Category Archives: Community/Charity

Equestrian Aid Foundation Is a Proud Partner of 43rd Annual Hampton Classic Horse Show

Wellington, Florida — August 24, 2018 — The Equestrian Aid Foundation is proud to return for the second year as an official partner of the Hampton Classic Horse Show.

The Hampton Classic Horse Show and its exhibitors hold special significance to the Equestrian Aid Foundation. “Since our inception in 1996, the Hamptons equestrian community has been an integral force in the work we do,” said foundation board member and co-founder Scot Evans. “The Hampton Classic itself is characterized by a unique international-yet-local energy. Its organizers and exhibitors are truly committed to the equestrian community and never hesitate to turn their conviction into action.”

The Equestrian Aid Foundation is one of ten charities that will participate in the horse show’s signature Jump for Charity presented by Sea Shore Stables. The event will be held during Friday’s $75,000 Douglas Elliman Grand Prix Qualifier, where riders will compete to raise money for ten designated charities with connections to the Hamptons community. Catherine Tyree will captain the Equestrian Aid Foundation’s team.

Funds for the Jump for Charity are generated through the sale of team ball caps and a raffle to win a course walk with a Grand Prix rider. Click here to make your purchases to support your favorite team, or visit the Hampton Classic’s information booths or souvenir stand.

Last year, a Jump for Charity win by Daniel Bluman earned $12,000 for Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research. Joining Tyree as team captains in this year’s competition are Georgina Bloomberg, Daniel Bluman, Beezie Madden, Callan Solem, Adrienne Sternlicht, Shane Sweetnam, Jimmy Torano, McLain Ward and Andrew Welles.

For more information, please visit EquestrianAidFoundation.org.

Interview with Rolex Grand Slam Live Contender Marcus Ehning

Marcus Ehning and Pret A Tout victorious in the Rolex Grand Prix of Aachen. Photo: Rolex / Kit Houghton)

To win the Rolex Grand Prix at the CHIO Aachen in front of your home crowd must have been amazing. What was going through your mind?

This was my second Rolex Grand Prix victory at the CHIO Aachen, so I knew already what an amazing reception I would receive if I won; however, when it actually happened, the feeling was indescribable and even louder than what I remembered. Each year the crowd gets better and the noise is incredible. I actually think winning the Rolex Grand Prix at the CHIO Aachen is one of the nicest victories in my career and certainly a moment I will never forget.

How did this year’s Rolex Grand Prix victory compare to when you won in 2006?

The first time you win a Major like this is always so special. When I competed at the CHIO Aachen 12 years ago in 2006 I really didn’t expect to win. I was younger and less experienced, so it was a bit of surprise for me! This year I felt like I had a horse who could go the distance; he was feeling good and I knew I had a very strong chance if everything went to plan. They were very different situations and many years apart, but I think both feel equally special.

Can you tell us about Pret A Tout?

Pret A Tout is 15 years old now, so he has lots of experience as well as such enormous talent. We have won some big competitions together and he is a horse I really believe in. He is very intelligent, very consistent and always knows his job. You put him in the right spot, point in him in the right direction and he will do his best for you every single time. We really put our trust in each other and it often pays off.

At the CHIO Aachen, when we entered the arena for prize-giving, I could just let go of the reins and wave to the crowd, as Pret A Tout is so relaxed, he knows he has done his job and can just enjoy the atmosphere – I think he enjoys the crowd and receiving the prizes more than me! You can see in his body language he really loves it.

How do you produce a talented horse like Pret A Tout?

You need to have a big support network behind you; producing a top Grand Prix horse does not come down to one person. It starts with the groom, the riders at home and the programme you put together with your team. The horse needs to be focused but also needs to be happy at home in order to learn and develop. I do my best to form a strong bond with all the horses; it is so important to build their trust and develop the partnership.

You have had a long and very successful career. How has the sport changed with the introduction of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping?

I think Rolex have chosen four of the best shows in the world to form the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping. All four Majors have the best atmosphere, footing, stabling conditions – all the assets that create the best environment for the riders and horses.

The introduction of the Grand Slam created a big step up for our sport; it has helped it to grow and develop and also creates a whole new element for spectators; it certainly makes it more exciting!

You weren’t sure whether you would be able to compete at CSIO Spruce Meadows ‘Masters.’ How did you make your final decision?

