All posts by Associate Editor

What Are the Three Areas of Equestrian Eventing?

Equestrian riding is a unique sport that pairs a rider and horse together in performance. Within equestrian, there are three Olympic sports that riders can participate in and these areas involve dressage, showjumping, and cross-country. All three Olympic equestrian disciplines are very different and each demands its own skills from the rider and horse. Unlike horse racing, equestrian sports focus on a rider’s command over his or her horse as well as the completion of various tasks on the riding ground. Equestrian and horse racing fans can follow the sports with Betmgm and wager on the latest horse-based sports events including the British Champions Day.

The Summer Olympics in 2020 will feature three disciplines in equestrian. So, what are those disciplines and how do riders compete in the events?

Dressage

Dressage is all about the control a rider has over the horse. In the event, judges want to see how well a rider can get his or her horse to respond and obey commands. During dressage, a rider and horse must complete a set of instructions. This dressage test will then be examined by a panel of judges that will score the contestants.

Judges give the rider and horse a score out of 10. The higher the score, the better the team performed in their test. The lower the score, the worse the pair did during the dressage event. The winner of the dressage event is the rider and horse who scored the best out of all the competitors.

Showjumping

Showjumping is an exciting, adrenaline-pumping event in equestrian. The event features horses and riders leaping over fences and barriers. The purpose of show jumping is to test the athletic abilities of both the rider and horse. The event also demonstrates the accuracy of the pair as they must not only clear the fence and barriers, but land fluidly.

The rider and horse must jump a variety of fences and barriers. These obstacles vary in height and range from 70 centimeters to 1.60 meters. In addition to jumping over the obstacles and landing, the pair must complete the showjumping course in a specified sequence. The rider and horse to jump and clear all the obstacles in the fastest time is crowned the winner.

Cross-Country

Cross-country is similar to showjumping as the rider and horse must leap over obstacles. The difference between cross-country and showjumping has to do with the size of the course and the obstacles the pair must jump over.

Cross-country tests a horse’s endurance, quickness, and leaping over the length of the event. A cross-country test can be done as part of a full evening show alongside showjumping and dressage. However, it can also be held by itself due to the nature of the event.

One of the biggest differences between cross-country and showjumping is the size of the courses. A cross-country course can be two to three kilometers in size. This gives a horse ample opportunity to showcase their speed and endurance during the event. No two cross-country courses are alike.

Ieromazzo Grabs Gold for Dominican Republic

(FEI/Pablo Albuja)

Dominican Republic’s Giorgia Ieromazzo claimed the FEI Jumping World Challenge Final 2019 title at Club Rancho San Francisco in Quito, Ecuador with a brilliant double-clear performance in last Sunday’s closing competition. The 32-year-old, who represented her country at the Pan-American Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in 2007 and again at the Bolivarian Games in 2013, pinned New Zealand’s Christine Cornege into silver while South Africa’s Mathiew Morrison took the bronze.

“I did a clear in the first round and then I was telling myself in the second round, ‘You have to concentrate!’ When I’m in the ring I’m in my zone. I don’t even remember what happens; I just ride!” — Giorgia Ieromazzo (Dominican Republic)

The FEI Jumping World Challenge Final was created in 2001 under the sponsorship of PSI, and was organised together with Dressage for five years at the Kasselman Stables in Hagen, Germany. It then moved to Santiago de Chile in South America in 2008 and 2009 before changing continents again when held at Kyalami Equestrian Park in South Africa in 2014. It visited Central Asia for the first time last year when Israel’s Nadav Sternbach came out on top in Tashkent, Uzbekistan, and the 2019 edition at Quito was the 18th in the popular series.

The FEI Solidarity Department oversees the running of this developmental competition which provides less experienced athletes from remote countries with the opportunity to compete internationally. A total of 21 riders from 16 nations flew the flags of Algeria, Bermuda, Chile, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Democratic Republic of Congo, Guatemala, India, Indonesia, Israel, Morocco, Panama, Republic of South Africa, and Zimbabwe in a week of great sport and camaraderie that began with last Wednesday’s Welcome Stakes.

