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US Dressage Team Wins Bronze in FEI Nations Cup CDIO3* Hickstead

Spidge Event Photography.

US Finishes Second in FEI Nations Cup Dressage Series

Hickstead, England – The Dutta Corp. U.S. Dressage Team clinched the bronze medal after having solid performances at the FEI Nations Cup CDIO3* Hickstead. Chef d’Equipe Robert Dover guided the U.S. team of Katherine Bateson-Chandler, Susan Dutta, Chase Hickok, and Charlotte Jorst to deliver quality tests throughout the three days of competition. The U.S. team earned bronze with a score of 421.920, finishing behind gold medal-winning France with a score of 424.811 and silver medal-winning the Netherlands with a score of 424.053. In addition, the FEI Nations Cup Dressage Series came to a close at Hickstead, with the U.S. finishing second behind Sweden and ahead of Denmark.

“I was very proud once again of our U.S. Nations Cup athletes here in Hickstead. Under extremely difficult weather conditions, our riders rode with class and did their very best,” said Dover. “Our goal this year was not to simply do well, which we did by winning in Rotterdam and placing second in Aachen, along with other results in the series, but to show off both our fabulous veterans as well as fresh, new human and equine faces. We are all very proud of our second-place finish in the series, the only nation to have supported every competition in it!”

The competition began on Friday with all team members performing the CDIO3* Grand Prix Test. Hickok (Wellington, Fla.) and Hyperion Farm, Inc.’s Sagacious HF were the top U.S. finishers in second place with a score of 71.640%. Jorst (Reno, Nev.) and Kastel Denmark’s Kastel’s Nintendo were not far behind in fourth place with a score of 70.880%. Bateson-Chandler (Wellington, Fla.) and Jane Clark’s Alcazar had a nice test to score 69.320% to finish in 15th place, while Dutta (Wellington, Fla.) and Tim Dutta Inc.’s Currency DC received a score of 63.640% to finish in 26th place.

On Saturday, two U.S. combinations competed in the CDIO3* Grand Prix Special with both of their scores counting towards the team score. Hickok and the 1999 Dutch Warmblood gelding had another stellar performance to finish third with a score of 70.843%. Bateson-Chandler and the 2005 Dutch Warmblood gelding delivered a great test to finish eighth with a score of 69.412%.

The Nations Cup came to its conclusion on Sunday with the CDIO3* Grand Prix Freestyle. The remaining two U.S. combinations competed, and the best score counted for the team score. Jorst and the 2003 Dutch Warmblood stallion put forth a good effort to score 69.825% to finish seventh. Dutta and the 2000 Oldenburg gelding performed their first freestyle of the year and received a score of 66.625% to finish in 12th place.

View the complete results.

By Kathleen Landwehr, US Equestrian Communications Department

What Are the Main Betting Terms in Horse Racing You Need to Know?

Horse racing is an exhilarating sport to watch, with powerful animals and talented jockeys either sprinting on the Flat or risking life and limb over obstacles.

It is even better when you have money on a horse and so it is essential to know the main betting terms involved in racing.

There are many ways to place a wager, with bets to win or ‘on the nose’ popular but it is also possible to back a horse ‘each way’.

You will need to outlay double your stake as you are backing it to either win or be placed (usually the first three or four home in a race).

If the horse wins then you will be paid out for the win and the place (a quarter or fifth of the winning amount) while a placed horse will see you receive just the latter.

The favourite, or ‘jolly’, is the horse the bookies expect to win and will have the shortest odds while the ‘outsider’ will have long odds but it much less likely to land the spoils.

Watch out for a horse that is ‘on the drift’ with its odds lengthening, as there is little money being placed on it and the bookmakers feel confident it will not win.

When a market has just opened up on an upcoming race, it is common to see a ‘bar’ price, which refers to the odds of those runners not quoted with a price during early betting shows.

An ‘accumulator’ is a multiple bet when you place money on the outcome of two or more races, with two selections termed a ‘two-fold’, etc.

The winnings from the first race roll over to the next, and so on, meaning a successful accumulator can be very profitable, although it is tough to pick just one winner, let alone two or more.

