All posts by Associate Editor

Kent Farrington and Kaprice Win the $25,000 #1 Education Place National Grand Prix

Farrington and Kaprice. ©Anne Gittins Photography.

Wellington, FL – December 8, 2019 – Kent Farrington of Wellington, FL and Kaprice, owned by Kent Farrington & Haity McNerney, dominated the $25,000 #1 Education Place National Grand Prix at Palm Beach International Equestrian Center (PBIEC) on Sunday, scooping up their second win of the week with a jump-off time of 40.616 seconds. In second, Wilhelm Genn of Lebanon, OH and Van Gogh, owned by Wilhelm and Patty Genn, finished the short course in a time of 42.925 seconds, while Luis Larrazabal of Wellington, FL and San Francisco Stables LLC’s Caristina took third after stopping the timers at 43.747 seconds.

Anthony D’Ambrosio saw 28 entries test his course in the first round, with 12 returning for the jump-off. Farrington reflected that the course was well-suited for greener horses or horses that need to build confidence: “You didn’t see any triple combinations today but there were three doubles, which for greener horses or for horses that are building, is a more fair test. For her [Kaprice], it’s great because she’s getting to see multiple types of combinations.

“Kaprice is really a special horse; she’s unbelievably careful. I’ve moved her up and down because of that,” Farrington said of Kaprice. “She’s similar to a lot of the great horses I’ve had in the past where she borderlines on too careful, so it’s all about keeping her confidence level high,” Farrington concluded.

To learn more about the ESP Holiday Series and PBIEC, please visit www.pbiec.com.

World’s Best Riders Return to Rolex IJRC Top 10 Final and Rolex Grand Prix at CHI Geneva

Geneva, Switzerland, 9 December 2019 – From 12-15 December, two of the most prestigious competitions on the show jumping calendar, the Rolex Grand Prix and the Rolex International Jumping Riders Club (IJRC) Top 10 Final, will take place in the Palexpo arena at the Concours Hippique International de Genève (CHIG).

ROLEX GRAND PRIX
On Sunday 15 December, an elite field of international riders will contest the year’s final Major, the CHIG Rolex Grand Prix, which forms part of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping. They will compete on a typically imposing course created by world-renowned designers Gérard Lachat of Switzerland and Louis Konickx of The Netherlands.

A founding supporter of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping in 2013, Rolex is a partner to all four constituent Majors, each one endowed with its own unique history. The Rolex Grand Slam is arguably the most coveted prize in show jumping, awarded to the rider who wins three consecutive Grand Prix at these events. It is also one of the most challenging, requiring unparalleled displays of courage, determination, and precision. Rolex Testimonee Scott Brash of Great Britain is the only person to have achieved the feat to date, starting with victory at the CHIG in 2014, followed by further triumphs at the CHIO Aachen and the CSIO Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ in 2015.

The partnership between Rolex and the CHIG is a key element of the brand’s long-standing commitment to equestrianism that dates back more than 60 years. Inaugurated in 1926, the event is among the most esteemed in the equestrian world, where the relentless pursuit of excellence – by horse and rider combinations and the event organizers – fits perfectly with Rolex’s own quest for outstanding performance in everything it does.

ROLEX TESTIMONEES
After highly successful seasons, Rolex Testimonees Steve Guerdat and Martin Fuchs have both already qualified to contest in the CHIG Rolex Grand Prix. The Swiss riders currently lead the world rankings, Guerdat at No. 1, Fuchs at No. 2, and will endeavour to continue this form in front of an enthusiastic home crowd. Crowned the European champion earlier this year, and second place to Guerdat in the FEI Jumping World Cup Finals, Fuchs will be a formidable opponent for his compatriot. Guerdat, a three-time winner of the CHIG Rolex Grand Prix (2006, 2013, and 2015), who was also victorious in the Rolex IJRC Top 10 Final in 2010 and 2018, said: “Competing in the final Major of the year is always a fantastic experience, particularly as it is hosted in my home country. Entering the arena to the eruption of support from such a patriotic crowd is a feeling like none other, and I can’t wait for the 2019 edition.”

