All posts by Associate Editor

War Horses, Cavalrymen, and the FEI Jumping Nations Cup

Capt Xavier Bizard from the French Cavalry School at Saumur with Honduras after winning the King George V Gold Cup in 1937.

Riders and sports fans all around the globe are pining for the cut-and-thrust of FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ this year. Since it was first staged back in 1909, war is the only thing that has ever stopped this great annual tournament in its tracks, and it is another kind of war that is getting in the way of the 2020 Longines sponsored series as the world currently grapples with the Coronavirus pandemic.

Only two of the 11 qualifying events were completed this season, in Wellington (USA) where the hosts wrestled victory from Great Britain in a thrilling jump-off, and in Abu Dhabi (UAE), also in February, where New Zealand posted an historic back-to-back double.

However, the resilience of this particular branch of equestrian sport, so often described as the “jewel in the crown of the FEI,” is second to none. It emerged from epic sporting battles between military men, and it still stirs the blood in spectators today as they roar on their own national teams, which now of course also include female athletes, at many of the most prestigious horse shows around the globe.

It’s the unique sense of national pride that gives it the edge, with riders often talking about how their horses are “fighting” for them as they tackle the tough courses set by world-class designers. A steed with great courage was what was needed by cavalrymen of old. And in the story of two war horses from very different periods of military history, there’s a reminder of the fighting spirit that continues to set the best apart from the rest to this day.

Vonolel

In the grounds of the Royal Hospital in Kilmainham, Dublin (IRL), built in the 1680s for retired soldiers but now home to the Irish Museum of Modern Art, there is a gravestone that marks the final resting place of Vonolel, a brave and special horse.

He was the charger of the decorated Anglo-Irish Field Marshal Frederick Sleigh Roberts, a Victorian era general who became one of the most successful British military commanders of his time. Lord Roberts, aka “Bobs”, was only 160cm tall so was a perfect match for the beautifully-bred Arab horse who stood at just 148cm.

Named after a great Lushai chief, the little grey was bought in Bombay (now Mumbai, IND) as a five-year-old and served Roberts for the next 23 years. Vonolel played a pivotal role in the relief of the Siege of Kandahar (AFG), and also saw action in India, Burma, and South Africa. The horse was a legend in his day and was repeatedly decorated by Queen Victoria, receiving amongst others the Kabul medal and the Kandahar Star for bravery in battle, both of which he wore around his neck on ceremonial occasions.

He travelled about 50,000 miles during his career without ever taking a lame step, and when he passed away at the Royal Hospital in June 1899, Roberts was said to be heartbroken. Vonolel was buried in the rose gardens of the Royal Hospital with full military honours, and there is a painting of him, with “Bobs” on board, in London’s Tate Gallery.

It’s that tradition of horses and riders battling as part of a team on behalf of their country, albeit in peace time and in a spirit of healthy competition rather than antagonism, that underpins the FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ series to this day.

Honduras and Nipper

Vonolel’s glorious send-off was in stark contrast to that of a black 160cm gelding of unknown breeding who is no less deserving of an honorable mention in dispatches. His name was Honduras when he clinched the coveted King George V Gold Cup for Capt Xavier Bizard in London in 1937. The rider from the French Cavalry School at Saumur was a showjumping star of the 1920s and 30s with a formidable record of success on Nations Cup teams riding a variety of horses.

Bizard was on the winning French sides at Nice (FRA) in 1924, New York (USA) in 1925, and Lucerne (SUI) and Rome (ITA) in 1927. He was back in Rome in 1928 for another victory and the following year helped post two more Nations Cup top spots in Naples (ITA) and Dublin (IRL). In the 1930s he was on three winning teams in London as well as in Nice, Lucerne, Vienna (AUT), Rome, and Riga (LAT). It was partnering Apollan that he won the Nations Cup in the Latvian capital in 1937, and that same year he scooped the King George V title in London with Honduras.

It seems that the ride on Honduras was then handed over to Amador des Busnel who won the Grand Prix with him in Brussels (BEL) in 1939, before the onset of World War ll brought everything to a shuddering halt.

What is intriguing about this horse is not his success-rate, but the fact that he was captured during the German occupation of France, and then re-appeared after the war on the US Army showjumping teams that won the Nations Cups in both London and Dublin in 1948, now competing under the name “Nipper” and ridden by Lt Col Charles (Chuck) Symroski.

