The Horse Capital Parade

For our friends in Florida, an amazing experience with horses is coming soon: the Horse Capital Parade!

Where: Downtown Square Ocala, Florida, the surrounding streets and at the Downtown Market.
March 7, 2020 at 1:00pm – 6:00pm

A vendor village will open at 1pm on the Downtown Square with a beer and wine garden, great vendors, horse breed meet-and-greets, and at 4:30pm, an incredible horse breed parade, the speedy Historic Stagecoach, and the grand finale with the Budweiser Clydesdales. Watch them harness the Clydesdales at 2pm at the Downtown Market. There are also wonderful restaurants with outdoor dining where you can watch the parade.

Gentle Carousel Miniature Therapy Horses
www.Horse-Therapy.org
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Exclusive Interview with Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping Live Contender Martin Fuchs

Martin Fuchs (Photo: Rolex Grand Slam / Ashley Neuhof)

The Rolex Grand Prix win at CHI Geneva was obviously very emotional for you; can you talk about what that win meant for you, especially in front of your home crowd?

Geneva has always been a good show for me. I’ve never been close to winning the Rolex Grand Prix there though, so when I qualified for the jump-off, I was very excited. Clooney was in great shape and I knew the jump-off would suit us both. I kept focused and tried to go as fast as I could whilst sticking to my plan. It was then hard for me to watch the others go and I was quite sure that what I’d done wasn’t enough and one of the best riders would beat me. When Darragh Kenny, who was the last rider in the ring, had a pole down, I realized I’d won. It was an incredible moment, made even more special winning in front of my home crowd, my family, and my friends.

Looking ahead to The Dutch Masters, which has a much smaller arena, does that change your preparations at all?

Our preparation doesn’t change at all. Clooney is very good in the smaller arenas, so in a way it’s better for him. I’m excited as this will be my first time at The Dutch Masters; we will be competing at a 2-Star event with Clooney also in Holland a few weeks prior to The Dutch Masters in order to be as prepared as possible.

Clooney 51 is a superstar horse; how did your journey start and how have you grown together?

We bought Clooney through one of my best friends, when he was seven years old. In the beginning, he was a bit difficult, but he’s always been a great horse to ride. When he was eight years old, I realized that he could be a special horse, as he’d often placed in big Grands Prix. As a nine-year-old he placed second in a 5* Grand Prix in Doha. To become the team we are today, we’ve worked very hard on our dressage and his confidence. I try my best to keep him happy and give him the confidence he needs to perform, then in the ring he normally doesn’t let me down.

What do you think are the qualities he naturally has that make him so special?

Clooney is very careful and clever at the fences; he’s very aware of his surroundings and always knows where the poles are. He’s a very intelligent jumper, with his own style; he doesn’t over-jump and never runs through the fences.

Do you plan on taking Clooney to The Dutch Masters?

I will definitely be taking Clooney; we’ve been training hard and preparing, so we have a good chance to do well.

You have achieved so much already but what are your next dreams and ambitions, what do you want to achieve?

I was ecstatic to become world number one; it was obviously a huge success and a dream come true for me, especially considering I’m still quite young. The Rolex Grand Prix victory in Geneva was the best possible outcome for me, which makes me a live contender for the Rolex Grand Slam. My main goals for this year are the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping and of course the Olympics in Tokyo, which I’m incredibly excited for.

The Rolex Grand Prix win at CHI Geneva was obviously very emotional for you; can you talk about what that win meant for you, especially in front of your home crowd?

Looking even further ahead to CHIO Aachen, again another completely different arena, does Clooney grow in an arena like Aachen? How does it affect him?

Clooney can be a little spooked in the big grass arenas, which makes things a little bit more difficult. Aachen is over the course of a whole week, which gives me the chance to get Clooney in the ring a couple of times before the Grand Prix, which will help us be more prepared. Last year he jumped really well and had clear rounds; however, during the second round I didn’t ride so well, but ultimately, I’m looking forward to bringing him back to the show.

Scott Brash won Rolex Grand Slam with Hello Sanctos; do you think Clooney could be a potential horse that could emulate their success?

I have complete faith in Clooney. I know he can win in any arena in the world, in any class. This gives me a lot of confidence, but I’ve not even dreamed about winning the Rolex Grand Slam because it’s so difficult. Anyone involved in our sport knows what Scott Brash has achieved is incredible and the odds of it happening again are so low. Of course, Clooney and I will try our best but who knows what the future holds?

