Category Archives: Equestrian Assistance

My Horse Damaged Property at the Boarding Barn. Am I Responsible for Paying for It?

By Leone Equestrian Law

A. I board my horse at a local stable, and unfortunately, he damaged his stall door overnight. We don’t know exactly what happened, but thankfully he wasn’t injured. However, the door will need to be replaced. It will probably cost a few hundred dollars, but there is nothing included in my boarding contract about me having to cover any costs from damage from my horse. Am I responsible for paying the cost of replacing it?

B. As many of us know, horses can be accident-prone. Even though we’d like to keep our horses swaddled in bubble wrap for their own safety, that’s just not possible. An experienced barn owner or manager can do their best to help prevent accidents from occurring at their facility, but sometimes things happen beyond their control. Following safety protocols and keeping the stable and fences in good working order can go a long way in protecting the horses from potential accidents.

Fortunately, your horse was not injured during his ordeal, but now the main concern is who will cover the replacement costs of the damaged stall door. Since your stable owner did not include any provision in your boarding contract specifying that you as the horse’s owner would be responsible for any damage to the facility caused by your horse, you are not legally obliged to pay for the damages. Some boarding contracts do contain provisions like these, though they are more commonly found in self-care boarding agreements where the owner, not the stable, provides care to the horse on the stable’s property. In your case, because nothing was included in the contract about this scenario, the stable owner will be responsible for the repair costs.

For many boarding stable owners, repairing damage around the facility is the cost of doing business, and the stable usually pays for all damages when they occur, regardless of the amount. They might even factor in these potential expenses when they set their monthly boarding fee. Also, in some situations (such as a broken fence between two fields), it is not always obvious which horse is the culprit. So, to be fair, the stable owner will often cover the costs to mend the fence and avoid placing the blame on any particular horse in order to keep relations with the boarders harmonious.

However, since your horse obviously was the culprit in the damage to his door, it’s worth having a conversation with the stable owner about the situation. You could offer to chip in on the cost of the new door, which they would probably appreciate. You might also try and figure out the cause of the accident, if you can, to avoid any future problems. Maybe your horse is stabled next to another horse he dislikes, and he might need to be moved to a different stall to avoid any bickering.

In any case, being able to refer to your signed boarding contract in a situation like this is always useful. Carefully reviewing everything in your boarding contract, especially before you sign it, will help you be prepared to handle situations like this and can protect you from any unexpected financial obligations.

Visit www.equestriancounsel.com to learn more or email info@equestriancounsel.com with inquiries.

Dave Thind Method ‘Improve Your Riding from Home’ Series Begins June 8

Walpole, MA, USA (June 5, 2020) – Join equestrians around the world for group class with biomechanics specialist, Dave Thind. Learn signature DTM and Feldenkrais movement techniques that improve your riding, all from the comfort of your home or barn and for half the cost, for a limited time. So that Dave can adequately supervise and assist you, only 24 spots are available per session, and the last two sessions sold out. Riders from the USA, Canada, Brazil, and Australia have registered for this particular class, aiming to improve their flexibility, position, and strength in the saddle as well as reduce bad habits and chronic pain.

In the event that this class fills or doesn’t work for your time zone, check out www.DaveThindMethod.com for other availability, including the start of a similar series on June 16 in French.

This limited time, half-price offer is a special outreach event to help riders continue their education from home while social distancing or getting back into the groove after a period of not riding. Now into their 5th week, students in the two May groups are incredibly enthusiastic and are reporting tremendous results. The two sold out classes are filled with wonderful riders from across the world, from beginner to International Grand Prix riders.

“I’m enjoying the class and found that last week’s lesson was very helpful in re-setting my asymmetry — I had to adjust my stirrups during the prior week because I was so crooked. I needed to do that to function, but after the class was able to go back to even stirrups. Personally, I find it helpful that I have to ‘show up’ for the group class even if I don’t ask many questions or participate directly. I tend to procrastinate and not get around to watching recorded videos,” stated May student Liz Morton.