Prior to race meetings there will be tips from the racing experts and a NAP of the day is the selection that racing correspondents feel is their strongest of the day.

Check out this NAP of the day if you fancy a flutter, while a horse termed a ‘banker’ is one that is expected to win.

A horse that goes off at ‘even money’ means that you will get back the value of your stake plus of course the stake should your selection win, while one that is ‘odds-on’ is fancied to do well and the pay-out will be less that the initial outlay, plus your stake.

You might sometimes hear a favourite referred to as a ‘Bismarck’ and this is a horse that bookmakers expect to lose or be ‘sunk’ and they are happy to accept bets for.

It is important to check out the ‘form’ of a horse before deciding which one to bet on, while the ‘going’ – the condition of the racing surface – should also play a part in your selection as some horses favour quick, dry ground and others enjoy the mud.

Finally, if you are lucky enough to land a winner, you will be keen to learn the SP (starting price) as this is the one that will determine how big your return will be.

A Thrilling Jump Off Saw Gregory Wathelet Claim Victory in Rolex Grand Prix at CHIO Aachen

23 July 2017, Aachen, Germany – The first equestrian Major of the year has been won by Belgium’s Gregory Wathelet riding Coree, thrilling the 40,000 capacity crowds in the main arena at CHIO Aachen in a dramatic jump off. Portugal’s Luciana Diniz riding Fit for Fun 13 was second and The Netherlands’ Marc Houtzager riding Sterrehof’s Calimero took third place.

A cool, overcast day welcomed the 40 horse and rider combinations who had qualified for the Rolex Grand Prix on Sunday 23 July, the finale and highlight of the nine-day World Equestrian Festival in West Germany. As one of the four Majors which make up the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, every rider had travelled here with one aim: to win in one of the sport’s greatest outdoor arenas.

The Rolex Grand Prix course, designed by the notoriously demanding Frank Rothenberger asked these world class pairings continuous questions over the first round, with 16 jumping efforts to tackle. Rolex Testimonee Scott Brash was third to go and despite a seemingly faultless start, the penultimate triple combination saw Brash take an unlucky four faults.

Testament to the difficulty of the course, only seven clear rounds were produced within the time, including a foot perfect round from Canadian Olympic 2016 bronze medallist and Rolex Testimonee, Eric Lamaze. Two seconds faster than the rest of the field; he had set the bar high for the second round.

18 riders progressed through to round two, with Scott Brash and Eric Lamaze joined by fellow Rolex Testimonees Kent Farrington and Meredith Michaels-Beerbaum, both of whom carried four faults from the first round.

The course was altered for the second stage of the competition: a revised track of 15 jumping efforts tested each horse and rider combination, requiring utmost accuracy and precision to leave the poles standing. Clear rounds were easier to come by and after Luciana Diniz of Portugal followed Marc Houtzager by posting the second double clear, the crowd knew it was going to be treated to a jump-off. Gregory Wathelet of Belgium and Laura Kraut of the USA followed suit, taking the final round to four competitors. Despite recording the fastest first round ride, Rolex Testimonee Eric Lamaze had an unlucky four faults, taking him out of contention of winning the Rolex Grand Prix.

First to go in the jump off was Marc Houtzager, posting a clear round with a time of 53.66 seconds, but this was quickly beaten as Luciana Diniz raced around the course in 47.40 seconds. With two riders left to go, a hushed silence descended over the crowd as Wathelet entered the arena aboard his mare Coree. The pair turned up the pressure and took another second off the fastest recorded time, finishing on 46.60. The cheering crowd once again quietened as the last rider to go, Laura Kraut, entered the arena. Unfortunately, luck is not always on your side in this sport and Kraut knocked the last rail, dropping her into fourth place, giving Wathelet the title spot.

Speaking about his first Rolex Grand Prix win at CHIO Aachen, Wathelet remarked, “Rolex has the best Shows to form the Rolex Grand Slam with Aachen, Calgary, Geneva and Den Bosch and every rider wants to win. For me it is a dream come to true to win the Rolex Grand Prix at Aachen and have my name on the wall and Calgary would be the same, so I hope to get a good result there also.”