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

I don’t think I’ve had a standout piece of advice given to me. I’ve learnt a lot of important values from a variety of people; the most important things I believe are to work hard, be dedicated, try to understand your horse, and do your best every day.

When you’re not riding and competing, what are you doing? Do you have any hobbies outside of showjumping?

I’m quite laid back, so when I’m not competing, I like to go for long walks on the beach by the water, but sometimes I also go into the city. I try to relax as much as possible when I’m not training or competing. I think that’s important if you want to do well.

© 2020 Rolex – Rolex Grand Slam

Equestrian Poland: New Season in the Stragona Equestrian Center

Photo by Mariusz Chmieliński.

The 2020 season in Strzegom starts soon and will last from the beginning of April until half of October.

The first show is a national one, taking place at 4-5th of April. Varied and relatively easy cross-country courses will await the riders, suitable for the beginning of the season. The show will contain the following classes: CNC LL, CNC L, CNC 1*, CNC 2*.

The international season at the hippodrome in Morawa will begin with Strzegom Spring Open – the first of five big events in the Stragona Equestrian Center calendar. For many riders it will be the first show at the 4* level. As always, the cross-country tests will be designed in such a way that the athletes and horses will have the chance to test their form at the beginning of the season, but at the same time, to have a motivating experience before more difficult shows.

Strzegom Spring Open will hold classes at the following levels: CNC LL, CNC L, CIC1*, CIC2*, CIC3*, CIC4*.

Traditionally, the cross-country course is the most demanding at Strzegom Horse Trials. This year the show will take place a week later than usual – from the 2nd until the 5th of July. New fences have been designed especially for this event, and groundwork has been performed to make the trial more attractive. The riders will compete not only in the Nations Cup, but also in easier classes. Thinking about junior and young riders preparing for the European Championships, we will have classes with a separate classification for their age categories. The athletes will also compete in two national classes: CNC LL and CNC L, and nine international ones: CIC1*, CIC2*-S, CIC2*-S-J, CIC3*-S, CIC3*-S-YR, CICO4*S-Nations Cup, CCI2* – L, CCI3*-L, CCI4*-L.

Fewer than ten days after Strzegom Horse Trials, Morawa will once again welcome the best European pony riders. The European Championships for Ponies in showjumping, dressage, and eventing will take place from the 14th until the 19th of July.

That’s not the end of summer in Morawa. The last weekend of August marks the beginning of Strzegom Summer Tour. The riders will compete in the following classes: CNC LL, CNC L, CIC1*, CIC2*, CIC3*, CIC4*. The difficulty level will as always allow the athletes to go up a level. The show is recommended for combinations that want to debut in a higher-level class.

As usual, the end of the season is the time for Strzegom October Festival. As well as SHT, the show will host a variety of classes: CNC LL, CNC L, CIC1*, CIC2*-S, CIC3*-S, CIC3*-S, CICO4*S, CCI2*-L, CCIO2*-L-J, CCI3*-L, CCI3*-L-YR, CCI4*-L. CCI2P-L. Team competitions for junior and young riders are a novelty this year.

Contact:
www.strzegomhorsetrials.pl
press@strzegomhorsetrials.pl

Beezie Madden and Jiva Open CSI5* Competition at WEF

Beezie Madden and Jiva. Photo © Sportfot.

Wellington, FL – February 19, 2020 – Four-time U.S. Olympic medalist Beezie Madden claimed victory in the $37,000 Douglas Elliman Real Estate 1.45m CSI5* aboard Jiva to open week seven at the Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF) on Wednesday, February 19.

Madden and her lightning-fast mare bested a field of 73 over courses set by Santiago Varela (ESP). The top three in Wednesday’s feature class were all separated by less than a half of a second. Madden’s time of 46.52 seconds bumped Ireland’s Jordan Coyle and Kristen Vanderveen (USA) to a tie for second place with matching times of 46.81 seconds. Coyle piloted Centriko Volo for Celtic Park LLC, while Vanderveen rode Bull Run’s Divine Fortune, owned by her own Bull Run Jumpers Six LLC.

“It feels great,” said Madden of kicking the week off with a win. “This is the first time Jiva has come out and tried to be competitive [this season].”