For only $17.50 per class ($140) you can join the global DTM community of riders in June and July for a fun, relaxing, and informative series of 8 classes. All 8 sessions will be taught live by equestrian biomechanics specialist and German FN Certified “Trainer A”, Dave Thind. The 50-minute classes are followed by Community Q&A to address any issues or concerns in the group of riders of all levels from the US, Canada, Europe, South America, Africa, Australia, New Zealand, and more.

When is it?
Class is held every Monday from June 8 through July 27, 5:00PM – 6:15PM EST*

REGISTRATION DEADLINE: June 7 at Midnight EST, or before if class fills. The session May sessions and overflow class both filled up with a waiting list, so book early to reserve your spot.

Riders that found themselves unable to ride as well as those who have been lucky enough to continue riding during this period have experienced outstanding results from Dave Thind Method’s series.

For more information on the Dave Thind Method, visit www.DaveThindMethod.com.

Media contact:
holly@equinium.com
www.equinium.com

America’s Horses Will Benefit from the COVID-19 Matching Campaign Underway

Horses across the country need us now more than ever and many are in dire need of a lifeline. Thanks to a generous challenge gift from an anonymous donor, every $1 you donate between now and June 30 becomes $2 — up to a maximum of $25,000 — to help feed and care for the horses of EQUUS Foundation Guardian charities affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

For horses to remain an important part of American life and have a viable future, we need to ensure that donor dollars are being spent on programs with the greatest impact – programs that not only increase adoptions of at-risk horses and provide a safe haven for aged horses, but also increase opportunities for all people to engage and partner with horses in new innovative ways.

Many more horses now are at risk of losing their homes – and their lives – due to this global crisis. The EQUUS Foundation helps America’s at-risk horses and we are asking for your help so that, together, we can offer a safety net for horses that now have no place to go.

With so many people facing hardships, our fear is that many more of our four-legged equine friends may be subjected to abuse and neglect and the number of horses heading to the slaughter pipeline will increase.

At the heart of the EQUUS Foundation’s mission is the EQUUS Foundation Guardians program. EQUUS Foundation Guardian charities undergo a rigorous vetting process annually to demonstrate that they are committed to the highest standards for horse care and are transparent and accountable by making their horse care practices and operations available to public scrutiny. Only EQUUS Foundation Guardian charities are eligible to receive financial support from the EQUUS Foundation.

Our rescues are reporting an increase in requests from owners who can no longer care for their horses — and our charities providing therapeutic services are finding it difficult to foresee when they will needing their full herds for a long time.

There’s no better way to give with confidence than to give to EQUUS Foundation Guardian charities — and there’s no better time to give than RIGHT NOW because every dollar you give will double between now and June 30th.

Will you lend a hand to America’s horses and help us reach our goal by June 30? Please make your gift here!

Contact the EQUUS Foundation, Inc., at 168 Long Lots Road, Westport, CT 06880, Tele: (203) 259-1550, E-Mail: mail@equusfoundation.org, Website: www.equusfoundation.org.

FEI Publishes Return to Play Policy as Equestrian Adapts to “New Normal”

The FEI has published its Policy for Enhanced Competition Safety during the Covid-19 pandemic, aimed at assisting Organisers and National Federations with the safe resumption of international equestrian events in line with national and local restrictions.

The Policy will apply to all FEI Events held as of 1 July 2020 and has been put in place to limit the risk of transmission and further spread of Covid-19 until an effective treatment and/or vaccine as determined by the World Health Organization (WHO) are available.

Developed by FEI Medical Committee Chair Dr Mark Hart together with FEI Headquarters, the Policy requires National Federations and Organisers to carry out a Risk Assessment to evaluate whether it is safe to hold their Events. The Policy includes general best practice recommendations for Organisers and is to be implemented in conjunction with any requirements imposed by the domestic authorities. In addition, discipline-specific guidance will be issued shortly by the FEI.

It is mandatory for FEI Event Organisers to conduct the risk assessment together with their National Federation and domestic government and public health authorities. Events for which the FEI has not received the completed risk assessment and mitigation measures plan will be removed from the FEI Calendar.

“Covid-19 has caused massive disruption to the FEI Calendar and to national events, with a huge impact on all the various participants of equestrian sports,” Dr Mark Hart said. “We are all in this together and this pandemic will be with us for at least 12-24 months. We need to adapt to a ‘new normal’ as we move forward.