Show Director Frank Kemperman spoke after the Rolex Grand Prix: “First of all I would like to congratulate the winners; you presented some fantastic sport today; a special thank you to your horses. A big thank you to Rolex because without Rolex it would not be possible to have this Grand Prix today. This is the start of a new Rolex Grand Slam for Gregory; our friends in Calgary and Geneva are waiting for you.”

Along with the prestigious Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping trophy, Wathelet also received an engraved Oyster Perpetual Datejust II. All eyes will now be looking ahead to the next equestrian Major at the CSIO Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ in September, where Wathelet will be attempting to continue his reign as the live contender of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping.

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Rolex SA
Virginie Chevailler
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US Dressage Team Wins Silver at FEI Nations Cup CDIO5* Aachen

Shannon Brinkman Photo (Left to right: Olivia LaGoy-Weltz, Kasey Perry-Glass, Laura Graves, and Adrienne Lyle)

Graves and Verdades Win Grand Prix Special

Aachen, Germany – The Dutta Corp. U.S. Dressage Team won the silver medal at the FEI Nations Cup at the World Equestrian Festival CHIO Aachen in Aachen, Germany on Saturday with a final score of 450.392. Rio Olympic team bronze medalist Laura Graves and Verdades were foot perfect as they bested the field of competitors, unseating Germany’s Isabell Werth in the Grand Prix Special to win with a final a score of 81.824%.

“These incredible young ladies are just super athletes along with super wonderful horses, some of which are brand new to arenas such as this,” said Chef d’Equipe Robert Dover. “I was over-wrought with emotion about them landing in second place halfway through this Nations Cup. On the one hand, a part of me expects that; I expect excellence. Still, it is an extra thrill to have this youthful look of new faces coming along with our seasoned veterans. I’m very happy and very excited about this group.”

Maintaining their silver status from Thursday’s Grand Prix, the U.S. had little to no room for error as they entered the arena. The 2016 Olympic duo of Graves (Geneva, Fla.) and Verdades, Graves’ and Curt Maes’ 2002 Dutch Warmblood gelding, kept the momentum going fresh off their Grand Prix test, where they placed second with a 79.514%. They were determined to keep the team on the podium by producing a showstopping performance in the Grand Prix Special.

“Today was just our day. My horse gave me a great birthday present,” said Graves. “It was actually the first time this year that we have shown in the [Grand Prix] Special. I could not be more pleased with him. Aachen brings out the top riders, and that’s what keeps me motivated.”

Graves is the fifth U.S. dressage rider to win at Aachen, behind Patricia Galvin and Jessica Ransehousen (1960), Robert Dover (1987 CHIO Freestyle) and Steffen Peters (2009).

“A win in Aachen is tantamount to a win at the Olympics,” said Dover. “She was against the very best rider from the Olympic Games, the very best rider from the World Cup and when you beat that rider and horse, it’s just everything. When you go into the stadium and have our national anthem played and our flag go up, it is something she will never forget in her life. Nothing can make me more proud or happier for her.”

London Olympic veteran Adrienne Lyle (Ketchum, Idaho) aboard Salvino, the 2007 Hanoverian stallion owned by Salvino Partners, LLC, entered the ring confident and composed, demonstrating brilliant movements to finish on a final score of 71.814% and 73.608% in the Grand Prix and Grand Prix Special, respectively.

“I’m ecstatic,” said Dover. “She rode magnificently both days. Today, the marks reflected a super talented horse and a fantastic rider piloting this young horse.”

Relatively new to international competitions, Olivia LaGoy-Weltz (Haymarket, Va.) and Lonoir, LaGoy-Weltz and Mary Anne McPhail’s 2004 Danish Warmblood gelding, competed with poise riding two technically outstanding tests, finishing the Grand Prix with a 71.514% and 72.118% in the Grand Prix Special.

“Olivia is another incredibly gifted rider. She is as tough about wanting perfect and being determined,” said Dover. “Right before she went in I said rack up as many points as you possibly can in the first half of the test because his greenness is in the second half and that’s exactly what she did. That’s what you want in a team rider; it shows another great talent for the future.”

