated all year round. Each horse racing event happening in any part of the world needs a perfect venue for all horse racers to earn a considerable number of prizes. At the same time, bettors would find another opportunity to wage for their favorite entries and grow their bank roll.

Most horse racing fans are on their feet as one of the biggest horse racing in the world is about to commence in the last quarter of this year. The Breeders’ Cup 2019 is a two-day grand horse racing event that will take place on November 1 and 2, 2019. It will happen in Santa Anita Park, which stands as one of the most legendary horse racing fields in the world.

Many races will take place during the Breeders’ Cup this year. Aside from that, it will come as the most exciting horse racing events this year as we might see a rematch of the mightiest horse racers who came not so strong in this year’s Triple Crown Series. Most of them have confirmed their appearances in Santa Anita Park.

The influx of horse racing fans and bettors are expected to fill in the Santa Anita racing field on the said day. Many bettors will surely wage huge amounts of money as this racing competition offers a big number of purse prizes. If you wish to look at the odds of each entry closely, you can visit the official Breeders’ Cup website or check TVG Odds for the latest listings and races each racer will partake in.

As we draw near to the 2019 Breeders’ Cup, inevitably, you can no longer contain your excitement in witnessing an action-packed show. To hype you up with this upcoming event, here are some of the contenders you can look forward to betting as they will make an epic comeback this year.

McKinzie

McKinzie is one of the most famous horse racers who’s going to seek a flying color in the Breeders’ Cup 2019. He was considered as one of the strongest contenders to win the U.S. Triple Crown Series; however, he wasn’t able to perform his goals. He suffered a leg injury early this March, which gave him a hard time to join said racing events.

Although McKinzie didn’t start the year as actively as other racing hopefuls, he was able to showcase his saddling skills in the middle of this year. He won the 2019 Whitney Stakes and placed second in the recently concluded Awesome Again S. race. He is confirming his ticket to the 2019 Breeders’ Cup and hopes to get the crown this year.

Code of Honor

Code of Honor is another famous horse to take a spot in the Breeders’ Cup this year. He is trained by Claude R. McGaughey, a Hall of Famer when it comes to producing successful horse racers. He was one of the most famous horse racers who took a winning spot of last year’s edition of Fountain of Youth Stakes and Florida Derby.

Code of Honor has also established reliable racing statistics this year. As of this time, he recorded around five wins already on some notable racing shows. His biggest victory was the Runhappy Travers Stakes on August 24, 2019 and the Jockey Club Gold Cup Stakes on September 28, 2019. This momentum is why Code of Honor is participating in this year’s 2019 Breeders’ Cup. This horse has the biggest chance of outlasting other horse racing contenders.

Omaha Beach

Although, he ended not joining the competition, Omaha Beach was a 2019 Kentucky Derby hopeful who gained so much popularity from the horse racing community. He was pulled out because of a severe throat infection, which affected his performance. Regardless of what this horse racer has gone through in the early months, he will return and try his luck yet again in the Santa Anita Park this year.

Richard Mandella, Omaha Beach’s trainer, had to make sure that Omaha Beach is in the best condition heading on to the Breeders’ Cup. He’s had an excellent racing record this year as he tallied four wins already. This horse was the winner of the 2019 Santa Anita Sprint Championship, which allowed him to gain confidence in winning the most coveted Breeders’ Cup crown.

Seeking the Soul

Seeking the Soul is considered as one of the wealthiest horse racers in history. He was the sire of Perfect Soul, who was also a horse racing superstar during his time. According to his trainer Dallas Stewart and Breeder Charles Fipke, his earnings are about to match what Perfect Soul had earned during his time.

The Breeders’ Cup 2019 is another horse racing event that Seeking the Soul will surely give an impressive fight. He might not have joined the Triple Crown Series, but he’s looking to show up in Santa Anita Park with a vengeance. He has an overwhelming seven recorded wins this year, where he won the 2019 Stephen Foster Stakes. He is one of the horse races to bet for the upcoming 2019 Breeders’ Cup.

Breeders’ Cup Santa Anita 2019

This year, California will be hosting the Breeders Cup at Santa Anita Park, Arcadia. Here is a guide that can take you through the key entries for Breeders Cup in this year’s edition. The 2019 Breeders’ Cup is held this year on November 1-2. Horse Racing betting is one of the only allowed online gambling options in California, so if you’re planning to get in on the action, check out this guide.

