Tag Archives: FEI

FEI’s Adoption of Global Reporting Initiative Pushes Sustainability to the Fore

Proud to Jump Green at the Helsinki International Horse Show where Gudrun Patteet (BEL) and Sea Coast Pebbles Z won their first ever Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ 2018/2019 Western European League qualifier in October. (FEI/Satu Pirinen)

Lausanne (SUI), 7 November 2018 – From supporting the use of horse manure to generate electricity to implementing equestrian-specific reporting indexes and creating a comprehensive guide book for event organisers across the world, the FEI is leading the way in ensuring sustainability is at the heart of its sport.

On the day the International Federation (IF) Sustainability Forum was held in Lausanne (SUI), the FEI was already working behind the scenes on sustainability initiatives, including its adoption earlier this year of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), and is now well on the way to adapting each of the GRI indicators to fit the unique world of equestrian sport.

Crucially, this will allow equestrian event organisers across the globe to effectively implement and measure the impact of their sustainability initiatives. And sustainability has been a part of the equestrian sport’s landscape for some time.

The organising committee for last month’s Helsinki International Horse Show (HIHS) has already put in place a wide range of sustainability initiatives. Feedback from the show is currently being incorporated into an updated version of the FEI’s flagship Sustainability Handbook.

This 36-page guide, originally published in 2014 and now being updated in line with the GRI, serves to aid and encourage event organisers to implement sustainability initiatives that will create positive social and economic legacies while reducing negative environmental impacts.

The HIHS itself is a great example of the innovation and application being displayed by organisers of equestrian events across the world.

The 2018 edition of the show didn’t just generate enough sustainable energy to power its own event, it managed to produce a surplus of 36 MWh – enough energy to propel an electric car 288,000km or heat 36 Finnish apartments for a month.

And it all came from horse manure!

Finnish company Fortum HorsePower – partner of the HIHS since 2015 – provided almost 600 bales of shavings to ensure comfy bedding for all 235 horses competing at this year’s show. In return, the animals produced 112 tons of manure, which was gleefully transformed into 168MWh of energy at local plant, Fortum Jarvenpaa.

While it’s a clear win-win for all concerned, energy production was far from the whole story at the HIHS in 2018. In fact, everywhere you looked, green initiatives were taking hold.

As part of the event-wide ‘HIHS Jumps Green’ project, the organising committee reduced overall paper usage by an impressive 64%, employed electric and bicycle-powered transport wherever possible, significantly increased recycling and reuse efforts across the venue and massively reduced food waste and single-use plastics.

Equestrian sport fans – and there were more than 50,000 of them across the five-day event – got involved too, posting their best environmentally-friendly initiatives on the event’s social media platforms. One lucky participant even received free tickets for the 2019 show in return.

And visitors to the show in 2019 will be greeted by even more green initiatives, with the organising committee having already revealed its intention to introduce a Green Partner project with Fortum.

These are just the kind of efforts the FEI happily promotes but, like all good leaders, the governing body knows the hard work must start at home. So the FEI’s headquarters in the Olympic Capital of Lausanne (SUI) have become the centre of a Green Office project.

Although the HQ of horse sport is already a Minergie certified building – a Swiss standard indicating low energy use – the FEI is asking more of itself. Following an external audit, employees from top to bottom are reducing the organisation and building’s environmental impact still further by such actions as eliminating disposable cutlery and cups, improving recycling efforts through increased segregation and avoiding waste types by eliminating their sources.

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Fuchs Flies to Victory at Longines Leg in Lyon

Martin Fuchs and Clooney. (FEI/Christophe Tanière)

Switzerland’s Martin Fuchs (26) and Clooney produced a spectacular victory as the fourth leg of the Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ 2018/2019 Western European League more than lived up to expectations at Equita Longines in Lyon, France. In an edge-of-the-seat 10-horse jump-off that included four riders flying the host-country flag, it came down to a race to catch the target-time set by Italy’s Lorenzo de Luca and Ensor de Litrange, who were fifth to go.

And the last three chasing down that time were Rio 2016 Olympic team gold medallist Kevin Staut from France and the silver and bronze medallists from this year’s FEI World Equestrian Games™, Fuchs and fellow-countryman Steve Guerdat.

