Longines Streak Continues for Nassar and Lordan in Las Vegas

Nayel Nassar (EGY) and Lordan. (FEI/Andrew Ryback)

Just a week after topping the World Cup qualifier in Thermal (USA), Nayel Nassar (EGY) and his longtime partner Lordan led another victory gallop after clinching the $135,000 Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ Las Vegas (USA).

Nassar, 27, and his 14-year-old Hanoverian gelding were fastest in a six-horse jump-off set by Anthony D’Ambrosio (USA). The pair used their natural foot speed and tidiness to their advantage, coming through the timers in 34.57 seconds, over a second fastest than their closest competitors. It was an international podium, with Wilhelm Genn (GER) and Bugatti earning runner-up honors (35.73 seconds) and Harley Brown (AUS) and Mylord Cornet finishing third (40.34 seconds).

“It was a fast jump-off,” Nassar said. “Wilhelm set a really tough time to beat, and he was really efficient everywhere on a horse that has a bigger stride than mine. I just knew I had to be nice and neat in the turns and not go too crazy down the long lines.”

“It was a fast jump-off… Wilhelm set a really tough time to beat… I just knew I had to be nice and neat in the turns and not go too crazy down the long lines.” — Nayel Nassar (Egypt)

The top three were the only combinations to turn in double-clear rounds on the evening. Brown was the first to navigate the jump-off without fault, but he was forced to take a more conservative route with his less experienced 8-year-old. Genn, who won Sacramento’s (USA) World Cup qualifier in October, jumped ahead by nearly four seconds with an outstanding right turn to the jump-off’s second fence and a bold gallop down to the final obstacle. As the last to go, Nassar knew exactly what he had to do to win his second straight World Cup qualifier, and he executed, despite having a precarious rub two fences from home.

“I had the luck of the draw a little bit. I had the pole position coming in,” Nassar said. “It always helps when you know what you need to do, and I relish the pressure as well. Lordan can feel that, too; I was getting tingly walking in [the ring], and he really tried his heart out.”

Shifting Standings

Richard Spooner (USA) may have been kept off the podium, but he took over the lead in the west coast sub league standings of the Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ North American League with his fourth-place finish aboard Quirado RC. He now boasts 49 points, one ahead of Eve Jobs (USA). Nassar moved up to third in the standings; he now boasts 46 points.

“[Quirado RC] is just knocking my socks off,” Spooner said. “He’s been unbelievable in the World Cup season. He’s a huge horse — he’s about 18.1, maybe 18.2 hands — but he somehow is still very elastic with his body. I just feel graced every time I get to ride him, because the power that you feel with that horse is absolutely awesome.”

Genn took over second in the east coast sub league standings, behind only Molly Ashe Cawley’s (USA) league leading 55 points. Genn has 47 points, one ahead of defending World Cup Champion Beezie Madden (USA).

“Bugatti is 12, and every year when I take him to a new level, and I think it is about as big as he can jump, he surprises me and makes it work,” Genn said. “Who knows what the future brings? I’m super proud of him.”

After a brief holiday, the North American League resumes in Guadalajara (MEX) on 26 January 2019.

By Catie Staszak

FEI Media Contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager Press Relations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Olympia Horse Show Statement Regarding Tim Stockdale

The Organising Committee of Olympia, The London International Horse Show was deeply saddened to hear of the death of one of its longest serving members, Tim Stockdale. Tim was Jumping Rider Representative on the Olympia Committee from 1992. His highly valued advice and knowledge of the sport helped to shape the Show into the international event that it is today. Nothing was too much trouble and his advice and counsel was sought and always listened to.

He competed at Olympia for many years and, recently, became a stalwart of the BBC commentary team, promoting his sport with insight and expertise.

Simon Brooks-Ward, Show Director, said: “Tim and I joined the Olympia team in the same year – he on the Committee and me as Show Director. He was not only a great friend to all of us; he was also passionate about doing his best for the show and show jumping. He represented riders when he thought it was right to do so, yet Tim understood the challenges of organising large-scale international events.

“He possessed huge integrity, was selfless and self-effacing, and combined his love for the sport with a great sense of humour. His smile, his energy, and his words of wisdom will be much missed in the Grand Hall at Olympia this year. I will miss him. Our heartfelt sympathy goes to Laura and his sons Joe and Mark.”

For more information, please contact:
Gayle Jenkins / gjenkins@revolutionworld.com / +44 (0)203 176 0355

For more information on Olympia, The London International Horse Show, please visit www.olympiahorseshow.com or telephone the box office on 0844 995 0995.

Another Golden Bonanza for Brazil

The Chilean Pre-Junior and Junior team silver medallists. (FEI/Cristian León/TopComunicaciones)

Chilean delight with double team silver; Argentina claims three podium places

Brazil dominated once again when taking all the gold on offer, and more, at the FEI Jumping South American Championships for Young Riders, Juniors, Pre-Juniors and Children 2018 at San Carlos de Apoquindo in Las Condes, Chile. These Championships are a great test for the next generation of Jumping athletes in the region, and a total of 93 horse-and-rider partnerships from Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela competed at this year’s edition.

With medals on offer in seven categories, the Brazilian haul was little short of spectacular as they scooped 16 of the 21 sets on offer. However, there was plenty for the hosts to celebrate as they produced their best performance of the last four years when claiming both Pre-Junior and Junior team silver, while Argentina claimed bronze in the Children’s Team competition along with Young Riders Individual silver and bronze.

Children

The Children’s Championship was one of the most exciting of the week, coming down to a three-way jump-off for individual silver and bronze. Brazil’s Eduardo Coelho Barbara (13) was already in gold medal position after a brilliant series of performances with Quatuor de Coutol before his compatriots Antonio Johannpeter Cirne Lima and Gabriela Munhoz Ongaratto Furlan took on Argentina’s Lucas Guevara in the race against the clock.

Guevara had enjoyed a brilliant run with CT Chamaco, winning the first qualifier, contributing to his country’s team bronze medal success, and then coming out on top in the Individual Final competition. It seemed the 14-year-old must be destined to take a podium placing, but he left a fence on the floor in the jump-off and had to settle for fourth place behind Munhoz Ongaratto Furlan in bronze and Johannpeter Cirne Lima in silver.

