Category Archives: Events

All Glory for Great Britain’s Golden Girls at Avenches

L to R – Sarah Bullimore (bronze), Nicola Wilson (gold), and Piggy March (silver). (FEI/Richard Juilliart)

British riders have long had a phenomenal record in the sport of Eventing, and they proved untouchable once again when not only clinching the team title but taking all the individual medals at the FEI Eventing European Championships 2021 in Avenches, Switzerland.

In the lead from day one they held on tight, and when this result is added to double-gold at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ 2018 and the team title along with individual silver at this summer’s Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, they clearly reign supreme in every sense.

It was a tough day for the defending champions from Germany as the dream of a seventh victory for the team and a third consecutive individual gold medal for Ingrid Klimke and SAP Hale Bob OLD didn’t come true, as they had to settle for silver. But in true sporting fashion the German team “elder,” Andreas Dibowski, said, “We won the silver, but we didn’t lose the gold. The Brits did an amazing job, and we just couldn’t beat them!”

Team Sweden stood on the third step of the podium.

First

Ros Canter and Allstar B were first of the British into the ring as the final showjumping phase got underway. Theirs was not a counting score for the team standings that left her side still out in front last night, but the pair who claimed double-gold at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ 2018 were back to their classy selves when producing a quality clear, and that proved a good omen for the rest of their team.

A total of 52 horse-and-athlete combinations made it through to this final test, with 13 nations still in the mix, and by the time it came down to the last ten riders the tension was palpable. As the action began, the Germans were just under 10 penalty points behind the British at the head of affairs, with France lying in bronze medal position another 18 points further adrift but with only three team members left after the elimination of Gwendolen Fer. So when Stanislas de Zuchowicz and Covadys de Triaval hit the first element of the double at fence nine and Jean Lou Bigot’s Utrillo du Halage left three fences on the floor, then French chances were slipping away.

Andreas Dibowski and FRH Corrida produced an opening clear for Germany before Anna Siemer and FRH Butts Avondale also fell victim to the first element of the triple combination. But Michael Jung steered fischerWild Wave home with nothing to add, and then only Klimke and SAP Hale Bob OLD were left to go.

However, it was only an individual medal Klimke was chasing by the time she took her turn, because as Dibowski said later, the British were just too good for the rest. Team member Kitty King’s Vendredi Biats hit the second fence, but Piggy March’s Brookfield Inocent was foot-perfect. And when Nicola Wilson’s JL Dublin went clear, she not only finalised the British tally at 73.1 for the winning team score, but she also had individual gold in her grasp while, lying fourth as the action began, March had the silver and British individual Sarah Bullimore had the bronze. It was a staggering result.

Pressure

Fifth-last to go, Bullimore piled the pressure on the remaining four with a fabulous clear from Corouet. And when Frenchman Maxime Livio, lying in bronze medal spot, faulted in the middle of the combination and then Klimke, holding silver, hit the vertical three from home, it would be an all-British individual podium for the seventh time in the history of these Championships. The last British threesome to do the same were Ian Stark (Glenburnie), Richard Walker (Jacana), and Karen Straker (Get Smart) at Punchestown (IRL) in 1991.

Meanwhile, Sweden also had plenty to celebrate when clears from both Malin Jesefsson (Golden Midnight) and Malin Petersen (Charly Brown) and a single error from Sara Algotsson Ostholt (Chicuelo) saw the team, that also included Christoffer Forsberg (Hippo’s Sapporo), rise from overnight sixth place to take bronze.

“I’m back in the team for first time in ten years and it’s great to be with the girls!” Forsberg said. “I’ve been really happy with the team spirit, and I want to thank the organisers very much for putting on this show.” And that was echoed by everyone else at the end of this extraordinary event that was put together so successfully in a few short months.

Trainer

At the post-competition press conference, Germany’s Ingrid Klimke said with a laugh, “I have one thing to say to the Brits – they stole our trainer!” referring to Britain’s Eventing High Performance coach Chris Bartle, who helped her country to many successes in previous years. “But I’m very happy for them; they did a wonderful job!” she added.

Her compatriot, the effusive Anna Meier, was thrilled to earn her first medal at Senior Championship level. “I feel like I’m always in a team with my horse, but to be in a team with these guys is wonderful; they’ve won millions of medals between them but this is my first!” she said, looking around at Dibowski, Klimke, and Jung.