With the FEI World Equestrian Games™ being so close to Spruce Meadows, I didn’t want to make any decisions without consulting my team, but now we have had discussions and have decided we have the horses to make it work. The Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping bonus system was a big pull for us, as if we don’t attend Spruce Meadows our Grand Slam journey would be over and there would be no opportunity to compete for the bonuses at CHI Geneva and The Dutch Masters. The Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping is an exciting journey to be a part of, so I felt we needed to try and make it work. I am lucky to have an amazing selection of horses at home, so we will see what happens.

Which horses are you taking to CSIO Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’?

I am hoping to take Cornado NRW and Funky Fred.

Which horse are your hoping to ride in the CP ‘International’ presented by Rolex?

I don’t know which horse I will ride in this class. I haven’t competed at Spruce Meadows for such a long time, so I want to arrive and familiarise myself with the place before making any decisions. I will also see what the weather is like and how the horses are feeling as all these elements can affect which horse I choose.

What has been your career highlight so far?

The biggest highlight of my career so far has to be winning a gold medal at the 2000 Games in Sydney with the German team. It was such a special moment and one I will never forget.

What motivates you each day?

For me, my biggest motivation is not the big shows, it’s not the winning; my biggest motivation is the relationship with the horses. I love working with them, competing with them, and growing with them. To build a partnership with a horse, see how it evolves and develops and be on a journey with them is such an incredible feeling.

If you weren’t a professional show jumper, what would you be?

I honestly can’t answer that question. I am so lucky to combine my hobby and my passion with my work.

What advice would you give to a young up-and-coming rider?

I have learnt so much in my career, but I think the best advice I can give is to remember this: ‘most of the faults you accumulate in the ring are due to rider error and not a horse’s mistake. So, when it does not go to plan, you must not blame the horse; you must look at what you as a rider could have done better and that’s the only way you will improve.’

© 2018 Rolex – Rolex Grand Slam

National Horse Show Announces 2018 NHS Bluegrass Charity Benefit Initiative

Photo: Emily Moffitt and Hilfiger Van De Olmenhoeve.

Lexington, KY – Aug. 17, 2018 – The National Horse Show is excited to announce the 2018 NHS Bluegrass Charity Benefit on Friday, November 2, and Saturday, November 3. Presented by Goshen Hill and Meralex Farm, the inaugural event will host local charities and their participants in Alltech arena at the Kentucky National Horse Park, for a chance to win a cash bonus to support their cause.

In order to participate, 501(c)3 organizations will submit an application and receive a unique ticket code to share with their supporters. This code will give attendees complimentary NHS tickets for either Friday or Saturday night. Through these specific ticket codes, those in attendance can be counted, and the charity with the most supporters in attendance will win the cash bonus. Cash prizes will be awarded to the top three charities with the strongest attendance, with $5,000 awarded to first place, $3,500 to second place, and $1,500 to third.

Friday evening’s event will begin at 7pm with the inaugural $50,000 National Horse Show Hunter Classic. Additionally, the charities in attendance on Friday night will be entered to win an additional cash bonus through an Athlete’s draw, where top hunter riders will draw the names of the charities in attendance. Charities that are chosen by the top three placing riders shall receive an additional bonus: First place will receive a $2,500 bonus, second will receive a $1,000 bonus, and third will receive a $500 bonus.

Starting at 7:00pm on Saturday, the charities will be cheering on competitors in the $250,000 Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ Lexington.

Winning charities will be announced following each class.

The National Horse Show has a long history of working closely with local charities to help raise money and awareness at the event, including the Grayson Jockey Club and UK Markey Cancer Research Center. If you are interested in applying, you can fill out an application here. The application should include the name of the charity, its website, its 501(c)3 certificate and Tax ID Number, Contact person name, email, and phone number. Charities wishing to get involved must register by October 15.

To learn more about the National Horse Show, click here.

Is There a Stereotype for a Horse Racing Bettor?

Betting has now been around longer than anyone could possibly remember. Whether that be betting on sporting events, playing poker, or enjoying blackjack at a casino, people from all walks of life enjoy doing so. Many stereotypes are associated with different types of gambling, such as the belief bingo players are all old women or anyone who plays roulette in a casino is a wannabe James Bond. One of the most popular types of gambling is to bet on horse racing, but why do all different types of people enjoy this and what are the different motivations for wanting to bet on horse racing?

Some of us are just casual bettors and will occasionally place bets on sporting events usually when a big event comes around for example the Grand National or Ascot. These are usually the same bettors who will place a bet on the FA Cup final. These bettors don’t tend to use a strategy and when it comes to horse racing are likely to just bet on a horse because their friend told them to or because they liked the name. Casual bettors might also find themselves enjoying a day at the races and places bets as a part of the experience and to increase their interest in the races.

