Catherine Tyree and BEC Lorenzo Take the Win in $50k Rushy Marsh Farm Grand Prix CSI 2*

Catherine Tyree and BEC Lorenzo. Photo © Sportfot.

Week 5 of the 12-week 2019 Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF) circuit concluded on Sunday, February 10, at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center in Wellington, FL. Catherine Tyree (USA) and BEC Lorenzo took the win in the $50,000 Rushy Marsh Farm Grand Prix CSI 2*.

Out of the 45 entries in the $50,000 Rushy Marsh Farm Grand Prix CSI 2*, 11 went clear to contest the jump-off. As the final competitor to enter the jump-off, 25-year-old Catherine Tyree (USA) rode Mary Tyree’s BEC Lorenzo to the top time of 40.05 seconds.

She was chasing a time of 40.24 seconds set by Lacey Gilbertson (USA) and Seabrook LLC’s Baloppi, who would settle for second place. Third place went to Ali Wolff (USA) riding Double H Farm’s HH Venice Beach, who were clear in 40.35 seconds.

Vanderveen Bookends Week 5 FEI Wins with 1.50m Victory on Bull Run’s Prince of Peace

There were 47 entries in the $72,000 CaptiveOne Advisors 1.50m Classic on Sunday morning, all attempting to have a clear round to advance to the jump-off. Only nine were able to find that clear path and returned to contest the shortened course designed by Kelvin Bywater of Great Britain.

Riding out of the fourth spot in the order, Kristen Vanderveen and Bull Run’s Prince of Peace were able to speed around the jump-off clear in 39.42 seconds for the win. Second place went to Darragh Kenny (IRL) on Kerry Anne LLC’s Important de Muze, who stopped the timers in 40.28 seconds. Shane Sweetnam (IRL) and Alejandro, owned by Sweet Oak, Spy Coast, Seabrook LLC, placed third in 40.58 seconds.

This was Vanderveen’s fourth FEI class victory at WEF 5. She and Bull Run’s Almighty won the Douglas Elliman Real Estate 1.45m on Wednesday and she picked up the win with Prince of Peace in the opening day 1.40m class. On Friday, she and Bull Run’s Faustino de Tili won the Bainbridge 1.45m Classic.

Google It and Hanna Lloyd Victorious in Week 5 Children’s Hunter Older Division

The Children’s Hunter Older division kicked off competition on the final day of week 5 at WEF in the FarmVet Ring 7 as 16 combinations contested for the champion ribbon. With a two-point lead over the division’s reserve champion, Hanna Lloyd and Google It produced 22.5 points across the division to earn the champion title.

Lloyd teamed up with James Lala and Virginia Confer’s seven-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding for the first time this weekend under the tutelage of trainer Jeff Di Carlo. With two first places and a fourth over fences and a sixth under saddle, they brought home the championship ribbon.

For full results, please visit www.PBIEC.com.

Horse Racing in the United States

Horse racing in the United States dates back to 1665, which saw the establishment of the Newmarket course in Salisbury, New York, a section of what is now known as the Hempstead Plains of Long Island, New York. The American Stud Book was started in 1868, prompting the beginning of organized horse racing in the United States.

Bookmaking, the process of taking bets, calculating odds, and paying out winnings, was banned in the early 20th century, but pari-mutuel betting, introduced in 1908, restarted the racing industry. Free live horse race video streaming of all horse and greyhound races across the world is available using the BetAmerica promo code. BetAmerica will give you content that is gathered from the thoroughbred, quarter horse, harness horse, and greyhound tracks from across the county – all major race courses, so you don’t miss a race.

The traditional high point of thoroughbred US horse racing is the Kentucky Derby, held on the first Saturday of May at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Kentucky. Together, the Derby, the Preakness Stakes, held two weeks later at Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore, Maryland, and the Belmont Stakes, held three weeks after the Preakness at Belmont Park on Long Island, form the Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing for three-year-olds. They are all held early in the year, throughout May and the beginning of June.

The Breeders’ Cup event is held in late October or early November at different race tracks every year. It receives less attention than the Triple Crown series from the general public but is of great importance in determining the American Horse of the Year and annual Eclipse Award divisional winners. It is normally held at a different track every year, though some racetracks have held back-to-back renewals. It currently consists of thirteen races held over two days with total prize-money of $28 million.