He was well-travelled at this stage of his life because, after being captured along with the rest of the German team horses near the town of Bayreuth in Bavaria (GER) in 1945, he was shipped to the United States in August of 1946. He competed across America and Canada that year, and again in 1947 before returning to Europe in the spring of 1948 to compete at a number of shows in the lead-up to the London Olympic Games for which he was selected as the reserve horse.

The Nations Cup win in Dublin in 1948 was historic, as it was the first time for a US side to lift the Aga Khan Cup, the first time for non-Europeans to take the title, and the last time an official US army team would line out at the Royal Dublin Society showgrounds. Nipper and Lt Col Symroski were joined by Capt JW Russell riding Airmail, Col JF Wing with Democrat, and Lt Col CH Anderson with Riem when New York-born Eamon De Valera, then Taoiseach (Prime Minister) and later President of Ireland, presented the coveted Aga Khan trophy.

One more time

And Honduras/Nipper would get to meet his old friend, Capt Bizard, one more time. Their encounter took place in London, but whether it was following their Nations Cup win or during the Olympic Games in the English capital that summer is unclear, as it has been separately reported at both venues. Wherever it happened it was an emotional reunion when the Frenchman accidentally came across his former mount who he had thought was long dead.

The story goes that when Capt Bizard told the Americans how old the horse was they were really surprised. However, the 19-year-old gelding wasn’t called into action for the one-round Olympic contest which proved to be a marathon, defeating all but three of the 14 participating teams. Mexico, Spain, and Great Britain clinched gold, silver, and bronze while the USA was amongst the 11 countries eliminated.

Following the Games, the US army team was disbanded and replaced by a civilian side. Although unconfirmed, it is believed that Honduras/Nipper returned to America to live out his days on the family farm of three-time Olympian Jimmy Wofford near Fort Riley in Kansas (USA) whose parents accepted all the remaining remounts for retirement following the mechanisation of the cavalry.

This horse’s life wasn’t celebrated with the pomp and ceremony that marked the passing of Vonolel a half-century earlier, but his story lives on as another symbol of survival in the face of destructive world conflict. And the FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ is also a survivor, just waiting in the wings for a return to centre stage as soon as the current pandemic crisis is sufficiently resolved.

Hopes are still high that a revised version of the Longines FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ Final will take place in October this year, but one way or another nothing will stand in the way of a renewal of the series that has been engaging and delighting spectators for well over a century and which remains the best-loved brand ambassador for equestrian sport.

And as for the once much-loved Vonolel and Honduras aka Nipper, they will not be forgotten. We’ll leave them with the words carved into that gravestone in Dublin, which reads:

“There are men both good and wise
Who hold that in a future state
Dumb creatures we have cherished here below
Shall give us joyous greeting when
We pass the golden gate
Is it folly that I hope it may be so?”

With special thanks to:
Olympian and coach Jimmy Wofford
Jane Garland, artist

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

A Brighter Tomorrow at Days End Farm Horse Rescue

Though it has been a challenging few months for all of us, we’re so grateful to our many supporters who continue to help Days End Farm Horse Rescue. During May 5th’s Giving Tuesday Now campaign, we were thrilled to reach our goal of raising $25,000 for the horses. Once again, our amazing community of supporters came together in a time of crisis to show that there is hope for tomorrow. Because of your outpouring of support, you can trust that we are better prepared for the months ahead and will be ready to respond in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic. Every dollar counts, and we’re incredibly grateful. If you missed that opportunity to donate, please consider making a gift today.

Prepared for Emergencies

Back in March, we closed our facility to the general public and regular volunteers, and the office personnel worked from home. We made this decision to protect the health of our animal care staff, while following the State of Maryland’s guidelines. Because we had protocols in place for such emergency situations, we were able to quickly create a highly functional, efficient system to keep things running smoothly and safely at the farm.

News from the Farm

Our amazing animal care team at DEFHR have gone above and beyond to keep our horses healthy and happy, even under challenging circumstances. Our trainers, Sara Nyman-Strauss and Leigha Schrader, have been sharing weekly video updates in their “Life on the Farm” series giving behind-the-scenes look into the care and training of the horses. Click here to watch this week’s episode. What a talented group we have right now!

