Tag Archives: Eventing/H.T.

Inaugural Blue Ridge Mountain Horse Trials Provides World-Class Competitor Experience

Doug Payne and Quantum Leap ©Christine Quinn Photography.

Mill Spring, NC – September 17, 2019 – The inaugural Blue Ridge Mountain Horse Trials (BRMHT) at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC) concluded Sunday, following two days of national-level Eventing competition at the venue. The event marked the first time competitors of all lower levels were welcomed to test the White Oak Cross-Country Course, the same to host Cross-Country competition during the FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon 2018 (WEG). World-renowned course designer Captain Mark Phillips (GBR) designed seven layouts to host nearly 150 entries from Beginner Novice through Advanced, including Modified.

In the Advanced Division, Doug Payne (Aiken, SC) piloted Quantum Leap to top honors after finishing with a final score of 40.60. Allison Springer (Upperville, VA) and Katie Lichten’s Sapphire Blue B, a 2010 Irish Sport Horse gelding (Heritage Fortunus x Lucy Blue), finished in second place after earning a final score of 51.70, while Ema Klugman (Clarksburg, MD) and Jeni Klugman’s Bendigo, a 2002 Trakehner gelding (Unknown x Unknown), took third place after a final score 52.40.

“He [Quantum Leap] is an eight-year-old and still greenish to the [Advanced] level for sure; he has probably five events under his belt at this point,” Payne shared of the 2011 Zweibrucker gelding (Quite Capitol x Report to Sloopy), co-owned with his wife, Jessica Payne.

Payne continued, “I wasn’t looking to going crazy fast, but he’s a very efficient and good galloping horse, so he just covers the ground so well. I’m very, very lucky to have such a talented and willing horse to go with. He goes in a rubber snaffle, and you barely have to touch him.”

Payne commended Phillips’ course-building to accommodate multiple courses on one footprint. “Initially I was thinking [the course] might get real busy, but there is enough space here that it’s quite good.” Payne concluded, “The course was wonderful. I think the footing couldn’t have been any better. It was a good, flowing course, and I think the whole competition has been excellent.”

After the Show Jumping phase on Saturday night under the lights in Tryon Stadium, Springer and Sapphire Blue B were leading after earning a score of 27.70 in the Dressage phase and putting in a clear round in Tryon Stadium. “He [Sapphire Blue B] is my student Katie Lichten’s horse. We call him Steve in the barn — he’s a unicorn.”

Springer continued: “He’s young, and was definitely spooky in there [Tryon Stadium] but he jumped great. He’s a talented young horse, and I feel really honored to be able to ride him for [Katie Lichten].”

Lucienne Elms and Mistralou Win Open Intermediate Division

Lucienne Elms (Campobello, SC) and her own Mistralou claimed the win in Open Intermediate after a speedy Cross-Country performance bringing her final score to 46.40. Second place was awarded to Annie Goodwin (Aiken, SC) and Mettraise, owned by Jeanne Sylvester, after their final score of 52.50, while John Michael Durr (Shelby, NC) earned third just behind, finishing with a final score of 52.60 with Becky Brown’s entry Tilikum.

“It was a fantastic course design; Mark Phillips is ever the master,” Elms said of the Cross-Country course designer’s work after piloting horses through two different levels. “[The course] rode really well; there were plenty of questions, with all combinations rewarding to just keep a forward rhythm, too.”

Although Elms just started competing again after sustaining injuries in late 2018, she admitted that she was still determined to be competitive: “I wanted a strong result; he [Mistralou] is not green, so I intended to set out for the time. He is a full-blood horse and always a pleasure to finish on, [since] he just keeps galloping, so I was confident I would be competitive providing the time wasn’t easy to attain.”

Kimberly Steinbuch (Shelby, NC) aboard PDQ Leigh, owned by Jil Walton, led the pack Saturday after scoring a 29.30 to lead the Dressage phase and producing a fault-free Show Jumping round. “He’s very new to me: I’ve had him for just over two and a half weeks,” Steinbuch admitted. “I’m very excited about him and looking forward to a very good partnership.”

Steinbuch shared that the course set by course designer Chris Barnard was her first Show Jumping round “under the lights,” and her second Show Jumping round with PDQ Leigh. “It was a little back-and-forth and a little discussionary, but he knows his job is just to leave all of the rails in the cups,” stated Steinbuch.

Steinbuch revealed that she is not used to riding a horse of PDQ Leigh’s size and that it could be a challenging dynamic on Cross-Country: “He’s definitely over 17 hands, so it’s very different for me to have a horse his size to try and ride around, but he’s pretty straight forward and he knows his job.”