In 1665, the first racetrack was constructed on Long Island. It is the oldest Thoroughbred race in North America. The American Stud Book was started in 1868, prompting the beginning of organized horse racing in the United States. There were 314 tracks operating in the United States by 1890, and in 1894, the American Jockey Club was formed.

In the United States, Thoroughbred flat races are run on either dirt, synthetic, or turf surfaces. Other tracks offer Quarter Horse racing and Standardbred (Harness) horse racing, or combinations of these three types of racing surfaces.

Quarter horse racing began in 1674 in Henrico County, Virginia. Each race consisted of only two horses and they raced down the village streets and lanes. The Quarter Horse received its name due to the length of the race as the races were indeed a quarter of a mile, or 400 meters. The breed of horse was developed so they could get off to a quick start and win the race.

There are also a Triple Crown of Harness Racing for Pacers and a Triple Crown of Harness Racing for Trotters, as well as an Arabian Triple Crown consisting of Drinkers of the Wind Derby in California, the Texas Six Shooter Stakes, the Bob Magness Derby in Delaware. Also, the main Standardbred event is the Breeders’ Crown.

American Thoroughbred races are run at a wide variety of distances, most commonly from 5 to 12 furlongs (0.63 to 1.50 mi). The shorter distances are more common but the mid-to-long distance races tend to be higher in prestige. Breeders of Thoroughbred race horses attempt to breed horses that excel at a particular distance.

The American Quarter Horse was not recognized as an official breed until the formation of the American Quarter Horse Association in 1940. In order to be successful in racing, Quarter Horses need to be able to propel themselves forward at extremely fast sprinter speed. The Quarter Horse has larger hind limb muscle and have more Type II-b fibers, which allow the Quarter Horse to accelerate rapidly. With the exception of the longer, 870-yard (800 m) distance contests, Quarter Horse races are run flat out, with the horses running at top speed for the duration.

Harness racing is a form of horse racing in which the horses race at a specific gait (a trot or a pace) and are pulling a two-wheeled cart called a sulky, occupied by a driver. In North America, harness races are restricted to Standardbred horses.

Standardbreds are so named because in the early years of the Standardbred stud book, only horses who could trot or pace a mile in a standard time (or whose progeny could do so) of no more than 2 minutes, 30 seconds were admitted to the book. The horses have proportionally shorter legs than Thoroughbreds, and longer bodies. Standardbreds generally have a more placid disposition, due to the admixture of non-Thoroughbred blood in the breed.

Races can be conducted in two differing gaits – trotting and pacing. The difference is that a trotter moves its legs forward in diagonal pairs (right front and left hind, then left front and right hind striking the ground simultaneously), whereas a pacer moves its legs laterally (right front and right hind together, then left front and left hind).

Almost all North American races are at a distance of one mile. North American harness horses earn a “mark” (a record), which is their fastest winning time at that distance. Harness races involve a good deal of strategy.

Important annual races include the Hambletonian for 3-year-old trotters, the Little Brown Jug for 3-year-old pacers, and the Breeders Crown series of twelve races covering each of the traditional categories of age, gait, and sex. The Hambletonian is part of the Triple Crown of Harness Racing for Trotters and the Little Brown Jug is part of the Triple Crown of Harness Racing for Pacers.

 

 

Holzer and Valentine Conclude AGDF Week 5 with Win in FEI Intermediate I Freestyle CDI3*

Ashley Holzer and Valentine. ©SusanStickle.com.

Wellington, FL – February 10, 2019 – Week 5 of the Adequan® Global Dressage Festival (AGDF) concluded on Sunday, February 10, with a win for Ashley Holzer (USA) and Valentine in the FEI Intermediate I Freestyle CDI3*, presented by Fair Sky Farm.

Holzer had the last ride of the day and just barely slid into first place with a score of 76.917%, ahead of Tina Irwin (CAN) and Laurencio who earned a score of 76.750%.

“I think my mare had a very tricky warm-up. She was so tense in the warm-up because she’s never done a freestyle before with the music,” commented Holzer about her first freestyle ever with her nine-year-old Oldenburg mare by Sir Donnerhall. “We actually had to run and grab a bonnet because she was unfortunately upset by the noise.