“The FEI is committed to assisting National Federations and FEI Event Organisers by providing resources to effectively assess the risks potentially posed by Events from the planning phase and mitigate such risks through relevant measures.

“As we anticipate the gradual return of competitions, we must do everything we can to mitigate the risk of transmission and further spread of Covid-19. This is a matter of public health, and it’s also how a sport can demonstrate to public authorities that it is ready to resume activity.”

Media contacts:

Grania Willis
Director, Communications
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 42

Vanessa Martin Randin
Senior Manager, Media Relations & Communications
vanessa.randin@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 73

Congress Must Pass Great American Outdoors Act

As the states move to re-open public lands, Congress has a major opportunity to pass important trails legislation that will get Americans outside while promoting the health of recreational riders and other outdoor enthusiasts.  Thanks in large part to continued advocacy from the horse industry, a bipartisan group of senators has sponsored the “Great American Outdoors Act of 2020” (S. 3422).  This important recreation bill will come up for a vote in June.   Please contact your senators today!

American Horse Council
www.horsecouncil.org

Equestrians Helping Equestrians: Relief Efforts in the Wake of COVID-19

Once a week, the American Saddlebred Horse Association (ASHA) shares a school-horse appreciation post on social media for what they’ve dubbed “Feed Your Favorite Lesson Horse Friday.” There’s also “Tip Your Groom Tuesday” and “Support a Horse Show Super Hero Sunday,” which are all designed to encourage equestrians to give money to support lesson programs and horse show support staff. While spring would typically be a busy time of year for the equine industry, this year is different, and people in the horse world have come up with creative ways to support each other.

“The Joint Leadership Council (JLC) comprises members from the leadership at the American Hackney Horse Society, American Morgan Horse Association, American Road Horse & Pony Association, American Saddlebred Horse Association, and United Professional Horsemen’s Association,” says Jessica Cushing, Marketing and Communications Manager for the ASHA. “The inspiration behind the JLC COVID-19 social media campaign was to be a voice and consistent promotional message for the difficulties many of our barns, professionals, and equine industry contractors in our community would be facing without the ability to give lessons and attend shows.”

The JLC’s social media campaign has been running for nine weeks, and Cushing says every post continues to receive positive engagement from the community.

“Our professionals are thankful for the recognition that business is still not back to normal, and there are a great many still in need,” says Cushing. “The ability to help spread the word that people are in need has seen countless success stories of lesson horses being sponsored, grooms getting extra support, and a great ‘pay it forward’ lunch program that emerged amongst barns.”

Other segments of the equine industry have launched similar initiatives during the pandemic shutdown. To help keep school horses fed during their furlough, the United States Hunter Jumper Association launched a Feed Aid Initiative to help USHJA members obtain free or discounted feed for lesson horses. Applications are being accepted now through June 1.

Monetary donations to the USHJA’s Feed Aid Initiative are tax-deductible and will be matched by the USHJA Foundation up to $300,000.

The PonyApp and Connolly’s Red Mills have also teamed up to give away feed to lesson barns this spring. Nominations of barns and programs in need are accepted now at ponygroceries.theponyapp.com.

Rescue Relief

In times of hardship, horse owners may find it increasingly difficult financially to maintain an ideal level of care for their horses. Fortunately, the equestrian community has built safety nets to help horses and their owners when hard times hit.

Equine rescue operations are often pushed to their limits in an economic downturn due to owners who can no longer afford to keep their horses and a market with more horses than potential buyers. Most equine rescues operate on a local basis, taking in horses and facilitating adoptions within a certain geographic area. National programs help support those organizations.

The EQUUS Foundation offers financial support to equine organizations that are part of its Guardians program. These organizations are put through a rigorous vetting process every year to ensure high standards of horse care and transparent and accountable operations.

“For horses to remain an important part of American life and have a viable future, we need to ensure that donor dollars are being spent on programs with the greatest impact,” says Lynn Coakley, President of the EQUUS Foundation.

EQUUS Foundation Guardian Charities include those that provide shelter and rehabilitation for abused, neglected, and at-risk horses; retraining and rehoming for horses in transition; peaceful and humane retirement options for aged equines; and/or are organizations that provide equine-assisted therapies and activities in a way that is beneficial for horses and humans.