Bullimore described her 10-year-old gelding Corouet as “just a freak of nature! He’s phenomenal in all phases; he could do pure show jumping and pure dressage; he’s unique,” she said. “He has a huge attitude in a small package, he knows how cool he is, and he’s been fantastic all week,” she added. Her individual bronze was an especially precious result because she bred the horse and also competed his dam at the FEI European Championships in Blair Castle (GBR) in 2015.

March, team gold medallist at the FEI World Equestrian Games in 2018 and team silver medallist at the last FEI European Eventing Championships two years ago, described her individual silver medal winning ride Brookfield Inocent as “definitely one of the best I’ve ever ridden – in all three phases he couldn’t have done any more!” And she added, “Personally, I think that if we’re ahead of Ingrid Klimke and Micky Jung then that’s a medal in itself, wherever we’d finish! This has just been a fabulous week!”

Reflected

Meanwhile, newly crowned individual European champion Wilson reflected on the enormity of it all with her trademark modesty. “This has been very very special, being with this fantastic group of girls who all get along really well. It’s been fun all the way and the horses have been phenomenal.

“It’s a first championship for Dublin; he missed a bit of time when I injured my neck (two years ago) and then Covid came long, but now I’m so proud for my owners. I was delighted with his dressage; it just felt very solid and good and then he stormed around the cross-country and produced a beautiful round in the show jumping. How lovely it is to have had him since he was a young horse and to build that lovely partnership and trust between us,” she said with quiet pride, adding, “Thank you to Switzerland for putting on these Championships!”

Gratitude

Everyone expressed their gratitude to the Organising Committee headed up by Jean-Pierre Kratzer, President of the Institut Equestre National d’Avenches, where this week’s event has taken place. A total of 21,000 spectators came through the gates of the fabulous venue, including over 10,000 on cross-country day.

“I built this place 20 years ago for racing, and to expand our business we then built a training centre for 150 horses. Last year during Covid, we were asked to help riders in preparation for Tokyo and we took the opportunity to plan for the future and help develop Eventing here,” he explained.

“When we got the opportunity to organise these Championships I talked with Mike Etherington-Smith in July about how to make it the best, and he asked if he could work with Martin Plewa. It was one opportunity for a lot of people and we took it and put it together in a few weeks with good team spirit. So I’m delighted to see all the teams happy and hear them say they want to come back; that’s the best thank you we could get!”

Results here.

by Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager, Media Relations & Media Operations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Mixed Cross-Country Fortunes, but British Hold Fast Going into Final Day

Nicola Wilson and JL Dublin. (FEI/Richard Juillart)

When asked what she thought of the cross-country course after completing her Dressage test with JL Dublin at the FEI Eventing European Championships 2021 in Avenches, Switzerland on Thursday, Great Britain’s Nicola Wilson described it as “positively terrifying!” But on a day of mixed fortunes for the British side who still managed to maintain the lead they established on the opening day, the pair rose from third to the very top of the Individual rankings after a spectacular run that further stretched the gap between her team and the defending champions from Germany.

And it was a very exciting afternoon for France. An unfortunate tip-up for Gwendolen Fer and Romantic Love in the water at fence 23 piled plenty of pressure on her compatriots who, however, rose gallantly to the challenge to hold on to bronze medal spot going into the final Jumping phase.

The British tally of 69.1 leaves them just over nine penalty points ahead of Germany, while on 96.8 the French are a good distance behind. Team Switzerland shot up from ninth to fourth while the Irish climbed from eleventh to fifth, and the stage is set for a sizzling conclusion to the 35th edition of these Championships, which are taking place against the odds during these troubling Covid times.

It’s only six short weeks since course designer, Great Britain’s Mike Etherington-Smith, started work on the track that embraces the beautiful racing venue at Avenches, but the horses, riders, and the enthusiastic crowd that turned up to see Europe’s best battle it out were treated to a great day of sport.

And the British maintained their supremacy despite a disappointing performance from the reigning World Championship partnership of Ros Canter and Allstar B. Sitting in Individual silver medal spot as the day began, the pair plummeted to 55th with two run-outs late in the course.