A zero score for the Brazil Amarelo side of Augusto Bonotto Perfeito, Maithe Carolina Gabriel de Limo Marino, Camila Alvares Correa de Siqueira, Henrique Maranhao, and Audrey Jean Paranaiba McKinnon clinched the Children’s team title. Coelho Barbara was joined by Munhoz Ongaratto Furlan, Johannpeter Cirne Lima, Lara Ozores de Souza, and Joao Felipe de Albuquerque Maranhao Gomes to claim silver while Argentina’s Guevara, Delfina Spinella, Bautista Jaled, Camila Sensever, and Thiago Brown bagged bronze.

Pre-Junior

All eyes were on Philip Greenlees in the Pre-Junior Championship after his victory in the 2017 FEI Children’s International Classics Final in Beijing last December, but the 15-year-old had to settle for individual silver behind Maria Luiza da Silva Martha Vieira, while Lys Katherine Park Kang sealed another completely Brazilian podium.

Da Silva Martha Vieira and Park Kang were joined by Caroline Souza Chade, Joao Pedro de Almeida Chaves, and Leandro Jose Abrahao Duarte Alecrim to take the Pre-Junior Team title, and Greenlees was on the bronze-medal winning Brazil Amarela side. But strong performances from Trinidad Soffia, Benjamin Fuente-Alba Vignola, Maria Ignacia del Pedregal Villalobos, Jose Tomas Duran Ramirez, and Guillermo Garin put smiles on Chilean faces as they easily slipped into silver medal spot.

“The work begins to be reflected in the results, which is very important. We have developed an arduous process and this medal reflects an advance because in this category we have won two consecutive bronzes.” — Joaquín Larraín (Coach, Team Chile)

Juniors

Brazil’s Thales Gabriel de Lima Marino took double-gold in the Junior division to increase his South American medal tally to five. The 17-year-old who won team gold and individual bronze in Buenos Aires (ARG) last year was joined by the experienced trio of Laura Bosquirolli Tigre, Marcelo Gozzi, and Pedro Malucelli Egoroff to clinch the team honours yet again. However, the Chilean foursome of Carmen Novion, Magdalena Pena, and brothers Mateo and Raimundo Guarda was less than 10 points adrift in silver medal spot, while the Brazil Verde team claimed the bronze.

The host nation made a great start when Raimundo and Mateo finished first and third in the opening individual competition. But De Lima Marino was unstoppable on his way to individual glory, and when Gozzi seized silver and Felipe Pereira Teixeira took his second bronze medal of the tournament, it was another all-Brazilian party on the podium.

Young Riders

There were just five contenders for the Young Rider title and while gold went to Brazil, it was Argentina that took silver and bronze.

Argentina’s Richard Kierkegaard and Contiki won the opening round, but Brazil’s Victoria Junqueira Ribeiro de Mendonca (20) topped the next two competitions partnering the Holsteiner Una Bella to complete on a score of just 7.91 penalty points. That left her way ahead of Argentina’s Emilia Grimaldi in silver and Victoria Garcia Colombo in bronze when the final scores were counted.

This was Junqueira Ribeiro de Mendonca’s seventh South American Championship and brought her tally of gold to four. She scooped double-gold at the South Americans in Sao Paolo (BRA) in 2016 when she was also on the team that finished second in the FEI Junior Nations Cup at Wellington, Florida (USA).

Full results here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

The California Fires: Four Ways to Help

Horses and humans seek refuge in Zuma Beach (Brittny Mejia / Los Angeles Times)

Wellington, Florida — Nov. 14, 2018 — It’s heartbreaking to watch the images coming out of California this week, especially those involving fellow horsemen. For those who feel compelled to help, it can be hard to know where donations will have the most impact. While many credible efforts to raise funds for California’s wildfire victims exist, here are four direct and effective ways you can help members of the equestrian community in crisis:

  1. Donate to the Los Angeles Fire Department Foundation

This foundation provides vital private funding for the Los Angeles Fire Department when city funds run out. Tax-deductible donations go directly to the firefighters, securing the equipment and supplies they need for their courageous effort on the front lines.

  1. Donate to Woosley Fire Horse Relief

This Facebook fundraiser initiated by California horsewoman Sami Gros is grassroots-meets-digital-age mobilization at its finest. Sami and others are working around the clock to locate, transport, and care for horses and horse people in devastated areas. She knows what these horsemen need because she’s beside them in the thick of disaster, and she pledges that every dime raised will be put toward the immediate needs of these animals and their caretakers who have lost everything.

  1. Donate to Horse Relocation and Support Costs

Devon Maitozo, WEG team coach and the most decorated vaulter in U.S. history, is working to help other horsemen even as the safety of his renowned vaulting center in Thousand Oaks remains in question. Donations to Devon’s Facebook fundraiser will help provide feed to displaced horses and veterinary care to those injured by fire and smoke.

  1. Donate to the USEF Equine Disaster Relief Fund

One hundred percent of your tax-deductible donation will go to the North Valley Animal Disaster Group, U.C. Davis Veterinary Emergency Response Team, and the Humane Society of Ventura County. US Equestrian will be working through the USEF Disaster Relief Fund with these organizations and others over the coming weeks to support the ongoing rescue and rehabilitation efforts throughout the state of California.

No donation is too small. Together, we can make a difference.

#HorsemenHelpingHorsemen

For more information, please visit EquestrianAidFoundation.org.

Emergency Funds Needed to Help Equine Victims of California Fires

A horse is spooked as the Woolsey Fire moves through a property in Agoura Hills, California, on Nov. 9, 2018. Matthew Simmons / Getty Images Source: NBC News (https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/california-wildfires-thousands-animals-displaced-fires-tear-through-communities-n935251)

LEXINGTON, Ky – Nov. 14, 2018 – Recent low humidity, dry conditions, and warm fast-moving winds have created ideal conditions for blazes to spread across California. Tens of thousands of acres are burning and images are emerging of horses being evacuated, roaming free, or fleeing approaching fires. The situation is devastating.