“I was always going for the win, but I wasn’t sure I could beat Lorenzo – I’m not always super-fast with Clooney and Lorenzo looked really fast on the screen. I didn’t know what time I had going through the finish, but when I looked up, I saw first place and I was very, very happy!” — Martin Fuchs (SUI)

With a third-place finish last weekend in Verona, Italy, the Swiss rider now heads the Western European League table carrying a handsome 35 points, so only needs a few more to book his ticket to the Longines Final in Gothenburg, Sweden next April.

French course designer, Gregory Bodo, gave them plenty to think about in the first round in which the 75 seconds time-allowed proved highly influential. “With the top riders and horses present, it’s not easy to find the right balance, but the time was perfect and riders had to keep the right tempo from the start to the end to be in time,” he explained.

Italy’s de Luca really put it up to the rest of them in the jump-off when stopping the timers in 37.78 seconds with a great run from his powerful 14-year-old gelding and, with just three left to go, Dutchman Maikel van der Vleuten was his nearest rival after posting 38.00 with Dana Blue. The 7,000-seat stadium was packed with French fans who held their collective breath as Staut set off with For Joy van’t Zorgvliet, but despite their best effort the pair didn’t threaten the lead when breaking the beam in 38.32 seconds.

Second-last into the ring, however, Fuchs had his foot to the floor all the way, and with a brilliant turn to the vertical three from home and a breathtaking gallop to the last, he stormed through the timers in 37.25 seconds and not even Guerdat and his brilliant mare Bianca could match that. De Luca held on for runner-up spot, while 2012 Olympic champion Guerdat, twice-winner of the Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ title, had to settle for third when stopping the clock on 37.89.

“Clooney had a one-month break after Tryon (FEI World Equestrian Games) and then we came to Verona and Lyon because I really want to qualify for the Final. I’m going to Wellington (USA) in January, so I wanted to focus on the World Cup qualifiers now,” Fuchs explained. He’s had an extraordinary year with the horse he competed at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games and with which he claimed two European team bronze medals, in 2015 and again in 2017.

They kicked off 2018 with 5-Star Grand Prix wins at Basel and Zurich (SUI), but Clooney then had to undergo colic surgery in April and that was a worrying time. He bounced back, however, and just a few weeks after claiming World Championship individual silver, the grey horse is continuing to show incredible form.

“He’s such a tough horse; he always fights. When I got him in the beginning, I was struggling a lot because he has his own mind and he’s so strong. But over time we have come to work really well together, and now we can do anything!” — Martin Fuchs (SUI)

The Swiss rider now plans to compete in the next leg of the series at Stuttgart in Germany in two weeks’ time and at Olympia in London (GBR) in December.

Watch highlights here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Werth Gives a Masterclass with Emilio at Lyon

Isabell Werth with Emilio. (FEI/Christophe Tanière)

Defending series champion and equestrian sports legend, Germany’s Isabell Werth (49), kicked off her FEI Dressage World Cup™ 2018/2019 campaign with a convincing win with Emilio at the second leg of the Western European League series at Equita Longines in Lyon, France.

With two Technical scores over 80 percent and one Artistic mark of 93 percent, the six-time Olympic gold medallist racked up a total of 84.410 that left her well clear of Sweden’s Patrik Kittel (42) in second and Antonia Ramel (33) in third.

Werth, who took triple-gold at the 2017 FEI European Championships and double-gold at the FEI World Equestrian Games (WEG) just seven weeks ago, is already aiming for a fifth FEI Dressage World Cup™ title, and her third in a row, when the series finale returns to Gothenburg, Sweden next April. However, she only just managed to keep Kittel at bay in the Grand Prix and was deeply disappointed with that performance. But with typical skill and determination, the lady who has three horses in the top four in the current World Rankings just turned it all around again with a sparkling ride that left the result beyond doubt.

“I’m very happy – yesterday Emilio was full of tension, but today he was much better from the beginning, and he got back his confidence step by step during the competition.” — Isabell Werth (GER)

Great Britain’s Hayley Watson-Greaves (35) and Rubin’s Night raised the bar to 77.355 percent in the closing stages and young Spaniard, Juan Matute Guimon (21), slotted in behind her when posting 77.070 for an eye-catching test with Quantico that included a one-handed pirouette. But Werth blew that all into infinity with her massive score, and it was the two Swedes who proved her closest rivals at the end of the day.

Ramel’s 80.060 with Brother de Jeu was hugely impressive and took even her by surprise. But the talented rider who has been on two winning Nations Cup teams for her country this year has been training diligently with three-time Olympian Kittel for the last two years, and he was very proud of her.