There is a small percentage that bet on horse racing who are actually professional gamblers and make a living from doing so. They will research and analysis statistics and use this information alongside their own knowledge before placing bets on horse racings. Those that also use betting exchanges to trade on horse racing will also fall into this category and will use deviations and mathematical probability to profit from races.

The bookies’ favourite type of horse racing bettors are known as ‘punters.’ These types of bettors will usually be found in betting shops and will go there on a very regular, sometimes daily basis. They will spend a lot of their income betting, do so with any real strategy and chase the thrill of winning and praise from their fellow punters. Some will even venture into the realms of online horse betting with Betpoint and other popular brands.

There are many other types of horse racing bettors too, such as those who just love the whole thing about gambling and have to very careful in how they spend their budget as well as winnings, all the way to those who are ‘semi-professional’ and bet with a strategy to make a steady income of profit, similar to those who do so full time.

Even though many people may associate different characteristics with those who enjoy betting on horse racing, it is clear that there is no correct stereotype associated with horse racing bettors. There are many different reasons why everyone chooses to bet on horse racing, whether that be a job, the social aspect of it, to try and win big, or because they are interested in stats. What is important is that whatever the reason, it must always be fun and balanced.

Reserve Your Tickets to “Life in the Doghouse”

Coming to Theaters
On-Demand
September 12th

Wellington, Fla. – Aug. 14, 2018 – Life in the Doghouse is a feature-length documentary about the lives of 2018 National Hunter Hall of Fame inductee Danny Robertshaw and his partner of 29 years, Ron Danta. The film takes you inside Danny and Ron’s Rescue, the dog rescue the couple run out of their South Carolina home.

To learn more about Life in the Doghouse, please click here. Learn how to host a screening or attend a pre-scheduled screening in your area here.

USET Foundation Awards Maxine Beard Trophy to Daisy Farish at NAYC

Daisy Farish and Great White. Photo: SEL Photography.

Gladstone, N.J. – Aug. 13, 2018 – The United States Equestrian Team (USET) Foundation is excited to announce this year’s recipient of the coveted Maxine Beard Show Jumping Developing Rider Award is Daisy Farish of Versailles, Kentucky. At just 17 years old, the accomplished athlete will be adding this prestigious award to her growing list of achievements.

The presentation of the Maxine Beard Show Jumping Developing Rider Award will take place at the FEI North American Youth Championships (NAYC) each year.

Farish earned the award after being the highest placing United States Young Rider at the 2018 NAYC in the Individual Show Jumping Final, held this year from July 31 to August 5 at Old Salem Farm in North Salem, New York.

With the ongoing mission to support and further the level of America’s developing horses and athletes, the USET Foundation Maxine Beard Show Jumping Developing Rider Award was established to elevate athletes’ opportunities on their journey to equestrian excellence.

“It was really a dream come true,” Farish explained. “I have competed at NAYC for three years in the Junior division, so this was my first year doing the Young Riders division. It was such a nice show at Old Salem Farm. They did a really great job with it. It is been a goal of mine to be successful there for a very long time, so winning meant a lot to me.”

Trained by Andre Dignelli and the team at Heritage Farm, Farish rode her 10-year-old Holsteiner gelding, Great White, to earn a spot on the podium wearing the gold medal after her incredible performances over the course of a few days.

“I have had Bruce for almost three years now. I got him when he was a 7-year-old. We have really grown together and started jumping bigger classes together. It is a really cool feeling to progress at the same rate. He has been so amazing and just couldn’t have been better at Young Riders,” Farish said.

The top three podium spots were selected to go to compete in the Young Rider’s Nation’s Cup in Belgium in September, so Farish will be venturing to Europe shortly and is hoping for further success with the United States Young Rider Teams.

“I now get to take him to Belgium in about one month. I am really excited for that,” Farish said. “As far as the rest of the year, we will continue focusing on getting experience in some of the bigger classes. He is so brave and scopey, so he has been a really great horse for me to jump the bigger classes on.”

As the winner of this immense honor, Farish will also receive a trip to a FEI Nations Cup Show Jumping competition. This will give the young athlete a look at a major international competition including the chance to observe operations in the horse show office, stabling area, veterinary inspections and schooling rings. Farish will also walk and discuss each course and have the chance to strategize with U.S. team riders and the chef d’Equipe.

