Tag Archives: Equine Protection

Tell Your Senators to Co-Sponsor the PAST Act

Before breaking for the August recess, the U.S. House of Representatives adopted the Sen. Joseph Tydings Memorial Prevent All Soring Tactics (PAST) Act of 2019 (H.R. 693) by a vote of 333 to 96.  In the wake of this historic vote, the horse industry is focusing efforts on the Senate, where there is an opportunity to gain a “super-majority” of cosponsors for the senate version of the bill (S. 1007), championed by Sens. Mike Crapo (R-ID) and Mark Warner (D-VA).  During August, AHC members sent 200 letters to the Senate urging support for this important bill.  You can put even more horsepower in the PAST Act by sending a letter to your senators today!

Click here to take action.

Just Days Left in Cloud Foundation’s Freedom Family Fundraising Campaign

There are just days left in our Freedom Family fundraising campaign and we are SO close to meeting our goal! Ginger and the TCF volunteer team are already in Montana getting the family ready for the long haul to Colorado.

Through supporter donations we’ve raised over $15,000 to support these beautiful rescued Pryor Mountain mustangs and bring them to their new home. Our goal of $20,000 should help us to cover all the basic costs of the move, from brand inspection, to health certificates, to the hauling itself.

Help us build a bright new future for these horses by donating today! You’ll receive a beautiful 5×7 photograph “Thank You” signed by Ginger Kathrens, founder of The Cloud Foundation.

More than that, you’ll be participating in the start of something new and magnificent, something we’ve never done before… creating the opportunity for people to experience a wild horse family, learn from them, and fall in love. Let’s do something great, together!

The Cloud Foundation
107 South 7th St
Colorado Springs, CO 80905
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Dorian Now Expected to Reach Category 4 Strength before Landfall

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – Dorian, which strengthened into a Category 1 hurricane Wednesday afternoon, is now projected to reach Category 4 strength before it makes landfall along Florida’s east coast early next week.

As of 11 a.m. Thursday, Dorian was moving northwest near 13 mph and this general motion is expected to continue through Friday. On this track, Dorian should move over the Atlantic well east of the southeastern and central Bahamas on Thursday and Friday and approach the northwestern Bahamas on Saturday.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 15 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 90 miles.

Farm & Barn To-Do List

  • □ Make sure ALL horses are microchipped and numbers recorded
  • □ Check and repair fences (walk the fence line)
  • □ Clear trees and limbs
  • □ Remove debris
  • □ Store jumps/tables/chairs
  • □ Examine barn for loose shingles/debris
  • □ Move tractor, trucks & trailers into large pasture
  • □ Spare fuel, store in trailer or stall, four 5 gallon cans, and all vehicle tanks full
  • □ Get tie downs for trucks and trailers
  • □ Store feed, a 7 day supply, in waterproof containers
  • □ Store hay under tarps in a stall off the ground
  • □ Water – 15-20 gal/horse/day (fill up boats, 55 gal drums, pools, troughs). Bleach – 8 drops/gallon (if contaminated)
  • □ CUT OFF POWER to the barn as storm approaches

Farm & Barn Equipment List

  • □ WATER – Hand pump for well (pitcher pump)
  • □ WATER – 55 gal drums (down spout on barn)
  • □ WATER – pond, lake, pool, boats, troughs
  • □ Generator 4 hp or higher (5000 watt)
  • □ Extension cords (50-100 ft)
  • □ Tools – hammers/nails
  • □ Fencing materials – field fence (no barbed wire), fence tape, and posts.
  • □ Chainsaw – extra chain, 2 cycle oil, bar/chain oil/gas
  • □ Ropes and tow cable, chain with hooks
  • □ Ladder
  • □ Wire cutters and pry bar
  • □ Rolls of black plastic and staple gun, large tarps
  • □ Flood lights – work light and handheld car plug-in type (1 million candle power), Headlamps
  • □ Waders or snake boots
  • □ Extra halters and lead ropes (in plastic storage bin)

Preparedness can be your best friend

If you are not evacuating, please make sure you have identification weaved into the mane or tail of your horse.