Graves’ Rio Olympic teammate, Kasey Perry-Glass (Wellington, Fla.), and Goerklintgaards Dublet, Diane Perry’s 2003 Warmblood gelding, had an unexpected miscommunication in their first pirouette during Thursday’s Grand Prix, resulting in a score of 68.929% which was the drop score for the team. However, the pair’s performance on Saturday set the tone for the U.S. with a score of 71.608%.

“We wanted Kasey to keep showing the continued evolution of how this horse is coming on,” said Dover. “It [Grand Prix Special] was so amazing and so lovely. The 74-75% is right there. I’m thrilled with her.”

Germany took home top honors with a final collective team score of 471.046, and placed three of their riders in the top ten in the Grand Prix Special. Sweden, who was in fourth after the Grand Prix, surpassed Denmark to round out the top three with a final score of 437.635.

Graves and Verdades placed third with a score of 82.550% in the Grand Prix Freestyle Sunday morning.

From Classic Communications/US Equestrian Communications Department

Caroline Martin and Doug Payne Awarded Jacqueline B. Mars Competition and Training Grants

Caroline Martin and The Apprentice. Photo By: Shannon Brinkman.

Gladstone, N.J. – July 20, 2017 – The United States Equestrian Team (USET) Foundation is pleased to announce that this year’s recipients of the Jacqueline B. Mars Competition and Training Grants are Caroline Martin and Doug Payne. Martin and Payne were recognized and unanimously selected by the US Equestrian eventing selectors due to their impressive records and future in representing the United States in international competition.

As recipients of the Jacqueline B. Mars Competition and Training Grants, Payne (Aiken, South Carolina) will travel to compete in the Blenheim CCI3* in Oxford, England with his and Debi Crowley’s gelding, Vandiver. Martin (Riegelsville, Pennsylvania) will travel to The Netherlands for the Military Boekelo-Enschede CCIO3* in October to compete her two geldings, Pebbly Maximus and The Apprentice.

Payne’s show jumping and dressage has continued to improve throughout his career in addition to maintaining his success in cross-country. Payne took over the ride for Vandiver in 2015 and in 2016, the pair placed fourth in The Fork CIC3* in April and earned a third place finish in the Nutrena USEA American Eventing Championships in August.

“It’s a huge honor and certainly an obligation to do our best and make the most of the opportunity,” noted Payne. “It’s a great opportunity against the best in Europe. The timing works really well and sets us up for 2018, which is the ultimate goal. I have to thank Jacqueline Mars and the USET Foundation for having faith in me and awarding grants like this. The experience gained is very difficult to get by yourself.”

Payne and Vandiver continued to find success in 2017, earning a second place at Pine Top Advanced CIC3* in February and a second place finish in April at The Fork CIC3*. Payne also plans to compete in the Millbrook Horse Trials and the American Eventing Championships before traveling to England.

Martin has been a part of the Emerging Athlete’s program since 2013, and recently received the 2017 Karen Stives Eventing Endowment Fund Grant. Martin had the opportunity to participate in the Karen E. Stives European Emerging Athlete Tour under the tutelage of Leslie Law, furthering her education and gaining competitive experience in Great Britain. Martin finished her two horses, Pebbly Maximus and The Apprentice, in fifth and eighth place, respectively, at the Bramham International CCI3*-U25 in June.

“It’s unreal to receive this grant,” expressed Martin. “It’s the second grant I’ve received this year and it’s a dream come true to have this much support from my country. I’ve always wanted to be a professional rider. I’ve now switched over from the Under 25 group to the young professional and it’s wonderful to go overseas and represent my country. I have two remarkable horses with The Apprentice and Pebbly Maximus and I hope to improve upon my results from earlier this year.”

Martin had the first 3* win of her career this year at Carolina International’s CIC3* in March. At just 22 years old, Martin is one of the country’s up-and-coming stars, and her return to Europe with her two geldings will be a strong stepping stone in her aim towards competing at the Kentucky CCI4* in spring 2018.

For more information on the USET Foundation, visit www.uset.org.