Jiva has been resting since the fall show season and has not competed in the FEI ranks since the National Horse Show in November. “I’m really pleased that she stepped right up and won her first class,” continued Madden of the 11-year-old Belgian Warmblood mare (Concorde x Nonstop). “She’s really a speed specialist, so this is her class. It’s fun and always good for me to go in and go fast to try to keep up with all these riders in the speed.”

Georgina Bloomberg and New Mount Balotelli 5 Find Victory

Kicking off CSI5* competition earlier in the day, Georgina Bloomberg (USA) rode a new mount to the pair’s first FEI victory together, topping the Bainbridge Companies 1.40m CSI5*. Besting 35 other contenders, Bloomberg and Balotelli 5 stopped the clock at 34.58 seconds over Sweden’s Petronella Andersson and Cassini Bay, owned by Stephex Stables. Their time of 35.85 seconds was just ahead of Catherine Tyree (USA) in third riding BEC Lorenzo in 36.69 seconds for owner Mary Tyree.

“I’m still getting to know him, so I didn’t go super fast,” said Bloomberg of her first CSI5* outing with Balotelli 5, a 10-year-old Hanoverian gelding (Balou du Rouet x Contendro I). “I still tried to do some of the inside turns so I could learn a little about him, and he’s a naturally quick horse. We are taking it slow, but he has a lot of talent.

“I’m learning to trust him a lot,” continued Bloomberg. “He is a little spooky but very honest at the jump. He’s definitely a horse for the big classes.”

Balotelli 5 joined Bloomberg’s string in the fall of 2019 after competing with amateur rider Julia Plate (GER). “She was riding with Jos Lansink, and several people had told us about the horse,” said Bloomberg. “It was the right time for us and for her to be able to sell him. We were lucky.”

For full results, please visit www.PBIEC.com.

Stella Manship & Bold Prinz Feel the Love in $15,000 1.40m Grand Prix

Stella Manship & Bold Prinz.

Wellington, FL (February 18, 2020) – The midway point in Florida’s winter equestrian season was marked by roses, show jumping, and hospitality on the Turf Tour. Roses were presented to each exhibitor as Week 6 wrapped on Valentine’s Day. Stella Manship and Bold Prinz took top honors in The Ridge’s $15,000 1.40m Turf Tour Grand Prix held at Jim Brandon Equestrian Center. Determined to win the Turf Tour’s Leading Rider prize, a souped up golf cart presented by Iron Horse Transit, Manship’s late-in-the-day double clear over Olympic designer Leopoldo Palacios’ course clocked in at 32.160 for the win. Turf Tour Weeks 7 & 8 will both be held at The Ridge’s home farm on a newly expanded turf Grand Prix field, before returning to Black Watch and To-Kalon Farms for the remaining weeks and season Finale.

Week 6’s $5,000 1.30m Rising Star Classic victor, Alvaro Tejada, set the pace in the Grand Prix with an early double clear and jump-off time of 33.377. A field of nearly 30 international riders put pressure on Tejada throughout the day, including Luis Larrazabal, Kim Farlinger, Jordan Coyle, Steven Bluman, Diego Vivero, Michael Janson, Riley Mackillop, and Michael Kearins, but only Manship was able to top his time.

For full results, visit www.HorseShowing.com.

For full schedules and prizelists, visit www.RidgeShowJumping.com.

FEI Jumping World Cup Winners Celebrated All across the Globe

Masami Kawaguchi. (FEI/Japan NF)

Across six continents, horses and riders have been competing in 15 leagues throughout the FEI Jumping World Cup™ 2019/2020 season. Many of the qualifying series are now completed, with only Western Europe, North America, and Central Europe yet to be decided. For some of the top finishers their result will carve a path to the Longines 2020 Final in Las Vegas, USA in April. For others, victory in their own region has been their ultimate goal.

Athletes from Uzbekistan dominated the Central Asian League where Gairat Nazarov, who took double-bronze at the 2019 Eurasian Championships in Moscow (RUS), edged compatriot Bekzod Kurbanov at the end of the three-leg series that visited Tashkent (UZB), Almaty (KAZ), and Bishkek (KGZ). There were also three legs in the Longines China League in which athletes from China, Taipei, and Hong Kong lined out. The events were staged in Tianjin, Beijing, and Chengdu and China’s Jirigala Eerdeng and Tongyan Liu claimed the top two places.

A total of 20 athletes contested the Japan League, and Masami Kawaguchi came out on top ahead of Jun Takada. Third place here went to Eiji Serizawa who collected points at every one of the seven legs of the series.