Have your Coggins and health certificate papers ready. If your horse has a microchip to be used for identification, have it with you.

Please keep in mind, our veterinarians have families to take care of as well. If the bridges and roads are blocked in any way, they will not be able to get to you.

Please have a medical kit ready to go.

If you do not have these things ready for this Hurricane, please make sure they are ready for the next one.

Jacksonville Equine / Southern Georgia Equine
info@jaxequine.com

Hurricane Dorian: Animals in Danger

The ASPCA is gearing up to face the storm head-on and rescue vulnerable animals in the hurricane’s path.

Hurricane Dorian has reached Category 4 status and could grow even stronger and more deadly before it makes landfall in Florida in just a few days. Millions of people are in danger, as are their pets and the region’s homeless animals.

The ASPCA stands ready to assist animals and communities with pre-evacuation efforts and we are actively mobilizing responders and supplies, including field and water rescue vehicles. We are already working with a local shelter to transport its animals out of the hurricane’s projected path to safety.

This critical work is possible only with your support. If you can, please donate today and help us be there for animals when we’re most needed.

Thanks to compassionate supporters like you, we assisted thousands of animals last year during disaster responses that included wildfires and hurricanes. Now, animals in harm’s way need your help again.

If current projections bear out, Hurricane Dorian could require a large, lengthy response — we might be needed on the ground for weeks. We, and the animals, urgently need you behind us. Your gift today represents a lifeline for animals facing the unimaginable, both today and in the future. Thank you.

Tell Your Senators to Co-Sponsor the PAST Act

Before breaking for the August recess, the U.S. House of Representatives adopted the Sen. Joseph Tydings Memorial Prevent All Soring Tactics (PAST) Act of 2019 (H.R. 693) by a vote of 333 to 96.  In the wake of this historic vote, the horse industry is focusing efforts on the Senate, where there is an opportunity to gain a “super-majority” of cosponsors for the senate version of the bill (S. 1007), championed by Sens. Mike Crapo (R-ID) and Mark Warner (D-VA).

Click here to take action.

Preparing Your Horse for Fourth of July Fireworks

Question: My neighbors set off fireworks in their backyard (directly over my barn and pastures!) for two nights in a row. The first night, my horses were in their stalls, and I found them sweating and worked up. The second night, I had them turned out overnight – not knowing that there would again be fireworks – and one of them ended up getting minorly injured after trying to go over the fence! Can I take legal recourse?

Answer: You might not like this answer, but chances are probably not. Because the fireworks were set off on your neighbors’ own property, likely in the manner that they were intended to be used, and without the direct intent to harm your horses, your neighbors are not likely to be held liable. You wouldn’t want your neighbors trying to dictate what you do on your property, would you? Unfortunately, that’s largely the scenario at play here.

However, it may be worth looking into and familiarizing yourself with the local firework laws. If fireworks, or fireworks of a certain size or type, are illegal in your town, your neighbor could then obviously be found at fault. If setting off fireworks violated any laws or ordinances – and the purpose of the law was to preserve peace and quiet in the neighborhood – you might be able to bring a legal action for damages. With that being said, this could lead to a great deal of tension between you and your neighbors!

While this does not sound like the situation at hand here, if the neighbor’s fireworks landed on your property, or if they set off the fireworks with the intent to purposely agitate your horse(s), you may be able to bring a claim for, amongst other things, the injury to your horse. An example would be if you caught the neighbor kids shooting bottle rockets aimed at your horse because they liked watching the horse run.