“What is amazing to me is that I trot off, and right away she is looking, she’s attentive, but she’s so trying her very hardest,” continued Holzer. “When I’m in that trot tour I feel like I’m floating. She floats through the trot tour without hardly any aid whatsoever. So I think for me, sort of feeling a horse dance underneath you like that so easily, that’s a thrill no matter what class you’re in.”

Holzer made a last-minute change to her music and choreography choice, and luckily her student Brittany Fraser had kept Holzer’s Olympic partner Pop Art’s freestyle from 2004.

Holzer said, “I had a bit of a different pattern with different music, which we realized was too bold. So luckily Brittany is quite a hoarder, and she actually found my Pop Art small tour freestyle from 2004 and brought it. It’s got a nice flowing trot tour, and I rode Poppy’s 2004 freestyle!”

Earlier in the day in the FEI Young Rider Freestyle CDIY NAYC/USEF Qualifier, Benjamin Ebeling (USA) and Illuster Van De Kampert, a 11-year-old Belgian Warmblood gelding by Spielberg owned by Nuvolari Holdings LLC, won with a score of 72.825%.

Second place went to Caroline Nicholson (USA) and Diozar, her 11-year-old KWPN gelding by Jazz. The pair earned a score of 70.925%.

Vanessa Creech-Terauds and Fleur de Lis L, a 10-year-old Hanoverian, by First Dance and Louise Leatherdale, earned a score of 70.400% to come in third place.

For more information and to see a full list of results, please visit www.globaldressagefestival.com.

It’s a Hat-Trick for Germany’s Deusser with Brilliant Win in Bordeaux

Daniel Deusser riding Tobago Z. (FEI/Eric Knoll)

Daniel Deusser produced his third sensational win of the season at the 13th and last qualifier of the Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ 2018/2019 Western European League in Bordeaux, France.

The 37-year-old German cruised to victory with Calisto Blue at round 3 in Verona (ITA) last October, and then rocketed up the series leaderboard when winning again at round 6 in Madrid (ESP) the following month with Tobago Z. Already heading the WEL leaderboard before competition began, the World No 5 rider and 2014 Longines champion has now accumulated a massive 99 points, and looks set to really put it up to the rest of the them when the Longines 2019 Final gets underway in Gothenburg (SWE) on 3 April.

In the six-way jump-off, it was Tobago Z who sealed it for him yet again, pinning Belgium’s Gregory Wathelet and Iron Man van de Padenborre into runner-up spot and Spain’s Eduardo Alvarez Aznar and Rokfeller de Pleville Bois Margot into third. Deusser can hardly believe what a run of form he’s been having.

“I’ve never had a season like this to be honest – not only three wins but fourth in Leipzig and third in Amsterdam – it’s just been amazing!” — Daniel Deusser (GER)

He admitted that he was “a bit confused” when two of the first four riders jumped clear over Jean-Francois Morand’s tough first-round track. “It was a big, long course with difficult combinations and the time-allowed was long. I thought he would reduce it, but it was such a good decision not to do that – we still only got six clear rounds, so the course designer did a really good job!” Deusser pointed out.

Celine Schoonbroodt-de Azevedo (Chepetta) led the way against the clock with a fence down in 51.92 seconds, but Belgian compatriot, Francois Mathy Jr, made no mistake with the ever-careful Uno de la Roque to set the first real target at 50.96 seconds. Then Norway’s Marie Valdar Longem, 621st in the Longines world rankings, produced her second superb clear of the day from the supercool Si la Sol de Greenbay Z in 53.14 seconds before Wathelet raised the temperature considerably.

His 11-year-old stallion is not long back after an injury-break and with a really positive and forward round they took the lead in 47.72 seconds, so when Alvarez Aznar broke the beam more than a second slower, it was Wathelet’s time that Deusser was chasing. The German hadn’t finally decided his strategy however, even as he set off.