Farish acknowledged how having the support of the USET Foundation has benefited her as she continues on her path toward competing for the United States at the highest level of the sport.

“The USET Foundation is really great. I have competed at USET Finals many times and I know that they are very involved in that, as well,” Farish noted. “I know everyone, especially the USET Foundation, is trying to focus on developing young riders. It is really cool to be a part of that generation that they are focusing on and supporting.”

For more information on the USET Foundation, visit www.uset.org.

Contact: Rebecca Walton
phone 561.753.3389 fax 561.753.3386
rjw@phelpsmediagroup.com

Jose Aguilar Wins $2,000 EAF Grooms Class at Blowing Rock Charity Horse Show

Class sponsor Missy Luczak-Smith with winner Jose Aguilar and Fearless, owned by Emily Durlach. Photo by Sally Floyd Kay.

Blowing Rock, N.C. – July 30, 2018 – Jose Aguilar and his charge Fearless, a 6-year-old Hanoverian gelding owned by Emily Durlach, topped a field of 14 entries to win the $2,000 Equestrian Aid Foundation Hunter Grooms Class at the Blowing Rock Charity Horse Show on Sunday.

“So much of a groom’s work happens behind the scenes, but these individuals are the heart and soul of the equestrian community,” said Missy Luczak-Smith, who has organized and sponsored the class since 2013. “The Grooms Class is a wonderful way to recognize their dedication to the horses they care for and to the sport in general.”

The top six entries were awarded cash prizes, and all class entries received gifts from FarmVet and a supply of Shapley’s Superior Grooming Products. Luczak-Smith said that the continuing partnership between Equestrian Aid Foundation and Shapley’s, which began earlier this year, is especially meaningful because both organizations share a commitment to the wellbeing of the equestrian community.

Aguilar also took home an Equestrian Aid Foundation rain jacket, donated by Luczak-Smith from The Clothes Horse. Second place winner Daniel Gomez, handling Caroline Moran’s Bacardi, took home an Equestrian Aid Foundation vest, also donated by Luczak-Smith from The Clothes Horse.

Luczak-Smith has been involved with the Equestrian Aid Foundation since 2005 and has served on its board of directors for over a decade. A consistently successful competitor in the Amateur Owner hunter division, she currently trains with Karen A. Kelley of Sims Hill Farm. The North Carolina-based training facility is a proud Equestrian Aid Foundation Stable Partner, a designation given to stables whose members work collectively to support the foundation’s mission of helping fellow horsemen recover and thrive following catastrophic illness or injury.

For more information, please visit EquestrianAidFoundation.org.

Equine Non-Profits Granted Nearly $40,000 by USA Equestrian Trust

Next Grant Application Period Opens Early 2019

July 25, 2018 — Lexington, KY — USA Equestrian Trust has awarded nearly $40,000 in grants to help fund equine-focused projects by four non-profits. Since the inception of its grants program, the Trust has awarded nearly $2.1 million in grants.

The projects funded as part of the grant application period ending in May were:

ASBURY UNIVERSITY ($5,000) to fund scholarships for students participating in the university’s service mount program, which trains horses for service with police, military, and national park rangers.

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL AT GULFPORT FOUNDATION ($3,212.75) to provide helmets and safety education to young riders.

RACING SURFACES TESTING LABORATORY ($25,423) to examine the effects of weight on the behavior of show horses’ hooves and legs while in the air. The research will compare horses with corrective and performance shoeing to flat-shod horses.

SACRAMENTO AREA HUNTER JUMPER ASSOCIATION ($5,000) to offer a free training clinic to its members, who are entry-level exhibitors and low-budget owners. The money for this grant was allocated from funding reserved for Hunter/Jumper activities in California and Nevada.

The Trust’s next grant application period will begin early in 2019. Equine non-profits wishing to make a request for funding during that application period will be required to fill out the online application form at http://trusthorses.org. To be notified once the application period has opened, please email grants@trusthorses.org.

About USA Equestrian Trust

USA Equestrian Trust’s mission is to assist in preserving and/or enhancing the quality of equestrian sport in the United States of America. Its objects and purposes are exclusively charitable, educational, and dedicated to the fostering of equestrian sports. The Trust is a private foundation pursuant to the United States Internal Revenue Code.