Volunteer Program Updates

Currently, our regular volunteer program remains closed as Maryland enters Phase 1 of the slow reopening process. We are using Maryland’s Road Map to Recovery to aid in determining when and how we can safely reopen the volunteer program. We will keep you posted as we make more decisions on this process. Thank you all for your support and understanding. We miss you and can’t wait for the day we welcome you back. Stay healthy, everyone!

Days End Farm Horse Rescue – www.DEFHR.org

Millar Family Launches Millar Brooke Farm South

Ian, Amy, and Jonathon Millar of Millar Brooke Farm. Photo by Starting Gate Communications.

Perth, Ontario – The Millar family has announced the opening of its U.S.-based satellite operation, Millar Brooke South, as well as the addition of Alexander and Holly Grayton to Team Millar.

As Millar Brooke Farm continues to expand its business and grow, the timing was right for Jonathon Millar and his wife, Kelly Soleau-Millar, to base in the United States for the majority of the year, marking the official launch of Millar Brooke Farm South. The move allows the business to have an increased presence south of the Canadian border, providing easier access to more shows, the ability to source horses from a wider area, and greater networking and training opportunities.

“We are excited to open up Millar Brooke South,” said Jonathon, a veteran of the Canadian Show Jumping Team and 2010 World Equestrian Games competitor. “With operations based in Canada and the United States, our business now has a lot more flexibility surrounding what shows we can attend around the world, access to additional horses and sponsorships, and enhanced training opportunities for our horses and riders.”

Millar Brooke Farm South will compete predominantly in the United States during the summer months while Millar Brooke Farm North, based in Perth, ON, will spend the bulk of its time competing in Canada. Both operations will continue to train and compete together in Wellington, FL during the winter circuit.

“Every year we come together to discuss how to provide the highest level of training and management for our horses and students,” said Kelly, who made her Nations’ Cup debut riding for the United States in 2018. “I am very excited about the future for Team Millar as we continue to grow and provide new opportunities for our students, sponsors, and owners.”

The expansion of Team Millar also necessitated additional coaching power and expertise to support Ian Millar and his daughter and fellow Canadian Olympian, Amy, in meeting the increased training demands at home in Canada. To that end, Alexander and Holly Grayton have relocated to Millar Brooke Farm North. Since 2008, the Graytons had been operating Grayton Farms in Alberta where they focused on coaching, sales, and developing young horses.

“After an extensive search for the right fit, we could not be happier that we were able to attract them to Perth to join our team,” said Amy, who was a member of Canada’s fourth-placed team at the 2016 Rio Olympics. “Alex and Holly are highly regarded with a proven track record of success, and we are confident that they will contribute to Team Millar. We are all excited about the opportunities that lie ahead.”

Ian added, “I am very excited to add Alex and Holly to our staff. Alex and Holly are both dedicated horse people with whom we have a history, first as students and then as colleagues. Alex is a talented rider, fantastic teacher, and has incredible passion for our sport.”

Over the past several years, Alexander has developed several horses to the elite level, claiming Talent Squad National Final and National Young Horse Championship titles as well as grand prix victories and hunter championships. Alexander has trained riders of all levels, from those entering their first horse show to winning National Talent Squad Finals, FEI Children’s Finals, international grand prix classes, and every place in between.

Holly is a budding grand prix rider and will take on managerial duties at Millar Brooke Farm North. Students of the sport can look to Holly for her accumulated knowledge of horse care and can trust in her never-ending desire to continue to learn from esteemed and respected colleagues from around the world.

“Both Alex and Holly will be incredible assets to our team,” concluded Amy. “Their passion for the sport, training, people, and their horses make them a perfect fit for our program.”

For more information on Millar Brooke Farm and Team Millar, visit www.millarbrookefarm.com.

CONTACT: Jennifer Ward | cell: 613-292-5439 | www.startinggate.ca

NARG Releases Sport Report: 2020 Winter Venues

May 21, 2020 – When the North American Riders Group last sent a release about plans for the return of the NARG Top 25, the terms COVID-19 pandemic, shelter-in-place order, social distancing, and face masks were not common in our daily vocabulary. As we dealt with the challenges of a global issue on an international horse show level, and rearranged our schedules to stay at home until competition begins again, NARG decided to issue a Sport Report focusing on the Winter Venues.