Coakley says that many of their Guardian charities have had to cancel fundraising events and close their doors to volunteers, which creates an immediate need for resources.

“Instead of waiting until the end of our fiscal year in August, the Board of Directors approved the immediate allocation of $100,000 to help ease the stress of EQUUS Foundation Guardian charities,” says Coakley. “Each eligible charity will receive a $500 grant for horse-care costs upon approval of its 2020 EQUUS Foundation Guardian Seal. As of today, we have awarded grants to over 67 charities and expect to reach at least 150 charities by June.”

“Rescues have had to cancel or postpone fundraising events for the foreseeable future, and many of them have experienced a severe decline in online donations since COVID-19 [closures] started in March,” says Cheryl Jacobson, Deputy Director of Equine Protection for the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS). “While many rescues have hay, feed, and funds for several months, some rescues are not as fortunate and need help to feed their equines while they find additional avenues for fundraising.”

HSUS awards grants to non-profit rescue organizations across the country. In order to qualify for an HSUS grant, organizations must be accredited or verified by the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries, be members of the Homes for Horses Coalition, or have been directly vetted by HSUS.

“HSUS contacted 440 Homes for Horses Coalition members in early March,” says Jacobson. “We collected information on whether they are open or closed to the public, how many equines they have on site and in foster homes, how long they have feed, hay, and meds for, and any other information they could provide us with. We noted which rescues mentioned that they were in dire need of emergency hay funds. As we were able to secure funding, we started providing grants to the rescues in dire need, and the amount was based on the number of equines in their care.”

Jacobson explains that grant applications are sent to rescues as more funding becomes available. As of this writing, HSUS’s Equine Protection Program and the Homes for Horses Coalition have awarded grant funds to 33 rescues. HSUS has provided additional grant money through its main COVID-19 grant budget.

US Equestrian has provided a USEF Disaster Relief Fund grant to support both the Equus Foundation Guardian Charities and HSUS’s Equine Protection Program to help horses in need due to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Help for Horse People

  • Equine safety-net programs offer direct financial support to owners who need short-term assistance to keep their animals, thereby helping to keep horses from entering the rescue system. The Homes for Horses Coalition maintains a searchable list of safety net programs by state that assist owners with emergency funds, feed, veterinary care, or other essential expenses. The United Horse Coalition also provides a comprehensive listing of local and national equine relief programs on its website.
  • The Equestrian Aid Foundation is currently assisting equestrian professionals and service providers through its Disaster Relief Fund. Individuals who make their living through the horse industry and have lost their income as a direct result of the pandemic can apply for a one-time emergency grant payment of $500 to assist with basic living expenses.
  • In addition to its ongoing social media campaigns, the JLC is providing funds to horse trainers, riding instructors, and horse show staff in the trotting breed industry who have lost income due to COVID-19 through its Horsemen’s Relief Fund. At jlccares.com, equine industry professionals can find resources for financial assistance and creative solutions for generating income during the shutdown.
  • The Show Jumping Relief Fund was created to provide immediate financial assistance to horse show staff, including ring crew, grooms, braiders, and officials, who have lost income as a result of COVID-19 closures. Information on how to apply for assistance or donate to the fund is available at wixsite.com/home.

Get Involved

For equestrians who are able to give back during this time, there are several ways to help.

If you have room in your barn, consider adopting or fostering a horse in need. This will help free up space and resources at a local rescue. One place to start is MyRightHorse.org, a search engine established by The Right Horse initiative that helps connect available horses of all ages, breeds, and types with prospective adopters across the country. Fostering an adoptable horse will not only help ease the burden on rescue organizations, but will give that horse more one-on-one attention and human interaction to improve their adoptability.

In addition to accepting direct donations for the Disaster Relief Fund, the Equestrian Aid Foundation has also partnered with other organizations that are donating partial proceeds from goods and services to the Fund. Find the current partnerships at www.equestrianaidfoundation.org/community-initiatives-ways-to-help.

If you are able, contributing financially to a reputable organization can help bring some immediate financial relief.