The Breeders’ Cup is held at different racetracks. In 2016, Santa Anita hosted the event for a record ninth time. Churchill Downs tied this record when hosting the 2018 renewal. Belmont Park hosted the series four times, and Gulfstream Park and Hollywood Park each hosted the meet three times. The 2019 race is being held again for the 10th time at Santa Anita Park.

The Breeders’ Cup World Championships is an annual series of Grade I Thoroughbred horse races, operated by Breeders’ Cup Limited, a company formed in 1982. From its inception in 1984 through 2006, it was a single-day event; starting in 2007, it expanded to two days. All sites have been in the United States, except in 1996, when the races were at the Woodbine Racetrack in Canada.

Each Breeders’ Cup race presents four Breeders’ Cup trophies to the connections of the winner and a garland of flowers draped over the withers of the winning horse. Many Breeders’ Cup winners will go on to win the Eclipse Award in their respective division. For example, of the eleven flat racehorse categories, seven of the Eclipse winners in 2015 had also won a Breeders’ Cup race, while three others were in the money.

The event was created as a year-end championship for North American Thoroughbred racing, and also attracts top horses from other parts of the world, especially Europe. The idea for the Breeders’ Cup was proposed at the 1982 awards luncheon for the Kentucky Derby Festival by pet food heir John R. Gaines (1928–2005), a leading Thoroughbred owner and breeder who wanted to clean up the sport’s image. The Cup was initially faced with much skepticism in the racing community; however, with the vocal support of legendary trainer John Nerud and others, the Breeders’ Cup was carried out, and subsequently experienced tremendous popularity domestically and abroad.

From 2008 to 2014, the Breeders’ Cup was held at either Churchill Downs or Santa Anita Park, both major tracks with a demonstrated record of success in hosting the event. In 2015, however, Keeneland was selected as the host track for the first time, in large part because of Lexington’s position as the center of the North American thoroughbred breeding industry. Although concerns were raised over Keeneland’s limited amount of permanent seating, the 2015 event was considered a success, with record Friday attendance and a sell-out on Saturday.

2015 marked the first time a Triple Crown had been won since the inception of the Breeders’ Cup, and thus the first opportunity to win the so-called Grand Slam of Thoroughbred racing, consisting of the Triple Crown and Breeders’ Cup Classic. American Pharoah completed the feat in a decisive wire to wire victory.

In 2016, Santa Anita had the record upon hosting the Breeders’ Cup for a record ninth time. The 2017 event was held at Del Mar for the first time. The 2018 event was held at Churchill Downs. For the 2018 event, the Friday card was known as “Future Stars Friday” and featured five races for two-year-olds, including the new Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Turf Sprint. The Distaff moved back to the Saturday card. Additional Breeders’ Cup changes arrived with the Breeders’ Cup Future Wager, similar to the Kentucky Derby Future Wager, and the first time the Equestrian event which was intermingled with Breeders’ Cup and Churchill Downs activities.

Horses from around the globe will be qualifying for the 36th Breeders’ Cup World Championships to be held at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, California on November 1-2. This year’s Championships consists of 14 races, 13 of which are Grade 1 events, with purses and awards totaling more than $30 million.

The Breeders’ Cup Challenge Series, now in its 13th year, will be held at many of the world’s premier racetracks in 11 countries: U.S., Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, England, France, Ireland, Japan, Peru, and South Africa.

As part of the enhanced benefits to horsemen competing in the series, Breeders’ Cup will pay the entry fees and guarantee a starting position in a corresponding Championships race for winners of all Challenge races. The Challenge winner must already be nominated to the Breeders’ Cup program or it must be nominated by the Championships’ pre-entry deadline of October 21 to receive the rewards.

In addition, Breeders’ Cup will provide a $40,000 travel stipend to the connections of all Championship starters from outside of North America and a $10,000 travel allowance for starters within North America that are stabled outside of California.

Motivation from Moshi, by Jane Savoie

Honesty is an interesting concept. Most of us horses are truly honest. We don’t know how to be any other way. But people, well, not so much.

Most people believe they are honest. But often humans are simply justifying their behavior and calling it honesty. If they really looked at what was going on, they’d probably realize they were either manipulating a situation to their advantage, or ignoring the truth of their behavior.

Are you honest? I’ll bet you are, at least most of the time. Sometimes not being honest is the kindest thing… like when your grandmother asks if you like her mince pie, but you really don’t. You don’t want to hurt feelings. So, when is honesty the best policy and when is it a matter of violating values and honor? That’s a tough question that I don’t have an answer to. But perhaps just asking the question will stir the kind of thought that’s helpful.

Do you appreciate honesty? Are you a good example for your children, friends, co-workers? A reputation is an easy thing to damage, so use your good sense of honesty well.