Set things up

Piggy March and Brookfield Inocent produced one of just seven fault-free rounds to set things up for the British side.

“Everything is easy when you have a horse like him. The time was tight enough but he’s a real cruiser. What a horse and how lucky am I to have him!” she said.

And when Wilson followed suit, they were already looking very secure. Despite her earlier reservations, Wilson admitted that “the course rode beautifully, and my horse was very honest.” So when Kitty King and Vendredi Biats added just 0.8 time penalties to her dressage mark, then Canter’s additional 56 penalties could be dropped as they were comfortably in control.

German pathfinder Anna Siemer also had a great day, adding just 1.6 to her scoreline with FRH Butts Avondale. She was over the moon after her ride. “It was so much fun!” she said. “For her the dressage was done and now this is what we are here for! She’s like a pony; I know her for 10 years now, and from the moment she jumped her first cross-country fence, she was a cross-country machine!” said the rider who walked the track seven times in order to ensure she met with no surprises.

Andreas Dibowski was next out for the German side, adding 15.2 penalties to his scoreline with FRH Corrida. But Michael Jung pulled it back with a classic clear with the nine-year-old fischerWild Wave, demonstrating the skill that has earned the German superstar the title “The Terminator.”

“He’s a young horse but amazing, with a lot of talent in all three disciplines. Today he showed how light and easy he can gallop, and he has super endurance, he’s fast, and has a lot of scope for the bigger, tougher courses. Right now, all he needs is just more experience – to learn to be clever and to think. I’m really happy with him,” Jung said.

Weight of expectation

Now only the individual leader, Ingrid Klimke, was left to go for the German side, with a huge weight of expectation on her shoulders. If she can take the individual title she will be the first athlete in the long history of the FEI Eventing European Championships to do so with the same horse on three consecutive occasions. But 1.2 time penalties saw her lose her grip on pole position and she goes into the final phase just 0.5 penalties behind Wilson at the head of affairs.

“He was bold and brave, like he always is,” Klimke said of her beloved Bobby. “I had lots of time at the 7-minute mark, and then in the end there were two seconds (added) because I just couldn’t go any faster, especially in the turns. I had to take my time so I didn’t have a run-out. I had to be precise to the end and I felt it was the fastest I would like to go through the corners and the deeper ground. I thought I would make it, but unfortunately we didn’t – but he did a lovely job really and he finished full of himself!” she said.

Meanwhile, Jean Lou Bigot got the French off to a great start when delivering a fault-free run with Utrillo du Halage, but Gwendolen Fer’s fall left them looking very vulnerable. However, when Stanislas de Zuchowicz and the lovely grey Covadys de Triaval added only 14 time penalties to their score, the French situation began to stabilise. And he was thrilled with his result, produced under pressure.

“It was his first time at 4-Star level and my Chef d’Equipe told me I had to be clear, but my horse was fantastic! My job was to be careful about his balance because his jump is always fantastic, and his canter is always very good. We had a slip on the turn after fence 15 and that was a tricky moment, but I had the face of my coach in my head, and I knew we had to stay on our feet!” said the man from Fontainebleau who first rode for the French team in 2009.

Great round

And then Maxime Livio secured that bronze medal position definitively with a great round from Api du Libaire.

“The trainer told me to be quick enough to secure the bronze medal place but not to take any stupid risk like I might if I was only an individual rider, but the plan was not to take too big risk with that horse because he’s not really experienced. So I was quite comfortable with that. He (the horse) allowed me to take the straight route at 6/7, because he’s very straight. So I took that risk and he answered very well, but I just felt when I jumped the water when I came back on the race-track that his jumping was not as energetic at the beginning. So I decided okay, now we try to hold it together. He was a bit tired in the body but not in the mind. He was listening to me, looking at the fences, fully focused, and I’m very pleased because he fought with me to the very end for the French team. And also, his score is really good, so I am very happy!” Livio said.

It’s all so very close, and the result could go any which way on the exciting final day.

Results here.

by Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager, Media Relations & Media Operations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Super-Tight Contest Going into Cross-Country Day

Maxime Livio with Api du Libaire. (FEI/Richard Juilliart)

Great Britain maintained the lead in the Dressage phase, but there will only be a hair’s breadth between them and the defending team champions from Germany when the cross-country phase of the FEI Eventing European Championships 2021 gets underway.