It was a second consecutive series win for Tegan Fitzsimon in the New Zealand League which concluded last month. The 29-year-old rider won two of the five legs along the way, but it was a close-run affair when she finished just two points ahead of runner-up Brooke Edgecombe who pipped her for pole position at the last leg in Dannevirke.

Chris Chugg, Jamie Kermond, and Billy Raymont filled the top three places on the Australian League leaderboard. Chugg won the legs at Tamworth and Sydney, but had to settle for third place at the last round in Boneo where Kermond reigned supreme. However, having accumulated 100 points, Chugg took the title, and the man who has introduced many super-talented horses to the top end of the sport is planning to bring his winning ride, PSS Levilensky, to Las Vegas.

In South Africa a total of 41 athletes competed in the five-leg league won by Christophe van der Merwe. The 26-year-old topped the opener at Midrand, the third leg in Shongweni, and the final in Kromdraai, collecting 75 points which left him well clear of his nearest rival, Govett Triggol.

London Olympian, Jose Roberto Reynoso Fernandez Filho, won the South American South League ahead of fellow-Brazilians Flavio Grillo Araujo in second and Karina Harbich Johannpeter in third. There were six events in this series, visiting Sao Paulo, Curitiba, and Rio de Janeiro in Brazil and Sol de Mayo and Buenos Aires in Argentina. A double of wins, and third place at the leg in Rio, sealed the league title for the rider who took team silver at the South American Games in Quillotta, Chile in 2014.

Just six athletes, all from Thailand, contested the three-leg South East Asian League won by 26-year-old Jaruporn Limpichati who took team bronze and individual silver at the SEA Games in Kuang Rawang, Malaysia in 2017. Runner-up was last year’s series champion, 23-year-old Siengsaw Lertratanachai.

The Arab League is sub-divided, and Saudi Arabia’s Abdullah Alsharbatly, individual silver medallist at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ 2010 in Kentucky (USA), pipped the UAE’s Abdullah Humaid Al Muhairi for top spot in the Middle East Sub-League. The North African Sub-League was dominated by Egyptian riders and Abdel Said, who finished 10th at the 2019 Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ Final in Gothenburg (SWE) with Jumpy van de Hermitage, was clear winner here when finishing with 63 points ahead of compatriots Mouda Zeyada and Karim Elzoghby who slotted into second and third with 38 points each.

The latest FEI Jumping World Cup™ series to conclude was the Caucasus-Caspian League which drew to a close in Tehran (IRI) last week where Ali Aziznia emerged as league champion by a narrow margin of just one point over fellow-Iranian Radmard Housmand.

The Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ North American League is also sub-divided and America’s Karl Cook is leading the Western Sub-League while, with one leg still left to run at Ocala in Florida (USA) in early March, it is double series champion Beezie Madden who heads the leaderboard in the Eastern Sub-League.

The last leg of the Western European League takes place in Gothenburg (SWE) while the Central European League results will be decided at the League Final in Warsaw (POL) in March.

Follow all the results of the FEI Jumping World Cup™ series here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Beezie Bags It for USA, but British Girls Are Brilliant

(L to R) Team USA’s Margie Goldstein-Engle, Laura Kraut, Chef d’Equipe Robert Ridland, Beezie Madden, and Jessica Springsteen. (FEI/Shannon Brinkman)

The 2020 series got off to a galloping start with a home victory for Team USA in the Longines FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ of United States of America at Deeridge Farm in Wellington, Florida (USA). But despite fielding a crack four-member side, the hosts were pushed to a third-round jump-off by a relatively rookie British team that consisted of just three riders.

And making competition all the more exceptional was the fact that, in this sport in which men outnumber women by a considerable margin at top level, it came down to a clash between two all-female teams, with America’s Beezie Madden pipping Britain’s Alexandra Thornton in the third-round tie-breaker.

“The British girls were excellent!” said double Olympic gold medallist Madden who piled on the pressure with a brilliant first-to go run with Darry Lou in the jump-off.

There were eight teams in action but only USA, Mexico, and Canada were chasing down qualifying points in the North and Central America and Caribbean League series from which two of those three countries will qualify for the Longines FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ 2020 Final in Barcelona, Spain next October. The American winners claimed the maximum 100 points while Mexico collected 80 when lining up third and Canada picked up 60 points when finishing fourth in a competition filled with plenty of excitement.