Chile dominated this opening test when Ignacia Munoz galloped into pole position ahead of compatriot Nicolas Fuentes, while Algeria’s Lena Boutekedjiret lined up in third and Costa Rica’s Diego Loria finished fourth. One of the biggest challenges faced by all the competitors is that they must ride borrowed horses, and the Ecuadorian NF secured a choice of 27 mounts, 19 of which were generously provided by the Ecuadorian Police service (Policia Nacional de Ecuador).

Riders were only paired with their horses the previous day when they were allowed a 30-minute warm-up before a 15-minute familiarisation period in the main arena during which they were permitted to jump a few fences. And it seemed that Morocco’s Sami Cherkaoui had found his perfect partner in the eight-year-old Argentinian gelding Quinchan with which he won Thursday’s First Qualifier. It was a convincing victory when they were the only pair to finish the course clear and inside the time, but the 18-year-old rider was eliminated in Saturday’s second qualifier won by Ecuador’s Agustin Baca.

As all the best athletes know, life-lessons are part and parcel of every day in equestrian sport, and Baca also had a major disappointment when his horse had to be withdrawn from Sunday’s medal decider. He was however permitted to compete in the Farewell class in which he finished third with his replacement ride, UIDE Bischochuelo, behind Chile’s Fuentes and Feroz in second, while Morocco’s Cherkaoui and Quinchan put their partnership right back together again to win it with the only clear round.

The top ten went through to the Final proper in which everyone started from scratch and competed in reverse order of merit from their standings after the first two qualifiers. In the first round only Ieromazzo, Morrison, and Lucas Dieudonne from the Democratic Republic of Congo went clear over another testing track set by Ecuadorian course designer Jaime Morillo.

Cornege, Zimbabwe’s Judy Riddle (Tambo Othar), and South Africa’s Victoria Lavelle (Chaman) were close behind with just four apiece. Lavelle added four more second time out but Riddle piled on the pressure when foot-perfect in a time of 82.65. Her advantage was cut short when 36-year-old Cornege and the 10-year-old Palugo were also clear but two seconds quicker, and when Dieudonne was eliminated for taking the wrong course with the lovely skewbald Pontiac, only Morrison and Ieromazzo stood between the Kiwi rider and the coveted gold medal.

It drew ever closer when 17-year-old Morrison and the 10-year-old Waldo left a fence on the floor in 81.94 seconds, but, last into the arena, Ieromazzo had victory in her sights and wasn’t about to let go. Although her horse, Magnus Jarea, was pulling hard and eager to run, she held her nerve to clinch gold with the only double-clear of the competition. With the quickest four faults Cornege slotted into silver while Morrison took the bronze and Riddle just missed out on the podium with her slower time.

The new champion was delighted with the performance of the police horse that carried her to victory, and was full of praise for the event organisers and the venue. Club Rancho San Francisco lies just 15 minutes from the centre of the Ecuadorian capital of Quito and has a majestic view of the active Cotopaxi volcano in the nearby Andes Mountains.

“It’s been amazing – the place, the horses, the organisation, the competitions, the people – we’ve all had a blast and this was a great experience!” Ieromazzo said.

Results here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Roxanne Trunnell Tops USEF Para Dressage National Championship with Dolton

Roxanne Trunnell and Dolton ©Susan J. Stickle Photography.

Mill Spring, NC – September 15, 2019 – Tryon Fall Dressage 2 CDI 3* and CPEDI 3* presented by Adequan® concluded Sunday at Tryon International Equestrian Center, wrapping up three days of international and national Dressage competition at the venue that simultaneously hosted the Adequan®/USEF Para Dressage National Championship. In CDI 3* competition, Karen Lipp (USA) rode to a win in Saturday’s FEI Grand Prix Freestyle CDI 3* with Whitney, while Katherine Bateson Chandler (USA) and Alcazar claimed their second FEI CDI 3* win Sunday with a 70.341% in the FEI Grand Prix Special CDI 3*. Roxanne Trunnell and Dolton secured the Adequan®/USEF Para Dressage National Championship title with a final cumulative score of 75.247%, and David Botana was named National Reserve Champion following his efforts riding Lord Locksley to a cumulative score of 74.318%.