He is often coached by Werth, and earlier this week he visited her to ask her advice about his stallion, Delatio. “I was at Isabell’s on Monday because I wasn’t sure if I should take him to Lyon – but she said yes!” said the Swedish star who scored a handsome 80.980 for second place.

Talking about Emilio, Werth said, “It’s his first competition since Aachen (where he won the Freestyle and Special and was on the winning team in July), it’s his first indoor of the season, and it’s a new Freestyle for him, so there were a lot of new things for him to handle and I’m very happy how it went, even though there are still some details to be worked out.” She has exchanged her Freestyle programmes, with Bella Rose now doing Emilio’s floorplan while Emilio does the one designed for her WEG-winning mare. Emilio is looking slimmer and fitter than ever.

“Yes, he has more muscle and less fat! So the canter-work is much better, and I was sad that yesterday I couldn’t show that, but today it came back!” — Isabell Werth (GER)

Werth plans to compete all three of her top horses during the 10-leg Western European League, and Emilio will be back in action for the next leg in Stuttgart (GER) in two weeks’ time where Bella Rose will also line out.

Watch highlights here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Deusser Pips Bruynseels in Electrifying Verona Jump-Off

Daniel Deusser and Calisto Blue. (FEI/Massimo Argenziano)

Daniel Deusser (37), winner of the third leg of the Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ 2018/2019 Western European League, admitted that it was a last-minute change of plan that gave him victory.

“The first question we all had when we saw the jump-off course was: is it possible to do six strides from fence one to fence two? I was thinking for me it was definitely seven because my horse would be hard to turn… and actually I only did the six because I saw Niels going in six, and I know that he has not the biggest horse and he was in the lead so I had to do the same!” the German rider said after bringing the crowd to their feet with a breathtaking last-to-go run with Calisto Blue.

There’s something about Jumping Verona that always guarantees a thriller, and this was vintage stuff.

“I’ve been here a couple of times with my best horses in good shape, and every year we have big sport with close results and a lot of people in a very exciting jump-off. So to be one time the winner here makes me very proud!” — Daniel Deusser (GER)

The Italian fixture attracted a spectacular line-up including all three medallists from the individual podium at last month’s FEI World Equestrian Games™ in Tryon, USA and their horses too. However, new world champion, Germany’s Simone Blum, had a tumble with DSP Alice on Friday and although both are fine, she decided to ride her young horse Cool Hill who had eight first-round faults. So when bronze medallists Steve Guerdat and Bianca also faulted in the opening round, silver medallist Martin Fuchs and his brilliant gelding Clooney were the only ones to make it through to the 14-horse jump-off.

Fifth to go against the clock, Italy’s Luca Marziani set the crowd alight when storming home with Tokyo du Soleil in 39.69 seconds, but then Bertram Allen (23) raised the bar with a brilliant round from his 2014 Verona winner Molly Malone in 38.60 seconds to take the lead. However, the young Irishman was immediately demoted by his Swiss friend Martin Fuchs who shaved 0.2 off that, and then Niels Bruynseels and his incredibly quick mare Gancia de Muze re-set the target once more when blazing through the timers in 37.03 seconds.

With just three to go, it seemed that just couldn’t be bettered and that the Belgian had it in the bag. Even Deusser doubted he could do it, “but I was last to go, and with the public and the atmosphere like that, I just stopped thinking about it and went in and I really wanted to try!”

The roar of the crowd was enough to tell him he had succeeded, by an incredibly narrow margin of just 0.2 seconds. His expression of sheer delight said it all.

He has only been riding the 11-year-old gelding Calisto Blue since July and it hasn’t all been plain sailing. “In the beginning it was very difficult; he’s scopey, very careful and fast but he’s very nervous. Especially with me with my long body – it was difficult to find the co-ordination because he was very sensitive. I’ve had good results in Grand Prix at Berlin and Brussels, but I was always fourth or fifth and he was never really able to win a class for me,” explained the tall German.

Fuchs was very happy with his third-place finish and some valuable early points in the battle for one of the top 18 places in the Western European League that will take riders to the Longines Final in Gothenburg (SWE) next April.

“This is my first big show since Tryon, so many riders I haven’t seen since my (silver) medal have been coming to me to say congratulations, and so it has been a very nice show!” — Martin Fuchs (SUI)

Deusser was reminded that he has finished first, second, and third on the World Cup podium. “Yes, my history in the World Cup sounds quite good if you look at it like that, but every year we start on zero again! It’s nice to start the season with 20 points, but it’s still a long way to the Final and I’m definitely hoping to qualify,” said the man who will line out again in Lyon (FRA), the place where he posted his memorable series victory in 2014.