A margin of 4.9 penalty points is all that separates the two sides as the best horse-and-athlete combinations from all across Europe continue to battle it out for the prestigious team and individual medals at these 35th bi-annual Championships.

Germany’s Ingrid Klimke took another step towards an historic first-ever three-in-a-row individual title with the same horse, when steering the brilliant SAP Hale Bob OLD into pole position in the Dressage arena. But Great Britain’s Ros Canter and Allstar B, who took double-gold at the FEI World Equestrian Games two years ago, came dangerously close to toppling them when third-last to go.

Scoring 20.6, Canter lies just 0.4 behind Klimke when the horses set out to take on the challenging cross-country track designed by Great Britain’s Mike Etherington-Smith, which consists of 40 jumping efforts and 32 fences over a distance of 5,678 metres that must be covered in 10 minutes 7 seconds to avoid time penalties.

And lying third, only 0.3 further behind, is Canter’s team-mate and first-day Dressage leader Nicola Wilson with JL Dublin, while a super test from Maxime Livio and his attractive 11-year-old grey gelding Api du Libraire leaves him individually fourth and secured third place for Team France.

Reshuffle

Klimke was always expected to reshuffle the order with her 17-year-old gelding whose career record includes Olympic team silver, individual World Championship bronze, and four European gold medals, the last two of the latter clinched on home ground in Luhmuehlen two years ago. He certainly didn’t disappoint again, but Bobby was full of beans before starting his test.

“Maybe he thought we were in cross-country already! I didn’t warm up for long because he knows all the movements and I thought it would be good if he was a bit fresh, because the ground is a bit deep (in the arena), but I didn’t know he was that fresh! I should have cantered a few more rounds outside!

“I had to take an extra loop to calm him down, but the moment I entered the ring, I knew exactly that he knows his job inside out and I could really enjoy it and I could ride very precisely from point to point. After so many years now, it is really a pleasure to ride through the test knowing he is absolutely focused and there is so much trust between us,” she pointed out.

She says the cross-country course reminds her of the track at Wiesbaden in Germany, “which feels like seven minutes in a jump-off – you can’t breathe very much!” But Bobby is a past-master over fences. “The good thing is that he has a very handy canter for the turns, and he doesn’t mind the ground,” she explained.

His lazy self

Canter gave the German star a real run for her money when third-last to go. Albie, as her 16-year-old horse is known to his friends, didn’t make it entirely easy for her though because, as she explained, “He was his usual lazy self! I wanted everyone to clap and cheer as we came in and he pricked his ears for about half a second but then he went ahhh… he’s always listening to me, and in a way it’s a benefit, but I was possibly sweating more than he was!” she said.

“But honestly, he’s just the most rideable horse I’ve ever had in a dressage test. He doesn’t change, regardless of the atmosphere or anything else; he just lets me ride for every mark, and that’s where his heart shines really and always has done. Time and again, he does mistake-free tests. It’s a lot of pressure coming out on him again (after their World Championship success), but I want to try and enjoy every minute because I know I haven’t got many left with him,” she added.

Impressive

While both Klimke and Canter’s horses are super-experienced, Livio’s fourth-place ride with Api du Libaire was all the more impressive because it’s this pair’s first Championship together, and you’d never have guessed it.

“We knew since the beginning this horse’s talent for the three phases is really nice; he can fight with the best horses in the world. This is his first Championship so it’s good to be where we are today and it’s a good score for the team, but it’s a three-day event also so we take it day by day,” said the 34-year-old Frenchman.

He described his handsome and characterful gelding as “a strange horse; he’s like a kid but not a bad kid, just someone who is pleased to be here and wants to see everything! My job is to show him a lot, and I’m pleased because he was totally connected to me, and when he is like that, he is a super student because he tries all the time,” he added.

Challenging

Meanwhile, looking ahead to the cross-country test, Canter said, “It’s a really challenging course in terms of the full circles we do and all the accuracy questions and the difference in surfaces which will affect horse’s balance. We’ll need to prepare for every fence, riding and planning the bits in between. Albie gets very wound up at the start but he’s a wise old man, so I’ll keep his warm-up limited and keep his energy and adrenaline for the course.”