Stories of courageous rescue volunteers and make-shift shelters are unfolding throughout ravaged California communities – all focused on helping abandoned and displaced equines. The rescue efforts are complicated. Often, animals caught in fires flee or hide, especially when injured.

California’s equines need your help now, and they will need your help in the weeks to come as they are reunited with owners or relocated to new homes. Feed, medical supplies, and veterinary care are necessary to help manage this critical situation.

“Every time there’s an emergency affecting horses, the equestrian community rallies together,” said Emily Dulin, executive director of Brooke USA. “It’s complicated and challenging, but I am always impressed with how this community jumps in and helps. These generous people move heaven and earth to make sure horses are safe.”

Brooke USA is committed to helping. You can make a difference! Donate to our California Equine Emergency Fund, and stay tuned for more information. Funds raised will be donated to organizations directly helping relief and recovery efforts.

To learn more about Brooke USA, please go to www.BrookeUSA.org or contact or 859-296-0037.

Payne and Quintessence Win $5,000 Classic Company Welcome

Week I of the Atlanta Fall Classic kicked off on the 8th and welcomed big numbers to the jumper divisions.

Jumper action got under way at the Olympic venue with the $5,000 Welcome and saw twenty-three tackle the course designed by Paul Jewel of Lambertville, New Jersey. First round was set with a time allowed of 74 seconds and the second was set at 47 seconds.

Doug Payne of Aiken, South Carolina entered and rode three mounts to the winner’s circle. As fourth to go in the order with Kelsey Calabro’s Home James, the pair posted the first double clear rounds and set the time to beat at 38.381 seconds.

Macie Atwood of Brentwood, Tennessee and her own SCS Luigi followed with the next set of double clear rounds and took the lead from Payne with their 35.915 second round time.

Heather Steinman of Canton, Georgia and Alexandra Doyle’s Carto’s Star’s 34.751 seconds followed Atwood and took the lead, which would see Atwood and SCS Luigi finish in sixth place overall.

J. F. Gagne of Columbus, South Carolina and Lyons Creek Sporthorses, Ltd’s Lyons Creek Dragon Bleu followed with double clear rounds, but their second-round time of 35.936 seconds would see them finish in seventh overall.

Payne returned to the arena, this time in the irons of Quintessence, owned by Jane Dudinsky. The pair bested the leading second round time with their own 34.474 seconds and took the lead.

Steinman and Elisabeth Yeager’s Hot Spot challenged that time with their own clear second round of 35.176 seconds but would settle into fifth place overall.

Maarten Huygens’ Fintan, ridden by Paul Macrae of Alpharetta, Georgia, followed with the next set of double clear rounds, but their time of 35.944 would see them finish in eighth place.

Charles Casey of Birmingham, Alabama in the irons of Double C Sporthorses’ CC Kolaborant also posted double clear rounds, but their second-round time of 36.325 seconds put them in ninth place overall.

Steinman returned to the ring, this time in the irons of Courtney Kelling’s Finnegan and looked to take the lead from Payne with their double clear rounds in a fast jump off time of 34.731, but by a mere hundredth of a second, would finish in second place.

Tenth was awarded to Emily Chavez’ Morning De Reve, ridden by Gagne. Payne picked up an eleventh place for his ride on Wendy Luce’s Marshal M Dillon and Sydney Long of Atlanta, Georgia rode her own Venchy De Bornival to a twelfth place finish.

“Quintessence is the best jumper I ever rode,” commented Payne. “He’s done really well over the last few months, winning the 6-year-olds in Kentucky and most recently in Princeton,” he added.

Tim Maddrix and Ebelina W Victorious in the $15,000 Jumper Classic

Twenty-three horse and rider teams tackled the course designed by Paul Jewel on Saturday in the Olympic Arena and Tim Maddrix of Leeds, Alabama took top honors with his own Ebelina W.

The 1.25 m course had a first round time allowed of 83 seconds. Only four advanced to the jump off round which was set with a time allowed of 47 seconds.

Doug Payne, winner of the $5,000 Welcome Week I, was the first to post a clear round in a time of 80.282 seconds with Wendy Luce’s Marshal M. Dillon. Maddrix followed with his own Ebelina W in a clear first round in a time of 81.979 which insured a jump off to the delight of the crowd.

Macie Attwood and her own SCS Luigi added themselves to the jump off roster after posting their first round clear score in a time of 79.876 seconds. Payne added another ride for the jump off round with Kelsey Calabro’s Home James after posting a clear first round in a time of 78.088 seconds.

As the first to go in the jump off round with Marshal M. Dillon, Payne posted a clear 42.110 seconds, well within the 47 seconds time allowed. Maddrix was up next with Ebelina W and also went clear with a time of 41.546 seconds, taking the lead.

Atwood and SCS Luigi followed but with four jump faults and 12 time faults for their time of 54.516 seconds, would settle into fourth place overall.

Payne and Home James sat it the desirable last to go spot, and looked to beat Maddrix and Ebelina W’s time. But a rail and four jump faults in a time of 39.081 seconds would find them finishing in third overall. “The time allowed was really snug. I tried to beat Tim’s time, but I knocked the front rail at the second element in the triple,” said Payne. “Tim rode well and had me by a second and a half off the first horse. I went for it and took a shot and well, you win some and you lose some. It’s just the nature of the sport,” he added.

The final results had Maddrix and Ebelina W with the win and Payne picking up second and third with Marshal M. Dillon and Homes James, respectively.

Fifth was Maarten Huygens’ Casquino, ridden by Paul Macrae, with an 84.381 second first round with two time faults, and Payne picked up a sixth place finish with Quintessence, owned by Jane Dudinsky, for their four fault first round in a time of 76.983 seconds.

Seventh place went to Sydney Long of Atlanta, Georgia and her own Take Two for their four fault first round in a time of 77.944 seconds, and Caroline Michele Dugas of Birmingham, Alabama and her own Skyfall earned an eighth-place finish for their four fault first round in a time of 78.802 seconds. Heather Steinman of Canton, Georgia earned ninth and tenth placings with Elisabeth Yeager’s Hot Spot and Livhaven Stables’ Itile Horta, respectively, while Long returned to the ring with her own Venchy De Bornival for an eleventh placing. Charles Casey of Birmingham, Alabama in the irons of Double C Sporthorses’ CC Kolaborant wrapped up the class with a twelfth place ribbon.