Watch highlights of Daniel Deusser’s win here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

FEI Bureau Sets Up Temporary Committee to Create Roadmap for Future of Endurance

Lausanne (SUI), 22 October 2018 — The FEI Bureau has set up a Temporary Committee with a remit to urgently assess the issues currently affecting the sport of Endurance and carry out an in-depth review of the rules in order to identify the most effective way of bringing the discipline back to its original roots of Endurance riding as opposed to Endurance racing, with horse welfare and horsemanship at its core, while still maintaining the competitive aspect of the sport.

The Temporary Committee, which has been established under Article 36.1 of the FEI Statutes*, will be chaired by Dr Sarah Coombs (GBR), a top FEI Endurance veterinarian who has many years’ experience of officiating at FEI Endurance events. Dr Coombs was formerly the British Endurance team vet, is a Trustee of the global equine charity World Horse Welfare and is also chair of its Veterinary Advisory Committee.

The members are Tarek Taher (KSA), an international Endurance athlete and recently-elected by his peers as a member of the FEI Athletes’ Committee; Pieter Wiersinga (NED), Chef d’Equipe of the Dutch Endurance team, a Police Commissioner and former Head of the Mounted Police in the Netherlands; Dr Margaret (Meg) Sleeper (USA), who has competed in FEI Endurance since 2005 and is also a trainer, official veterinarian and veterinary cardiologist; and Dr Tim Parkin (GBR), who heads up the scientific research conducted at the University of Glasgow as part of the FEI’s Global Endurance injuries Study (GEIS) and is a candidate for election as a member of the FEI Veterinary Committee.

In order to underline the importance of this discipline review and to facilitate communication between the Temporary Committee and the FEI Bureau, FEI 2nd Vice President Mark Samuel (CAN) will also be involved in the work of the Temporary Committee.

“We need to bring the discipline back to the principles of the FEI where welfare of the horse and horsemanship prevail,” FEI President Ingmar De Vos said. “The Temporary Committee will conduct a thorough review of the discipline with the aim of getting back to real Endurance riding with the focus on horsemanship and the partnership between horse and human.

“The sport has evolved and there needs to be a recognition of that, but the essence of the sport must remain the same. What we need are rules that place greater emphasis on completion of the event, rather than the ‘win at all costs’ mentality that is more and more threatening our sport.

“We have a strong Chair in Dr Sarah Coombs, who has a long-standing and in-depth understanding of the sport, particularly the horse welfare and veterinary aspects. With this new role she will be helping steer this crucial next step by leading a committee of extremely knowledgeable members that is focused on regulatory change driven by science with horse welfare at its heart.”

Prior to the creation of the new Temporary Committee, the FEI Bureau had received and accepted the resignation of Dr Brian Sheahan (AUS) as Chair of the Endurance Technical Committee due to ill health. His eight-year term in office was due to expire in 2020. The President has thanked Dr Sheahan for his dedication and passion for the sport and wished him a speedy recovery.

In a further development, the Bureau has provisionally relieved Ignasi Casas Vaque (ESP) of his rights and duties as Deputy Chair and Member of the Endurance Committee due to pending legal proceedings for alleged incorrect behaviour at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ 2018.

The FEI Legal Department last week initiated a disciplinary action against Dr Casas Vaque, based on evidence provided to the independent Equestrian Community Integrity Unit during its investigation into the cancelled Endurance event in Tryon (USA) on 12 September 2018. Any additional disciplinary actions against other individuals involved in events at Tryon last month will be announced in due course.

Due to the resignation of the Chair and the pending legal proceedings involving the Deputy Chair, the Endurance Committee is currently unable to function as a full committee. However, the remaining members of the Endurance Committee – Shanie Bosch-Fourie (NAM) (2014-2018), Rocio Echeverri (CRC) (2015-2019) and Stéphane Chazel (FRA) (2016-2020) – will remain as members for their terms and until further notice. The Temporary Committee will be asked to consult with them to ensure their expertise is not lost during the review process.

The Temporary Committee will start work as soon as possible, with the plan to hold a session dedicated on Endurance at the FEI Sports Forum 2019 allowing the Temporary Committee to provide an update to delegates.