Klimke said the most important thing will be to maintain the horse’s rhythm and “not lose any stride, just keep a wonderful flow,” all very possible perhaps when you are partnering a creature of the calibre of SAP Hale Bob OLD who she affectionately calls “the professor.”

Livio agreed. “The rider who can be fluent in their riding will do the best. This course is a good test of the ability of the rider to be fluent – if we manage to do that it will go well,” he said.

Team France lies only 7.6 penalty points behind the Germans who currently hold silver medal spot. But the French will need to be on the button because fantastic tests from Harald Ambros (Lexikon 2), Robert Mandl (Sacre-Coeur), and Lea Siegl (van Helsing P) moved Austria up into fourth, less than two points behind.

The Dutch team is in fifth place, Italy in sixth, Sweden in seventh, and Belgium in eighth, while the hosts from Switzerland lie ninth. Spain, Ireland, Russia, and Czech Republic fill the last four places.

Results here.

by Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager, Media Relations & Media Operations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

EQUUS Foundation Awards over $631,000 in Grants in 2021

The EQUUS Foundation announced the award of over $631,000 in grants, including awards of new and gently used riding apparel, valued at $313,864, to individual riders in need, scholastic riding programs, pony clubs, equestrian camp programs, and equine charities through The Rider’s Closet program.

Primary support is awarded to equine charities nationwide that save and re-home increasing numbers of horses from abuse, neglect, and slaughter and charities that partner with horses to improve the well-being of people through the Foundation’s Transparency Awards program. The EQUUS Foundation awarded small grants ranging from $500 to $5,000 to 142 charities that earned the EQUUS Foundation Guardian Seal of Transparency by completing the EQUUS Foundation’s comprehensive and unique verification process.

EQUUS Foundation Horse Whisperers are a select group of individuals and organizations who are committed to ensuring that America’s horses are safe and live with dignity throughout their lives and are recognized by the EQUUS Foundation for their extraordinary kinship with horses by the establishment of an award in their names to honor deserving equine charities.

The EQUUS Foundation Board of Directors honors those charities from among the grant recipients that best align with the interests of the Horse Whisperers with a Horse Whisperer Award.

“The work of the EQUUS Foundation begins each time the career of a horse comes to an end. It is only through engaging passionate supporters and collaboration that we are able to identify and invest in effective programs that are finding homes for at-risk horses and horses in transition, providing a safe haven for aged horses, and increasing opportunities for more people to benefit from the magic and power of horses,” said Lynn Coakley, EQUUS Foundation President.

To learn more about the EQUUS Foundation and their mission, please visit www.equusfoundation.org.

CHIO Aachen Highlights News Film

Aachen, Germany, 20 September 2021 – The 2021 Rolex Grand Prix of CHIO Aachen was won by Daniel Deusser riding Killer Queen VDL. Second place went to Brian Moggre and third place to Gregory Wathelet. The German produced a masterful display on the final day of CHIO Aachen to capture the prestigious 5* Grand Prix, and in doing so, becomes the new Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping live contender.

The two-round competition saw 18 riders progress to the second round, 12 through on a zero score. These included Steve Guerdat, riding Venard de Cerisy, fresh from their victory in the previous Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping Major at CSIO Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’, as well as former Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping winner Scott Brash.

Seven horse and rider combinations produced faultless double clear rounds to head into a jump-off. Deusser, the current World No. 1, was first into the arena to face the final test against the clock, setting the pace with a stunning clear in a time of 41.85 seconds. Those to follow were unable to challenge Deusser, either failing to catch his time or amassing jumping faults. American young rider, Brian Moggre, came closest as last to go, putting in an impressive round, just 0.31 seconds slower than Deusser on 42.16, to finish in eventual second.

The Rolex Grand Prix at CHIO Aachen is the third of four equestrian Majors in 2021, which together form the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, considered to be the sport’s most demanding challenge. All eyes will now look ahead to the final instalment of the year at CHI Geneva in December.