NARG Top 25 work began last fall when we revisited the evaluation form, and reached out to managers, riders, and owners to get feedback. As a result, and to level the playing field, the evaluations include subjective scoring, plus NARG research and points awarded via a questionnaire answered by management.

In North America, the competition year kicked off with a winter season comprised of 21 CSI 3*, 4*, and 5* events over an 11-week period, leading directly into a busy spring season that had 12 more events of this caliber plus a Longines FEI World Cup™ Final that were to be complete by the end of May.

By the time that mid-March hit and shows were canceled, 19 shows over nine weeks at eight venues throughout North America were in the books and evaluations well underway. These events and the venues that hosted them are the focus of this first edition of the NARG Sport Report.

WHAT HAPPENED IN A DECADE

The sport of show jumping has evolved in the decade since we gave a voice to the riders, owners, and trainers in North America. The number of FEI events offered has more than doubled, but more importantly the star-ratings went up. For example, in 2010 there were four CSI5* events on the calendar, with three of them in summer or fall in Calgary; in 2020, there were 20 CSI5* events on the calendar, with eight (40%) scheduled in Wellington, Mexico City, and Miami, before the Canadian season even commenced.  Of course, these are pre COVID-19, but illustrate the point of how North America has stepped up in this regard.

In the four years and three months since we last released a report, new events, organizers, tours, and facilities have come on the scene, and we commend all of their efforts. We are truly sorry for those events that canceled since mid-March, as the loss is felt on so many fronts.

2020 REFLECTION, REALIZATION AND RECOGNITION

We were all set to have a busy year, from the NARG Top 25 perspective, focusing only on CSI 3*, 4*, and 5* events, there were 74 events and one Final to focus on. With this global change that halted the end of the winter season and obliterated the spring season, we all took a deep breath and considered what we had accomplished this winter.

Up from four events in 2010, eleven in 2015, Mexico had 22 FEI CSI 2*-5* events on their calendar. Six of those offered top competition at three impressive venues this winter.

The winter season is certainly important to the sport of show jumping in North America and worthy of its own report. Since the events are produced in two countries, at eight different venues by six managements, each week was evaluated multiple times and we averaged the scores by venue.

Although the evaluation form was updated for 2020, interestingly the highest scoring venue was within a percentage point of the top score earned by Spruce Meadows in 2015. The eight venues were separated by less than 14 percentage points, and the lowest scoring venue is certainly not ‘the bottom’ as the score would have not only made the top 25 in 2015, but securely in the middle of the list.  We also noticed that had we continued through the full year of 75 events we would have been splitting hairs with scores.

Of course, there are many events that would certainly have been recognized in the NARG Top 25 this year that we regrettably won’t be evaluating this season, including some of the top over many years, Thunderbird’s May events and the aforementioned Spruce Meadows, to name just two. NARG looks forward to the return of these as well as the GCT, Split Rock Jumping Tour, Tryon, and others to the North American calendar.

One final note – NARG is aware that our sport goes beyond FEI Jumping; that there are young horse programs, jumper development programs, as well as high performance hunter and equitation events and programs. Currently our focus is on high level show jumpers. We intend to expand that over time.

Wishing all riders, owners, trainers, organizers, and the wide net of those who help make this sport what it is, as well as all their horses, good health.  NARG presents the Sport Report: 2020 Winter Venues.

Old Friends Celebrates the Daytona Stakes Saturday May 23

GR1 winner Daytona at Old Friends (Photo: Rick Capone)

GEORGETOWN, KY – MAY 21, 2020 – On Saturday, May 23, 2020, Santa Anita will present the Daytona Stakes (G3T), a 5-1/2-furlong race on the turf, as part of their nine-race program.

Named for a resident at Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement facility based in Georgetown, KY, The Daytona Stakes pays tribute to the six-time graded stakes winner whose career earnings totaled nearly $1 million. Overall, the son of Indian Ridge, bred by the Irish National Stud, scored 8 wins, 2 seconds, and 3 thirds in 18 career starts.

CLICK HERE to see Daytona’s 2007 GR1 Hollywood Derby win, where he faced off against fellow Old Friends retiree NoBiz Like ShoBiz.

In 2008 Daytona started in the Breeders’ Cup Mile at Oak Tree against the formidable Goldikova. Injured during the race, he finished 10th. It would be his final start.