“Thanks to a generous challenge gift from an anonymous donor, every $1 you donate now becomes $2 — up to a maximum of $25,000 — to help feed and care for horses at our Guardian charities during the COVID-19 pandemic,” says EQUUS Foundation President Coakley. “Every gift goes directly to underwrite actual horse-care costs like feed, bedding, veterinary, dental, and farrier care.”

The matching donation challenge applies to donations made now through June 30. Visit www.equusfoundation.org/give to donate.

“In addition, while the many barns and equine organizations we support had to temporarily close their doors to volunteers due to social-distancing requirements, many are now beginning to reopen with precautions in place,” says Coakley. “Volunteers are the lifeblood of many equine organizations, and volunteering is a great way to learn about and be close to horses and nature while giving back, making friends, and staying in shape! Learn more about our Champions Volunteer Incentive Program sponsored by Ariat International at www.equusfoundation.org/champions.”

There are always opportunities to provide assistance and give back to the equestrian community, whether that’s by contributing to the barns and shows that would normally have your business at this time of year or by seeking out people in need in your extended network.

“From the first week [of the JLC’s social media campaigns], we had a very generous member of the show-horse community sponsor a whole program of 10+ horses for a month,” says Cushing. “Their barn does not have a lesson program, but they were inspired to help. The ‘Feed Your Favorite Lesson Horse’ campaign helped them find a barn in need and a way to support our community through these challenging times.

“Every day we were getting tagged in photos of barns whose clients, friends, and peers stepped up to send the whole barn lunch and help keep spirits up,” Cushing continues. “It has also been humbling to see barns and industry vendors find creative ways to give back to the JLC Horsemen’s Relief Fund through hosting fundraisers or donating part of their proceeds from sales to our grant program.”

by Leslie Potter/US Equestrian Communications Department

COVID-19 Matching Campaign: Help Us Help Them

Thanks to a generous challenge gift from an anonymous donor, every $1 you donate now becomes $2 — up to a maximum of $25,000 — to help feed and care for the horses of EQUUS Foundation Guardian charities affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Horses bring joy to young and old alike – and make those with the deepest of wounds whole again. However, America’s horses are also confronted with a disturbing reality. Over 65,000 horses were transported across our borders for slaughter in 2019. Tens of thousands more are abused and neglected and in need of rescue, rehabilitation, and re-homing each year.

With so many people facing hardships, our fear is that many more of our four-legged equine friends may be subjected to abuse and neglect and the number of horses heading to the slaughter pipeline will increase.

For horses to remain an important part of American life and have a viable future, we need to ensure that donor dollars are being spent on programs with the greatest impact – programs that not only increase adoptions of at-risk horses and provide a safe haven for aged horses, but also increase opportunities for all people to engage and partner with horses in new innovative ways.

At the heart of the EQUUS Foundation’s mission is the EQUUS Foundation Guardians program. EQUUS Foundation Guardian charities undergo a rigorous vetting process annually to demonstrate that they are committed to the highest standards for horse care and are transparent and accountable by making their horse care practices and operations available to public scrutiny. Only EQUUS Foundation Guardian charities are eligible to receive financial support from the EQUUS Foundation.

There’s no better way to give with confidence than to give to EQUUS Foundation Guardian charities — and there’s no better time to give than RIGHT NOW because every dollar you give will double between now and June 30th.

Act Now to Help Us Reach Our Goal by June 30.
Please make your gift here.

Contact the EQUUS Foundation, Inc., at 168 Long Lots Road, Westport, CT 06880, Tele: (203) 259-1550, E-Mail: mail@equusfoundation.org, Website: www.equusfoundation.org.

How to Reopen Your Barn Following the COVID-19 Quarantine

The COVID-19 pandemic is responsible for a complete shift in the daily lifestyle of everyone in the United States, including our horses. Living under quarantine, curfews, and learning how to work from home has reiterated how important barn visits are to mental health. As states across the country relax stay-at-home requirements, we have some tips on how to keep your horses, horse people, and your barn as healthy as possible.