“I knew there was the option to go inside after the double (third fence) but I only decided to do it after he jumped into the double because he was so confident in the air. I knew then we could do it, and then we got a good run to the plank (the following fence) so I just told myself to bring it home and not do anything crazy after that!” — Daniel Deusser (GER)

The top 18 riders on the Western European League table are all eligible for the Longines 2019 Final and current World No. 1, Steve Guerdat, will be chasing down his third title when the action gets underway in seven weeks’ time.

After the Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ prizegiving, the Swiss super-hero, whose extraordinarily successful year in 2018 included individual bronze at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ in Tryon (USA) last September, was presented with the prestigious Longines FEI World’s Best Rider Award for 2018. Steve also accepted the Longines FEI World’s Best Horse Award 2018 on behalf of his brilliant mare, Albfuehren’s Bianca.

Meanwhile, Deusser has decided that Tobago Z will be his choice as he strives for a second Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ series title. “He’ll have four weeks off now and then I’ll take him to ’s-Hertogenbosch (NED) for a last run before the Final. It’s not an advantage to go to Gothenburg as the (WEL) leader, but it’s a really good feeling all the same!” he concluded.

Watch highlights here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Horses Helping Horses Does It Again

ARREDONDO DRESSAGE SOCIETY
Presents the 10th Annual Horses Helping Horses

A day to benefit the HORSE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA
Saturday, March 16, 2019
Canterbury Equestrian Showplace, Newberry, Florida
In the Covered Arena

Join us and some of the regions most talented dressage instructors as they donate their time and skills to perform a benefit clinic for Horse Protection (HPAF). The Arredondo Dressage Society Website lists the clinicians, ride times, and instructions for bidding on the clinics (arredondodressage.org).

The day is a day all about horses, and a day to raise awareness about equine rescues and sanctuaries and the lifesaving work they do year-round to care for the at-risk horses in their communities who have often been abused or neglected. Horses are majestic, loving animals, and we hope our local and loyal supporters will come out so that we can continue our lifesaving efforts for years to come.

To support this cause, Arredondo Dressage Society will sponsor events throughout the day. The clinics offer riders and spectators a chance to see actual dressage training and work. In addition, there will be lunchtime demos including vaulting, reining, and dressage. There will also be a used tack sale and raffles throughout the day.

Arredondo has an online auction on its website which will be finalized at the 5:00 Wine and Cheese Reception, with a live auction and bidding. Horse Protection staff will showcase some of the rescued animals and they will be on hand to answer questions and to educate the public about the work being done on behalf of the equines of Florida.

Come for a fun day and support this most worthy cause!

HORSE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA
Horse Protection Association of Florida (HPAF) is located on 140 acres in Micanopy where herds of upwards of 60 rescued horses are cared for. These horses have been abused, abandoned, or neglected and have been seized, surrendered, or otherwise rescued by Morgan Silver and her team. The horses usually arrive at HPAF in an emancipated condition and they are typically weak and scared. Some have never known a kind human touch, but under the loving care of Morgan and the women and men who work at the farm, the horses are given the care they need. They receive veterinary care, farriers work on their feet, their diets are customized for their needs, and each horse is handled and worked with until they recognize that these humans are there to help.

Each horse has its own stall and is trained to walk into its stall each morning and night for feeding. Each horse is Parelli trained with a rope halter and rope so that they are used to handling and develop ground manners. Each horse is groomed on a daily basis before being turned out to pasture.

The HPAF website (hpaf.org) shows some of the work being done at the farm, and shows the horses that are ready for adoption. Once a horse is sound and properly trained, it will be ready to be adopted. Of course, there are some that will remain at HPAF as their forever home. Right now, there are 4 distinct herd groupings. The mares with an occasional senior or quiet gelding are kept in one barn and pasture. The geldings have another barn and pasture. There is also a senior barn and pasture, and finally, there is the mums and babies barn. We have 4 new babies this year, and just recently, the mums have been taken to a new farm and the babies have been weaned. After a few days of protesting, the babies have all settled down and happily romp around in their own pasture.

Contact:
Heather Stalker, stalkhj@peds.ufl.edu, (352) 231-0670

Gentle Giants Bring the Thunder at Chesapeake International Draft Horse Show

Wellington, Fla. – Feb. 9, 2019 – Day two of the Chesapeake International Draft Horse Show at Crab Orchard Equestrian Estate started off with a big bang with the Six-Horse Hitch Classic Saturday. The day’s events included entertainment from the Young Singers of the Palm Beaches, as well as the Four-Horse Hitch and the Ladies’ Team Cart class. A large crowd gathered at the Crab Orchard Equestrian Estate, generously donated by Frank and Monica McCourt, for the beautiful day in Wellington, Florida to cheer on their favorite teams from Friday.