Second and third place finisher Payne commented, “There were a good group of horses here. The course was tricky enough and rode bigger and a lot more interesting than it looked and It suited my horses very well.

“Marshal M. Dillon is owned by Wendy Luce in Milford [NJ] and I’ve ridden for her for a long time. We bought him quite young and initially as an event horse. He got to the Preliminary level and it just didn’t suit him, so we moved over to the jumpers. Marshall is a beautiful horse and has really come along over the last three months,” said Payne.

“Home James is a really great horse and has just got the biggest heart. When he came to us about four or five months ago, he had lost his left eye from an infection. But the owners wanted us to play it by ear and give him a shot,” he said. “Sometimes the shadows make it a little tough for him, but he really just gives it his all. He actually won the $35,000 Grand Prix in Charleston Week II last summer. He’s a little weird with shadows and the Olympic Arena here is a tough setting for him, but he is the most genuine and big-hearted creature,” he added.

Payne continued, “We’ve got a great group here. We brought 11 horses and we have three other students showing with us too. Two of our horses are going to the Jockey Club in Ocala next week for an event and this is the perfect prep for us. They’ve done really well here and they got to jump in the big ring. I haven’t been here in a couple of years and the footing is a huge improvement over what it used to be. The rain really hit us here this week and the footing held up really well, especially with the Classic Company guys managing it-really a great job!” he added.

Abigail Beaty Pilots Via Dolorosa to the win in the $5,000 Barry Lane Jumper Classic

Saturday’s first installment of the $25,000 Barry Lane Classic saw 21 enter the 1.10 m class and awarded Abigail Beaty of Indian Springs, Alabama and her own Via Dolorosa the first place ribbon for their double clear rounds in times of 73.132 seconds and 33.131 seconds, respectively.

Of the twenty-one entries, twelve advanced to a second-round opportunity and only five went clear. Jack Dengler of Marietta, Georgia and Castlewood farm, Inc.’s Kira Van De Vaartdijk were the first to advance to the second round and set the new time to beat at 33.396 seconds.

Four horse and team riders later, Beaty challenged that time and grabbed the lead with her own 33.131 seconds. Adam Edgar of Leesburg, Virginia and Ellie Miller’s Zathura got close with their own 33.511 clear second round, but settled into a third-place finish. Lucy Reich of Birmingham, Alabama and Booth Parker’s Nomination Hastak earned double clear rounds, but their second round in a time of 34.528 seconds saw them finish in fourth overall.

Grace Jordan or Marietta, Georgia and Darragh Kerin’s Rossco also turned in double clear rounds, but their second round in a time of 36.930 seconds landed them in fifth place overall.

Sixth was awarded to Alexandra Doyle of Canton, Georgia and her own Carto’s Star for their four fault second round in a time of 30.746 seconds.

Ella Duffy of Marietta, Georgia rode Missy Nolen’s Croft Original to a seventh-place finish and Lucy Reich of Birmingham, Alabama rode Ashley Hayden Morrison’s Cucino Z to an eighth-place ribbon.

Clayton Mullis piloted his own Tower Lux to a ninth-place finish, and Paris, owned and ridden by Jordan Keay Dillenberg, placed ninth. Grace Jordan of Marietta, Georgia rode Sarah Kerins’ Camboro to an eleventh-place ribbon and Accomplice, owned and ridden by Grace Asbury of Atlanta, Georgia, wrapped up the class in twelfth place.

Alexandra Doyle and Carto’s Star Win the $7,500 NAL WIHS Barry Lane Jumper Classic

Twenty-five horse and rider teams competed in the $7,500 Barry Lane Jumper Classic, the second installment of the $25,000 Barry Lane Jumper Classic, Week I at the Atlanta Fall Classic.

The 1.10 m course designed by Paul Jewel was set with a first round time allowed of 77 seconds and 48 seconds for the second round. Only eight advanced to a second round opportunity. Adam Edgar and Ellie Miller’s Zathura were the first to post double clear rounds and set the time to beat in the second round at 38.783 seconds. Jordan Grace and Sarah Kerins’ Camboro tried to take the lead, but their clear second round in a time of 43.690 would finish the pair in third place overall.

Doyle and Carto’s Star sat in the second to last to ride in the order of go and posted lightning fast double clear rounds. Their second-round time in 37.841 seconds stole the lead and the win, moving Edgar and Zathura into the second place finish.

“I thought it was a really clever course. He [Paul Jewel] is an excellent designer and really set it up so it baited you to go fast in sections, where you really shouldn’t,” commented Doyle.

“My grey horses is pretty hot and has a lot of anxiety. My plan was to just get around the first course safely and correctly. The second round I just let him go a bit. He’s a naturally quick horse and he really enjoys his job. I want to give him a good ride and don’t want to give him any mental setbacks.

I’ve had him about a year. He really wants to do well and he is so afraid that he won’t do well, he freaks himself out. He’s such a good boy and I owe that horse everything,” said Doyle.

Isabelle Blackstone and Madison Akins’ Chasm Z finished in fourth with the fastest four fault second round in 37.819 seconds. Fifth was awarded to Lucy Reich and Booth Parker’s Nomination Hastak.

Doyle returned for the sixth-place ribbon in the irons of her own Wrozbita for their four fault second round in a time of 40.780 seconds. “I’ve had this horse for about a month. This was his second show in America and it’s his first time in Conyers. I want to say he was imported a month and a half ago but he was jumping on the larger side in Europe. I Was trying horses at Paul Mcrae’s and he suggested I ride him. I did and it has turned out really well. He’s been a good boy. I’ll definitely be showing both horses in the Barry Lane Jumper Classics next weekend,” she said.

Jordan Keay Dillenberg brought home the seventh-place ribbon with her own Paris, and Celia Cram of Aiken, South Carolina rode her own Auspicious to an eighth-place finish. Clayton Mullis earned ninth with his own Tower Lux and Abigail Beaty rode her own Via Dolorosa to a tenth-place ribbon. Grace Jordan of Marietta, Georgia and Darragh Kerins’ Rossco placed eleventh, and Grace Asbury and her own Accomplice wrapped up the class in twelfth place.