Following his racing career, Daytona, a handsome chestnut, made an attempt at a second career but soundness issues prevented him from continuing.

The now 16-year-old Daytona was retired to Old Friends in 2014.

For more information, please call (502) 863-1775 or visit the website at www.oldfriendsequine.org.

Sign Up for Ride Times Now with ShowGroundsLive

Wellington, FL – May 21, 2020 – Exhibitors participating in the ESP May Schooling Shows and June Spring Series may now sign up online for their order-of-go via ShowGroundsLive on PBIEC.com. Beginning May 21, competitors may select their ride times between 5:00 P.M. – 7:00 P.M. EST for the following day’s competition. To learn how to select ride times online, please click here. The decision to offer online sign-ups was made in an effort to reduce in-person contact at the in-gate and to allow riders a more accurate way to plan their schedule while showing at PBIEC’s Equestrian Village.

We are planning to use this sign-up system at least through the month of June, so we encourage trainers to learn this optional process during the schooling shows. It is our intention to have orders-of-go for all sections that are open in the schedule. After 7:00 P.M., the rest of the unselected rounds will be ordered by the in-gate personnel to establish a final order-of-go. This is a new process for ESP as well, so we appreciate your patience in advance while we work out the kinks together over the next few weeks. Course maps for all classes will also be posted online at PBIEC.com the day prior to competition by 7:00 P.M. in order to reduce large gatherings for course walks.

As previously stated, exhibitors must fill out all (4) four forms online prior to entering the show grounds: Schooling Show Entry Blank, Schooling Show Waiver, the Spring & Summer Show Entry Blank, and the USEF Waiver & Release of Liability Assumption of Risk and Indemnity Agreement. These forms and the revised ESP June Spring Series Prize List are now available on the homepage under the ‘Competitors’ tab.

Thanks to the great efforts of a local charity, ESP will also be able to provide $10 packs of protective supplies. Each kit includes ten (10) 3-ply masks and two (2) pairs of nitrile gloves, and will be available at the show office for purchase. All proceeds will go towards XPI Emergency Relief Fund to continue providing critical supplies to those in need. To contact the show office, please contact Jenn Glosson at jglosson@equestriansport.com or 561-313-5133.

Please take the time to read through the ESP COVID-19 Safety Protocols and Procedures so you have a full understanding of what to expect here. To answer just a few questions that have been asked:

Yes, we will be taking temperatures of everyone entering the property. We ask everyone to get in the habit of checking your temperature in the morning to avoid surprises. We will have multiple places where your temperature will be checked either with a touch-less thermometer or a thermal camera system. Please allow a little extra time for this process.

Yes, everyone on the show grounds will require a facial covering. Riders while mounted will not be required to wear a facial covering, but should have access to one after getting off their horse. If a rider chooses to wear a mask in any class, there will be no point deductions from the judges.

Yes, we will be enforcing all of these protocols at the schooling shows in May. These two practice shows will also allow our staff to better enforce these rules and make modifications if necessary. This is new to all of us and we sincerely appreciate your patience and understanding in advance.

Yes, braiding is optional in all classes. Judges will be asked not to add or deduct any points for braiding choices. Braiders have taken a huge financial hit with the shut down and we did not want to exclude braiding for this reason.

No, we have no official answers on the 24-hour rule, jogging, confirmation, or model classes. We expect that information to be released soon and we will update our Prize List and COVID-19 Safety Protocols and Procedures by announcements and edition date on PBIEC.com.

Her Majesty The Queen Wins at Virtual Windsor Horse Show

After the cancellation of Royal Windsor Horse Show which was to run in the private grounds of Windsor Castle, ‘The Queen’s Back Garden’, from 13-17 May, organisers moved the Show online to create Virtual Windsor 2020. More than 4,200 entries were received for the online Showing competitions, including several from HM The Queen.

A ‘usual’ Royal Windsor Horse Show would receive around 2,800 entries, illustrating how the equestrian community has come together to make Virtual Windsor 2020 a larger success than ever envisioned.

A huge number of viewers watched the Show online with more than 250,000 tuning in to enjoy the event over its five days, while the social media reach soared past the million mark.

The numbers surpassed all expectations and organisers were particularly delighted by the number of viewers from overseas with more than 90 countries getting involved.