Joining these riders will be Canada’s Eric Lamaze, in a bid to repeat his 2008 victory in Geneva. Aiming to set his sights on the top honours will be Kent Farrington of the United States, winner of the Rolex Grand Prix at the CHIO Aachen this year and the CHIG in 2017. Brash and France’s Kevin Staut, winner of the Rolex Grand Prix at the CHIG in 2010, will be joined by Rolex’s newest Testimonee, Britain’s Harry Charles as they also look to contest the Rolex Grand Prix in Geneva. Dutch rider, Jeroen Dubbeldam, former World and European champion, and Rolex’s longest-standing equestrian Testimonee, Brazilian Rodrigo Pessoa, who won the Rolex Grand Prix at the CHIG in 1993, 2000, 2002, and 2004, will be hoping to complete the strong roster of Testimonees competing.

ROLEX IJRC TOP 10 FINAL
At the Rolex IJRC Top 10 Final, the world’s top 10 riders are invited to compete against one another. This unique concept, supported by Rolex since its inauguration in 2001, acknowledges the achievements of the best show jumpers over the course of the season, and has established itself as a highlight of the equestrian calendar.

Guerdat will contest the 19th edition of the event as World No. 1 and reigning champion, having ridden his horse Alamo to victory over two faultless rounds last year. His success was the fifth in a row for Rolex Testimonees, following in the footsteps of Brash, Farrington, Lamaze, and Staut. He will defend his title against fellow Testimonees Fuchs and Farrington, along with other members of show jumping’s elite group of riders.

IJRC Director, Eleonora Ottaviani, comments: “We are extremely proud to hold our unique event at the CHI Geneva for the 15th time, one of the most iconic shows worldwide. Similar to the ATP Finals in tennis, the Top 10 Final is unrivalled in equestrian sport. It is a privilege to be associated with Rolex, a brand that continuously demonstrates its commitment to equestrianism, providing fundamental support and developing its long-standing success.”

Virginie Chevailler
Rolex SA
virginie.chevailler@rolex.com
+41 (0) 22 302 2619

Merrick Haydon
rEvolution
mhaydon@revolutionworld.com
+44 (0) 7748 186 833

Longines Grand Prix of Paris: The French Flair

© Cécile Sablayrolles pour EEM.

What better present for the organizer and the public of the 11th Longines Masters of Paris than this 100% French podium? In front of their fans, French team stalwarts Simon Delestre, Kevin Staut, and Roger-Yves Bost took first, second, and third, respectively, in the Longines Grand Prix of Paris. Believe us, there was noise – a lot of noise! – in the stands while history was made in the arena.

“Fair,” “perfectly balanced,” “definitely sport and welfare oriented.” A lot of praise went towards French course designer Grégory Bodo’s tracks during the press conference. “The course was interesting and faults occurred everywhere as opposed to a true stumbling block which would have penalized a certain type of horses in particular. Grégory did a very subtle job forcing the riders to ride forward which one of the basis of our sport.” Coming from reigning team Olympic champion Kevin Staut, second of this Longines Grand Prix of Paris, these words were certainly honey to the ears of Bodo who is very much in demand in the horse world and whose courses raise unanimous appreciation wherever he operates. “The tracks of the Longines Grand Prix of Paris and all the weekend’s classes of this 11th Longines Masters of Paris required fluidity, delicacy, accuracy, and rhythm. I nonetheless included two turns to give the competitors a chance to take risks.” Did it mean that the Longines Grand Prix of Paris was to be won on the flat and not over the jumps?

“A champions’ class”
“Hermès Ryan is naturally very fast on the ground,” confirmed the winner Simon Delestre. “I did actually win on the flat and stuck to my plan as far as related distances were concerned but turned very fast. This was a big Grand Prix. Going last in a six-strong jump-off was a rather comfortable position to be in.”

“Walking the course, I really thought that this was going to be a champions’ class and that the winner would be really strong,” added Roger-Yves Bost, third of the Longines Grand Prix of Paris, the other reigning Olympic champion on the podium. “I had to risk it all, take off strides… I knew that the rockets Staut and Delestre were going to be hot on my heels. I haven’t ridden very many jump-offs this fast with Sangria. I’m really pleased with her.”

As far as final placings go, the three French leaders are followed by Ireland’s Darragh Kenny on Classic Dream, France’s Félicie Bertrand, the only lady rider to have qualified for the jump-off of this Longines Grand Prix of Paris 2019 on Sultane des Ibis, and Germany’s Christian Ahlmann riding Take A Chance On Me Z.