Natalie Geller Earns Top Scores in Classic Hunter Derby

Natalie Geller of Alpharetta, Georgia rode the first and second place $3,000 Classic Hunter Derby winners to top scores Week I of the Atlanta Fall Classic.

The winning ride in the irons of Holly Sims’ Sunkist saw first and second round scores of 84, for a total of 168 which bested the competition. Her second ride, Lori Christman’s On Board, led the first round with a score of 86, but their second-round score of 78 finished them in second place for a total of 164.

Javite, owned and ridden by Katie Kittrell of Madison, Georgia, rode to the third-place ribbon with a total score of 154 and the $250 3’3” Non Pro Rider Bonus. Eljero, owned and ridden by Sarah Williams of Peach Tree City, Georgia, earned a fourth place for their combined score of 153 and the $150 3’3” Non Pro Rider Bonus.

Low Country Phantom, owned and ridden by Laura Neely of Savanah, Georgia, placed fifth for their combined score of 146 and earned the $250 3’ Non Pro Rider Bonus. Josie Evans of Covington, Georgia rode to both the sixth and eighth placings in the irons of Lynn Laird’s Mandolin and her own QVF Colt Seavers, respectively. Her performance on Mandolin earned them the $150 3’ Non Pro Rider Bonus also. Conrad 10, owned by Seven Hills Farm and ridden by Kristin Martiniello, placed seventh and also earned her the $100 3’3” Non Pro Rider Bonus.

ClassicCompany.com
GulfCoastClassicCompany.com
Phone/Fax: (843) 768-5503
Post Office Box 1311, Johns Island, SC 29457

McLain Ward Triumphant in $205,000 Longines FEI Jumping World Cup Toronto

McLain Ward and HH Gigi’s Girl. Photo by Ben Radvanyi Photography.

Toronto, Ontario -Two-time U.S Olympic team gold medalist McLain Ward claimed the $205,000 Longines FEI Jumping World Cup Toronto, presented by GroupBy, in front of a sold-out crowd on Saturday night, November 10, at the CSI4*-W Royal Horse Show in Toronto, ON.

Ward topped a 21-horse starting field over tracks set by 2018 World Championship course designer, Alan Wade of Ireland, to claim the ninth Royal Horse Show World Cup title of his career. As the final challenger in the jump-off, Ward saved the best for last, executing a brilliant round to stop the clock at 32.42 seconds riding HH Gigi’s Girl. Ward’s U.S. gold medal teammate at the recent World Championships, Devin Ryan, posted a time of 33.88 seconds with his World Championship partner, Eddie Blue, to finish runner-up.

“It was nice to have the last spot in the order,” said Ward, who was presented with the Hickstead Trophy, given in memory of Eric Lamaze’s legendary 2008 Olympic gold medal partner, and a Longines timepiece for his win. “I know Devin and his horse are quick because he has beat me a few times. Sometimes you get lucky.

“This was a gymnastics test, which is what courses are now at the highest level,” continued Ward of Wade’s track, one that HH Gigi’s Girl, a 10-year-old Dutch Warmblood mare (Vingino x Celano) owned by Double H Farm, conquered with style. “The mare performed beautifully the whole second part of this year and is really putting things together, and it’s a great way for her to finish her season. She has always been a spectacular jumper and I feel she has a really exciting future.”

Ward, 43, estimates that he has been competing at the Royal Horse Show for almost a quarter of a century, saying, “I love it here. Obviously, I’m not Canadian, but I think of this as a second home. The show is being run beautifully and the organization is phenomenal. As you saw, we had a sold-out crowd, and I’m thrilled to be part of it.”

The victory earned Ward coveted qualifying points for the 2019 Longines FEI Jumping World Cup Final, an event he won in 2017. The 2019 edition will be held next April in Gothenburg, Sweden.  Ward, who had also won the $50,000 Weston Canadian Open one night earlier riding Tradition de la Roque, earned the Leading International Rider title.

Ryan’s second-place finish placed him closer to his goal of qualifying for the 2019 Longines FEI Jumping World Cup Final after a spectacular year for him and his mount, Eddie Blue, a nine-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding owned by LL Show Jumpers LLC.

“As I always say, take it one day at a time, but this year I am going to try to make it back to the World Cup Final,” he said. “We’ll see how the cards play out, but he’s had quite a big year this year, and I think he’s a really special horse, so I don’t want to over use him.

“You always think about what you would you have done differently,” continued Ryan, 36, of his position behind Ward. “I didn’t take quite the shot that McLain took. I probably should have tried it, but that’s show jumping for you!”

Ali Ramsay of Victoria, BC posted the first clear round of the evening riding her 11-year-old Belgian Warmblood mare, Hermelien vd Hooghoeve, and opened the jump-off by again jumping clear in a time of 34.62 seconds for third place.

“It’s always harder going first because you know you have to go clear,” said Ramsay, 26, who first attended the Royal Horse Show in 2012 when she won the Running Fox CET Medal Final. “I think my horse did everything I asked of her. We are really lucky to have this Canadian indoor venue here at The Royal and having this crowd is really unlike anything else.”

Great Britain’s Amanda Derbyshire also posted a double-clear performance in a time of 35.20 seconds to finish fourth riding Roulette BH for owner Gochman Sport Horse LLC, while New Zealand’s Sharn Wordley rounded out the jump-off field in fifth place after having a rail down over the short course aboard Barnetta, owned by Sky Group.

For more information on the Royal Horse Show, the marquee event of The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, please visit www.royalfair.org/horseshow.html.

Nassar and Lordan Repeat Longines Victory in Thermal

Nayel Nassar and Lordan. (FEI / Ashley Neuhof)

For the second year in a row — and third overall — Nayel Nassar (EGY) and his indelible mount Lordan led the victory gallop in the $100,000 Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ Thermal (USA).