24 Showing classes were run over the five-day virtual Show, mixed with streaming of 5* Jumping and Dressage classes from previous live events, along with displays and competitions that you can only see at Royal Windsor Horse Show.

HM The Queen had six entries in the Showing Classes and was the outright winner in two — Class 2 for Cleveland Bays which she won with Wyevale Harry ridden by Matthew Powers and Class 19 the Side Saddle which she won with Stardust ridden by Katie Jerram-Hunnable.

Over the course of the five days, many stars of the equestrian world joined the virtual Show in interviews and commentary. Their Royal Highnesses, The Earl and Countess of Wessex, also participated in a video interview showing their support for the event.

As a first-time event for Royal Windsor Horse Show, organisers expressed it was more than they could have ever wished for. Simon Brooks-Ward, Show Director, ended the Show by thanking all involved and hoping to see everyone again – in the flesh – next year.

Brooks-Ward said: “We’ve been delighted by the response we’ve had to Virtual Windsor 2020. It’s been fantastic to see the Show’s community getting together to keep the Show going – whether they are competitors, shop holders, sponsors, stewards, judges and officials, or visitors – everyone has been engaged. I think it demonstrates how important the Show is for all and how close it is to their hearts.”

Details of the virtual Show can be found by visiting virtual.rwhs.co.uk. The site will be constantly updated and will remain in place throughout the year.

Victoria Colvin Honored as National Show Hunter Hall of Fame Rider of the Year

Colvin piloted Private Practice to victory in the $100,000 USHJA/WCHR Peter Wetherill Hunter Spectacular in 2019 and 2020.

Wellington, Fla. – May 20, 2020 – One of the most prominent hunter riders in the United States today, Victoria Colvin has once again been recognized for her talent in the ring. Voted on by the trainers of champions at the top ten shows of the year, the National Show Hunter Hall of Fame’s Trainers Choice Annual Awards recognize the accomplishments of one rider, one owner, and seven horses for their success in the hunter ring. Thanks to her astounding collection of winning performances throughout all of 2019, Colvin has been named the Rider of the Year. Originally scheduled for May 26, 2020, The Hall of Fame’s Annual Awards and induction ceremony will now be held June 1, 2021, at The Merion Cricket Club in Haverford, Pennsylvania in order to comply with social distancing guidelines.

Throughout 2019, Colvin topped a multitude of scorecards and continued to add to her lengthy list of accomplishments. Beginning the year with a rapid succession of class and division wins during the Winter Equestrian Festival, the young professional rider and trainer was ultimately honored as the WEF Overall Hunter Rider and also emerged victorious in both the $100,000 USHJA/WCHR Peter Wetherill Hunter Spectacular and the $50,000 USHJA International Hunter Derby Championship. In the summer, Colvin made history as a three-time winner of the Platinum Performance/USHJA International Hunter Derby Championship, topping the leaderboard by nearly 25 points in the 2019 installment aboard El Primero. The fall saw more success as she came out on top in the $10,000 World Championship Hunter Rider (WCHR) Professional Finals during the Capital Challenge Horse Show.

“I am so thrilled and humbled to be named the Rider of the Year as part of the National Show Hunter Hall of Fame’s Trainers Choice Annual Awards! The fact that fellow trainers and riders voted on this and recognized me as one of their peers makes it even more special. This is an incredible privilege, and I have to thank my team and supporters for all of their dedication and hard work that allowed me to reach this milestone. I’d also like to congratulate Bryan Baldwin and Brad Wolf on their awards!” commented Colvin.

In addition to Colvin’s recognition as Rider of the Year, two of her connections also received annual honors. Bryan Baldwin, the owner of El Primero, was named the Owner of the Year. Colvin piloted El Primero to victory in August 2019 in the $256,640 Platinum Performance/USHJA International Hunter Derby Championship, among other derby and division championship honors throughout the year. Honored as the High Performance Horse of the Year, Private Practice is owned by Brad Wolf. “Peter” is another of Colvin’s equine partners that she has ridden to consistent success, and in 2019 the duo won the $100,000 USHJA/WCHR Peter Wetherill Hunter Spectacular, later winning again in 2020 for the second time in a row.