Contact: Rebecca Walton
phone 561.753.3389 fax 561.753.3386
rjw@phelpsmediagroup.com
PhelpsMediaGroup.com

US Eventing Team Wins FEI Nations Cup Eventing Competition at Great Meadow International

Photo Credit: Anna Purdy.

Jennie Brannigan Captures Second Individual Title

The Plains, Va. – The Land Rover U.S. Eventing Team won the FEI Nations Cup™ CICO3* at the Great Meadow International, presented by Adequan, for the second consecutive year. The team of Jennie Brannigan, Lynn Symansky, Phillip Dutton, and Boyd Martin defeated teams from Canada and Great Britain in the only FEI Nations Cup™ Eventing competition outside Europe. Brannigan also captured her second individual title at Great Meadow, having won previously in 2015.

Cross country course designer Mike Etherington-Smith reversed the direction and order of the fences from last year with the intention of generating interest for both the competitors and spectators. The change proved to be challenging for some, though not for the U.S. team. All four riders completed the course without any jumping penalties.

Brannigan had an unforgettable day. The Reddick, Fla. resident went third in the team order and secured the victory for the U.S. incurring only 1.6 time faults on Nina Gardner’s Cambalda. Brannigan came into the final day in fourth place and catapulted to the top spot with a final score of 49.8 penalties.

“The first time I came it was so exciting because it earned me a spot as a traveling alternate for the Pan Am Games, which was quite special to me,” said Brannigan. “It’s such an honor to get to ride for your country and ‘Ping’ has been an incredible horse in a lot of ways and is wonderful to me. I really appreciate him stepping up to the plate.”

By the time second U.S. team rider Lynn Symansky took to the course, two riders were eliminated from the British team and the Canadians had already secured a team score. The Middleburg, Va. resident jumped clear, finishing just above the optimum time on Donner, owned by The Donner Syndicate, LLC. They incurred 1.2 time faults for a three-phase score of 50.1 penalties, which was good enough for second place individually. Symansky was originally the alternate, but was named to the team after Buck Davidson, Jr. withdrew Carl Segal and Sherrie Martin’s Copper Beach.

“It’s such a great cohesive group. Everybody just works together and supports each other. We’re all out here to win and do the best that we can,” said Symansky. “It was awesome. The whole way around I heard people cheering me on, saying, ‘Come on Lynn, you can do it!’ It’s cool to ride at your hometown event. It was an honor.”

U.S. pathfinder Boyd Martin of Cochranville, Pa. was the first rider to complete the course within the optimum time of 6 minutes and 33 seconds, finishing within two seconds at 6:31. Riding Steady Eddie, owned by Denise Lahey, Pierrie Colin, George and Gretchen Wintersteen, the Olympic veteran finished on his dressage score of 58.3 penalties.

“He came through for me; he was the only horse that finished on his dressage score,” said Martin of the New Zealand Thoroughbred. “It was a bit hard to gauge the course because the first rider Justine Dutton (GBR) fell and second rider Jessica Phoenix (CAN) was held on the course, but I zipped around and everything rode really well.”

Dutton, of West Grove, Pa., already knew that the U.S. had won the Nations Cup prior to going out, but an individual win was on the line. Riding Kristine and John Norton’s I’m Sew Ready, the six-time Olympic veteran finished outside the optimum time adding 5.6 time faults to his cumulative score of 51.6 penalties and putting him in third place.

“My teammates did it all for me. Jennie came home and I had a minute to go before I went in the box and they said she only had a couple of time faults,” said Dutton. “I thought it was a good run for the horse. He’s not the fastest, but I think I could have done a little better job at the galloping fences. Overall, though, I think it was a good run for him and pleased that he went so well.”

The winning score for the U.S. was 151.5 penalties. Team Canada finished on 168.6 penalties for second place. Because Great Britain failed to have the required three qualifying scores, they were awarded a drop score penalty of 1000 points, and finished third.

Full Results

From Classic Communications and the US Equestrian Communications Department

Tinners Way, Multiple Grade 1 Winner and Son of Secretariat, Dead at 27

Photo: Laura Battles.

GEORGETOWN, KY – JULY 6, 2017 – Tinners Way, multiple grade-one winner and the last colt born of the great Secretariat, has died. The 27-year-old stallion was euthanized July 5th at Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement Farm in Georgetown, KY, where he had been pensioned since 2010.