Besting a jump-off field of five, Nassar and his 14-year-old Hanoverian gelding crossed the timers of Marina Azevedo’s (BRA) shortened course in 43.89 seconds. The duo narrowly edged Eve Jobs, who recorded the best World Cup finish of her career with her own Venue d’Fees des Hazalles; their time was 43.97 seconds. Lisa Carlsen (CAN) finished third aboard Parette after recording the winning time but pulling the rail at the final fence.

“I’m just thrilled with my horse and thrilled to be sitting here again!” — Nayel Nassar (EGY)

Nassar has been partnered with Lordan for more than seven years. In addition to winning last year’s event, the pair also topped the class in 2016. Nassar used his longtime partnership to his advantage, creating his own jump-off plan based off his horse’s quick, yet smaller, stride.

“I tried not to focus too much on what the other riders were doing,” Nassar said. “I know that Lordan is a very different kind of horse with a different kind of stride. I just wanted to know whether my jump-off pace was going to be fast enough or if I needed to take any extra risks.”

The pace proved to be just enough, resulting in a close, eight-hundredths of a second margin of victory.

“It ended up being a lot closer than I expected,” Nassar said, “but luckily we were on the right side of that today.”

Consistency Proves Key

With consistent, points-earning performances in Vancouver (CAN), Columbus (USA), Del Mar (USA) and Thermal, Jobs took over the lead in the west coast sub league standings of the Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ North American League with 48 points.

Should Jobs qualify to compete at Gothenburg (SWE) in April, it would be her first appearance in a World Cup Final.

“If everything goes as planned, and I can continue to feel comfortable competing at such a high level, I would be honored to go,” she said. “I’m very excited.”

Richard Spooner (USA), a 15-time World Cup Finals veteran, including last season, moved into second in the standings after finishing fourth in Thermal. He has 36 points, four ahead of Zazou Hoffman (USA), who won the World Cup qualifier at Del Mar (USA) in October.

By Catie Staszak

FEI Media Contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager Press Relations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Green Meadows Coaching Keeps ‘Old Times’ Alive at Royal Horse Show

McLain Ward, his wife, Lauren, and their three-year-old daughter, Lilly, joined the Wallers atop the ‘Old Times.’ Photo by Ben Radvanyi Photography.

Toronto, Ontario – Mr. and Mrs. Harvey and Mary Waller of Stockbridge, MA and their ‘Old Times’ coach claimed a third consecutive victory in the historic Green Meadows Four-In-Hand Coaching Appointments Class on Friday, November 9, at the Royal Horse Show, held as part of the 96th Royal Agricultural Winter Fair in Toronto, ON.

“It never gets old!” said Mary of the win on Friday night. “It’s always special. I love the Royal.”

The Green Meadows Coaching division, generously sponsored by Hugessen Consulting, Inc., is dedicated to the great tradition of the road coaches and park drags of years gone by, and the Wallers’ ‘Old Times’ coach exemplifies a fine example of that tradition.

The ‘Old Times’ coach was famously driven from London to Brighton, England in the 1880s. It has since been conserved in its entirety by the Wallers, who purchased the road coach in 2001 and had the paint stripped down to find the original color and lettering, enabling it to be put back to its exact original appearance.

That attention to detail is part of what helped the Wallers earn the win in the Coaching Appointments Class, judged on performance, presentation, and emphasis on appointments. All three factors were taken into consideration during Friday evening’s Green Meadows Four-In-Hand Coaching Appointments Class in the Coca-Cola Coliseum, while the presentation and emphasis on appointments were also judged during a special reception on Friday afternoon.

“This is a very special coach, so it’s nice to bring it here to a special show,” said Mary. “The way they do the appointments in the other ring beforehand showcases the coaches. You get to see them in a special surrounding, and it makes it that much nicer. All of our staff works so hard, so for them to see it in there after they’ve been working on it for days – and then to have us win – it’s really more for them than for us because it’s our whole team that has accomplished this!”

This year, the Wallers also had three special guests as part of their winning team for the evening’s Coaching Appointments Class. Two-time Olympic and recent World Championship team gold medalist, McLain Ward, rode on ‘Old Times’ alongside his wife, Lauren, and their three-year-old daughter, Lilly.

“We’ve known McLain forever, and he’s probably ridden with us three or four times here at The Royal,” said Mary. “Lilly was bracketed by mom and dad holding her in up there! It was really fun having them with us.”

Finishing in second behind the Wallers was the Canadian entry of Gerben Steenbeek and his park drag entry for Stonecreek Friesians of St. Marys, ON. Third place went to John P. White of Newtown, NJ driving a road coach, ‘Excelsior,’ for Shallow Brook Farm.

For more information on the Royal Horse Show, the marquee event of The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, please visit www.royalfair.org/horseshow.html.

Kuhn Weathers the Storm to Win on Second Day of 2018 US Dressage Finals

Friday morning at the 2018 US Dressage Finals presented by Adequan® at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington dawned with the type of weather conditions more suitable for staying in bed than having the ride of one’s life. Hailing from New Berlin, Ill., Martin Kuhn (Region 4) is no stranger to chilly weather, but when he entered the ring at 10am for the Training Level Open Championship, the persistent rain and 40-degree temperature was admittedly tough to handle. But his mount, Debra Klamen’s five-year-old Hanoverian gelding Ronin (Romanov Blue Hor x Something Royal by Sir Donnerhall I, bred in the U.S. by Marcia Boeing) held steadfast, earning the championship title with an impressive score of 72.803%.

“It was really cold and wet, but my horse seemed unaffected by the conditions – they bothered me much more!” Kuhn laughed. “Situations like this can often be ‘interesting’ with young horses, but even though he’s only five, at this point in the show season he’s been out a lot and in some challenging environments. So when the time came to go down centerline today, he put his head down and did his job. I couldn’t be more happy with him.”

Kuhn is no stranger to success at the US Dressage Finals, finding the winner’s circle with several talented mounts over the last six years. But in his opinion, Ronin stands out. “He’s an amazing athlete – I think he’s the most talented young horse I’ve ever sat on,” Kuhn explained. “I’ve had the privilege to work with lots of horses who have ability, are willing and fun to ride, but on top of that, Ronin is easily the most athletic and elastic horse I’ve ever ridden.”