55 000 spectators over four days
Christophe Ameeuw, president and founder of EEM, organizer of the Longines Masters of Paris and the Longines Masters Series (Hong-Kong, Lausanne, Paris), commented that this Grand Prix perfectly reflected the sport, passion, and boldness which prevailed in Paris-Villepinte over the weekend. “This 100% French podium is the perfect conclusion. An event like ours must absolutely serve the sport and keep bringing on to new fans the best showjumping has to offer. During this weekend, we have experienced historical moments and kept our good spirits despite external constraint. We also innovated with the introduction of a new competition for the best ponies in the world as our duty is to always challenge ourselves, fly high, experience new things, and pursue our ideas. There is still some way to go and many people have yet to discover this sport which, to my eyes, is the most beautiful in the world. Therefore, we need to cross community borders and create new fans. This actually was one of the bets of this youth oriented 11th edition.”

Find all the results HERE.

© 2019 Blizko Communication

Do Horses Sleep Standing Up?

Myth or Fact: Horses sleep standing up. The truth lies in survival. Horse physiology has evolved to give them the best possible chance of procreating the species. And yes, that means horses can sleep standing up. They have specific physiological developments that make standing sleep possible. However, not all their sleep needs can be met while on their feet.

Designed for Survival

The horse “stay apparatus” makes it possible for them to stand and enter the lighter sleep stages. It functions in both the forelimbs and the pelvic region. When the stay apparatus is activated, the muscles are bypassed in favor of the tendons, ligaments, and other connective tissue. These tissues require less muscle activity and reduce fatigue.

The stay apparatus fully supports the horse’s weight without collapsing. However, a horse can wake up and move almost instantly because the muscles are already prepped and in position. In the wild, that gives horses a significant survival advantage over their predators.

More Than Standing

All that being said, all of a horse’s sleep cannot take place while standing. Like humans, horses need rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. During this deep sleep stage, the brain becomes almost as active as it is during the day. Vivid dreaming, muscle spasms, and an increase in heart rate and breathing occur.

A temporary paralysis also takes place during this phase, which is why horses have to lay down for a short time each day. If they didn’t, they may act out dreams, collapse, or potentially injure themselves. Generally, horses only need about 30 minutes of REM sleep to maintain their health, but some may spend more or less time based on their individual needs.

Promoting Better Equine Sleep

Though the structure of the equine sleep cycle may be different from humans, it’s no less vital to their health. People need mattresses to get comfortable, and horses have unique sleep needs too. Horses spend anywhere from five to seven hours in a state of rest. Their deepest sleep takes place after midnight.

Standing sleep doesn’t require much more than a safe, undisturbed space. However, for a short period of REM sleep, horses need plenty of room. Corrals or pens should be large enough that the horse can comfortably lie down. If several horses share an enclosed space, there needs to be enough room that one or more can comfortably lie down at the same time. In a herd, the horses take turns lying down to sleep as a survival measure.

Horses can suffer from REM deficiency and drowsiness if they’re not getting enough deep sleep. We’ve already mentioned how lack of space can limit REM sleep, but so, too, can a horse’s position in the herd hierarchy and/or their physical health. Arthritis can make it difficult for a horse to get up and down, for example.

A bedded area, one that’s large if you’ve got several horses, can help with both issues. Horses prone to arthritis can get comfortable while those low in the hierarchy can lie down without disturbing those higher up the chain.

With the right conditions, your horse should be able to get the rest he needs. Think about what you might need to take along when you travel. It could be extra bedding or panels so that he can easily and safely lie down. When you take the steps to make sure your horse is getting good sleep, you’ll be setting both of you up for success.

Samantha Kent is a researcher for SleepHelp.org. Her favorite writing topic is how getting enough sleep can improve your life. Currently residing in Boise, Idaho, she sleeps in a California King bed, often with a cat on her face.

Werth Pips Werndl in Close Contest at Salzburg

Isabell Werth with Emilio. (FEI/Daniel Kaiser)

The Queen of international dressage, Germany’s Isabell Werth, continued her relentless march to the 2020 Final when winning the FEI Dressage World Cup™ 2019/2020 Western European League qualifier at Salzburg in Austria.

As defending champion, she only has to compete twice during the qualifying season with whichever horses she intends to take to the Final in Las Vegas, USA next April, and this result makes it a double of victories partnering the 13-year-old gelding Emilio in the current season.

At Lyon, France in October, the pair pinned Charlotte Dujardin and Mount St John Freestyle into runner-up spot, having been pipped by the British duo in the previous day’s Grand Prix. But although they kept their German counterparts Benjamin Werndl and Daily Mirror at bay in both competitions at the Austrian fixture this weekend, their winning margin was a relatively narrow one each time out.