Colvin will aim to maintain her winning ways in 2020 when horse shows resume in both the hunter and jumper rings. Although the schedule is subject to change, the original calendar included Colvin’s participation from July to the end of the year at the Blowing Rock Charity Horse Show, Bluegrass Festival Horse Show, Hampton Classic Horse Show, Kentucky National Horse Show, and a series of indoors shows.

For more information, please visit www.victoriacolvin.com.

Support the Future of Para Equestrian Sport

Photo (c) United States Para-Equestrian Association.

United States Para-Equestrian Association Mission Statement  

To Help Develop, Promote, Support, and Sustain all USA Para Equestrian Athletes for Regional, National, and International Competition with a focus on Paralympic Equestrian Sport.

United States Para-Equestrian Association Vision Statement  

The vision of the United States Para Equestrian Association (USPEA) is to provide leadership for equestrian sport in the United States of America for athletes with an eligible physical impairment, promoting the pursuit of excellence from the grass roots to the Paralympic Games, based on a foundation of fair, safe competition and the welfare of its horses, and embracing this vision, to be the best national Para Equestrian Association in the world.

About USPEA

The United States Para-Equestrian Association (USPEA) includes every recognized equestrian discipline that is practiced by athletes with an eligible physical impairment with a focus on Paralympic Equestrian Sports. The USPEA is a network of current and past athletes, owners, officials, event organizers, and equestrian enthusiasts. The Association assists athletes to get involved and expand their knowledge and experience in the Disciplines of Para-Equestrian.

USPEA was created to fill a need to assist Para Equestrian disciplines when they came under the governance of the FEI. While Para Equestrian disciplines were originally segregated, they now are integrated in international sport. As each individual Para Equestrian discipline develops, it is USPEA’s mission to always serve as an advisory resource with the ultimate goal that the established able-bodied discipline affiliate will integrate within their organization.

In 2010, the USPEA earned its 501 (c)(3) status and became a recognized International affiliate association of the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF) working together to grow the FEI recognized disciplines by helping to provide press, educational information, symposiums, and competition opportunities for athletes with eligible physical impairments.

For more information about the USPEA, please visit www.USPEA.org or contact USPEA President: Hope Hand by e-mail: hope@uspea.org or by phone: (610)356-6481.

The USPEA is a USEF Recognized National Affiliate. The USEF International High Performance Programs are generously supported by the USET Foundation, USOC, and USEF Sponsors and Members. For more information please visit US Equestrian at https://www.usef.org/compete/disciplines/para-equestrian.

COVID-19 Matching Campaign: Help Us Help Them

Thanks to a generous challenge gift from an anonymous donor, every $1 you donate now becomes $2 — up to a maximum of $25,000 — to help feed and care for the horses of EQUUS Foundation Guardian charities affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Horses bring joy to young and old alike – and make those with the deepest of wounds whole again. However, America’s horses are also confronted with a disturbing reality. Over 65,000 horses were transported across our borders for slaughter in 2019. Tens of thousands more are abused and neglected and in need of rescue, rehabilitation, and re-homing each year.

With so many people facing hardships, our fear is that many more of our four-legged equine friends may be subjected to abuse and neglect and the number of horses heading to the slaughter pipeline will increase.

For horses to remain an important part of American life and have a viable future, we need to ensure that donor dollars are being spent on programs with the greatest impact – programs that not only increase adoptions of at-risk horses and provide a safe haven for aged horses, but also increase opportunities for all people to engage and partner with horses in new innovative ways.

At the heart of the EQUUS Foundation’s mission is the EQUUS Foundation Guardians program. EQUUS Foundation Guardian charities undergo a rigorous vetting process annually to demonstrate that they are committed to the highest standards for horse care and are transparent and accountable by making their horse care practices and operations available to public scrutiny. Only EQUUS Foundation Guardian charities are eligible to receive financial support from the EQUUS Foundation.

There’s no better way to give with confidence than to give to EQUUS Foundation Guardian charities — and there’s no better time to give than RIGHT NOW because every dollar you give will double between now and June 30th.

Act Now to Help Us Reach Our Goal by June 30.
Please make your gift here.

Contact the EQUUS Foundation, Inc., at 168 Long Lots Road, Westport, CT 06880, Tele: (203) 259-1550, E-Mail: mail@equusfoundation.org, Website: www.equusfoundation.org.