The highlights film can be seen here:

FINAL RESULTS OF THE ROLEX GRAND PRIX

  1. Daniel Deusser (GER) riding Killer Queen VDM
  2. Brian Moggre (USA) riding Balou du Reventon
  3. Gregory Wathelet (BEL) riding Nevados S
  4. Ben Maher (GBR) riding Explosion W
  5. Laura Kraut (USA) riding Baloutinue
  6. Scott Brash (GBR) riding Hello Jefferson
  7. Jérôme Guery (BEL) riding Quel Homme de Hus
  8. Martin Fuchs (SUI) riding Leone Jei
  9. Gerrit Nieberg (GER) riding Ben 431
  10. Steve Guerdat (SUI) riding Venard de Cerisy

Virginie Chevailler
Rolex SA
virginie.chevailler@rolex.com
+41 (0) 22 302 2619

Merrick Haydon
rEvolution
mhaydon@revolutionworld.com
+44 (0) 7748 186 833

Eva Froio and Emily Dougherty Earn Low Junior and Low Amateur Jumper Championship Titles

Emily Dougherty and SLF Peanut.

Devon, Pa. – Sept. 19, 2021 – The final day of the Devon Fall Classic kicked off early Sunday morning, this time featuring the final championship rounds of the show’s various jumper divisions in the famous Dixon Oval. The $5,000 Low Junior and Low Amateur Jumper Championship classes rounded out the day of festivities, with Eva Froio and Emily Dougherty taking home the top honors in their respective divisions.

New Jumper Division Champions Crowned

Prior to the $5,000 Low Junior and Low Amateur Jumper Championship classes, new champions were crowned in the $3,000 High Adult Amateur Jumper Championship, the $3,000 High Children’s Jumper Championship, the $1,500 Low Adult Amateur Jumper Championship, and the $1,500 Low Children’s Jumper Championship. Click here to read the full day’s results.

For additional information, please visit our website at www.DevonHorseShow.net.

Luiz Francisco de Avezedo and Collin Win $25k Wellington Equestrian Realty Grand Prix

Luiz Francisco de Avezedo and Collin. ©Anne Gittins Photography.

Wellington, FL – Sept. 19, 2021 – The ESP September show reached its pinnacle on Sunday as 23 entries took to the Derby Field for a chance to win the lion’s share of the prize money in the $25,000 Wellington Equestrian Realty Grand Prix. The course, designed by Andy Christiansen (ECU), proved to be a difficult one to master as only three starters advanced to the jump-off, but was no match for the only double-clear contenders of the contest and the class winners, Luiz Francisco de Avezedo (BRA) and Collin, owned by Santa Cecilia Stables. The win is one of many victories earned by the Brazilian and Collin during their longtime partnership, which amazingly began by purchasing the horse before he reached the slaughterhouse.

Competition on the Derby Field kicked off Friday morning with the $10,000 Bainbridge Companies 1.40m Open Steak. Diego Vivero (ECU) and his own entry, Zambia Mystic Rose, sped their way to the top of the leaderboard after clearing the jump-off in 37.15 seconds.

Vivero found himself in the winner’s circle once again on Saturday after topping the Ford’s Garage 1.35m Stake. He and his own Flipper Lady posted double-clear rounds with a jump-off time of 35.74 seconds to take home top honors.

In Sunday morning’s $2,500 Medium Junior/Amateur-Owner Jumper Classic, presented by Equiline, six pairs advanced to the jump-off over the 1.30m fences, led by Catalina Peralta of Geneva, FL on Wendy Peralta’s Amore from Second Life Z. The duo won the class with a double-clear time of 38.85 seconds.

Isabel Beltran and Sazerac Secure First Derby Win in $2,500 USHJA National Hunter Derby

Isabel Beltran of Jupiter, FL and IMB of Jupiter LLC’s Sazerac captured the win in ESP September’s highlight hunter class, the $2,500 USHJA National Hunter Derby, presented by Equiline. The class took place on Friday at Equestrian Village and marked a special occasion for the duo as it was their first derby win together.

In the Amateur-Owner 3’3”/3’6” Hunters, sponsored by Vita Flex, Jennifer Speisman of Wellington, FL piloted her own Totality to the championship honors. The duo earned three first-place results, along with a second place and third place, to secure the highest number of points on the overall scorecard.