At the press conference afterwards, Werndl said, “This is my favourite place… being so close to Isabell!”

But the five-time title-holder who is bidding to become the first-ever four-in-a-row FEI Dressage World Cup champion was quick with her joking reply: “I’m very happy that Ben had such a good tournament here in Salzburg and is going so well. As long as he stays like that – in second place – that’s fine by me!”

In the early stages there were smart performances from Austria’s Stefan Lehfeliner and Fackeltanz who posted 73.360, and from Ireland’s Anna Merveldt partnering Esporim. At this summer’s European Championships in Rotterdam (NED) this inexperienced 10-year-old Lusitano helped the Emerald Isle to Olympic qualification, and on his Freestyle debut posted a solid score of 73.310. A real eye-catcher was the lovely 12-year-old Robinvale ridden by Greek 18-year-old Theodora Livanos who put 74.455 on the board, but it was Swedish star Patrik Kittel who led the way at the halfway stage on a mark of 75.680 with Eddieni.

The target-score shot up to 78.150 when 2013 series champion, Germany’s Helen Langehanenberg, took her turn with the lovely mare Annabelle. But their lead didn’t last long, Werth and Emilio setting a whole new standard with another of their power-packed tests when next into the arena. It wasn’t perfect, as Werth said afterwards: “There was just a little second going into piaffe,” but, as only she can, this extraordinary competitor simply turned up the heat to throw down a new target of 85.905 which brought the crowd to their feet and put it up to the rest.

Werndl wasn’t intimidated, however. He won with Daily Mirror at this venue last year, and as a partnership the pair has just been getting better and better. They finished second at the opening leg of this series in Herning seven weeks ago scoring 84.545, fifth at the third leg in Stuttgart with 80.900, and here racked up a personal-best 84.705 with a performance filled with freedom of movement, harmony, and lightness. Only their piaffe was holding them back from a higher score that might well have challenged even closer for the win.

It looked set to be another German whitewash until, second-last to go, Victoria Max-Theurer and Benaglio snatched third place from Langehanenberg with a lovely performance that earned the Austrian duo a mark of 78.525 to the delight of the home spectators.

Werth is now planning to give Weihegold, the mare with which she has claimed the FEI Dressage World Cup™ title for the last three years, her second outing of the season at Amsterdam (NED) in January. And looking even further head, when asked which of her rides she plans to take to the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, she replied, “The season will decide… but it’s no secret that my first choice is Bella Rose, then Weihe and Emilio.”

Werndl has now bounced to the top of the league table ahead of Langehanenberg in second, The Netherlands’ Hans Peter Minderhoud in third, and French rider Morgan Barbancon into fourth place. The next leg, at London, Olympia (GBR) on 17 December, will bring the Western European League to the halfway stage.

Result here.

Watch highlights here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Emanuele Gaudiano Wins Longines Speed Challenge of Paris and Speed Challenge Series Bonus

© Aléa pour EEM.

This amazing pair boasts a fabulous total of sixty plus international wins over the past five years, twelve of which in 2019! Emanuele Gaudiano and Carlotta 232 confirmed their status when they won the much acclaimed 2019 Speed Challenge of Paris in a super time of 60’’48 without a single pole down: a repeat for the winners of the same flagship competition during the Longines Masters of Lausanne, Switzerland this summer. “I’m extremely lucky to ride such an amazing mare. Each round with her is a pleasure – even more so at a show like this one where the stands are packed,” he commented.

The Paris crowd was held spellbound throughout the aptly named Longines Speed Challenge, the fastest class in the world. The spectators who supported each rider unreservedly were treated to the most spectacular show. The special table where one pole down is worth 2 seconds extra time goes toward an increased speed and more suspense.

However, a clear round was definitely a bonus to score the best time to win the class. A goal reached among others by world n°1 Steve Guerdat (Switzerland). Number 13 out of 27 to go, the 2012 Olympic champion set a very fast pace in 61’’98 aboard Ulysse des Forêts. “I rode according to my plan and mostly took advantage of my mare’s natural speed without pushing much,” the rider commented. Enough to win? “I think it’s possible to be faster. If I finish in the top five, or even on the podium, it’ll be a good thing.” He ends up a very creditable third, behind Emanuele Gaudiano and his long- standing friend, Canada’s Eric Lamaze. Riding top mare Fine Lady 5, the 2008 Olympic champion also put down a top performance thanks to a time of 61’’37 at the very end of the class. A lesson in riding and courage greeted by all.