  • Limit gatherings to as few people as possible, and continue to maintain the recommended social distancing protocols that include six (6) feet of separation between individuals. Just because the quarantine is being lifted doesn’t mean the threat is over. COVID-19 can be detected in the air for up to 3 hours after being transmitted. Some stables have created a schedule where clients can reserve time slots for their visits, reducing the amount of people in the barn by only allowing 3-4 people present at once. This may be the most appropriate step forward for those barns in states that were forced to close outright.
  • Encourage proper hand-washing and provide as many locations/opportunities for people to do so. Due to the structure of the virus, washing hands with warm water and soap for at least 20 seconds is the most effective way to prevent contamination. Hand sanitizer must contain at least 60% alcohol to be effective.
  • Make a daily or hourly cleaning chart to prevent virus transmission. Disinfect common contact areas regularly and avoid sharing equipment and supplies between people, COVID-19 can live on copper for up to four hours, cardboard for 24 hours, and plastic and stainless steel for up to 3 days.
    • Non-porous materials (leather bridles/saddles/halters, nylon halters/lead ropes, gate latches, door handles, spray nozzle) harbor the virus longer than porous materials (cotton lead ropes, saddle pads)
    • Clean communal leather tack daily with tack cleaner. Knowing how to properly disinfect tack is useful for any equestrian, be it for strangles or COVID-19. Aerosol sprays such as Lysol tend to strip leather of oils, so if you use an aerosol spray to disinfect your tack, be sure to let it dry completely and then recondition the leather to protect it. Soap and water is another effective way to break down the lining of bacteria and viruses and is often safe for most tack. Diluted bleach disinfects well, but leather may dry out and crack from repeated treatments.
    • Disinfect gate latches, spray nozzles, cross tie snaps, pitchforks, wheelbarrows, and other frequently used items regularly or after contact with personnel.
    • Stall door latches, hose ends, light switches, faucets, and feed scoops should be cleaned and disinfected frequently.
  • There may be state requirements to wear gloves or face coverings to reduce the risk of spreading germs. Many businesses will be looking to taking the temperature of those present in and will not allow anybody to come if they register a temperature or feel sick and this may go a long way to helping clients feel comfortable.
  • Long story short, nobody spends 2 months on the couch unscathed, so take it easy getting back into training. Many riding stables are closed to tenants and all equine events have been canceled in an effort to reduce the virus’s spread. Due to these closures, many horses are not receiving regular workout schedules, or maybe no exercise at all. While daily lifestyles are difficult for all during this pandemic, adapting a horse’s schedule to a life after quarantine can be equally as challenging. Exercise related injuries would be a terrible way to end the quarantine.

Making boarders and clients safe and secure will be critical in getting the horse industry back on its feet, and each facility, whether private or public, should have written policies regarding COVID-19 and expect all clients and professionals to adhere to them. Keeping our horses healthy has always been a priority, but without their owners you can’t keep the lights on. All of these tips, and more, can be found on the AHC COVID-19 Resource Page; please visit it here as we continue to update it during this transition.

Details: Contact Cliff Williamson at cwilliamson@horsecouncil.org.

American Horse Council
www.horsecouncil.org

Should I Let My Horse Be Used in a Lesson Program to Offset Board Costs?

Jump Media Photo.

By Leone Equestrian Law

Q. When our barn’s lesson program starts back up again after the quarantine, should I let my horse be used in my trainer’s lessons in order to help offset my monthly board costs? He would be perfect for the job and I’d love the reduction on his board, but I’m not sure of all the risks involved.

A. With the coronavirus pandemic affecting many equestrians’ financial situations, horse owners might be looking for ways to offset barn expenses in the near future after training programs are back to their normal routines. In certain situations, allowing your trainer or barn owner to use your horse in lessons, if he’s suitable for the job, could be a way reduce a portion of your board. However, before you dive into this agreement, there are a few things to keep in mind.

Even if your horse is quiet and capable of acting in this role, there are still certain “what ifs” to consider. What if he gets injured when someone else is riding him, or what if a rider falls off him during a lesson and gets hurt? You’ll want to make sure you address all liability concerns before setting up this type of agreement.

Though the farm owner likely has liability insurance, and also uses a liability waiver to protect him or her, this type of insurance or liability release does not typically protect individual horse owners or boarders. Make sure to take the necessary precautions to protect you and your horse before beginning this arrangement.