“It feels really good [to win a National Championship], Trunnell shared. “I haven’t been with Dolton for very long. [Our] partnership is really forming.” Trunnell also relayed that one of the highlights of her tests with Dolton was “just how consistent he was. Always marching!”

Trunnell scored a 79.333% in the FEI CPEDI 3* Freestyle Grade I, earning the highest score of the weekend with the 2012 Hanoverian gelding (Danone I x Unknown) owned by Flintwood Farm LLC. “Our Freestyle music is from ‘Forrest Gump’ – it’s adorable!”

While Trunnell is hoping to be named to Team USA for the Tokyo Paralympics, she reflected that accuracy is a big focus, and that gaining experience at TIEC is a great environment to prepare for atmosphere and stiff competition going forward. “[Going forward we’ll do] just a lot of training, and working on accuracy with geometry. I think the bigger venue and more competition is more realistic of what we’ll get [in Tokyo], so it helps us mentally.”

Botana shared that his weekend with the 2001 Trakehner stallion (Unkenruf x Lida x Enrico Caruso) owned by Margaret L. Stevens, Lord Locksley, had been an “amazing” culmination of hard work over the summer: “We’ve worked all summer and learned a lot. We practiced the halt, bending, and improving precision, plus overall harmony. I think it all really came together this weekend. I think we were able to pull off some really improved balance in our turns, and stayed constant throughout the weekend with high scores. It’s been amazing; everything kind of came together, from working with my trainer and meeting to go over our test before each ride, and taking the judges’ comments and what I felt during each ride to transition on to the next test. [That 75] was amazing. We had a perfect ride, and it all came together.”

Botana and the big grey stallion have made strides towards harmony and Lord Locksley knows his job well despite a serious career change, Botana explained. “It’s a big transition from being a Grand Prix International stallion to being in Para Dressage Grade I, and he’s taken beautifully to it. It took us a while to get into a groove,” Botana recalled, “but now we’re in a perfect balance. He knows that as soon as I put my foot in the stirrup, we’re going to walk, and that’s it. There can be a million things going on, and he won’t bat an eye. But the second I get off and step a foot away, he’ll be back to his regular big stallion self!”

Katherine Bateson Chandler Wins FEI Grand Prix Special CDI 3*

Bateson Chandler and the 2005 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Cantango x Polina x Ferro) owned by Jane Forbes Clark repeated their Friday win in the FEI Grand Prix CDI 3* with the top score in Sunday’s FEI Grand Prix Special CDI 3*, but Alcazar was “a bit more with me today,” she explained. “I’m a little happier with this ride, because he’s another two days down the road of being in the heat, and sort of it’s been a little tough for him. He came off a lot of atmosphere in Europe, so now he’s a little like, ‘what happened to everybody?’ This has been an amazing show and he felt a bit more with me today.”

The pair has had a busy summer and Alcazar is ready for a break, Bateson Chandler relayed, but spent their last competition before a holiday making the most of their stay. “It’s an amazing venue. This is truly a world-class venue with beautiful stabling, which always really matters to us. We’ve got fans in the stalls, which really helps with the heat.”

Karen Lipp and Whitney Win the Grand Prix Freestyle CDI 3*

Karen Lipp and Whitney travelled down centerline to win the blue rosette in Saturday’s Grand Prix Freestyle CDI 3* with a score of 61.185%. Lipp shared that she has been working with Whitney, a 2005 Hanoverian mare (White Star x Hauptstutbuch Grace) owned by Kathleen Oldford, since she was four years old and has brought her through all of the young horse programs: “We did the four, five, and six-year-old programs. Her owner rode her a little bit and then decided to sell her, and then she didn’t like that idea, so she said, ‘You keep her and ride her.’ I’ve been showing her in the Grand Prix now for about two and a half years.

“I didn’t really have a quality horse to show in CDI for a year, so it’s been nice to have Whitney go the CDI ring because it was a long break for me out of the ring, and it’s a lot different than riding in normal shows.”

To learn more, visit www.Tryon.com.