As long as you are given advance notice or know it is a holiday when fireworks may be prevalent, there are also several other things that you can do to best prepare your horses:

  • Ensure that your horses are inside for the night and close all windows and doors to help cancel out noise and block any views. While this doesn’t sound like it applies in your case, for others who keep horses outside 24/7, it may be worth talking to other equestrians in the area to see if they have open stalls available just for the night.
  • Play music in the barn. If you have a stereo system in the barn, put it to use to again help cancel out the noise of the fireworks. (Make sure that the night of the fireworks is not the first time that your horses have heard the stereo system though – otherwise it could potentially have an equally dramatic effect!)
  • If there will be any fireworks visible from in the barn even with the doors and windows closed, leave the lights on to help lessen the effect of the bright flashes.
  • If your horse is used to wearing earplugs, try leaving earplugs in just for the night.

I might advise (kindly) approaching your neighbors – if you have not already – about what happened and requesting that they let you know in advance the next time that they plan to set off fireworks so that you can prepare your horses accordingly. Depending on your current relationship with them, they may offer to pay for a portion or all of the horse’s injuries if you explain how and why your horse was injured, allowing everyone to avoid the uncertainties of legal action.

Visit www.equestriancounsel.com to learn more or email info@equestriancounsel.com with inquiries.

Cloud Foundation Calls for Hearings on Dangerous New BLM Management Plan

(June 11, 2019) Last week, The Cloud Foundation (TCF), a Colorado-based nonprofit organization, sent a letter to the Chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee (Click here for letter), voicing opposition to a dangerous and ill-conceived management plan that could result in the roundup of over 50,000 horses. The letter calls on the Committee’s Chairman, Rep. Raul Grijalva, to hold hearings regarding the failure of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to effectively manage the Wild Horse and Burro program. The Colorado nonprofit also urges the committee to provide oversight and benchmark requirements for a BLM pilot program, embedded in the fiscal year 2020 appropriations bill.

The legislation, as passed by the House Appropriations Committee on May 22, 2019 and headed to the House floor this week, “lacks safeguards, assurances, and oversight,” said Ginger Kathrens, Director of The Cloud Foundation. (Click here for legislative text and report language.)

“We believe the appropriations language gives the agency far too much latitude on issues where there is disagreement between BLM and the wild horse and burro community. The Cloud Foundation recommends that this pilot program be developed with the oversight and guidance of the House Natural Resources Committee and that the committee initiate a series of hearings to oversee the development of a sound and balanced management plan that holds BLM accountable for implementing humane, reversible fertility control programs.”

The management plan, submitted to Congress earlier this year by the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) et al. would double the number of horses in off-range holding at enormous cost to the American tax-payer. “While perhaps seen as a compromise, these groups are bargaining with the lives and potential deaths of 50,000 horses,” says TCF Director of Communications, Lisa Friday. “Unless funds are allocated to support those horses in holding for the rest of their natural lives, it is not hard to imagine that slaughter will be their eventual fate.”

TCF has advocated for wild horses and burros since its inception in 2005, and Kathrens has documented these animals in the wild for over 25 years.

“BLM never wanted the job of managing a wildlife species, particularly one that competes with one of their major clients, the livestock industry,” Kathrens states. “We cannot trust that BLM will implement reversible fertility control if we simply ask nicely, as called for in this plan. BLM must spend the money where it is allocated – and we must allocate the majority of funds to humane, reversible on-range management. We believe one way to hold BLM to account is to build oversight into any pilot program.”

Click HERE for TCF’s full response to new “multi-stakeholder” management plan.

Click HERE for the Unified Statement, a plan for humane management of America’s Wild Horses and Burros signed by over 100 wild horse and animal advocacy groups.

The Cloud Foundation
107 South 7th St
Colorado Springs, CO 80905
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Comments Needed on BLM Experiment to Spay Wild Mares

The Cloud Foundation and other wild horse advocate groups are once again fighting to protect the Warm Springs mares. Despite having been stopped time and time again by our legal actions, the Bureau of Land Management has again revived its abhorrent plan to carry out cruel experimentation on the mares rounded up from the Warm Springs HMA.