For each class, spectators watched in amazement as the gentle giants entered the arena. The judges lined up in the middle of the ring to watch the team tests which consisted of teams completing three laps around the ring at the trot before changing direction across the diagonal. Trotting across the diagonal gives the drivers a chance to showcase their team’s skills to the judging panel. All hitches were then asked to demonstrate the natural gait, the walk, and the trot in the opposite direction to show the horses ability to work in unison under control. After being asked to line up in the center of the ring, the judges took a final look at the hitches’ presentations, while also asking for a demonstration the reverse gait. The final team scores were based on their ability to work together, head carriage, consistency, and the overall presentation of the hitch and driver.

The Six-Horse Hitch Classic class was comprised of 13 teams that included all the draft breeds-Clydesdale, Percheron, and Belgian. The teams were split into four heats to allow them room in the ring to really show off their skills to the judge. The top five teams were then called back to allow the judge to make his final decision. In the end, it was the Express Ranches team from Yukon, Oklahoma, driven by Josh, who took the top honors. Coming in second was Blue Ribbon Farm from Farmington, Missouri, driven by Dean. Third place in the very competitive class went to the Zubrod Percherons from Guthrie, Oklahoma, driven by Chad.

After the entertainment it was time for the Ladies’ Team Cart, where women of all ages drove their wagons with two horses pulling them forward. All of the ladies had beautifully turned out teams and wagons and were dressed to match the part. In first place was Sugar Ridge RV from Danville, Vermont, driven by Mary Fernhoff. In second place was Blue Ribbon Farm from Farmington, Missouri, driven by Alli Woodbury. Finishing in third place was Express Ranches from Yukon, Oklahoma, driven by Jeanine Regier.

The day was capped off with the Four-Horse Hitch class, with six hitches coming back without their swing team. This was another large and highly competitive class, with the crowd cheering excitedly as the horses thundered by them. The judge awarded first place to Zubrod Percherons from Guthrie, Oklahoma, driven by Chad. Second place went to Blue Ribbon Farm from Farmington, Missouri, driven by Dean. Rounding out the top three was Express Ranches from Yukon, Oklahoma, driven by Josh.

Media Contact: Lenore Phillips
561-753-3389 | lrb@phelpsmediagroup.com

Martin Fuchs and Clooney 51 Capture First Five-Star Grand Prix Win of the WEF

Martin Fuchs and Clooney 51. Photo © Sportfot.

Wellington, FL – February 9, 2019 – The first five-star competition of the 2019 Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF) brought together top show jumpers to compete in the $391,000 Fidelity Investments® Grand Prix CSI 5* on Saturday, February 9, at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center in Wellington, FL. Martin Fuchs (SUI) and Clooney 51, owned by Luigi Baleri, captured the first big win of the circuit.

Out of 40 entries in the grand prix, 18 were clear over the course designed by Kelvin Bywater of Great Britain. It was a footrace in the jump-off, with nine finding the path to double clear, but it would come down to who took the biggest chances to see who would stand atop the first five-star podium of the 2019 circuit.

Alannah Argyle and Norway Win THIS National Children’s Medal 15-17

Twenty-seven combinations headed to the South Ring at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center on Saturday for the THIS National Children’s Medal 15-17. The medal is one of many top equitation classes offered for junior riders throughout the 12-week circuit at the 2019 Winter Equestrian Festival. Alannah Argyle of Dover, MA captured the win aboard the 13-year-old Warmblood gelding, Norway.

For full results, please visit www.PBIEC.com.

P. J. Rizvi and Breaking Dawn Dazzle in Their Second Win of AGDF Week 5

P. J. Rizvi and Breaking Dawn. ©SusanStickle.com.

Wellington, FL – February 9, 2019 – Week 5 of the Adequan® Global Dressage Festival (AGDF) continued on Saturday, February 9, with three-star dressage competition at the Equestrian Village at Palm Beach International Equestrian Center in Wellington, FL. P. J. Rizvi (USA) and Breaking Dawn concluded the day with a win in the FEI Grand Prix Freestyle CDI3*, presented by Wellington Equestrian Realty.