Madden Is Magnificent with Another Longines Victory in New York

Beezie Madden and Garant. (FEI/Barre Dukes)

Twice a Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ Final Champion, Elizabeth “Beezie” Madden (USA) has ridden some exceptional horses, but even she admitted that her expectations were exceeded when 8-year-old Garant jumped her to another Longines victory in New York (USA).

Madden and the chestnut gelding topped a jump-off field of six to win the $210,000 Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ New York CSI4*-W, the first east coast qualifier of the 2019/2020 North American League season. Using her mount’s footspeed and athleticism to her advantage, Madden crossed the timers of Alan Wade’s (IRL) shortened track in 40.89 seconds. Last to jump, Karl Cook (USA) and Caillou finished second on a time of 41.25 seconds, while Katie Dinan (USA) completed an American sweep of the podium with Brego R’n B. The only other double-clear performance, they finished in 41.94 seconds.

“He’s a young horse. The plan was to step him up this fall. He jumped on Friday, and he went so well, we decided to go [today]. I wasn’t even sure I was doing this class this week when we came here. For him to come through like that today is amazing.” — Beezie Madden (USA)

Seven combinations produced a clear first round, but Nicole Shahinian-Simpson (USA) elected not to return for the jump-off with Akuna Mattata, leaving a field of six. Dinan was the first to add a second clear to her scorecard, before Madden shaved more than a second off her time. The two-time Olympic gold medalist simply could not be caught.

“He has tremendous jumping talent, which as we all know is not everything,” Madden said. “I also think he’s incredibly smart. He knows he’s not supposed to hit the fences! He then proceeds to know how to run fast and jump high, and I have no idea why!”

Madden has now skyrocketed to the top of the North American League’s east coast sub league standings. She boasts 35 points, having also finished fourth in Vancouver. Vancouver’s winner, Daniel Coyle (IRL), sits second with 20 points, while Dinan moved into third with 15 points.

By Catie Staszak

FEI Media Contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager Press Relations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Jessica Springsteen Wins the LGCT Grand Prix of Ramatuelle – Saint Tropez

Jessica Springsteen ©Filippo Gabutti.

An exceptional end to this sixth edition of the Longines Athina Onassis Horse Show, the 17th leg of the prestigious Longines Global Champions Tour and the Global Champions League. A stone’s throw from the mythical Pampelonne Beach, in front of a thrilled crowd, America’s Jessica Springsteen won her first LGCT 5* Grand Prix in an exceptional jump-off. Earlier in the day, the provisional ranking of the Global Champions League, the team circuit, underwent some major changes.

You will find all the results here: https://www.longinestiming.com/equestrian/2019/longines-global-champions-tour-of-st-tropez-st-tropez.

JULIETTE FEYTOUT PEREZ
Relations médias & influenceurs
juliette@blizko-communication.com

USEF Para Dressage National Championship Results in Win for Team USA

Rebecca Hart and El Corona Texel ©Susan J. Stickle Photography.

Mill Spring, NC – September 14, 2019 – Day Two of the Adequan®/USEF Para Dressage National Championship saw a win for Team USA at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC) at Tryon Resort, consisting of Roxanne Trunnell, Kate Shoemaker, Rebecca Hart, and Sydney Collier combining efforts for a total score of 439.585. In second, Team Canada, including Lauren Barwick, Lee Garrod, Jody Schloss, and Winona Hartvikson, finished on a score of 416.079. David Botana and Lord Locksley currently lead in the Individual competition, with Trunnell just behind heading into the final day of competition.

Hart and “Tex” claimed a win in the CPEDI 3* Individual Grade III on a score of 73.775%, but Hart revealed that the weekend was about much more than the current competition for her just a year following her double-medal achievements at the World Equestrian Games (WEG) hosted at the venue last September.

“This arena has so many emotions for me. I’ve had some monumental moments – the epitome of my riding career here. I rolled in to the venue on Monday and all the emotions came back,” she recalled. “And I was having the memory of meeting up with my parents – because my parents don’t get to come to shows that often, and my dad was here – and I was telling myself, ‘don’t get weepy, you just got in the driveway!’