Best of the French is none other than Roger-Yves Bost, a.k.a. “Bosty the Rocket”, who gave it his all with Castleforbes Talitha to finish fourth 62’’22.

Find all the results HERE.

© 2019 Blizko Communication

Nayel Nassar and Martin Fuchs Hand in Hand on Top of the Masters Power Lido de Paris

Nayel Nassar & Can Can Della Caccia © Aléa pour EEM.

High jump contest the Lido de Paris Masters Power was the first highlight of the day at the Longines Masters of Paris. Seven of the seventeen pairs entered came from the Masters Two category and ten from the Masters One. Tied at 1.97 meter, Egypt’s Nayel Nassar and Switzerland’s Martin Fuchs are joint winners of the Masters One while the Netherlands’ Elise van de Mheen, the only rider from her category to clear 1.87 meter, was the best of the Masters Two section.

After an initial round at 1.45m, all riders but Italy’s Filipo Marco Bologni started in the first jump-off at 1.72m. With an extra 27cm, things were getting a bit trickier. Nonetheless, twelve pairs gave the second jump-off (1.87m) a go! Now, the added 15cm proved much more challenging. Of the Masters Two field, only The Netherlands’ Elise van de Mheen managed to clear the line. On the Masters One side, Nayel Nassar, France’s Philippe Rozier, and Martin Fuchs remained in contention. The Egyptian and the Swiss easily cleared the next round at 1.97m while Philippe Rozier’s Prestigio LS La Silla refused to launch himself at the impressive vertical.

The competition was then coming to an end. Both leaders had a final attempt at 2.07m, both a record height and a challenge with a 10 000 euros Super Bonus for all riders clearing over 2.05m at each leg of the Longines Masters Series. Were they going to be able to fly even higher? Despite their determination and the support of the Paris audience, neither managed to clear the huge jump. No Super Bonus, then, but a nonetheless superb victory for the riders who were both partnered with horses who were novices at this type of competition.

“This was a good class in which I had entered my Grand Prix horse Silver Shine. We gave a go at 2.07m and it didn’t work. 2.07m is actually quite high. Especially as it was Silver’s first puissance. I like entering this kind of class before a Grand Prix. The gymnastics are very good preparation,” explained the European champion Martin Fuchs. “It was Can Can Della Caccia’s first puissance. Honestly, I did not know how he would react. I’m not very experienced either at this kind of class. But he got better and better after each round. He felt like he kept growing up.”

Find the complete results HERE.

© 2019 Blizko Communication

Riders Masters Cup: Unbeatable Europe

© Jean-Louis Carli / Aléa pour EEM.

This year, the competition was open to riders from the whole American continent. This year, the Americas managed a superb first round. This year, true showjumping legends made up the American team. And still, Europe yet again won the Riders Masters Cup, for the fifth time in a row!

On paper, the Americas had serious chances to win the fifth Riders Masters Cup, flagship competition of the Longines Masters of Paris launched in 2017 by EEM with Longines for Founding Partner. Robert Ridland’s troops really seemed in a position to turn the tables on Europe and at last clinch the class that has been eluding them since the beginning. On paper only. Led by Swedish chef d’équipe Henrik Ankarcrona, Europe mercilessly won on a final score of 125 for the Old Continent to 80 for the New World.

The Americas dominated the first round
For the very first time, Robert Ridland’s team stood up to their opponents in the first round. It must be noted that for the sake of sport and suspense, the rules made it possible to select riders from all the Americas. The chef d’équipe could thus pick Canadians and Brazilians. Good choice: Ridland’s team included as many as 3 Olympic champions with the USA’s Laura Kraut, Brazil’s Rodrigo Pessoa, and Canada’s Eric Lamaze. Thanks to Kraut and Pessoa as well as Brazil’s Marlon Modolo Zanotelli, the Americas won three of their five duels. On Europe’s side, Olympic champions Kevin Staut (France) and Henrik von Eckermann (Sweden) both had four penalties. At that point, with a provisional score of 40 to Europe’s 35, Ridland’s five had reasons to hope for a win.