Steinbuch and her husband, John Michael Durr, operate out of Shelby, North Carolina, which allows them to compete at TIEC as often as they wish, she said. “We’re here two to three weeks a month, so we basically live here. We do all the Jumpers and Hunters here, and then we do Eventing on the weekends. It’s nice to be centrally located,” concluded Steinbuch.

John Michael Durr and Casofino Claim Open Preliminary Division

John Michael Durr (Shelby, NC) maintained his lead from the first day of competition in the Open Preliminary division to win it all, earning a final score of 29.10 aboard Casofino, owned by Madigan Murphy. Ema Klugman (Clarksburg, MD) and Jeni Klugman’s Bronte Beach Z came in a close second after finishing with a final score of 30.00, while Doug Payne (Aiken, SC) and Stephen Blauner’s Baymax finished in third with a final score of 34.40.

“The course rode really well; Mark [Phillips] did an amazing job; even though there were a lot of courses it felt like the horses were never confused about where they were going,” explained Durr of the White Oak Course adjacent to TIEC. “It was really well done. There were several different tracks, and he nailed it.”

Durr explained that he has been working on giving Casofino “consistent miles and education” before turning the reins back over to his adult-amateur owner, who is also Durr’s student. “He’s a really exciting young horse. He just needed a little making up to win with his adult amateur.” Durr continued, “This was the first time he had been in a ring like this under the lights. His heart was going a million miles a minute and he saw every kid rolling down the grass, but he focused on the jumps and did his job.”

Durr concluded, “Every part of what Tryon does makes you feel special – it doesn’t matter whether you’re there for a national horse trials, a B-rated Hunter/Jumper show, or the 5* week. Tryon gives you that championship feeling all the time, so when my students do go to the championships or go to Young Riders or something like that, they don’t fall apart, because they’re used to being in a big atmosphere.”

For full results from the Blue Ridge Mountain Horse Trials at TIEC, click here.

To learn more, visit www.Tryon.com.

What Are the Three Areas of Equestrian Eventing?

Equestrian riding is a unique sport that pairs a rider and horse together in performance. Within equestrian, there are three Olympic sports that riders can participate in and these areas involve dressage, showjumping, and cross-country. All three Olympic equestrian disciplines are very different and each demands its own skills from the rider and horse. Unlike horse racing, equestrian sports focus on a rider’s command over his or her horse as well as the completion of various tasks on the riding ground. Equestrian and horse racing fans can follow the sports with PlayMGM and wager on the latest horse-based sports events including the British Champions Day.

The Summer Olympics in 2020 will feature three disciplines in equestrian. So, what are those disciplines and how do riders compete in the events?

Dressage

Dressage is all about the control a rider has over the horse. In the event, judges want to see how well a rider can get his or her horse to respond and obey commands. During dressage, a rider and horse must complete a set of instructions. This dressage test will then be examined by a panel of judges that will score the contestants.

Judges give the rider and horse a score out of 10. The higher the score, the better the team performed in their test. The lower the score, the worse the pair did during the dressage event. The winner of the dressage event is the rider and horse who scored the best out of all the competitors.

Showjumping

Showjumping is an exciting, adrenaline-pumping event in equestrian. The event features horses and riders leaping over fences and barriers. The purpose of show jumping is to test the athletic abilities of both the rider and horse. The event also demonstrates the accuracy of the pair as they must not only clear the fence and barriers, but land fluidly.

The rider and horse must jump a variety of fences and barriers. These obstacles vary in height and range from 70 centimeters to 1.60 meters. In addition to jumping over the obstacles and landing, the pair must complete the showjumping course in a specified sequence. The rider and horse to jump and clear all the obstacles in the fastest time is crowned the winner.

Cross-Country

Cross-country is similar to showjumping as the rider and horse must leap over obstacles. The difference between cross-country and showjumping has to do with the size of the course and the obstacles the pair must jump over.

Cross-country tests a horse’s endurance, quickness, and leaping over the length of the event. A cross-country test can be done as part of a full evening show alongside showjumping and dressage. However, it can also be held by itself due to the nature of the event.

One of the biggest differences between cross-country and showjumping is the size of the courses. A cross-country course can be two to three kilometers in size. This gives a horse ample opportunity to showcase their speed and endurance during the event. No two cross-country courses are alike.

Horse & Country TV to Air Thrilling Highlights from Land Rover Burghley Horse Trials

Pippa Funnell (GBR) and MGH Grafton Street.