Your comments are needed, and the deadline to submit is June 12th. BLM had originally scheduled the deadline for Memorial Day. This was an underhanded tactic that allowed for only 9 business days to comment. Thankfully our legal team filed a motion and we were able to get that unreasonable time frame extended.

The link to TCF’s comments is here. We know passions run high on this issue, ours included, but as always, we ask you to remain professional and courteous in your comments.

A step-by-step guide for submitting your comments:

1) Enter a title for your comments.
2) Ignore “Chapter Reference” & “Section Reference”
3) You can enter your comments in the space provided and/or as an attached document.
4) Click “Next” and enter the required personal information on the following page.
5) Click “Next”, agree to the disclaimers on the final page, and click “Submit”.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us!

Read the details of the BLM ovariectomy plan here.

The Cloud Foundation
107 South 7th St
Colorado Springs, CO 80905
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Mustangs’ Insides Viciously Ripped Out: Stop the BLM!

The Bureau of Land Management is once again callously planning to permanently sterilize wild horse mares using a gruesome procedure so deadly and inhumane that many veterinarians refuse to perform it. Don’t let the BLM rip out the ovaries of wild mares!

The proposed surgery, called ovariectomy via colpotomy, is controversial even for domestic mares who are used to human handling and given normal surgical protections such as sterile conditions, anesthesia, and complete long-term aftercare. The situation at the Burns Corral in Oregon, where the deadly experiments are slated to take place, is not conducive to any of those conditions which makes the already risky procedure all the more dangerous and life-threatening.

This is the third time that the Bureau has tried to perform this barbaric experiment on defenseless wild horse mares, under the guise of a “study.” After two major universities dropped out, lawsuits were filed, and massive public outcry occurred, the first two attempts were abandoned by the Bureau. Many thousands of In Defense of Animals supporters wrote to both of the universities initially involved, and also to the BLM in protest of this vile procedure from its past attempts.

Take action on this issue.

In Defense of Animals
3010 Kerner, San Rafael, CA 94901
Tel. (415) 448-0048 Fax (415) 454-1031
idainfo@idausa.org

Racing to Extinction: New Management Plan Will Devastate Our Wild Herds

For the past couple of weeks, we have been in contact with the ASPCA and HSUS, the main drivers behind a new management proposal for America’s wild horses and burros. We learned of their concerns for our wild herds in response to growing impatience on the part of lawmakers. We have also listened to the comments of other wild horse advocates and all of you wild horse lovers.

We share your deep concern, especially if this plan moves forward.

In its current form, this “management” plan lacks the safeguards and oversight that would keep our wild herds safe from inappropriate, unscientific, and cruel management practices. We have tried to work with the organizations supporting this plan, asking them to add language which mandates that funds be allocated for humane, reversible fertility control and provide for meaningful accountability on the part of BLM.

Sadly, we understand that the proposal will soon be put forward to Congress as-is. This does not end our efforts. We will continue to fight for the protection of America’s wild horses and burros. We are actively working on alternative solutions to this disastrous proposal and we will see the fight through.

We want to thank you all for your support of our mission and our work, and for loving our wild herds as much as we do. Transparency is at the core of meaningful communication and that is why we’d like to explain our concerns about this proposed plan, so you can decide for yourself whether or not it seems right to you.

Our wild horses will need your voice in the coming months, and being informed is the first step in taking effective action. I have learned in my 25 years of advocacy that one passionate voice can make a difference, but an army of informed, passionate voices can create lasting change.

Thank you for standing with us and with our wild ones.

We know that we can count on you to lend your voice, as needed, to champion our wild families, who cannot speak for themselves.

We encourage you to call your representatives and senators and urge them not to support this proposal as-is.

Click here to find your elected officials.

Ginger Kathrens
Founder and Executive Director
The Cloud Foundation
107 South 7th St
Colorado Springs, CO 80905
www.thecloudfoundation.org