Rizvi, of Wellington, FL, and Breaking Dawn earned a score of 74.030% with their freestyle test. “I’ve had him since he was nine, turning 10. I purchased him as an amateur Prix St. Georges horse,” said Rizvi of her 18-year-old KWPN gelding by Akribori. “He’s been my horse of a lifetime; I got to learn everything on him. I got really lucky.

“He knows his job. It’s really about keeping him fit and happy and taking good care of him because he is in the older bracket for a grand prix horse, but he always comes out willing to do something,” continued Rizvi. “Today he came out like, ‘Yep I’m 12!’ We always say at the barn he is 18 going on five because he doesn’t know how old he is, and that’s what I love about him.”

Michael Erdmann put together the music for Rizvi’s freestyle, and trainer Ashley Holzer and Rizvi put the choreography together. “I wanted to do more of American Pie because I figure everyone goes out and rides for different reasons and I always do my best, but I do it really for the fun and for the joy of it,” added Rizvi about her music choice.

Adrienne Lyle (USA) returned after her two wins to capture another one in the FEI Grand Prix Special CDI3*, presented by MTICA Farm. Lyle rode Harmony’s Duval, an 11-year-old Danish Warmblood gelding by Rosseau owned by Duval Partners LLC, and the pair earned a score of 72.851%.

Susan Pape (GBR) and Harmony’s Don Noblesse, a 12-year-old Hanoverian stallion by Dancier owned by Harmony Sporthorses, came in second place with a score of 72.213%.

Third place went to Jill Irving (CAN) and Arthur, her 14-year-old KWPN gelding by Jazz. The pair earned a score of 70.064%.

Earlier in the day Leida Collins-Strijk (NED) and Romy, a 13-year-old Hanoverian gelding by Royal Blend owned by Arlene Page, earned a score of 72.016% to win the FEI Intermediate I CDI1*, presented by Iron Spring Farm.

For more information and to see a full list of results, please visit www.globaldressagefestival.com.

4 Stars at Equestrian Festival Baborówko

Baborówko, the 6th of February 2019 – 5 international classes will be played out during Baborówko Equestrian Festival, from the 23rd to the 26th of May 2019. Thanks to the patron of the show, Mr Roman Roszkiewicz, the prize money will reach 465 000 PLN (approx. 110 000 EUR), which places Equestrian Festival Baborówko among the top 10 eventing shows with the highest prize pool in the world.

Olympic qualifications for Tokyo 2020 will take place in Baborówko this year. The team that wins the CCIO4*-L class will immediately qualify for the games. For athletes from C group (Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia), Equestrian Festival Baborówko is one of two opportunities to qualify. The other one is the overall position in the classification of Nations Cup in 2019.

Since 2019, the FEI has introduced a new distinction in the eventing classes. The Olympic qualification will be played out in the range of 4 stars. The cross-country trial will last 10 minutes, with 40 fences to hurdle over the course of approx. 6000 metres. The prize money in the CCIO4*-L class will reach 85 000 PLN (19 000 EUR), with 60 000 PLN (approx. 14 200 EUR) going to the winning team.

The highest class at Equestrian Festival Baborówko will be the CCI4*-S class, where the winner will gain 100 000 PLN (approx. 23 500 EUR). The organizers suspect that this will be the class where we will have the opportunity to see international eventing’s biggest stars, including the number one in the FEI rankings, Oliver Townend (GBR), or the currently placed as third, Tim Price (NZL). The overall prize money for the class will reach 325 000 PLN (approx. 76 000 EUR).

The most important classes of Equestrian Festival Baborówko will be played out in the classic format – dressage on Thursday and Friday, cross-country on Saturday, and showjumping with prizegiving on Sunday. Traditionally, organisers have also prepared additional shows and activities for children and adults on Saturday and Sunday.

Other classes during Equestrian Festival Baborówko include the international CCI3*-S, CCI2*-S, and CCIYH2*-S for young horses, as well as the national class CNC-L for the less experienced.