Lincolnshire, UK – Sept. 13, 2019 – As one of the world’s greatest 5* equestrian events, the Land Rover Burghley Horse Trials draws the world’s leading event riders and enormous crowds of spectators to Burghley House in Stamford, Lincolnshire for the annual four-day event. Claiming the coveted trophy for the second time in history was Britain’s Pippa Funnell and MGH Grafton Street, emerging victorious by a mere 0.1 of a penalty. While the live action took place from Sept. 5 to 8, Horse & Country TV (H&C TV)’s highlight show featuring Funnell’s winning ride as well as the other top performances, including exciting finishes from the American contingency, will air on Sunday, Sept. 15, at 8 p.m. EST.

Join H&C TV and watch the thrilling events transpire as British riders swept the competition in front of their home crowd. Never lacking excitement, the 2019 Land Rover Burghley Horse Trials feature a down-to-the-wire final show jumping phase with a field of talented athletes and horses in hot pursuit of the winning title.

Sixteen years after her first win in the 2003 Burghley Horse Trials abroad Primmore’s Pride, Funnell made her return to the top, this time aboard Jonathan and Jane Clark’s MGH Grafton Street. Funnell and the 11-year-old gelding received an impressive dressage score of 22.8 to lead the standings going into the final show jumping phase. Although the pair lowered a rail at fence eight, their determination to remain in the lead was rewarded when they clinched the overall win with an impressive score of 30.8.

“It’s been such an amazing journey and hopefully it will continue, but it’s the horses that have kept me going,” said Funnell. “He’s not the best show jumper but I’ve always been convinced he had a big win in him – what an incredible two weeks with this and the Europeans.”

Hot on the heels of Funnell was Piggy French and Vanir Kamira, who won the 2019 Badminton Horse Trials in May, and Oliver Townend on Ballaghmor Class, who won the 2017 Burghley Horse Trials.

Eleven horse-and-athlete combinations represented the United States throughout the competition with Lauren Kieffer and Ariel Grald earning top 10 finishes. Don’t miss out on the exhilarating highlights of this premier equestrian event, airing on Horse & Country TV on Sunday, Sept. 15, at 8 p.m. EST.

H&C TV broadcasts in Europe, Australia, and in the United States on cable, satellite, and broadband television, including Roku, and online at www.horseandcountrytv.us.

Strzegom October Festival: Great End of Eventing Season

Photo by Mariusz Chmieliński.

Strzegom is preparing itself for last competitions in eventing in 2019. Strzegom October Festival will take place in less than a month.

Strzegom October Festival joins international competitions (CCI1* -INTRO, CCI2* -L, CCI3* -S, CCI3* -L, CCI4* -S, CCI4* -L) and national classes (CNC 1* – 105cm, CNC L – 100cm, CNC LL – 85cm). SOF will take place from 10th till 13th October this year. Recently was added class for ponies – CCIP2* -L.

All courses will be very educational for horses and riders. The level will be friendly, soft, and very good for the first time at that level.

Entries for event are open now. For more info, visit:  www.eventing.strzegomhorsetrials.pl.

Contact:
www.strzegomhorsetrials.pl
press@strzegomhorsetrials.pl

From Baborówko Horse Sale Show to Stables All over Europe

Baborówko, 5 September 2019 — Growing interest in the sport horses auction in Baborówko shows that horses bred and trained in Poland are appreciated by athletes from foreign countries, and the event has written itself into the growing demands of the market.

Every year, more and more horses are being submitted to the auction Baborówko Horse Sale Show, and each year the horses are even better. That’s why the selection by the organisers has to be more rigorous, in order for only the best horses predisposed for eventing and showjumping to be presented in the catalogue. All horses accepted for the next stage will be subjected to a bundle of examinations performed by veterinarians from Equi Vet Serwis Dr Maciej Przewoźny. The examinations include x-ray photos, endoscopy, and detailed clinical inspections, and the buyers can get acquainted with them before the auction.

Last year at Baborówko Horse Sale Show, horses were bought by riders such as Olympic champion Andreas Dibowski, titled rider Elmar Lesch, and a couple of excellent eventers from Finland – Sanna Siltakorpi and Elmo Jankari.

“I compete in Baborówko two times a year – at Equestrian Festival Baborówko and Baborówko Horse Sale Show. Last year from Baborówko Horse Sale Show I brought home a young horse that I had an opportunity to see and try at the show. The youngster is really promising. I will certainly check out the catalogue this year,” says Andreas Dibowski.

During three editions of the event, horses from the auction have found new owners in Germany, Finland, Russia, and Austria. A fusion of an international eventing show and sport horses auction into one event allows the sellers – breeders, riders, and owners – to meet with the buyers at one place and time.