*FEI Statutes, Article 36. Other Committees and Sub-Committees

36.1 The Bureau may establish Temporary Committees for particular purposes. The Bureau shall appoint the Chair and members, define the terms of reference and decide the date when any such Committee shall make its report. Any such Committee shall consist of not more than five (5) and not less than three (3) members, including the Chair. A Bureau member who is appointed to any such Committee shall automatically become the Chair of such Committee.

Media contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Communications
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 42

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Irish Sport Horse Studbook Reigns Supreme Once Again

Kitty King and Cristal Fontaine. (FEI/Libby Law)

The Irish Sport Horse Studbook won the overall title for the second consecutive year at the FEI WBFSH World Breeding Eventing Championships for Young Horses 2018 which drew to a close at the Haras National at l‘Isle de Briand in Le Lion d’Angers (FRA). The title is decided by the best three scores of each Studbook in both categories, and it was the performances of Emerald Jonny ridden by Great Britain’s Piggy French, Cooley Moonshine with America’s Elisabeth Halliday-Sharp, and Universal Cooley with Britain’s Camilla Millie Dumas that decided the result when these three finished second, third and fourth in the 6-year-old division.

The combined score for the Irish-bred horses was 79.5, giving them almost three points of an advantage over the second-placed Selle Français Studbook while the KWPN Studbook of The Netherlands finished third on a score of 102.0.

There were 25 Irish horses representing eight nations in the two categories, but it was the Selle Français gelding Cristal Fontaine that claimed the 6-Year-Old title for Britain’s Kitty King while the Brandenburg mare, Asha P, was steered to success in the 7-year-old class by Germany’s Ingrid Klimke.

6-Year-Olds

King and the French-bred grey owned by Alex Wakeley posted a score of 25.4 for third place on Dressage day and never faltered. America’s Halliday-Sharp and Cooley Moonshine were the dressage leaders ahead of Dumas and Universal Cooley in second while British compatriot, Piggy French, sat in fourth spot going into cross-country day when the 20-fence track presented relatively few problems.

However, single showjumping errors cost the top two dearly, dropping Halliday-Sharp to third and Dumas to fourth while clears for King and French saw them claim the top two places.

King (36) is an Olympian and a veteran of multiple Young Horse Championships at Le Lion where she previously finished third with Zidante as a 6-year-old before returning to win the 7-year-olds with the same horse the following year. She was filled with emotion when she realised she’d done it again and was mighty proud of her lovely grey gelding.

“He’s just tried really, really hard. I always said to the owner he was as good as Zidante… and I’m just chuffed to bits with him. Millie (Dumas) and Liz (Halliday-Sharp) are on really good jumpers; I know what their English form is like so I would have been delighted to just finish third on my dressage score. It’s wonderful; I’m so pleased for my team at home, my sponsors and especially my owners!” — Kitty King (GBR)

A total of 40 horse-and-rider combinations started in this category and 36 completed.

7-Year-Olds

In contrast to the younger horses, the 7-year-olds found the cross-country test set by master course designer Pierre Michelet much more challenging, with 19 different horse-and-rider combinations racking up penalty points including three that retired and seven that were eliminated. A total of 69 started in this category, and 56 completed.

Newly-crowned team and individual world champion, Great Britain’s Rosalind Canter, made it all the way to fence 20, four from home, before her Irish-bred Rehy Royal Diamond collected 20 penalties for a refusal. Well down the line in 17th place after dressage she finished 44th in the final analysis, while dressage leader, Germany’s Michael Jung, was eliminated for a fall with Chocolat at fence 8 which left the three-time Olympic gold medallist with a shoulder injury.

As a result, second-placed Klimke and Asha P rose to pole position when cruising round the cross-country track well inside the time-allowed of 9’14”, but going into the final phase they had only 0.3 of a lead over Britain’s Nicola Wilson and JL Dublin who posted the second-quickest cross-country time. However, a fence down saw this pair drop to fifth and it was Great Britain’s Tom Jackson with the Irish-bred Capels Hollow Drift who slotted into runner-up spot behind Klimke and her bay Brandenburg mare who never put a foot wrong. Third place went to Astier Nicolas from France with Babylon de Gamma (SF) and Belgium’s Karin Donckers and Leipheimer van’t Verhah (BWP) finished fourth.

Double Olympic and double World Championship team gold medallist Klimke, who clinched individual bronze with SAP Hale Bob at the FEI World Equestrian Games in Tryon, USA last month, was delighted with her result.