“But revisiting the place where I saw my dad, and where I was waiting in the chute for the final rides when we realized I had gotten the bronze and the first medal ever for US Para Equestrian in a WEG, was just fantastic,” Hart continued. “To have Tex here again with me, and to have him perform so well for me again in this arena… Tryon has such a special place in my heart.”

Hart is now focused on 2020, and admitted, “We’re Dressage riders – we always want more and want to get that extra little tenth of a point that we can get anywhere! Heading into next year we’ve got a lot of little things to work on.”

But it was a significant change in routine that has helped deepen Hart and her mount’s connection, she detailed: “We had actually changed up our routine coming into this event, which was a little intimidating, because changing anything before a big championship can go one of two ways, but it has really worked for us. I now do all the warm-up myself with Tex, which has made for a much more symbiotic relationship with my horse.”

Hart elaborated, “Before, I had my trainer doing the warm-up, because I don’t post, so I liked to give him a bit of a warm-up with an able-bodied rider to get his back moving, but I always felt like there was a bit of translation period from the two rides, and I would basically have to re-warm him up all over again. And then, any issue they had would translate into my ride as well, so me handling him from the start myself makes it my own ride, and it gives us a lot more confidence in the ring.”

Trunnell and Dolton, the 2012 Hanoverian gelding (Danone I x Unknown) owned by Flintwood Farm LLC, claimed second behind Botana in the CPEDI 3* Individual Grade I test Saturday, scoring a 73.571%. “It was a wonderful weekend,” Trunnell said after the Team USA win. “We really have been working on solidifying them [our tests]. It feels like they’re really coming together. I love how he just kept marching.  We’re hoping to make it to Tokyo, so that’s what we’ll be working on.”

Collier and All In One grabbed third place in the CPEDI 3* Individual Grade I Competition to help earn the win for Team USA, and shared that she was impressed with her mount’s reliability in their first CPEDI competition together: “For this weekend, we wanted to come out, be consistent, and I personally wanted to work on my geometry. With him being as great of a horse as he is, I have to step up to his amount of talent! Being a visually-impaired rider, geometry can be one of the most difficult things to nail, so I’ve really been working at home on perfecting my step counts, because that’s how I do my geometry.”

Collier continued of the 2009 Hanoverian gelding (Abanos x Dauphin) owned by Going For Gold LLC, “Being here in the big ring with different lighting and situations, I was very impressed with how ‘Alle’ stepped up his game. He was like, I’ve got your back! Really, we had no idea what to anticipate going into our first CPEDI.”

Working towards Tokyo 2020 and hoping to be named to next year’s team, Collier emphasized that competing at TIEC has been a valuable learning experience for such a new combination. “[Going forward] I just want to work on fine-tuning the little things we’ve observed here. It’s been an amazing learning experience for us, and for only having him since mid-June, I think there is so much room to improve on so many things, which is just – I keep using the word exciting, but I don’t think it really sums up the feeling that I feel about our partnership. We connected so quickly, and I can’t wait for the future with him,” Collier concluded.

Shoemaker and Solitaer 40 presented solo once again in the CPEDI 3* Grade IV Individual competition, scoring a 73.049% and putting in what she felt were “personal bests” for her team this weekend regardless of scores: “I think this was really the best work we’ve gotten in the arena – we’ve been together for five years now, and every show has been a step in the right direction: we get it at home, then we get it in the warm-up, then we get it around the arena, and then we get it in [the arena], so I felt like we had some really amazing moments in the arena this week. So, that’s what I’m really excited about, and regardless of the scores, they were personal bests.”

“I just want to keep adding more cadence, self-carriage and balance into the work, so we can show the expressiveness that he has,” Shoemaker said of the 2007 Hanoverian gelding (Sandro hit x Dynastie x De niro). “There’s so much in there, and he’s just waiting for me to tap into it.”

The Adequan®/USEF Para Dressage National Championship will be streamed live on USEF Network throughout the weekend. Click here to watch.

To learn more, visit www.Tryon.com.