19 horses predisposed for eventing and showjumping have been selected for the Baborówko Horse Sale Show 2019 catalogue. Baborówko Horse Sale Show 2019 will take place during the last weekend of September, from the 27th until the 29th. The bidding will take place on Saturday, the 28th. During the show and auction, interested parties will be able to schedule a test ride, get acquainted with the veterinary test results, consult them with veterinarians, and get to know the informational brochures.

More information can be found at http://bhss.baborowko.pl/eng/.

Ingrid Klimke and Hale Bob Do the European Double in Luhmühlen Medal Battle

Ingrid Klimke (FEI/Oliver Hardt for Getty images)

The popular and ever-gracious Ingrid Klimke (GER) thrilled her mass of cheering, flag-waving supporters by conjuring a faultless Jumping round from her wonderful horse SAP Hale Bob OLD to clinch both the team title for Germany as well as her second successive individual gold medal at the Longines FEI European Championships, held in her home country at Luhmühlen.

Klimke, who lost her grip on the world title last year when hitting the very last fence at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ in Tryon (USA), never looked like making a mistake on the spring-heeled Bobby, and she left her team mate Michael Jung, who was bidding for a record fourth European title, no margin for error.

When Jung’s fischerChipmunk FST, a horse that is surely a thrilling prospect for Tokyo, hit the second part of the double at 10b, Klimke smiled in rueful sympathy before dancing a jig of excitement.

She is the fifth rider in the 66-year history of the Europeans to win back-to-back titles, following Britain’s Lucinda Green (1975, 1977), Ginny Eliot (1985, 1987, 1989), Pippa Funnell (1999, 2001), and Michael Jung (2011, 2013, 2015), and the second to do it on the same horse, following Funnell’s triumphs on Supreme Rock.

“I definitely came here to win for sure. It was so close, but this year the luck was with me,” said Klimke. “It’s really special knowing that there are so many very quality riders and horses.”

Klimke paid tribute to her long-time Jumping trainer Kurt Gravemeier, who came to walk the course with her, and said that this victory for Germany would be “a positive wind” for the Tokyo Olympic Games next year.

Jung was sportsmanlike in defeat, describing the weekend as “super sport.” He explained: “I was a little bit too fast in the last combination, but this little mistake has not made the whole week bad, so I am very happy. We are a great team and we still have one more year to work on little details and I think we are well prepared for next season.”

Germany’s team gold, their fourth European title since the country’s dazzling run of success began at Luhmühlen in 2011, was never really in doubt with their comfortable three-fence margin after Cross Country, but the fight for silver and bronze medals became an intriguing game of snakes and ladders as team fortunes ebbed and flowed over what was a relatively straightforward Jumping track.

Great Britain just managed to hold onto team silver – by 0.3 of a penalty – as Oliver Townend (Cooley Master Class SRS, ninth), Piggy French (Quarrycrest Echo, 15th), and Pippa Funnell (Majas Hope, 22nd) each clocked up four faults. Townend, for whom it was a personal best team performance, did well to recover his composure after Cooley Master Class got too close to the planks at eight and crashed through the fence.

Sweden, silver medallists in 2017, were the beneficiaries of a titanic struggle for the team bronze medal, securing qualification for the Olympic Games in Tokyo next year in the best possible style with superb clear rounds from Ludwig Svennerstal (El Kazir SP, eighth), Louise Romeike (Wakiki 207, 12th), and Ebba Adnervik (Chippieh, 23rd).

Svennerstal said: “The Olympics is really the highlight for us. It’s very important for our federation and for ourselves. The team has worked really hard to achieve this and we’re extremely happy. I think we had a slightly disappointing start to the week and then we regrouped and everyone in the whole team, including behind the scenes, has been working very hard and we’re very happy with the outcome.”

France’s grasp on the bronze medal was already precarious when Alexis Goury withdrew Trompe l’Oeul d’Emery at this morning’s horse inspection. The 2003 and 2007 European champion Nicolas Touzaint put France back in the hunt with a magnificent clear round on Absolut Gold HCD, but medal success hinged on Lt Col Thibaut Vallette delivering a clear round. Unfortunately, Qing de Briot hit the fifth fence, putting paid to both France’s team and his own individual medal chances by frustratingly small margins.

Italy, with a clear round from Arianna Schivo (Quefira de l’Ormeau, 17th), looked threatening until Pietro Roman (Baraduff) incurred eight faults and Giovanni Ugulotti suffered a nightmare 22.4-penalty round on Note Worthy. This relegated Italy to fifth, but at least with the compensation of the second available Olympic qualifying slot.

Ireland finished sixth, a weekend of mixed fortunes being compounded with the overnight withdrawal of Ciaran Glynn’s November Night. However, there was a clutch of clear rounds from riders in the top 10 and the supremely talented Cathal Daniels (IRL), riding the diminutive mare Rioghan Rua, was the one left at the head of the queue for the individual bronze medal. The 22-year-old from Co Galway is Ireland’s first European individual medallist since Lucy Thompson in 1995.