“It’s my third win at the Mondial du Lion and the happiness is still the same! I love more and more bringing young horses to top level, and winning here is really important. My mare is really good and I believe she will easily rise to 3-Star level. I have no doubt she will step into Hale Bob’s shoes!” — Ingrid Klimke (GER)

Full results here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Patteet and Pebbles Win Super-Hot Helsinki Leg

Gudrun Patteet and Sea Coast Pebbles Z. (FEI/Satu Pirinen)

Gudrun Patteet (33) and Sea Coast Pebbles Z won the sizzling second leg of the Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ 2018/2019 Western European League in Helsinki, Finland. Second-last to go in an edge-of-the-seat 10-horse jump-off, they scorched through the finish to post the Belgian rider’s first-ever World Cup success and to firmly grasp those maximum qualifying points on the road to the Longines Final next April.

And it wasn’t the easiest of tasks because the second-round decider was stacked high with some of the most formidable opposition on the showjumping planet. Swiss supremo Steve Guerdat set a blistering target with the great mare Hannah when third to go against the clock, but they just kept getting quicker and quicker. However, Patteet, who has an outstanding reputation as a producer of top-class young horses, is no shrinking violet, and neither is her quirky 12-year-old gelding.

“He’s not normal; he’s very complicated and very, very hot, but he’s so brave and very talented. I’m really happy for him; he was super today!” — Gudrun Patteet (BEL)

Guerdat looked to have really thrown down the gauntlet when galloping home in 40.10 seconds over the jump-off course set by Brazil’s Guilherme Jorge. And when French rider Olivier Robert and the handsome Tempo de Paban and Belgium’s Christophe Vanderhasselt with identity Vitseroel were clear but slower, the Swiss star remained in front.

But when Germany’s Philipp Weishaupt and the 11-year-old mare Asathir broke the 40-second barrier despite a wide run to the last, and then reigning European champion Peder Fredricson from Sweden was faster still when breaking the beam in 39.51 seconds with the 10-year-old Hansson WI, the lead kept changing. The 2011 series champion, Christian Ahlmann from Germany, didn’t threaten when stopping the clock in 40.43 seconds when third-last to go with his exciting nine-year-old grey stallion, Clintrexo Z, who looks set for future-stardom.

However, Patteet and Pebbles most certainly did, racing through the track with absolute determination and scorching through the finish in the winning time of 39.30 as the crowd went wild with excitement. Last in, Hans-Dieter Dreher and the flamboyant 17-year-old stallion Embassy ll gave it their best shot, but when the Longines clock showed 39.47 seconds the German duo had to settle for runner-up spot ahead of Fredricson in third.

Patteet, who is based in the heart of Belgium’s horse-country between Brussels and Antwerp, won gold in 2013 and bronze this year at the prestigious FEI WBFSH Championships for Young Horses in Lanaken, Belgium. “I used to ride them from four-year-olds but now I start riding them at six, and I want to continue doing that because you become more of a team with your horse when you ride them from when they are young,” she said.

She only acquired Pebbles as an eight-year-old, however, and he was never easy. He still isn’t. She has an unusual warm-up routine before going into the ring.

“First he goes on the lunge, and then I get on him with 10 horses to go because if I warm him up any other way he just loses it! I know how to handle him now, but I have to follow my plan carefully. He’s one of the fastest horses in world so if the plan goes well he can beat anybody!” — Joe Bloggs (Team Country)

Her win leaves her in second place on the Western European League table going into next week’s third leg of the series in Verona, Italy with Germany’s Dreher sitting in pole position when adding points from last weekend’s open in Oslo (NOR) where he finished sixth.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Home Win for Daniel Bachmann Andersen at Opening Leg in Herning

Daniel Bachmann Andersen and Blue Hors Zack. (FEI/Ridehesten.com/Kristine Ulsø Olsen)

Daniel Bachmann Andersen (28) and Blue Hors Zack were definitive winners of the first leg of the new FEI Dressage World Cup™ 2018/2019 Western European League season on home ground in Herning, Denmark. All five judges put the Danish duo into pole position while Germany’s Helen Langehanenberg (36) steered Damsey FRH into second spot ahead of Sweden’s Tinne Vilhelmson Silfven (51) and Don Auriello in third.

“It was a fantastic Freestyle today – no mistakes and very easy, very light and smooth. Yesterday Zack felt tight during the Grand Prix and we had a few mistakes. But today he was suppled up a little bit more and that paid off a lot,” Bachmann Andersen said.