The open water was the source of the greatest drama, Israel’s Ashlee Bond having to call it a day with Donatello in the second round when the nine-year-old gelding refused to have anything to do with it after giving himself a fright first time out. And Brazilian pathfinder, Cassio Rivetti, took a real soaking there when his 13-year-old mare, Bacara d’Archonfosse, dumped him in it at their second attempt.

Meanwhile, there were impressive firsts for both Canadian 17-year-old Sam Walker (Kelstar du Vingt Ponts) and 22-year-old Israeli rider Teddy Vlock (Volnay du Boisdeville) who collected just four faults in each round on their Nations Cups debut. Israel and Ireland finished joint-fifth while Australia and Brazil shared seventh place at the end of a very eventful afternoon.

Team Ireland, series champions in 2019, shared the lead with Great Britain on just four faults at the end of the first round, but the addition of 16 faults second time out put paid to Irish chances. In contrast, despite having no discard score, the British added just four more when anchor rider Amanda Derbyshire (Cornwall BH), who had been fault-free first time out, lowered the bogey second fence after team-mates Thornton (Cornetto K) and Emily Moffit (Winning Good) both kept a clean sheet.

Now with a total of eight they found themselves on level pegging with the multi-medalled Americans who recovered from single errors for three of their four team-members at their first attempt to squeaky clean runs from Jessica Springsteen (RMF Zecilie), Margie Goldstein-Engle (Royce), and Laura Kraut (Confu) next time out which meant Madden’s services were not required in round two. And Goldstein-Engle was at her gutsy best, returning to battle despite an unscheduled dismount when her big stallion spooked after going through the finish in the opening round.

Madden set the pace against the clock with a great run from the 12-year-old Darry Lou who broke the beam in 33.11 seconds.

“He does love to gallop! He’s actually really super to ride; he’s not delicate so you can wind him up a bit and let him off and he rises to the occasion – he’s a lot of fun to ride!” — Beezie Madden (USA)

Thornton and the experienced 14-year-old Cornetto K also put in a perfect run, but crossing the line 36.34 seconds they were well short of Madden’s winning time.  However, British showjumping got a big boost, Di Lampard putting her faith in three US-based riders – 27-year-old Thornton, 21-year-old Moffit, and 31-year-old Derbyshire – who didn’t let her down and finished runners-up behind a superstar American selection.

In the lead-up to the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games when riders are looking to impress, there was plenty to see at this opening leg of the 111th Longines FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ season during which this much-loved series will visit 11 top venues around the world en route to the annual decider in eight months’ time.

Watch highlights here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Tokyo 2020 Team and Individual Quota Places Confirmed by FEI

Following concerns raised about FEI Jumping Events in France and Syria where Olympic and Longines Ranking points were on offer, the FEI has investigated events at both Villeneuve-Loubet (FRA) and Damascus (SYR).

The investigation into the three events at Villeneuve-Loubet in December 2019 has established that, contrary to the FEI Rules (Article 110.2.3 of the FEI General Regulations), two competitions counting for the Olympic and Longines Rankings were added at each event after the respective Definite Entries deadlines. The updated Schedules for these three events were submitted to the FEI by the French National Federation and were mistakenly approved by the FEI.

As a result, and in accordance with Article 112.3 of the FEI General Regulations, the FEI has retrospectively removed these additional competitions, meaning that athletes who participated will lose their ranking points from these competitions. The Olympic and Longines Rankings have been updated accordingly.

Additionally, the FEI has established that three of the six events at Villeneuve-Loubet in January 2020 also had two classes counting for Longines Rankings points added after the Definite Entries deadline, again contrary to the FEI Rules. As a result, these additional competitions have been removed and athletes that participated will lose their ranking points for these competitions.

The FEI also reviewed the events that took place in Damascus (SYR) between October and December 2019, and while it was clearly established that there was no breach of FEI Rules and Regulations regarding FEI Calendar entries, the event Schedules or the number of events run, the investigation revealed an irregularity with the prize money at three of the events.

The events held in Damascus on 24-27 October 2019, 31 October to 3 November 2019, and 13-17 November 2019 had total prize money that exceeded the limit for a CSI2* and the Schedules for these events were erroneously approved by the FEI. As a result, the FEI has removed one FEI competition at each of these events in order to bring the total prize money within the specified limit, but this has no impact on the Olympic Ranking for Olympic Group F.