Katherine Bateson and Alcazar Kick Off Tryon Fall Dressage 2 CDI 3* with a Win

Katherine Bateson Chandler and Alcazar ©Susan J. Stickle Photography.

Mill Spring, NC – September 14, 2019 – Tryon Fall Dressage 2 CDI 3*/CPEDI 3* presented by Adequan® and the Adequan®/USEF Para Dressage National Championship at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC) kicked off Friday when Katherine Bateson Chandler (USA) piloted Alcazar down centerline to win the FEI Grand Prix CDI 3* after capturing a total score of 69.196%. Michael Pineo (USA) and his own 2010 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Jazz x Belalussi x Samba Hit), Farrington, were awarded second place in the class with a score of 63.63%. Third-place honors were then awarded to Julio Cesar Mendoza Loor (ECU) and Aileen Daly’s Rosali, a 2005 Danish Warmblood mare (Blue Horse Romanov x Mosegardens Ratina x Ragazzo), with a score of 63.587%.

Chandler explained that she and the 2005 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Cantango x Polina x Ferro) owned by Jane Forbes Clark have been working together for seven and a half years now, during which they have had to face many challenges: “It’s been a long journey with a lot of ups and downs, but he’s a horse that we’ve always believed in and I’m excited for him to start to come into his own.

“We’ve just come off a European tour with a lot of atmosphere, and a lot of big shows. We were on the Aachen Nations Cup Team and he was really super there. He actually is one of those horses that the bigger the environment and the bigger the show the better he gets and sort of rises to the occasion,” Chandler continued, “I’m super happy with him [today]. He was so honest and made no mistakes — I couldn’t be happier with him!”

Chandler, who competed in the 2010 World Equestrian Games (WEG), but missed coming to Tryon in 2018, is aiming at Tokyo in 2020 and enjoyed a Grand Prix win on her first-ever trip to the venue, she detailed: “Our next goal is Tokyo, so that’s why we’re here. To qualify we have to do four Grands Prix, and I wanted to get one in, so I didn’t have all the pressure of getting them all during Florida, and to get one score under my belt. My goals [for this weekend] are to get in the ring and get experience, and to get my scores as high as I can before going into the Florida season. I’ve never actually been here before; I’m so impressed, and it’s a beautiful facility.” Chandler concluded, “After this show, I’ll go back to Wellington where we’re based, and then in January, the circuit starts!”

USEF Para Dressage National Championship Team Competition Sees Tight Competition between the USA and Canada

After the first half of Adequan®/USEF Para Dressage National Championship Team competition, the Adequan® U.S. Para Dressage Team, consisting of Roxanne Trunnell, who currently leads Individual competition, Kate Shoemaker, Rebecca Hart, and Sydney Collier headed into Individual Tests on Saturday in Tryon Stadium. Team Canada, consisting of Lauren Barwick, Lee Garrod, Jody Schloss, and Winona Hartvikson, are close behind with a chance to make up the difference in day two of competition.

Rebecca Hart (USA) and El Corona Texel topped Grade III Team Test competition on a score of 71.226%, while Canada claimed second via Lauren Barwick and Engelbrecht, her own 2009 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Vivaldi x Regina x Rimini), scoring 70.098%. USA also claimed third, with Meghan Benge and Worth the Trip, the 1998 Welsh Cross gelding by Anjershaf rocky, bringing home a score of 68.137%.

“This is kind of our first technical qualifying event for Tokyo. He felt amazing today,” Hart said of the 2009 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Wynton x Urieta Texel x Goodtimes) owned by Rowan O’Riley. “We had created a plan leading up to this event on how we wanted everything to go, and so far the plan has worked accordingly and we’ve been able to do everything that we wanted to.”

While she’s “actively campaigning for Tokyo,” Hart explained, for now the plan is to continue their progress this weekend: “I just want to continue with the progress we have made. I hope he has very confident and encouraging rides moving forward so that we can build and bring in the dynamic and expressiveness that I know we can. We’ve got two more events in January in Wellington, and then a final observation event after that.”