Stephen Lengyel of Wellington, FL rode Carolyn Teneyck’s Formal Attire to the championship tricolor in the USHJA 3’ Hunter division, presented by Perfect Products. Over the course of five classes, the pair received three second-place ribbons and two fourth-place ribbons.

The Junior 3’3”/3’6” Hunters, sponsored by #1 Education Place, saw Kat Fuqua of Atlanta, GA and her own Grand Remo ride away with victory in the division after earning three blue ribbons and two red ribbons.

For more information and results, please visit www.PBIEC.com.

Daniel Deusser Wins Rolex Grand Prix of Aachen, Becomes New Rolex Grand Slam Live Contender

(Photo: Rolex Grand Slam / Ashley Neuhof)

The world’s most distinguished show jumpers and their equine partners contested the highlight class of 2021’s edition of CHIO Aachen: the Rolex Grand Prix. The third Major of 2021’s Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, the 1m60 test, created by leading course designer, Frank Rothenberger, comprised 40 starters from 15 nations. Amongst them was current world number one, Daniel Deusser, current world number three, Martin Fuchs, winner of the 2021 CP ‘International’, Steve Guerdat, reigning Olympic Individual champion, Ben Maher, plus another 11 of the world’s current top 30-ranked riders.

The tense action played out in front of approximately 19,000 knowledgeable show jumping fans in CHIO Aachen’s Hauptstadion, a truly iconic stadium which also hosted the sport’s World Championships in 2006 and European Championships in 2015. The format was simple: following the Rolex Grand Prix’s first round, the best 18 riders would qualify for Round 2, with a jump-off triggered should any riders’ combined scores be tied. In the case of a jump-off, the rider with the fewest penalties and fastest time would be crowned champion.

Clear rounds combined with fast times saw three of the sport’s greatest riders comfortably progress to the second round: Great Britain’s Ben Maher and his 12-year-old megastar gelding, Explosion W; the first and only rider to win the Rolex Grand Slam, Scott Brash and his 12-year-old gelding, Hello Jefferson; and Steve Guerdat and his 12-year-old gelding, Venard de Cerisy. However, it was Mexico’s Patricio Pasquel who topped the leader board at the end of the first round, after he and his 14-year-old gelding, Babel, finished over two and a half seconds ahead of next fastest rider, America’s rising talent, Brian Moggre.

Other riders of note to make the cut of 18 included the sport’s current highest-ranked rider, Daniel “Double D” Deusser of Germany, Frenchman Kevin Staut, Martin Fuchs from Switzerland, winner of the Rolex Grand Slam Major at CHIO Aachen in 2017, Belgium’s Gregory Wathelet, and the next generation of show jumping talent, 22-year-old American rider Lucy Deslauriers and 23-year-old Sanne Thijssen from The Netherlands.

Consisting of 15 fences, and over a very slightly shorter course than the first, home favourite Deusser soon assumed control of the second round, the first of the 18 riders to go double clear. He was followed by Belgian, Jérôme Guery, confirming a jump-off would decide who would become the new Rolex Grand Slam Live Contender, after the last Major winner, Steve Guerdat, failed to record a clear round. Guery’s Tokyo 2020 Team bronze medal-winning teammate, Gregory Wathelet, started a procession of double clears, with Laura Kraut from the USA, Scott Brash, Ben Maher, and Brian Moggre all booking their places in the final showdown, thereby making it a seven-way jump-off.

First to go in the jump-off was Daniel Deusser and his 11-year-old mare, Killer Queen, meticulously navigating the nine-fence course and recording the first double clear. Deusser held on to top spot after Gregory Wathelet finished clear, but was over a second off his pace, while Scott Brash, Ben Maher, Laura Kraut, and Jérôme Guery all recorded faults. Last to go, Brian Moggre and his 15-year-old stallion, Balou du Reventon, were Deusser’s last remaining threat; however, despite an impressive clear round, the 20-year-old from Texas crossed the line 0.31s off Deusser’s time, which meant a new Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping Live Contender was crowned.

On his first Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping Major victory, Deusser commented: “The Rolex Grand Slam is part of equestrian history. So far, I haven’t been in this position of winning one of these four Major Grands Prix, but I’m now looking forward to trying my best at the next three stages.”