Also impressed with the maturity of her young partner under adverse weather conditions was Reserve Champion Kelsey Broecker of Celina, Texas (Region 9), who rode Molly Huie’s four-year-old Hanoverian gelding Caelius (Christ x Hauptstutbuch Bonny by Buddenbrock) to a score of 71.818%. “By our ride time, I was ready to be done,” she laughed. “But like Martin’s [Kuhn’s] horse, mine was also unfazed by weather and the overall atmosphere. He doesn’t act like a typical four-year-old – he’s a bit of an old soul, so agreeable and so much fun to ride. He’s just a joy to bring to shows.”

Hometown Girl Laura Crowl Wins Big in Second Level Adult Amateur Championship

Almost 40 competitors from all across the country entered the Claiborne Ring to compete for this year’s Second Level Adult Amateur Championship title, but local eventer and newlywed Laura Crowl of Lexington, Ky. (Region 2) only had to drive a few miles down the road to claim the blue ribbon with her six-year-old U.S.-bred Dutch Warmblood mare Hana (UB-40 x Jolien E by Chronos). After overcoming an untimely hoof abscess right before the Region 2 Championships, Crowl and Hana successfully made it to the Finals and became the only combination to top the 70% mark from all three judges, earning the unanimous victory with 71.585% to earn their first national title.

“I loved almost everything about our test,” said Crowl. “She was really spot on the entire time and did everything I asked. Over the last month I’ve asked her for a little more expression in the movements, and I think the judges appreciated it. She really stepped up to the plate.”

As an eventer who has competed through the FEI 2* level, Crowl originally found Hana in the local barn of her breeder, Reese Koffler-Stanfield, when searching for her next prospect. But the relationship got off to a rocky start. “The first time I rode her she bit me, and it turned out she hated stadium,” Crowl laughed. “But she loved dressage so I had to adjust to what she wanted to do, and along the way I realized it’s fun, not just something you get through to go cross-country. It definitely was a little interesting in the beginning, but we’ve grown to love each other since then.”

In her first trip to the US Dressage Finals, Amanda Lopez of Sarasota, Fla. (Region 3) earned Reserve Championship honors with her nine-year-old Westfalen gelding Rubitanos Dream (Rubitano x Diva by Dream of Glory) with 69.431%. “I like horses with a little character, and we joke that he’s like one of the ruby slippers in The Wizard of Oz – it has to fit, and we just really ‘click’ with each other,” said Lopez of her mount. “I feel so lucky that he chose me as his person. He aims to please with a heart of gold, and I was so honored to show him today in front of these judges and against this caliber of competition.”

Growing Confidence Earns Sandeman the Third Level Open Championship

Angela Jackson of Henderson, Ky. (Region 2) already knew Sandeman was a nice horse, since earlier this summer the six-year-old Hanoverian gelding (Sir Donnerhall x Flora by Florencio, owned by Julie Cook) earned reserve honors at the Markel/USEF Young Horse Championships at Lamplight. But it was the youngster’s ever-growing confidence in himself that carried the pair to the unanimous victory under all judges in Friday’s Third Level Open Championship with a total score of 73.632%.

“It was one of our nicest rides of the year, so to do that here is special,” Jackson explained. “Sandeman has grown up a lot. I could finally ride each movement of the test with a little more confidence today, and everything fell into place. This is definitely ‘the’ show of the season. I’m so thankful for all of the sponsors who support this event, and everyone who makes it possible. It’s the highlight of our year.”

Martin Kuhn (Region 4) participated in his second awards ceremony of the day, this time taking Reserve Champion with 72.265% at Third Level aboard Elizabeth Cronin’s seven-year-old Westfalen gelding Venivici (Vitalis x Sabrina by Sherlock Holmes), who earned First Level Open Reserve Championship honors last year. “It was a little exciting in the cold and the rain, but he stayed with me,” Kuhn noted. “It was definitely a little bit of a conservative ride, but he trusted me and was happy to do his job. He used to be a little bit of a nervous type, but like Angela’s [Jackson’s] horse, as he’s matured, he’s become much more confident.”

Sara Stone Rises to the Challenge in Fourth Level Adult Amateur Championship

As Sara Stone of Lake in the Hills, Ill. (Region 4) and her seven-year-old American Warmblood gelding Gotham (Gabriel x Mystic, bred in the U.S. by Indian Hills Stables) prepared for their afternoon ride in the Fourth Level Adult Amateur Championship, she knew she was facing quite a challenge. “It was a very tough class, and I didn’t think we had a chance at all,” Stone admitted. “But Gotham was in a great mood this afternoon, and he actually likes this chilly weather. When we came out of the ring, I was so focused on what we were doing that I actually wasn’t sure what to think about our test.”

Not long after, all Stone could think about was how proud she was of her mount as the pair emerged as victors with a winning score of 67.704%. “I bought him when he was just three, and he’s the first horse of my own that I have ridden at this level. He’s my best friend,” said Stone, who works in commercial insurance in addition to raising a family. “As an adult amateur, all of the hard work, passion, sweat and tears that goes into having an everyday job and being a mom all while trying to ride…to be able to come to a show like this and lay it all on the line with so many people supporting you…it’s the icing on the cake at the end of the year, and I can’t wait to come back again next year.”

Reserve Champion Amy Gimbel of Oldwick, N.J. (Region 8), who also works in the insurance field when not in the saddle, was equally delighted with her nine-year-old Dutch Warmblood mare Eye Candy (UB-40 x Wednesday by Weltmeyer, bred in the U.S. by Judy Barrett) and their second-place score of 67.407%. “We had some nice moments as well as some tense moments, but overall I was pleased,” Gimbel noted. “We’ve been to the Finals before but took a few years off – Eye Candy had an injury and it’s been a bit of a slow, arduous journey back, something that so many horse people can relate to. Just to be back here is a big accomplishment for us and means a lot.”

Romantico SF Bounces Back to Claim Intermediate I Open Championship

Over the course of more than four straight hours of hard-fought competition on Friday afternoon in the Alltech Arena, competitors battled for top honors in the Intermediate I Open Championship. With a score of 72.157%, ultimate victor Heather Mason of Lebanon, N.J. (Region 8) explained how her 12-year-old Hanoverian gelding Romantico SF (Romancero H x Wesermelodie by Wenzel I) had already proven to be the winner of a much bigger battle – for his life.