I’m honestly hungry! Will you bring me a carrot or two? Jane’s out of town and I want my treat!

Love, Moshi

Jane Savoie
1174 Hill St ext.
Berlin, VT 05602
Jane’s Website
DressageMentor.com

Theo Genn and Boucanier Blaze to Win $25,000 American Standard Grand Prix

Theo Genn and Boucanier ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – October 7, 2019 – Theo Genn (Lebanon, OH) and Taylor Reid’s Boucanier came out on top in Sunday’s $25,000 American Standard Grand Prix to conclude Tryon Fall 3 competition at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC) at Tryon Resort, stopping the jump-off timers at 41.562 seconds. In second, Manuel Torres (Leesburg, VA) and Evermine, a 2006 Holsteiner gelding (Corofino I x Cantus) owned by Santa Catalina Farm, cleared the short course in a time of 42.062 seconds to earn reserve, while Sharn Wordley (Citra, FL) and Barnetta, his own 2004 Westphalian gelding (Baloubet Du Rouet x Polydor), received third on a score of 44.448 seconds.

The Peter Grant (CAN) course welcomed 36 pairs on the first-round track, with nine pairs presenting for the jump-off challenge. Genn was second-to-last, and had a rough idea of what his strategy would be, but had to see what the 2006 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Ovidius x Joost) was up for, he detailed:

“For the jump-off, I only got to see the first couple go. I kind of had an idea of how fast I needed to go based on what I saw Sharn [Wordley] do when he was sitting in second. Boucanier is a naturally very fast horse – he skims a little bit across the ground – but he can get a little nervous when I go fast,” Genn said. “I knew within the first two jumps whether or not I was going to be able to go for it. He popped over one and two really nicely, and listened to me when I asked him to go faster without getting nervous, so then I knew I could let it rip a little bit. Then, I just kind of went after it at every jump. I got a little lucky around a couple, but they all stayed up!”

For Genn, the win was a bit of “badly-needed” redemption following a week of stiff competition, he revealed. “Honestly, overall, it wasn’t a great week for us [compared to last week]. I was having a really rough week, and was a little down! Last week, my horses were unbelievable here: it didn’t matter what happened, we still ended up jumping clean. This week, even though they went around nicely, we had four faults almost every time. So, this was a nice way to end it and go home. I’m just happy. I needed that badly!”

Genn is currently riding Boucanier for his owner-rider, Taylor Reid, and it was particularly special that Boucanier ended up on top at TIEC, he shared. “Good friends of ours, Taylor Reid and Alex Blackman, own him along with some other horses we ride. They were here today to watch, and it’s been a while since they were able to come visit, so that was really nice. Right now, Taylor is pregnant and due in four months, so I’m riding him and keeping him going, and then when she’s ready she’ll take him over and do him in the Junior Amateurs again.”

For now, Genn and crew are headed home. “We’ve been on the road for three weeks now, and I don’t like to show for more than three weeks in a row, so we’ll go home, give the horses a little break, and then head to Florida already,” concluded Genn.

Hunter Kay and Alright Are $5,000 USHJA National Derby Winners

Hunter Kay (Columbia, SC) and Alright scored a two-round total of 176 to top the $5,000 USHJA National Hunter Derby at TIEC on Friday. Ashley Conkle (Wellford, SC) and Agnetta Currey’s Tomcat, a 2004 Warmblood gelding (Mezcalero x Kitten), earned second with a total score of 173.5, while the yellow rosette went to Haiku, the Jo Ann Forman-owned 2011 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Advance x Utrillo van de Heffink) ridden by Aida Sanchez Long (Signal Mountain, TN), with scores totaling 169.

“He’s an eight-year-old gelding that we got a little bit over a year ago,” Kay said of Ann Rice Ervin’s 2011 Warmblood gelding with unknown breeding. “I’ve been doing him some in the national derbies as well as the second-year greens 3’9” divisions. He’s a really sweet, easy-going guy. He’s super quiet; you kind of just chuck the reins and kick! He’s super fun. After this year, we’re looking to move up to the international derbies in the next year, which is why I did this derby today as practice.”

Alright was sitting on the edge of the podium after the first round, and Kay went into the handy round with a strategy to show off his mount’s pace and efficiency, he explained. “In the first round, I was a little slow to the first jump, and when I came back for the handy, I really wanted to just go for it a little bit to make up some ground, and just be efficient in my turns. I also wanted to step up the pace and show a real transition for the hand-gallop jump.”

To learn more, visit www.Tryon.com.

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