The FEI has also reallocated one of the two Jumping team quota slots from the Olympic Jumping Qualifier for Group F in Rabat (MAR) in October 2019, following adverse analytical findings in two members of the Qatari team, Sheikh Ali Al Thani and Bassem Mohammed. Both athletes tested positive for Carboxy-THC, a metabolite of Cannabis, which is a prohibited substance under the FEI’s Anti-Doping Rules for Human Athletes (ADRHA).

The FEI Tribunal issued a partial decision regarding the disqualification of the individual results of the two Qatari athletes on 15 February 2020. As a result, Qatar loses its team quota place for Tokyo and this has been reallocated by the FEI to Morocco.

The FEI has now confirmed the team and individual quota places across the three disciplines of Dressage, Eventing, and Jumping for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, with three nations – Luxembourg (Dressage individual), Pakistan (Eventing individual), and Israel (Jumping team) – qualifying for the Olympic Games for the first time. The new formats have opened the door for more nations to compete at the Games, with Jumping going up from 27 in Rio to 35 in Tokyo, Dressage increasing from 25 to 30, and Eventing rising from 24 to 30. In total, the number of flags has risen from 43 in Rio to 48 in Tokyo.

Latvia’s individual quota slot for Jumping would mean a first Games start after a 32-year absence, having last competed in Seoul 1988. The Czech Republic and Hong Kong, which have both qualified for an individual place in Eventing, are planning to return to the Games for the first time since Beijing 2008.

The deadline to achieve the Minimum Eligibility Requirements (MERs) is 1 June, after which the FEI will confirm approval of the FEI Certificates of Capability to the National Federations. The final athlete/horse combinations for the three disciplines will be announced on 6 July 2020.

The Olympic equestrian events get underway the day after the Opening Ceremony in Tokyo on 24 July. Dressage will be the first discipline to hold its competitions (July 25-29), followed by Eventing (31 July to 3 August) and then Jumping (4-8 August). The competitions will take place at the Bajikoen Equestrian Park and the Sea Forest Cross Country venue.

FEI contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Communications
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 787 506 142

Vanessa Martin Randin
Senior Manager, Media Relations & Communications
Vanessa.Randin@fei.org
+ 41 78 750 61 73

Carlos Hank Guerreiro Dominates the Field for Hermès Under 25 Grand Prix Victory

Carlos Hank Guerreiro and H5 Quantador 3. Photo © Sportfot.

Wellington, FL – February 16, 2020 – The sixth week of the Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF) closed with victory for Mexico’s Carlos Hank Guerreiro in the $25,000 Hermès Under 25 Grand Prix on the grass Derby Field at Equestrian Village (home to the Adequan® Global Dressage Festival) on Sunday, February 16.

Fifty of the future stars of show jumping took to the grass Derby Field with nine jumping double-clear over a course designed by Ana Catalina “Catsy” Cruz Harris (MEX). It was 19-year-old Guerreiro who bested the competition with nearly two seconds to spare riding H5 Quantador 3, owned by H5 Stables.

“I love this field,” said Guerreiro, who trains with Brazilian Olympian Eduardo Menezes and has been competing in the Under 25 division for four years. “I find that it’s a bit of different feeling, but I grew up riding on a lot of grass arenas, so I really like big, open spaces. I love this week!”

Guerreiro has had the ride on H5 Quantador 3 since the 12-year-old Westphalian gelding’s seven-year-old season. “Paul Schockemöhle sent him to me to be sold, but in the end, they let me keep him,” recalled Guerreiro. “I always say, it’s the best deal I have ever had.”

Peter Lutz Saves Best for Last to Claim $25,000 CP Grand Prix Win

Peter Lutz (USA) kept the horse sport fans who lined the Derby Field banks guessing by posting the fastest jump-off time of the day as the last to compete from a field of 26 in the $25,000 CP Grand Prix to close out week six jumper competition.

Six horses advanced to the jump-off to vie for a piece of the top prize. Lutz and Quinta 106 cantered onto the field as the last to go and executed a clean, tight turn to the final line to secure the win in 36.908 seconds. The time bumped Jazz Johnson Merton (USA) into second place with a time of 37.698 seconds aboard her own Corona SB.

“Any opportunity I have to show on this field, I always take it,” said Lutz. “It’s a beautiful place to show with great footing and great environment. I think the horses do well here, but [Quinta 106] excelled today.”

Lutz has had the ride on the Swede Ventures’-owned Quinta 106, a 13-year-old Holsteiner mare (Quidam de Revel x Cento), for a year. “She’s a really competitive horse, very experienced, and scopey. I’m really happy to have the ride!”