“It’s an amazing feeling!” he said. “I’ve gone through Juniors, Young Riders, and now seniors with this mare. Unfortunately, the team didn’t get as strong a result as they wanted, but I was glad I was able to get a medal and keep spirits high and build again for next year on the road to Tokyo.”

The Olympic countdown has already begun!

Click here for full results.

View the highlights here.

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

German Legend Jung Sets Up Germany to Go for Gold Again

Michael Jung and fischerChipmunk FST (FEI/Oliver Hardt for Getty Images)

The German team is on course for another rich medal haul on home turf at the Longines FEI European Eventing Championship at Luhmühlen (GER).

Brilliant Cross Country performances by Michael Jung (GER) on new ride fischerChipmunk FST and defending champion Ingrid Klimke (GER) with the evergreen SAP Hale Bob OLD, who are in individual gold and silver medal positions, ensured the hosts retained their lead over defending champions Great Britain. They now have a three-rail advantage over their rivals going into the final Jumping phase.

“fischerChipmunk is a fantastic horse,” said Jung (37), who was visibly thrilled, but refusing to get ahead of himself by envisaging a record fourth individual European title. “Today was a great feeling. We went a bit fast at the beginning so I slowed down but he was always ahead of the time.

“It was a great feeling around the course everywhere. It was so nice to see so many people here supporting our sport.”

Klimke, 51, described her round as “pure fun – I felt like a passenger.” She commented: “For sure there was pressure. Hans Melzer [team manager] said to me, ‘Don’t pat your horse until you get to the finish line,’ because sometimes when I am so thrilled I pat him all the time. I say, ‘Bobby you are my hero’, so I wanted to really focus. He really loves cross country. It’s his job and he loves it.”

A cluster of early riders, notably British and Irish pathfinders Pippa Funnell (Majas Hope, 21st) and Ciaran Glynn (November Night, 23rd), made Mike Etherington-Smith’s beautifully presented, flowing course look easy, but there was plenty of drama. There were 44 clear rounds, 22 horses came home inside the optimum time of 10 minutes 10 seconds, and a total of 20 of the 71 Cross Country starters remain on their Dressage score – but all nations had their difficult moments and this made for a thrilling day’s sport.

Kai Ruder, second out for Germany, stayed admirably calm when Colani Sunrise inexplicably refused to go into the start box, which cost the pair 16 time penalties, and Britain’s third starter, Kristina Cook, had an expensive run-out with Billy The Red at the skinny brush fence exiting the second water (12c).

“I was having a super ride,” said Cook sadly, “but he’s an experienced horse and I can’t make excuses. At the moment I am just very disappointed, for me and for the whole team.”

Ireland’s Sam Watson will also be kicking himself after crossing his tracks at the bird fence in the final water (20b) with Tullaberg Flamenco. Italy’s anchorwoman Vittoria Panizzon (Super Cilious) incurred 11 penalties for hitting the frangible gate at 10a and Belgian pathfinder Laura Loge on Absolut Allegro fell at the Rathaus fence (17) in the main arena.

Laura Collett (GBR), third after Dressage, was “gutted” to part company with London 52 after a mis-stride before the influential carved bird at the final water. Four others fell here and Dutch pathfinder Merel Bloom (Chiccolino) retired.

Jung, who has never been out of the individual medals in five European Championships, does not have a fence in hand over his compatriot Klimke. In turn, she has no margin for error over Luhmühlen first-timer Lt Col Thibaut Vallette (FRA), who rode superbly on the 15-year-old Qing de Briot – coincidentally this is the same final rider line-up as at Blair Castle (GBR) in 2015.

The cost of one Jumping rail covers the next seven: Tim Lips (NED), currently fourth on Bayro, Oliver Townend, who restored Britain’s fortunes with a perfectly judged round on Cooley Masterclass SRS, in fifth, Ireland’s Cathal Daniels, sixth on his super mare Rioghan Rua, French individual Christopher Six (Totem de Brecy, seventh), Italian team member Pietro Roman (Barraduff, eighth), British team member Piggy French (Quarrycrest Echo, ninth), and British individual Kitty King, 10th on Vendredi Biats.

The team medals are equally close: Britain has nothing in hand over the French team, which only has a one-fence advantage over Italy. The Italians, currently in bronze medal position, have no margin over Sweden – both nations are seeking Olympic qualification – and Ireland is a mere 2.2 penalties behind the Swedes in sixth place.