Hart is no stranger to the venue, as just a year ago she made history as the first U.S. Para Dressage athlete to claim a medal at WEG, later securing a second medal in the team competition. “I love showing at Tryon,” Hart emphasized. “The arena we are competing in this weekend has special memories for me, as it’s where we received our medals from the Tryon 2018 World Equestrian Games last year, so it’s always nice to come here. It’s a great feeling and it has a nice vibe to it.”

CPEDI 3* Grade I Team competition saw the day’s high score as Roxanne Trunnell (USA) and Dolton, received a 74.881% to dominate the field. David Botana (USA) and Lord Locksley, the 2001 Trakehner stallion (Unkenruf x Lida x Enrico Caruso) owned by Margaret Stevens, scored a 73.274% to claim second, while Sydney Collier (USA) and All In One, the 2009 Hanoverian gelding (Abanos x Dauphin) owned by Going For Gold LLC, scored an even 71.000% to achieve third.

“Dolton is a seven-year-old; he’s just a little baby,” said Trunnell. “He felt really good today! I love showing here at Tryon! It is so pretty and I love the mountains. We hope to continue to have great rides and help build his confidence even more this weekend. We’re hoping to qualify for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.”

CPEDI 3* Para Dressage Team Grade V results saw Canada top the podium, with Lee Garrod (CAN) taking top honors on a score of 69.225% with Question, the 2008 Oldenburg gelding (Quaterback x Evita) owned by Lee Garrod. Cayla van der Walt (RSA) and Daturo II, her own 2006 Andalusian gelding (Merlito XI x Daturna x Pestillo), scored a 68.217% for second, while Cynthia Screnci (USA) and her own Eragon VF, the 2009 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Don romantic x Ujinja), landed in third with a 63.101% score.

In CPEDI 3* Para Dressage Team Grade II competition, Beatrice De Lavalette (USA) claimed first on a score of 69.495% with Duna, the 2008 Dutch Warmblood mare (Vivaldi x Nicola x Amethist) owned by Nicolas De Lavalette, while Jason Surnoski (CAN) rode Phoenix, a 1999 Westphalian gelding owned by Cynthia Nugent, to a score of 69.192% and second place. Alanna Flax-Clark (USA) and El Paso, her own 2004 Dutch Riding Pony gelding (Elegant x Karin x Carl), earned third with a total score of 67.778%.

CPEDI 3* Para Dressage Team Grade IV competition saw Kate Shoemaker (USA) present solo for a score of 73.083%, riding her own Solitaer 40, a 2007 Hanoverian stallion (Sandro hit x Dynastie x De niro).

CPEDI 1* Para Novice Test A Grade IV saw Emma Jameson (USA) make her FEI debut aboard Cortesana La, a 2007 PRE mare owned by Misha Marshall, to score a 50.052%.

The Adequan®/USEF Para Dressage National Championship will be streamed live on USEF Network throughout the weekend. Click here to watch.

To learn more, visit www.Tryon.com.

Pieter Devos Wins First Jump-Off of the Week at Longines Athina Onassis Horse Show CSI 5*

Pieter Devos and Espoir ©Filippo Gabutti.

First jump-off class of the CSI 5* Longines Athina Onassis Horse Show, the Prix Premiumares, goes to Belgium’s Pieter Devos and his gelding Espoir. On the technical course designed by the Italian Uliano Vezzani, nine pairs out of forty-six starters signed a perfect first round. First clear round, first double clear round of the class, the British Alexandra Thornton on Charielle will quickly be caught up by Devos; neither Eric van der Vleuten (Djoost Again), nor the American Kent Farrington (Austria 2), nor the French Kevin Staut (Viking d’la Rousserie) will manage to dethrone Devos, despite their double clear-rounds.

“I am very happy. My horse jumped perfectly today. I had a very good feeling and a victory is always good! Espoir is naturally very fast and I think I gained almost three seconds over Alexandra Thornton’s time at the end of the course. At first, and as I could see that there were faults on this jump-off, I decided to secure the score, and then I gradually accelerated. I was afraid of Kent, who really finished a few hundredths behind me, but in the end, he keeps behind (laughs). Obviously, this victory gives confidence for tomorrow’s Grand Prix, even if I will ride another horse and it will be even bigger in terms of sport,” explained the winner, while the Brabançonne had just resounded.