Langehanenberg won the Grand Prix ahead of Vilhelmson Silfven in second and Bachmann Andersen in third. But the Danish rider who became part of the Blue Hors Stud team four years ago was determined to do better.

“I felt I had a chance to win today but I knew I had to be humble. Helen and Tinne could also do good so I had to ride really well – I took my chance and I rode my chance!” — Daniel Bachmann Andersen (DEN)

The bar was raised to over 80 percent by six-time Olympian, Vilhelmson Silfven, when third-last to go with her 16-year-old gelding. The pair finished second at the FEI Dressage World Cup™ Final in Gothenburg (SWE) two years ago and were on the Swedish team that finished fourth at last month’s FEI World Equestrian Games in Tryon, USA.

However, their mark of 80.90 was immediately bettered by London 2012 Olympic team silver medallist Langehanenberg whose brilliant record at the FEI Dressage World Cup Finals includes victory with Damon Hill NRW in 2013. A score of 81.40 with the 16-year-old stallion Damsey FRH put her out in front when second-last into the arena, but her advantage was short-lived.

Big marks included two scores of 9.9 for Degree of Difficulty from judges Katrina Wuest (GER) and Mariette Sanders-Van Gansewinkel (NED) as Blue Hors Zack soared to the top of the leaderboard on a final tally of 83.37 for victory. Bachmann Andersen was delighted with the horse who he says has “an amazing temperament; he’s sharp and yet he’s still very calm.”

“He’s also a breeding stallion and he’s not just my horse; he’s my friend and my partner; he’s everything to me! He was given up a bit by other riders who had him before; he wasn’t easy because he’s very sensitive, so I had to get into his heart and get him to trust me – now what we have is very special!” — Daniel Bachmann Andersen (DEN)

And Zack is also special because he’s blind in one eye. “There were a few issues to work on and a lot of bumps along the way, and he was actually 12 years old when he made his debut at this level of the sport, but he just got better and better from show to show after that,” Bachmann Andersen added.

However, after this great result, Zack will take a break because he’s had a busy year, finishing seventh at the FEI Dressage World Cup™ Final 2018 in Paris (FRA), competing successfully in Aachen (GER) in July, and finishing 10th individually in the Grand Prix and 17th in the Special at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ last month.

“My plan now is to give him a rest until the qualifier in Amsterdam (NED) in January, and I definitely want to make it to the Final in Gothenburg with him,” the Danish rider said.

Watch highlights here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Zazou Hoffman Earns Electrifying First Longines Win in Del Mar

Zazou Hoffmann (USA) with Samson II. (FEI/ Lindsey Long)

When Zazou Hoffman (USA) was asked whether the Longines watch that sat before her was her first, her initial response was a dead giveaway: “I get to keep the watch?”

Hoffman, 26, topped the $100,000 Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ Del Mar with Samson II, besting a compact yet furiously competitive jump-off field of four. Jumping cleanly over Marina Azevdeo’s (BRA) jump-off track, the duo crossed the timers in 41.68 seconds. Olympians Eduardo Menezes (BRA) and Quintol finished second as the leadoff pair (42.64), while Georgina Bloomberg (USA) and Chameur (44.73) were third. Last to go, Nicole Shahinian-Simpson (USA) and Akuna Mattata posted the winning time (41.15) but fell to fourth after they pulled the rail at the final fence.

“Tonight was super exciting for me. I have a lot of amazing things to say about my horse and how lucky I am to have him. In the jump-off, he was incredible! Everything came up kind of just by moving forward.” — Zazou Hoffman (USA)

Clear rounds were hard to come by in the first round. In fact, the first faultless performance did not come until Menezes and Quintol jumped at 22nd in the order. The pair, veterans of the 2016 Rio Olympic Games, used their experience to their advantage and put the pressure on when first to go in the jump-off, and Hoffman formulated her plan based off their smooth execution. She followed up Menezes’ round with a confident, flowing ride of her own, which was highlighted by a tidy turn back to the jump-off’s third fence and a bold, time-shaving angle to the wall that came two fences later.

“I think I based my plan off of watching Eduardo,” she said. “I hadn’t really considered how fast or not I was going to go. After watching him, I realized I was going to have to be quite quick. I’ve ridden a lot of jump-offs this year on Samson with 4 faults, and I know that I can trust him and go fast, but it’s just that fine line of risking too much. I did one extra stride than Eduardo to first line, and then my turn backs were quite tight. I took a little bit of a risk to the wall, and that’s where I think I saved a little bit of time.”