Michael Blowen, founder and President of Old Friends, made the announcement of his passing this morning. Old Friends resident veterinarian Dr. Bryan Waldridge attributed the cause of death to acute onset of severe neurologic disease. “Tinner had been treated in the past for EPM,” added Waldridge, “and he did have some lingering neurologic effects from a previous infection.”

Bred and owned by Juddmonte Farms, Tinners Way (Secretariat – Devon Diva, The Minstrel) began his career in Europe, where he won three of his seven starts in England and France, including the City of York Stakes and the Milcars Temple Fortune Stakes on the turf as a 3-year-old.

In the U.S. as a 4-year-old, Tinner joined California-based trainer Bobby Frankel’s barn, and under the Hall of Famer’s watchful eye the striking chestnut won the grade one $1 million Pacific Classic in 1995, beating future Hall-of-Famer Best Pal and posting a record-equaling mile and a quarter of 1:59 2/5, a time reminiscent of his sire’s Kentucky Derby run.

Tinners Way had a repeat victory in the ’95 Pacific Classic, where he defeated 1994’s Breeders’ Cup Classic champion Concern, and he earned yet another grade-one win the following year in The Californian.

Throughout his career Tinners Way faced off against numerous Old Friends pensioners, including Awad, Kiri’s Clown, and Alphabet Soup.

Sent to stud in 1997 after 27 starts, seven wins, and career earnings of $1,849,452, Tinners Way stood at Vinery in Kentucky, Harris Farms in California, and finally at Key Ranch in Texas, where he retired in 2010 as the richest racehorse in Texas. He was donated to Old Friends by owners Phil Leckinger and Jerry Hardin.

“Twenty-seven is not a bad number,” said Leckinger by phone from Texas. “I can’t thank Old Friends enough for the care and support he was given. Tinners Way certainly did wonders for us, he did wonders for Juddmonte on the track, and I hope he did wonders for his friends and fans in retirement.”

“We are so saddened by the loss of Tinners Way,” said Old Friends’s Blowen, “but its times like these that you really see how much we can do for these old horses. Tinner, like Wallenda, was a warrior to the end, and when he told us his battle was over, we listened.  He had so many friends from all over the country that visited him often,” added Blowen. “He leaves behind a great legacy and a host of adoring fans.”

Old Friends is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization that cares for more than 170 retired racehorses. Its Dream Chase Farm, located in Georgetown, KY, is open to tourists daily by appointment. Old Friends also has a satellite facility in Greenfield Center, New York, Old Friends at Cabin Creek: The Bobby Frankel Division, which is also open to visitors. For more information on tours or to make a donation, contact the main farm at (502) 863-1775 or see their website at www.oldfriendsequine.org.

MEDIA CONTACT: Cynthia Grisolia, (347) 423-7322, cindy@oldfriendsequine.org; Michael Blowen, (502) 863-1775, michael@oldfriendsequine.org

Belgians Bound for Barcelona Final and Division 1 Slot after Brilliant Win in Roeser

Catherine Van Roosbroeck and Gautcho Da Quinta. (FEI/Henri Schwirtz)

Runners-up from Luxembourg surprise even themselves; last leg in Gijon will decide second qualifying spot

Team Belgium confirmed their return to Europe Division 1 when sealing promotion with a definitive victory at the sixth leg of the FEI Nations Cup™ Jumping 2017 Europe Division 2 League in Roeser (LUX).

Taking command with the only zero score of the first round they added just six more in round two without calling up their anchor partnership, while the hosts sprang a major surprise when finishing a superb second ahead of the United Arab Emirates in third.

Belgium cannot now be overtaken at the top of the Division 2 leaderboard after an extremely effective campaign, but the battle for the second available spot in next year’s 10-nation Division 1 series and the FEI Nations Cup™ 2017 Final in Barcelona (ESP) in September will continue at the last leg in Gijon (ESP) next month. The British look set to take it, but another less than sparkling performance failed to improve their position.