Tracy Scheriff-Muser, Raina Swani, and Sterling Malnik Conclude WCHR Week with Wins

World Championship Hunter Rider (WCHR) Week came to a close on Sunday, with Tracy Scheriff-Muser and Bode Well, Raina Swani and Knightly, and Sterling Malnik and Charlie claiming concluding-day victories in the $5,000 Peggy Cone Memorial WCHR Hunter Classic and the $5,000 WCHR Junior Hunter 3’3” Classic.

Eighty-eight horse-and-rider combinations were present to display their final efforts in the $5,000 Peggy Cone Memorial WCHR Adult Hunter Classic.

Heading into round two, Scheriff-Muser and Bode Well held the highpoint score of 90, and the pair replicated their performance in round two to earn an additional score of 90 for a 180 total.

“I started riding this horse this summer because I live in Florida all year long, so whatever I can find to ride to keep in shape during the off season, I will,” explained Scheriff-Muser of Melissa Burns’ nine-year-old Zweibrucker gelding (Apiro x Desprit).

The $5,000 WCHR Junior Hunter 3’3” Classic saw 59 competitors and was held in a California-split format. Ultimately, it was Raina Swani aboard Knightly who took home the victory for Section A. The pair received two scores of 88 for a total high score of 176.

“It just feels so special,” said Swani. “Going in last was definitely a bit nerve-wracking but Knightly was such a good girl. She has a great canter and great pace around the ring and a great expression. She’s a really fun horse!”

Taking the top spot in Section B was Sterling Malnik and Charlie with scores of 82 and 88 for a total score of 170.

“It’s a really big deal!” said Malnik of her successful day. “I actually won the [WCHR Large Pony Classic] today too. They were dreams of mine!”

For full results, please visit www.PBIEC.com.

Sarah Lockman Crowns a Bumper Week of Wins in AGDF Week Six

Sarah Lockman and Balia. ©️Susan Stickle.

Wellington, FL – February 16, 2020 – National dressage competition continued apace in week six of the 2020 Adequan® Global Dressage Festival (AGDF) at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center (PBIEC) in Wellington, Florida.

Three combinations picked up tickets for the Future Challenge developing horse finals — which take place in the main Stadium Arena in week 12 — two in the small tour class presented by Summit Farm, and one at big tour, which is sponsored by Lövsta. The lucky recipients at small tour were Sarah Lockman and Heather Blitz, with the big tour qualifying slot going to Jan Ebeling.

It was a bumper week for USA rider Lockman and her mount Balia. The pair topped Saturday’s open Prix St. Georges with over 74%, and followed up with a win in the Future Challenge class at the level on Sunday with 73.603%. The eight-year-old German-bred mare by Belissimo M out of a Florestan dam is owned by the class sponsor, Summit Farm. Lockman bolstered her success by also topping the USEF developing Prix St. Georges class riding her own horse, Dehavilland, by Diamond Hit, to another plus-73% score.

“Balia’s still young and green and we missed a couple of the changes, so if it was a clean test, I think it could have been over 75%,” said Lockman, who is based in California and is spending the season in Wellington for the first time. “It’s been a really great week for both my younger horses. Dehavilland needs ring experience, but I’m really proud of Balia, who we bought from Helgstrand here in Wellington when she was five. She’d only been here about two days.

“Balia’s been a lovely addition to our string of horses,” she added. “She’s also part of the USEF developing program, so they have their eye on her. And I’ve owned Dehavilland since a foal, so it’s really special to have seen him come up from an ugly duckling with a big head and ears — his nickname is Donkey — to his score from today which puts him at number one in the country.

“It’s been a really great start to the season,” added Lockman, who debuted the 10-year-old stallion First Apple, her Pan American Games individual gold medal ride, at grand prix level the previous week, scoring over 70%. “It’s especially good for the young horses to have a horse show available every weekend here. They spend an hour doing their thing, then we go back to my trainer Scott Hassler’s barn and the horses go back out in the field.

“I feel really lucky,” concluded the 31-year-old. “Not many riders have such a pipeline of horses coming through. I feel fortunate to have Summit Farm so behind me in my career and all the help I’ve had from Scott, who has been there since the very beginning with these horses. I feel like I’m set up for the future.”

For more information and results, visit www.globaldressagefestival.com.

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