Here are four things you can do:

  1. Get Your Name Added to the Farm Liability Waiver

Ask the farm owner or trainer to add your name in the liability waiver signed by each rider, including you in the list of individuals who cannot be sued. As the horse’s owner, you may also want to create a separate liability waiver for lesson riders to sign. This will release you from all liability from injuries that result from riding the horse and/or caring for the horse during the lesson

  1. Be Included as an Additional Insured Individual

It is also a good idea to ask to be included in the barn’s liability insurance as an additional insured individual. Review the insurance coverage policy yourself to ensure that everything is applicable to the activities that your horse will be used for.

  1. Purchase Your Own Liability Insurance Coverage

If you don’t feel comfortable asking to be included in the farm’s liability insurance or if this is not an option the farm owner can agree to, consider purchasing your own liability insurance coverage. This is called Personal Horse Owner’s Liability Insurance or sometimes called “Private Horse Owner’s Liability Insurance.” This type of insurance generally protects the horse owner (and possibly others that the owner may designate) in the event that someone is hurt while riding, handling, or near the horse.

  1. Create a Contract

Once liability coverage is established, consider having all the details of the agreement between you and the farm owner documented in a signed contract. An experienced equine law professional can create such a document for you, or you can create one yourself. Click below to learn more about what should be included in this contract.

Read More

Visit www.equestriancounsel.com to learn more or email info@equestriancounsel.com with inquiries.

EQUUS Foundation Announces Serena Marron’s Cacan as Newest Equine Ambassador

Serena Marron & Cacan.

When Serena Marron first set eyes on the beautiful, 17 hand, dark bay Belgian Warmblood gelding with a white face and four white socks named Cacan, she knew there was something incredibly special about this horse and that he was destined to be her next show horse. She was drawn to his athleticism and talent, but also something deeper in his uniquely magical personality.

“Cacan is soulful and deeply loving. He is naturally intelligent, with so much ability in the ring. No matter the task, Cacan gets it done with grace and ease. I’d trust him with anything. His competitive zeal combined with his gentle and protective nature makes him a great Equine Ambassador for the EQUUS Foundation,” said a proud Marron.

Marron and 11-year old Cacan compete in the High Amateur Owner Division and were ranked in the top five in the country in the 1.40m-1.45m Amateur Owner Division for Zone 2 in 2019.

Cacan won the $10,000 Show Jumping Hall of Fame High Amateur Owner Classic at Vermont Horse Manchester & The Mountains Show in the summer of 2019 and has placed in prestigious shows including the Hampton Classic, Pennsylvania National, Tryon, and the American Gold Cup.

Marron’s plan is to compete in the Under 25 Series and FEI classes/Grand Prixs as well as continuing to do High Amateur classes.

EQUUS Foundation Equine Ambassadors are sport horses whose owners donate a portion of their winnings in equestrian sport competitions to help ensure that all horses are safe, healthy, and treated with dignity as partners.

Cacan joins Lafitte De Muze, owned by Cheryl Olsten and ridden by Amanda Steege, and Happy Thoughts, owned by Caroline Moran and ridden by Havens Schatt, as EQUUS Foundation Equine Ambassadors.

“Too many of America’s horses need a lifeline and opportunities to thrive. Our Equine Ambassadors program is our way of having horses and those who love them represent and support horses across the country that need our help,” said Valerie Angeli, EQUUS Foundation VP of Engagement.

“Having the opportunity to work with a horse like Cacan has further shown me the tremendous ability horses possess to transform and expand lives,” said Marron.

Marron hopes to open an equine therapy center for children to share this unique power of horses and inspire more connection between horses and humans.

“I am thrilled that Cacan will be able to inspire awareness and support for America’s horses that need our help,” said Marron.

Marron is looking forward to being able to get into the show ring with Cacan once again — going forward to proudly represent the EQUUS Foundation and horses across the country that need our voice and support.

Contact the EQUUS Foundation, Inc., at 168 Long Lots Road, Westport, CT 06880, Tele: (203) 259-1550, E-Mail: mail@equusfoundation.org, Website: www.equusfoundation.org.