Second round: Europe regains control
Right from the beginning of the second round, Europe recovered some strength… and took advantage of a weakness of the Americans who had all changed rides. Clear in the first round, Modolo Zanotelli was now eliminated for two refusals. The young Canadian Kara Chad was equally unfortunate. Only the legend that is Rodrigo Pessoa managed to win his duel against Henrik von Eckermann. Spearheaded by a reigning European champion and reserve World champion Martin Fuchs in top form, Europe eventually won four of the five duels for a fifth victory in as many editions. First to go in both classes and double clear, Fuchs commented, in front of packed stands: “I’m feeling very well at the Longines Masters of Paris. I won the Grand Prix here five years ago and I hadn’t been back since.”

The Americans only have two days left to win competitions at the Longines Masters of Paris 2019. On top of their triumph in the Riders Masters Cup, the Europeans won most classes so far, leaving only the Masters One Hubside to Modolo Zanotelli. Yes, they can… can’t they?

© 2019 Blizko Communication

Olympia Announces Live TV and Streaming Schedule

Olympia, The London International Horse Show announced the live TV broadcast and streaming schedule which will take the Show out beyond the four walls of the Olympia halls. High viewing demand is anticipated for the Show which has eight of the world’s top ten show jumpers lined up to compete including British number ones and Olympic Gold medalists Ben Maher (jumping) and Charlotte Dujardin (dressage). Olympia continues to be the most watched show jumping event in the UK.

Olympia Show Director, Simon-Brooks Ward, said: “We are grateful for the BBC’s continued support of the Show. Over the years their coverage has provided an important platform for equestrian sport in the country and is not only hugely beneficial for the Show but for equestrian sport as a whole.

“This year the competition is shaping up to be better than ever and we hope the extensive viewing opportunities on offer will allow fans from around the world to be involved in what is truly a festive equestrian extravaganza.”

Live Coverage

In the UK, the BBC will be showing over 14 hours of live coverage on BBC Two and on their online platforms including the Red Button.

For those wanting to watch live from outside the UK:

All FEI World Cup™ classes can be viewed internationally on FEI TV.

In the US and Canada the full programme of classes with the exception of the FEI World Cup™ classes will be available on Horse & Country TV.

In Scandinavia, the full programme of classes, with the exception of the FEI World Cup™ classes will be shown on Riders Live TV.

To purchase tickets for Olympia, please visit www.olympiahorseshow.com or telephone the box office on 0871 230 5580.

For more information, please contact:
Gayle Jenkins / gjenkins@revolutionworld.com / +44 (0)203 176 0355

Riders Masters Cup: The Duels

© Jean-Louis Carli / Aléa pour EEM

The first “signature” competition of the 11th Longines Masters of Paris, the Riders Masters Cup, will have two original teams of five European riders and five riders from the American continent battle it out on Friday December 6. The draw, which took place in the heart of Paris, at the Cirque d’Hiver, right before the young showjumping champions auction The Auction by Arqana, decided the duels for the first round of a competition which, so far, always smiled on the European side.

A spectacular and strategic competition, the Riders Masters Cup pits five riders from each team against each other in two rounds, or ten duels. The first round is held following timed Table A rules over a Grand Prix course. The starting order and the composition of the duels have been drawn. Each duel won in this first round earns the team 10 points. In the second round, held under Table C rules, the Chefs d’Équipes’ strategies and choices are crucial. In particular, they may, if they so wish, assign riders new mounts more suited to speed classes. The Chef d’Équipe of the losing team in the first set picks the first rider to start out; the leading team then has the advantage of choosing the competitor he wants to pitch against this first rider. The second, third, fourth, and fifth riders are then chosen alternately by the Chefs d’Équipe of the winning and losing teams. In the second set, each duel won earns 20 points.

The duels for the first round
Duel 1 : Kara Chad vs Martin Fuchs
Duel 2 : Marlon Modolo Zanotelli vs Kevin Staut
Duel 3 : Rodrigo Pessoa vs Jos Verlooy
Duel 4 : Eric Lamaze vs Darragh Kenny
Duel 5 : Laura Kraut vs Henrik von Eckermann

The Riders Masters Cup will start at 9h00 pm on Friday December 6. The line-up of riders is entrusted to world renowned Chefs d’Equipe: Robert Ridland, team USA selector, for the Americas, and Henrik Ankarcrona, Sweden’s selector, for Europe. Each team will be supported by a showjumping legend: Marcel Rozier, French Team Olympic Champion in 1976 for the European side, and Nelson Pessoa, the great Brazilian champion who won countless competitions all over the World, for the Americas.

© 2019 Blizko Communication