“We knew at the beginning of the year that some of our top riders would compete at Global shows during the season so from the start we planned to give opportunities to many riders, and I’m very, very happy that it has worked out so well! I’m very proud of them all – it means a lot to be back in Division 1 next year!” — Peter Weinberg (Chef d’Equipe BEL)

Pathfinder Nicola Philippaerts (24) was the only Belgian to fault in the first round, but his clear with H&M Harley vd Bisschop second time out was followed by Catherine Van Roosbroeck’s (29) effortless double-clear with the stallion Gautcho da Quinta. So although Dominique Hendrickx (43) and Bacardi les Hauts collected six faults for a stop after an unfortunate slip on the turn to the influential penultimate triple combination, that was good enough to ensure that Vilm Vermeir (37) and Iq van het Steentje didn’t have to go again because victory was already assured.

The crowd held their breaths as a battle for runner-up spot ensued between first-round four-faulters Luxembourg and Switzerland. Christian Weier’s single error was followed by two from Victor Bettendorf second time out, but when Victor’s sister Charlotte Bettendorf went clear and anchorman Marcel Ewen picked up just a single time fault it fell to London 2012 Olympic champion, Switzerland’s Steve Guerdat, to pin the hosts, now on a final total of nine, back to third. A mistake in the triple combination put paid to that, however, dropping the Swiss to fourth behind the impressive UAE foursome.

Now lying third with 180 points, Luxembourg could challenge the British for that much-sought-after second-place finish on the Division 2 leaderboard with another good performance in Gijon (ESP) next month. “That possibility was presented to us today, but we’ll have to see as a team if it makes sense,” said Christian Weier, however. “It’s a nice spot to be in, but we mustn’t get carried away. We’ve just a small string of horses!”

Catherine Van Roosbroeck – Team Belgium (winners), talking about her 11-year-old stallion Gautcho Da Quinta: “We went to St Gallen and the team ended up in fourth place. Gautcho and I were fourth in the Grand Prix and I got the prize for Leading Rider. He has been jumping double-clear and doing well all this season. We bought him when he was four (he’s now 11) and I built him up to this level. I know he made it look easy today. I think he’s in the best form of his life!”

Christian Weier – Team Luxembourg, talking about his team’s second-place finish: “We have been working a long time toward this goal and wanting to promote the sport in Luxembourg. What happened today is something special, our first time to have a team in a Nations Cup in Luxembourg. We have to be realistic with our means though, we’ve seen other teams coming up from the second division to the first and it doesn’t work out for them. We don’t have enough horses – I’m an amateur and personally I think it would be aiming too high, but of course it’s not my decision!”

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145

Super Swedes Win Division 1 Cliffhanger in Rotterdam

Henrik von Eckermann and Cantinero. (FEI/Christophe Taniere)

Swiss have to settle for second; Swedes squeeze ahead of French on league leaderboard

In a competition that was most definitely a game of two halves, Team Sweden stood strong to win the fifth leg of the FEI Nations Cup™ Jumping 2017 Europe Division 1 series in Rotterdam (NED). With four teams sharing a zero score at the end of the first round, and the remaining four only a single fence behind, it seemed the course designed by Dutchman Louis Konickx was a bit of a breeze.

But when the poles were raised and the fences widened in round two it was a very different story, and it came down to a duel between the winners and the Swiss who eventually had to settle for runner-up spot. The withdrawal of Rolf-Goran Bengtsson and Clarimo Ask piled the pressure on Sweden in the closing stages, but despite not jumping in round one it was anchorman Peder Fredricson (45) and the gelding H&M All In who clinched it.

“I warmed up for the first round but all our riders went clear so I didn’t have to go, and I thought I’d save my horse in case there was a jump-off. The fences were a bit bigger in the second round but he jumped great, and this is his first 1.60m competition since we won the silver medal in Rio because he had colic surgery, so I’m very happy!” — Peder Fredricson (SWE)

With 16 faults each to add, the German and Irish teams lost their grip on the lead and it was the first-round four-faulters from Italy and Spain who, posting eight more second time out, jointly moved into third spot at the end of the day.