Results here: https://www.longinestiming.com/equestrian/2019/longines-global-champions-tour-of-st-tropez-st-tropez.

JULIETTE FEYTOUT PEREZ
Relations médias & influenceurs
juliette@blizko-communication.com

Callan Solem Continues Streak to Win $5,000 Speed Stake with VDL Wizard

Callan Solem and VDL Wizard.

Devon, Pa. – Sept. 13, 2019 – Highlighting the day at the 2019 Devon Fall Classic was the $5,000 Speed Stake, with 27 competitors vying for the lion’s share of prize money. Hosted at the iconic Dixon Oval, horse-and-rider combinations were pressured to produce a clear round with the fastest time. Ultimately, Callan Solem and VDL Wizard emerged victorious to take home the coveted Devon Blue at the end of the competitive speed class.

Amanda Dobbs and MJ Claim Championship Title in Thoroughbred Jumper Division

A fall feel in the air, cool temperatures, and a light breeze set the stage for jumper competition Friday morning at the Devon Fall Classic. Midway through the day, Thoroughbred Jumpers took to the Dixon Oval, which was lined with festive pumpkins and cornstalks. Several entries made an appearance over the two days of Thoroughbred competition but ultimately, it was Amanda Dobbs and MJ who took the overall championship title.

For more information, visit www.devonhorseshow.net/fall-classic/.

Media Contact: Rebecca Walton
Phelps Media Group, Inc. International
phone 561.753.3389 fax 561.753.3386
info@phelpsmediagroup.com

Horse & Country TV to Air Thrilling Highlights from Land Rover Burghley Horse Trials

Pippa Funnell (GBR) and MGH Grafton Street.

Lincolnshire, UK – Sept. 13, 2019 – As one of the world’s greatest 5* equestrian events, the Land Rover Burghley Horse Trials draws the world’s leading event riders and enormous crowds of spectators to Burghley House in Stamford, Lincolnshire for the annual four-day event. Claiming the coveted trophy for the second time in history was Britain’s Pippa Funnell and MGH Grafton Street, emerging victorious by a mere 0.1 of a penalty. While the live action took place from Sept. 5 to 8, Horse & Country TV (H&C TV)’s highlight show featuring Funnell’s winning ride as well as the other top performances, including exciting finishes from the American contingency, will air on Sunday, Sept. 15, at 8 p.m. EST.

Join H&C TV and watch the thrilling events transpire as British riders swept the competition in front of their home crowd. Never lacking excitement, the 2019 Land Rover Burghley Horse Trials feature a down-to-the-wire final show jumping phase with a field of talented athletes and horses in hot pursuit of the winning title.

Sixteen years after her first win in the 2003 Burghley Horse Trials abroad Primmore’s Pride, Funnell made her return to the top, this time aboard Jonathan and Jane Clark’s MGH Grafton Street. Funnell and the 11-year-old gelding received an impressive dressage score of 22.8 to lead the standings going into the final show jumping phase. Although the pair lowered a rail at fence eight, their determination to remain in the lead was rewarded when they clinched the overall win with an impressive score of 30.8.

“It’s been such an amazing journey and hopefully it will continue, but it’s the horses that have kept me going,” said Funnell. “He’s not the best show jumper but I’ve always been convinced he had a big win in him – what an incredible two weeks with this and the Europeans.”

Hot on the heels of Funnell was Piggy French and Vanir Kamira, who won the 2019 Badminton Horse Trials in May, and Oliver Townend on Ballaghmor Class, who won the 2017 Burghley Horse Trials.

Eleven horse-and-athlete combinations represented the United States throughout the competition with Lauren Kieffer and Ariel Grald earning top 10 finishes. Don’t miss out on the exhilarating highlights of this premier equestrian event, airing on Horse & Country TV on Sunday, Sept. 15, at 8 p.m. EST.

H&C TV broadcasts in Europe, Australia, and in the United States on cable, satellite, and broadband television, including Roku, and online at www.horseandcountrytv.us.