Commuting Coasts

After earning 12 points in Vancouver, Hoffman skyrocketed to the top of the west coast sub league standings of the Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ North American League with her win under the lights in Del Mar; she has 32 points through three legs. Eve Jobs (USA) sits second with 31 points, and Uma O’Neill (USA), winner of Vancouver’s qualifier, is third with 24 points.

Bloomberg, meanwhile, moved into second in the east coast sub league standings. She has 28 points, one behind leader Molly Ashe Cawley (USA), who won New York’s qualifier. Bloomberg is six points ahead of Mattias Tromp (USA), who sits in third with 22 points.

Bloomberg, a New York native, migrated west specifically for the World Cup competition.

“I had shown out here a couple years ago, and I’ve loved being out here,” she said. “It’s fun to be in a different environment with different people and a great crowd. We always jump at the opportunity to come out here and show, but part of it is also that my goal is really to qualify for World Cup Finals now that I have the right horse.”

The North American League continues in Washington, D.C. (USA), on 27 October 2018.

Click here to watch Zazou Hoffman’s winning round.

By Catie Staszak

FEI Media Contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager Press Relations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Lindelöw Scorches to Victory at Opening Leg in Oslo

Sweden’s Douglas Lindelöw and Zacramento. (FEI/Satu Pirinen)

It takes courage to give it everything you’ve got, and Sweden’s Douglas Lindelöw (27) and his brilliant bay gelding Zacramento threw down a really courageous performance to win the first leg of the Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ 2018/2019 Western European League in Oslo, Norway.

Fourth to go in the 12-horse jump-off, and followed by many of the world’s best, they posted a formidable target that proved way too fast for the rest. When he was told afterwards that he’d been very brave after stopping the timers in 44.67 seconds, the Swedish star laughed and replied, “I thought so too!” He’d just pinned Rio 2016 Olympic team gold medallist Kevin Staut (37) from France into runner-up spot and Australian star Edwina Tops-Alexander (44) into third, so he had every reason to be happy.

There were seven double-clear rounds, with Italy’s Luca Moneta (Connery) and Michael Cristofoletti (Belony) slotting into fourth and fifth places ahead of Germany’s Hans-Dieter Dreher (Twenty Clary) in sixth and Ireland’s Denis Lynch (The Sinner) claiming seventh spot.

Lindelöw knew he was in with a big chance at this opening round of the 13-leg series.

“Zacramento has been in really good shape since finishing second in the Grand Prix in Brussels last month, so I came here with a great feeling and from the first day I believed we could give it a go!” — Douglas Lindelöw (SWE)

A total of 38 horse-and-rider combinations from 16 countries arrived at the Telenor Arena in the Norwegian capital city with the same goal of picking up some precious early qualifying points for the Final which, in this 41st season, returns to where it all began in Gothenburg (SWE) next April. That’s Lindelöw’s big target right now.

“I am based in the south of Sweden so of course I want to get to Gothenburg!” said the rider who was a member of Sweden’s silver-medal-winning team at the FEI European Championships last year, and who has an impressive record at Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ Finals. He finished eighth with his former ride, Casello, in Las Vegas (USA) in 2015 and 11th with Zacramento at the Final in Paris (FRA) earlier this year.

It was Italy’s Michael Cristofoletti (Belony) who set the target at 46.70 seconds when second to go in the jump-off, but Lindelöw shaved more than two seconds off that with a fearless run from his 13-year-old Swedish-bred horse. Belgium’s Olivier Philippaerts (H&M Legend of Love) and Italy’s Alberto Zorzi (Contanga) were quicker, but both left a fence on the floor, and it was last man in, Kevin Staut, with Silver Deux de Virton HDC who came closest to Lindelöw’s time as he crossed the line in 45.51 seconds.

The Frenchman complimented Norwegian course designers Terje Olsen-Nalum and Anders Hafskjold.

“It was fair for the first indoor of the season, there were not too many clears and it was a great competition.” — Kevin Staut (FRA)

He also pointed out that they made the right decision when sticking with the time-allowed they had set before the action began, even though even though some of the early starters picked up time faults. “The time was exactly as it should be, and it was good they didn’t change it at the start,” Staut said.

Lindelöw’s next plan is to collect some more qualifying points at the third leg of the Western European League in Verona (ITA) in two weeks’ time. Before that, however, there will be another afternoon of edge-of-the-seat excitement when the series visits Helsinki (FIN) next Sunday.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46