“I think it was a really great day for the sport and for us in Luhmühlen,” said Event Director Julia Otto. “I would like to thank my whole team – they are just amazing the way they work.”

“We have seen some spectacular riding and some great decisions by people who may be riding at this level for the first time today,” Course Designer Mike Etherington-Smith (GBR) commented.

“I didn’t expect quite so many to get the time, but when you have great weather like this with excellent footing, it happens, but it could have been pouring with rain and, in my view, you have to prepare a course for all weather. It’s all about achieving a standard, so full marks to everyone. For me, it’s been a fascinating day. There’s always something new to learn, and if you think you know it all you might as well give up.”

Follow all the medal action in what’s sure to be a thrilling finale with FEI TV.

For full results and start times, click here.  

Click here for the highlights.

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Jung and Klimke Put Team Germany Out in Front at Luhmühlen

Michael Jung (GER) with fischerChipmunk FST. (FEI/ /Oliver Hardt for Getty images)

Michael Jung (GER), who has smashed pretty much every record in the sport, has just put himself in line for another – a fourth European title on a fourth horse – having taken the lead at the end of the Dressage phase at the Longines FEI European Eventing Championship in Luhmühlen (GER).

The double Olympic champion, who never gives away a mark if he can help it, has a great reputation for getting the best out of all sorts of horses. With his Luhmühlen ride fischerChipmunk FST, he has the added benefit of the 11-year-old by Contendro having been well established at top level by his former rider, Julia Krajewski (GER).

Jung’s outstanding score of 20.9 – despite a break of pace in the free walk – could not be bettered, even by defending champion Ingrid Klimke (GER), and the German team is now 16.8 penalties ahead of the 2017 winners, Great Britain, with a mere 68.9 penalties on the scoreboard.

“Chipmunk is a fantastic horse. He’s so intelligent and extremely well trained,” said Jung, who blamed himself for the mistake. “He has a lot of power and sometimes there’s a difficult balance between that and keeping him relaxed. Maybe I risked a little bit too much in the walk so he accidentally broke into trot.

“I nearly liked everything in the test today, just not really the walk – the extended walk especially!”

Klimke produced a reliably stellar performance on her regular team partner SAP Hale Bob OLD to score 22.2. Their test reflected a beautifully trained horse and a happy partnership, and Klimke even had time to pat her 15-year-old bay gelding in reward for a smooth flying change.

British individual Laura Collett and London 52, the first-day leaders, are now third, ahead of German team member Kai Ruder (Colani Sunrise) and France’s Lt Col Thibaut Vallette (Qing de Briot).

Regular Dutch team rider Tim Lips has slotted into sixth place on Bayro on a score of 26.0 and three British riders occupy the next three places.

They are headed by team anchorman Oliver Townend, who has been grounded for some weeks after a fall. He put in a solid performance, bar a slight stumble in trot, and is in seventh place on his dual Kentucky winner Cooley Master Class (27.6). Individual runner Kitty King (Vendredi Biats) is eighth on 27.9.

The 2009 champion Kristina Cook, currently ninth on 28.3, is back on the team with a well-behaved Billy the Red. They were dropped from the team last year due to the Balou de Rouet gelding putting in some occasionally explosive Dressage performances.

The Belgian team, which is seeking one of the two precious Olympic qualification slots for Tokyo 2020, is in third place with a team total of 90.9; France, Ireland, and Italy follow, with just 3.4 penalties covering the four nations.

Attention is now focused on the Cross Country test designed by Mike Etherington-Smith, who has re-routed the track, allowing plenty of alternative routes while warning that they will cost in time penalties. “It’s beautifully designed and built,” commented Townend.

“I’m a fan of Mike Etherington Smith’s courses. There are no blind questions. If you’re on your line and you and your horse are focused on the job, it should ride well.”

“The way the fences are situated, it’s very easy to make a mistake,” added Townend’s teammate, Kristina Cook, a veteran of nine Europeans and, with pathfinder Pippa Funnell, a member of the winning British quartet 20 years ago here in Luhmühlen.

The overnight leader Michael Jung is also appreciative of the 26-fence track: “It’s a very fair course; to be in the time you have to be fast, you have to take a little bit of a risk, and as faster as you go, as easier you can have somewhere a little mistake.”

Follow the action on FEI TV and click here for full results and start times.

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

London Calls for Laura Collett

Laura Collett riding London 52. (FEI/Oliver Hardt for Getty images)

Belgium leads the team standings at this early stage, with Britain’s Laura Collett holding the individual top spot after the first day of Dressage at the Longines FEI Eventing European Championships Luhmühlen 2019.

Laura Collett (30) competing as an individual for Great Britain, produced some stunning work to take the lead at the end of the first day of Dressage, but it looks as though the door has been left open for a potential new order.