On his partner, Balou du Reventon, runner-up Brian Moggre commented: “I really think our personality types are similar. I didn’t really give myself a chance to not get along with him, so I’m glad he liked me. We have just gone step by step, and he wants this just as much as I do. He’s a really competitive horse and I find myself a bit of a competitive rider, so we mesh well and I’m very thankful for him.”

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© 2021 Rolex – Rolex Grand Slam

Kaitlyn Williams and Cassio Melloni Top $25,000 Devon Fall Classic Grand Prix

Kaitlyn Williams and Cassio Melloni.

Devon, Pa. – Sept. 18, 2021 – The stadium surrounding the Dixon Oval at the Devon Fall Classic was packed with spectators from near and far in anticipation of the weekend’s highlight event, the $25,000 Devon Fall Classic Grand Prix. With the high energy of the night, Kaitlyn Williams and Cassio Melloni rode quickly and carefully to beat out the competition and wrap up the evening with a victory gallop around the arena.

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Lucy Matz and Jillz Earn the $7,500 Show Jumping Hall of Fame High Junior/Amateur Jumper Championship

Just prior to the $25,000 Devon Fall Classic Grand Prix, the $7,500 Show Jumping Hall of Fame High Junior/Amateur Jumper class took place under the stadium lights. Lucy Matz and Jillz, a 7-year-old KWPN mare owned by Dorothy Matz, were first to jump clear in the class with a time of 70.186 seconds. Ultimately, Matz took home the win and earned the championship title in the $7,500 Show Jumping Hall of Fame High Junior/Amateur Jumper division. Kristin Glover and her own Eyecatcher, a 12-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding, finished in second place and took home the reserve championship ribbon.

For additional information, please visit our website at www.DevonHorseShow.net.

Nicolas Delmotte and Urvoso du Roch Win RWE Prize of North Rhine-Westphalia

(Photo: Rolex Grand Slam / Peggy Schröder)

Fifty world-class horse and rider combinations entertained CHIO Aachen’s crowds over one round and a jump-off in Friday’s feature class, the RWE Prize of North Rhine-Westphalia, the final chance for those riders not already qualified to book their place in the week’s pinnacle event, Sunday’s Rolex Grand Prix.

Second to go, Germany’s Jana Wargers made the 17-fence Frank Rothenberger-designed course look straightforward, effortlessly going clear with her 12-year-old Eve Jobs-owned bay stallion, Limbridge, in 87.02s. The 30-year-old – currently ranked number 361 in the world – was to hold on to top spot for the majority of the first round, after many of the sport’s very best were unable to emulate her performance and go clear, demonstrating how difficult the course was. However, reigning Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping champion, Great Britain’s Scott Brash, and his 12-year-old gelding, Hello Jefferson, and Nicolas Delmotte of France and his 13-year-old gelding, Urvoso Du Roch, both demonstrated their talent, confidently navigating the course without accruing any penalties, thereby triggering a deciding three-horse jump-off.

First to go in the jump-off, it looked as though the crowd favourite, Jana Wargers, would make it a fairy-tale ending after going double clear in a time of 47.03s. Next up, Scott Brash was to also go double clear, but over a second faster than the German managed, slotting into top spot with just one rider to go. Last to go, July’s winner of the Rolex Grand Prix at the Chantilly Masters, Nicolas Delmotte breezed the jump-off, eventually eclipsing Scott Brash’s time, finishing double clear in 45.03s.

Looking ahead to Sunday’s Rolex Grand Prix, current world number 25, Delmotte, commented: “I’m very happy about this season’s results that I’ve had with Urvoso du Roch and also today. I’m feeling confident with him, but this will be the very first Major of his career, so I am looking forward to the Rolex Grand Prix on Sunday.”

On his 13-year-old gelding, Urvoso du Roch, who he competed with at the recent Tokyo Games, the Frenchman said: “He’s very sensitive, but he didn’t start very well with his previous rider, and would sometimes refuse jumps. Now, he has a bit of a funny technique, and I think he has to really grow into these classes with their heights. I will have to be very careful with how I ride him, to make sure I give him the opportunity to jump well, so he can use his technique to the best of his ability.”

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© 2021 Rolex – Rolex Grand Slam