“He was laid up for a year with an injury, and I only had about two rides on him when he went in for colic surgery the week after I returned home from last year’s Finals,” Mason remembered. “But amazingly here we are. He’s not an easy horse, which is how I originally ended up with him for just a dollar. But he was great today: the first medium trot was a little bit tentative, but as we got more comfortable in there he was very good. His canter work is generally strong, his pirouettes were very solid, and his zig zag was good. He’s back and better than ever.”

Finishing in Reserve with 71.373% were last year’s Prix St. Georges Open division champions Nora Batchelder of Williston, Fla. (Region 3) and the 10-year-old U.S.-bred Hanoverian gelding Faro SQF (Fidertanz x MS Rose by Rotspon, bred by Jill Peterson). “He was super brave and ready to go today – there’s always a lot of atmosphere in the Alltech Arena but he dealt with it really well,” Batchelder said of her mount. “The canter work is always his strong suit, and I also thought his trot extensions were nice. It’s even more exciting for him to do well because his co-owner and my cousin Andrea Whitcomb is here to watch this year, which makes it extra special.”

Finals First-Timer Hannah Hewitt Wins Intermediate I Adult Amateur Championship

It may have been Hannah Hewitt’s very first time cantering down centerline into the impressive atmosphere of the Alltech Arena, but she and Tammy Pearson’s eight-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding Fidens (Tango x Bliss by United) looked like Finals veterans as they came away with the victory in the Intermediate I Adult Amateur Championship on a score of 67.745%.

“I’m so excited to be here for my first Finals, and it’s been amazing. My trainer, Karen Lipp, has been here several times and really encouraged me to try for this,” said Hewitt, of Atlanta, Ga. (Region 3), who attends law school and finds time to train by being in the saddle before 7am almost every day. “I was very happy with the energy we had today: a little more expression in the trot, and I loved our pirouettes. He’s still young, but has grown up a lot even in just the last few months, and he surprised me a little bit in that he was unaffected by the Alltech Arena – he was very steady and good. He’s a small horse with a big personality, and is just a joy to ride.”

After claiming the 2017 title at this level, defending champion and director/cinematographer Elma Garcia of Mill Spring, N.C. (Region 1) returned to the Finals to claim this year’s Reserve Championship with her 16-year-old Hanoverian mare Wenesa (Westernhagen x Dancing Girl by Davignon) with 67.696%. “Since this spring I have a new program with Wenesa because we’re preparing for the Intermediaire II, so she’s changed a lot since last year – she’s feeling very powerful and is more sensitive,” Garcia explained. “I love coming here and showing in front of so many top judges, and experiencing the camaraderie among the competitors from all over the country and seeing so many different breeds, all in one place. It’s a special feeling.”

Alice Tarjan Wins Second Straight 2018 Finals Title in Grand Prix Adult Amateur Championship

After emerging victorious in Thursday’s Intermediate II Adult Amateur division, Alice Tarjan of Oldwick, N.J. (representing Region 1) is now two-for-two at this year’s US Dressage Finals with her eight-year-old Hanoverian mare Candescent (Christ x Farina by Falkenstern II). The pair returned to the winner’s circle in the Grand Prix Adult Amateur Championship with a score of 64.203% to claim the new George W. Wagner Jr. Perpetual Trophy (presented by the International Georgian Grande Horse Registry). “She was on fire in the warm-up,” said Tarjan. “Even though we had a couple of mistakes today, I’m thrilled because she’s a young horse and the quality keeps getting better and better. She’s so much better than she was just six months ago.”

Fellow Region 1 rider Kristin Herzing of Harrisburg, Pa. and her Hanoverian gelding Gentleman (Grusus x Rumpelstilzchen by Raphael, bred in the U.S. by Kathryn and Jeffrey Nesbit) have been together for 15 years, and traveled to Kentucky this year for their fourth US Dressage Finals. The pair’s persistence paid off with Reserve Champion honors in the Grand Prix Adult Amateur division with 61.667%. “Coming to the Finals is on my list of goals every year,” Herzing explained. “I’m so pleased with my horse today. He may be 20 years old, but he is a bit of a nervous type. He knows his job and the test, so I just try to keep him calm and steady. I knew I needed to have a clean test, and we did.”

Adiah HP Wows the Crowd in Grand Prix Open Championship

At first glance, the colorful mare Adiah HP may not look like your stereotypical Grand Prix dressage champion. But everyone knows a book can’t be judged by its cover, and this 11-year-old Friesian Sport Horse (Nico x Marije ANT by Anton, owned and bred in the U.S. by Sherry Koella) is no exception. In the experienced hands of James Koford of Winston-Salem, N.C. (Region 1), Adiah HP had the crowd cheering in the Alltech Arena as she claimed the Grand Prix Open Championship and Veronica Holt Perpetual Trophy (presented by USDF Region 5 and Friends) with 69.130%.

“I am so pumped! She’s getting so mature – now she goes in the ring and gets excited, but I can channel that energy,” said Koford after the win. “I saw her in a clinic four years ago and thought she was the most fun horse I’d ever seen, and I had to sit on her. Now she’s gone on to do everything I’ve asked and more. She’s like my dirt bike: I just get to run around and have fun, without stress or drama. It just gives me goosebumps because it’s so much fun to get on a horse like this that loves to go in the show ring.”

Last year’s Intermediate II Open Reserve Champion Judy Kelly of Clarkston, Mich. (Region 2) returned to the Finals with her 14-year-old Hanoverian mare Benise (Breitling W x Rubina by Rubinstein) and added another Reserve title to their resume, this time in the Grand Prix Open division with 67.862%. “This is her second year at the level so she can do everything; I just wanted to be able to guide and direct her and show her off. Now we’ll try to do the same thing tomorrow night in the freestyle,” said Kelly.

To learn more about the US Dressage Finals presented by Adequan®, download competition information, review day sheets and results, and read daily news releases, visit the official event website at www.usdressagefinals.com.

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