The graceful Collett, a neat rider known for her prowess in this phase, scored 25.5 on the German-bred 10-year-old London 52, a runner-up at Boekelo CCI4*-L last year and winner of the Chatsworth CCI4*-S this year, but only one of the three judges placed her first.

“He’s still a bit green and shy,” explained a delighted Collett of London 52, who made only small errors in the second flying-change and with a misstep in the canter work. “He saw the grandstand and was a little overwhelmed. He’s never been in a situation like this before, but he listened to me and kept his head.

“He knows all the moves and trusts me so much. If I keep riding and hold his hand, he’s all right. I’m obviously delighted with his score and it’s exciting for the future.”

The former Junior and Young Rider European Champion is a mere 0.3 ahead of Germany’s second team rider Kai Rüder on Colani Sunrise and France’s 2015 European team and individual bronze medallists Lt Col Thibaut Vallette on the elastic moving Qing de Briot ENE HN.

Both the French army rider, a member of the 2016 Olympic gold medal team, and Rüder are reliably elegant in the Dressage arena and the pair is in joint second place on 25.8 penalties.

“It was a super dressage test with lots of highlights,” commented Rüder. “Colani was very relaxed, with good half-passes and the extended canter was just brilliant. It’s wonderful to see how much he improves from test to test. He’s a very strong character and you have to respect him – then he’ll do anything to please.”

The Ground Jury – Martin Plewa (GER, President), Anne-Mette Binder (DEN), and Peter Andrew Shaw (AUS) – awarded sub 30 marks to seven of 35 riders, including the first two for the Belgian team, Laura Loge (Absolut Allegro) and the hugely experienced Karin Donckers (Fletcha van’t Verahof).

The Belgian pair is in equal fourth place on 28.8 penalties which gives the nation, in search of qualification for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, a boost in first place in the team competition at this stage.

Germany, the host nation, is second – their pathfinder, Andreas Dibowski (FRH Corrida), scored 34.6 – and France is third. Defending champions Great Britain are fifth.

Pippa Funnell (GBR), who won the European title at Luhmühlen 20 years ago, was a late call up to the team on Monday and is taking the pathfinder role on Majas Hope, currently 17th individually on 35.4. Second to go, Piggy French (GBR) and Quarrycrest Echo, members of the winning team at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon (USA) last year, are in seventh place on 29.8.

“This is no dressage competition,” pointed out French. “I’ve walked the cross-country course once and my first impression is that it’s a proper championship course. You have to think really hard about which lines you choose. It’s a quick track with decent waters.”

Follow the action on FEI TV and with live results on www.rechenstelle.de.

Click here for the full results.

Watch highlights here.

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

USEA Foundation Supports Eventers on Their Way to USEA American Eventing Championships

Frankie Thieriot Stutes, recipient of a $50,000 Rebecca Broussard International Developing Rider Grant last year, and Chatwin at The Event at Rebecca Farm in 2018. Photo: Taylor Pence/US Equestrian.

The impact of the USEA Foundation can be felt throughout the 2019 USEA American Eventing Championships (AEC) taking place this week at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, Ky. From educational seminars available to all attendees to the very horses and riders themselves, the USEA Foundation plays an important role at the USEA AEC.

The USEA Foundation, formerly the USEA Endowment Trust, is an independent 501 (c)(3) established in 1991 to benefit the USEA and its members. The fundamental mission of the USEA Foundation is to protect and preserve the sport of eventing for future generations and to provide support for the core educational, safety, and equine welfare programs of the USEA.

Originally established to raise funds to build the USCTA (now USEA) headquarters in Leesburg, Va., the Trust evolved into an organization focused on building long-term reserves for the security of the USEA, providing support for the USEA’s educational programs, developing and administrating a number of different grants, and funding safety and equine medical studies and other strategic initiatives essential to the future of the sport. This evolution resulted in the transition from the USEA Endowment Trust to the USEA Foundation.

The Foundation now serves three primary roles for the USEA: it provides short-term assistance to the USEA in meeting financial obligations, provides a long-term financial safety net, and provides protection and growth for the USEA’s monetary assets. In addition to the roles the Foundation serves for the USEA, it also manages several fundsincluding the frangible technology research fund, the equine health research fund, and the Roger Haller educational fundand provides USEA members with a number of different grants that benefit riders of all ages competing at all levels.