Brilliant double-clears from Sweden’s Henrik von Eckermann (Cantinero) and Switzerland’s Steve Guerdat (Bianca) kept these two sides neck-and-neck as round two got underway, and with Bengtsson out of commission the four faults posted by 26-year-old Douglas Lindelow (Zacramento) left them still on level pegging when Switzerland’s Werner Muff (Daimler) also lowered the widened middle element of the triple combination four fences from home after Romain Duguet (Twentytwo Des Biches) put eight on the board.

When Fredricson went clear it was left to Switzerland’s Martin Fuchs to discard Duguet’s score and force a jump-off by doing likewise, but his feisty gelding Clooney clipped the first element of the triple combination to leave his team on a final tally of eight, while the Swedes reigned supreme with just four. The result moves Sweden up to second spot, five points ahead of the French, on the Europe Division 1 league table which continues to be dominated by Italy going into the sixth leg at Falsterbo (SWE) in three weeks’ time.

Peder Fredricson – Team Sweden (winners), talking about his brilliant gelding H&M All In, who had a colic operation after the pair won individual silver at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games: “He needs to do a few more rounds to build up his strength because he was off work for a long time. I want to try to give him as good a run as possible to try to compete at the European Championships in Gothenburg in August, but he needs to be fit enough for that. I was very happy with him here though.”

Henrik Ankarcrona – Team Sweden Chef d’Equipe, talking about the result: “We came here to Rotterdam with high expectations – to win, and we did! The plan was always to perform here and the team is strong – they all delivered. Our next Nations Cup is on home ground in Falsterbo, our last before the Final.”

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145

Julia Krajewski Secures Biggest Career Win at Luhmühlen with Samourai Du Thot

Julia Krajewski on Samourai du Thot (FEI/Eric Knoll)

Nicola Wilson (GBR) and Bulana clinch second with overnight leader Bettina Hoy third on Designer 10 (GER)

It was an emotional moment for Germany’s Julia Krajewski when she realised she had scored the biggest win of her career after steering Samourai du Thot to victory at her home event, Luhmühlen CCI 4* presented by DHL, fifth leg of the FEI Classics™.

Krajewski, 28, was third year last year at her first attempt, but now she goes home with the big prize after the fairytale failed to come true for cross country leader Bettina Hoy (GER), who is 26 years her senior.

“If I hadn’t taken a pull, my horse wouldn’t have hit fence eight as he didn’t want to touch a pole. I thought ‘damn’, but there were so few clear rounds and when Bettina had her fence and time faults, that’s how it happens sometimes and you’re a four-star winner!” — Julia Krajewski (GER), winner

There had been little difference in the leaderboard after a straightforward cross country phase, but a challenging jumping track certainly shook up the order, with only four clear rounds without time penalties from the 34 finishers.

Krajewski, second after Saturday’s cross country, hit the back rail of fence eight, and Britain’s Nicola Wilson, third before jumping on Bulana, jumped clear but added a frustrating three time faults to finish a mere 0.7 behind in second place, a career best for the 2012 Olympic team silver medallist who has been a solid pathfinder for the British team.

“It was an expensive time fault or two, but Bulana gets better and better and better.” — Nicola Wilson (GBR), runner-up

Hoy’s problems started with a sticky jump over the fifth fence on Designer 10 and the horse then didn’t get high enough over the sixth for a rail down. That, plus three time penalties, dropped the newly crowned national champion (Hoy won the German championships earlier in the day) to third place.

Marilyn Little (USA) was clear to move up to fourth place on RF Scandalous and Maxime Livio (FRA), currently runner-up in the FEI Classics, was also foot-perfect, rising six places to fifth on Opium de Verrieres.

Livio has now managed to narrow the gap with runaway FEI Classics™ leader Michael Jung (GER) to just six points, and Wilson has sprung from 11th place in the rankings to third, so a thrilling finish is guaranteed at the finale at Burghley (GBR) in September.

By Kate Green

Press contacts:

At FEI:

Leanne Williams
Manager Press Relations
leanne.williams@fei.org
+41 79 314 24 38

At Luhmühlen:

Dr. Friederike Stüvel-Huck
Press Officer
media@luhmuhlen.de
+49 17 153 829 00