More information can be found at www.festiwal.baborowko.pl.

Larger Than Life Performance on First Day of Chesapeake International Draft Horse Show

Wellington, Fla. – Feb. 8, 2019 – The first day of the Chesapeake International Draft Horse Show in the equestrian community of Wellington, Florida took place Friday, February 8. Founded by Victoria McCullough, the Chesapeake International Draft Horse show was held at Crab Orchard Equestrian Estate, generously donated by Frank and Monica McCourt. Beautiful wagons painted in team colors showcased the heritage of the sport and made up the whole package as these teams displayed their skills to the judges. Showcasing the three breeds of draft horse, Belgian, Clydesdale, and Percheron, classes on Friday featured a six-horse hitch for each breed as well as a ladies’ cart.

For each class, spectators watched in amazement as the gentle giants entered the arena. The judges lined up in the middle of the ring to watch the team tests which consisted of teams completing three laps around the ring at the trot before changing direction across the diagonal. Trotting across the diagonal gives the drivers a chance to showcase their team’s skills to the judging panel. All hitches were then asked to demonstrate the natural gait, the walk, and the trot in the opposite direction to show the horses’ ability to work in unison under control. After being asked to line up in the center of the ring, the judges took a final look at the hitches’ presentations, while also asking for a demonstration the reverse gait. The final team scores were based on their ability to work together, head carriage, consistency, and the overall presentation of the hitch and driver.

The first class of the day was the Belgian Six-Horse Hitch, which saw four teams compete for the first blue ribbon of the inaugural Chesapeake International Horse Show. Originating in Belgium, the Belgian breed has the highest annual registration numbers. Starting the competition on an exciting note, the Belgians made a lasting impression on the crowd as they trotted around the ring cheered on by their fans. The first blue ribbon of the day was awarded to the Sugar Ridge RV owned hitch from Danville, Vermont, driven by Kirk. Second place went to the EH Perkins Construction hitch driven by Dusty hailing from Stowe, Massachusetts. The third-place hitch was driven by Sarah and owned by the Brockwood Belgians based out of Dayton, Pennsylvania.

The Clydesdales were then on display as the famed feathered giants took to the arena. Originally from Scotland, the Clydesdale is the most recognizable of all the draft breeds. Five teams hitched up for the class, and their presence was felt as they worked around the arena. The traditional tack of the horses was on display as it shined in the Florida sun. Winning the Clydesdale class was the Highpoint Clydesdales hitch driven by Freeman from Hooper, Utah. Coming in second place was the hometown favorite, Chesapeake Clydesdales, driven by Jim with assistance from the show’s founder, McCullough. Third place was awarded to Hunting Creek Farm, based in Hamptonville, North Carolina, driven by Chip.

Rounding out the six-horse hitch classes were the Percherons. Four teams competed in the class, all made up of beautifully turned out black horses. Originating in France and considered the smaller of the draft breeds, these horses still managed to make the ground shake and kick up the sand under their hooves as they thundered by spectators. Taking top honors was the Zubrod Percherons hitch from Guthrie, Oklahoma, driven by Chad. Coming in second was Express Ranches from Yukon, Oklahoma, driven by Josh. Third place was awarded to Blue Ribbon Farm from Farmington, Missouri, driven by Dean.

After an entertainment break, the ladies’ cart competitors were set to compete. Switching from wagons to two-wheel single carts, the ladies brought in one horse of their choosing to drive. The class showed off each draft breed and included both mares and geldings. Boasting a field of 12 competitive entries, the ladies split up into two groups of six to allow space to properly show off their skills. The ladies performed in the same manner as the six-horse, completing laps of the arena before changing direction, demonstrating walk-trot transitions before lining up and showcasing a reverse and allowing the judge to look over their overall presentation. Taking top honors in the ladies’ cart was the Express Ranch driver, Jeanine, who was beautifully dressed to match her shining wagon and jet black four-year-old Percheron, Joe. Coming in second was Sugar Ridge RV driver Mary and her Belgian mare, with third place going to Blue Ribbon Farm driver Alli, who showed a Percheron in the ladies’ cart.

Media Contact: Lenore Phillips
561-753-3389 | lrb@phelpsmediagroup.com

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