“The USEA Foundation is perfectly positioned in a number of ways to secure the future of eventing in this country,” stated USEA CEO Rob Burk. “Initially, we have been trying to spread the word about the existence of the Foundation and differentiate it from the USEA and from other charitable entities. As recognition and support for the Foundation have grown, we have been excitedly watching the successes of the Foundation-supported riders, horses, and projects as they come to fruition. One of the key attributes of the USEA Foundation is that it has been very nimble. Should new research be needed to tackle an issue of concern, the USEA Foundation can quickly establish charitable campaigns to address it.”

One of the many educational seminars taking place during the AEC is a frangible device clinic held by the 2019 USEA AEC course-builder Mick Costello. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions relating to frangible technology, from proper installation to the function served by different types of frangible devices. The depth and breadth of knowledge surrounding frangible devices is due in part to the work of the frangible technology research fund, which is invested in and protected by the USEA Foundation.

Several of the riders competing this year at the 2019 USEA AEC have been supported on their journey by USEA Foundation grants. Frankie Thieriot Stutes received the $50,000 Rebecca Broussard International Developing Rider Grant in 2018. This spring, she traveled to compete in the Luhmühlen CCI5*-L in Germany with her partner, Chatwin, where, in their first attempt at the level, they finished in fourth place as the highest-placed American pair.

“I was able to use the bulk of my funds to go to Luhmühlen, and the remainder of my Broussard grant money will make it possible for Chatwin and me to get to Kentucky to compete at the AEC, which is an amazing building-block in our partnership,” explained Thieriot Stutes, who lives in California. “It’s giving us an opportunity, where we otherwise wouldn’t be able to afford to make the trip to Kentucky to compete at such a world-class venue on Derek di Grazia’s courses.”

In addition, Thieriot Stutes will be using a Tex Sutton flight she purchased through the USEA Foundation silent auction at the USEA Annual Meeting and Convention in 2018. “It’s neat, because I was really excited to buy the flight to support the USEA Foundation, not knowing what I would use it for,” she said. “It’s come full circle, and I’m excited to be able to support the Foundation and have the opportunity to fly Chatwin on Tex Sutton to compete at the AEC.”

Madison Temkin, who is competing with Dr. Hart in the Intermediate Championship division and with MVP Madbum in the Preliminary Horse Championship division, received the $5,000 Amy Tryon Young Rider Grant in 2016 and the $6,000 Wilton Fair Young Rider Grant in 2018. She was named to the USEF Eventing 18 training list for five consecutive years since the program’s inception in 2014 and then to the USEF Eventing 25 list in 2019.

“The USEA Foundation grant has given me the opportunity to travel to the East Coast and not only compete at my first AEC, but also to continue east and base myself in Ocala, Fla., with High Performance coach Leslie Law,” said Temkin. “I am so grateful to have been a recipient of this grant, and I cannot wait for the next couple of months. The knowledge and experience I am going to gain is crucial to my career in this sport, and it will be a trip of a lifetime. Thank you so much to everyone who has believed in me and made this possible. I hope to make everyone proud.”

International five-star event rider Caroline Martin has a whopping eight rides at the AEC this year, including two in the Intermediate Championship: Danger Mouse and Cristano Z. In 2017, Martin was awarded the $10,000 Essex Grant, which is available to riders under the age of 25 competing at the CCI4*/CCI5* levels. Martin and her mount, Islandwood Captain Jack, were named to the USEF Development Pre-Elite Training List and represented the U.S. in the CCIO4*-S at Aachen.

In the winter of 2018, Martin used the grant money she received to travel south to train with Olympic dressage rider Bent Jensen. “I was with Bent for over a month, and I also got to ride some of his Grand Prix horses, which was really interesting,” Martin said. “This winter I got to go down for 10 days and work with Anne Kursinski in show jumping. I got to go do my first 1.55-meter Grand Prix with Cristano Z.

“Both experiences were really great for me. It was great for me to go and train with Bent and actually learn pure dressage and ride the pure dressage horses – it helped me with my tempi changes and my pirouettes. I got to live there and completely immerse myself. It was also great to go train with Anne, because I’ve never jumped that big, and it gave me a lot of self-confidence, especially when I went to Aachen this year and jumped in an arena that big. It really helped me take my show jumping to the next level.”

In addition to the training that Martin was able to undertake as a result of the grant, she’s also had the chance to transition her business from pure riding to encompass sales as well. Three of Martin’s AEC mountsRedfield Bajall, Redfield Cheranimo, and Redfield Idealare sales horses owned by her business partners. “Since I got that grant, my business has changed,” she said. “I went from being just a professional rider to now being a salesperson and rider.”

Support of the USEA and USEA Foundation through donations and memberships helps ensure the long-term future of the USEA and the sport of eventing. To learn more about the USEA Foundation and the different grants and programs it supports, visit www.useafoundation.org.

by Jessica Duffy, United States Eventing Association