Contact: Press Link
Phone: 516-848-4867
Email: dderosa1@optonline.net

Safe Sport Frequently Asked Questions

US Equestrian has prepared responses to frequently asked questions regarding interim measures issued by the U.S. Center for SafeSport. The following information is an additional resource to help further educate US Equestrian members and the public around these important matters.

Safe Sport

What is the U.S. Center for SafeSport, what is their jurisdiction and how is the Center empowered?
The U.S. Center for SafeSport launched in March 2017 as an independent entity charged with (i) providing education and outreach about athlete abuse; and (ii) investigating and resolving reports of sexual misconduct. Their jurisdiction is exclusive as it relates to allegations of sexual misconduct and it retains discretionary jurisdiction over non-sexual misconduct allegations, i.e. bullying, harassment, physical and emotional misconduct.

The Center was authorized by Congress on February 14, 2018, through S. 534 – Protecting Young Victims from Sexual Abuse and Safe Sport Authorization Act of 2017.

The bill amended the Ted Stevens Olympic and Amateur Sports Act of 1978 by designating the U.S. Center for SafeSport to serve as the independent national safe sport organization, with the responsibility for developing policies and procedures to prevent the emotional, physical, and sexual abuse of amateur athletes.

What are the reporting requirements?
All USEF members and participants must report to the U.S. Center for SafeSport conduct of which they become aware that could constitute (a) sexual misconduct, (b) misconduct that is reasonably related to the underlying allegation of sexual misconduct, and (c) retaliation related to an allegation of sexual misconduct. This report must be made within 24 hours of learning about the alleged misconduct.

Importantly, the obligation to report requires reporting any conduct that comes to a member’s or participant’s attention, which if true, would violate the U.S. Center for SafeSport Code or USEF Safe Sport Policy.

Individuals should not investigate or attempt to evaluate the credibility or validity of allegations involving sexual misconduct, as a condition of reporting to the U.S. Center for SafeSport.

What happens if I do not report conduct that I am required to report?
The failure to report is a crime under federal law and it is punishable as a criminal offense. In addition, the failure to report is a violation that could result in a sanction against the individual.

Am I required to report about suspected abuse that occurred several years ago?
Yes. There is no statute of limitations applicable to reports of incidents of sexual misconduct made to the U.S. Center for SafeSport.

What resources are available to learn more about Safe Sport?
The USEF website links to the Center with extensive resources, including:

  • Reporting forms and process
  • 24 Hour Helpline
  • Definitions
  • Safe Sport Training
  • Safe Sport Code
  • USEF Safe Sport Policy
  • Safe Sport Sanctions List

Suspensions, Bans, and Enforcement

Who decides whether to issue a temporary suspension for sexual misconduct?
The U.S. Center for SafeSport has exclusive jurisdiction over reports of sexual misconduct and determines whether interim measures, including suspensions should be imposed.

Does the U.S. Center for SafeSport issue a temporary suspension in connection with every report of allegations of sexual misconduct?
No.  The U.S. Center for SafeSport issues a temporary suspension when they deem the facts and circumstances warrant it.

What is the criteria for a temporary suspension?
The U.S. Center for SafeSport may impose interim measures, i.e. a temporary suspension, when they deem it is appropriate to ensure the safety and well-being of the Reporting Party, Athletes, other Non-Athletes or the Responding Party.  Interim measures may be appropriate where an allegation against the Responding Party is sufficiently serious that the Responding Party’s continued participation could be detrimental to the sport or its reputation.

For more information refer to the U.S. Center for Safe Sport Practices and Procedures, please visit: https://www.safesport.org/files/index/tag/policies-procedures.

Is there a process for a person to seek relief from a temporary suspension?
Yes. An individual may request that the U.S. Center for SafeSport stay the temporary suspension in certain circumstances, e.g. participation in a certain event. In addition to, or in lieu of, a request for a stay, the individual may request an interim measures hearing, which will be afforded within 72 hours of such request. The interim measures hearing is conducted before an independent arbitration body.

Can a suspended person request that USEF lift their suspension or permit them to participate in some activities?
No, any request for relief from a suspension must be directed to the U.S. Center for SafeSport, and decisions will be made in accordance with their Practices and Procedures.

How are individuals notified they are under a temporary suspension?
The U.S. Center for SafeSport notifies the Responding Party by e-mail.

What is the scope of an interim measures hearing on a temporary suspension?
An interim measures hearing is limited to determining whether reasonable cause exists to justify the temporary suspension. It is not a full hearing on the merits of the case.

Is there recourse against someone who intentionally makes a false accusation?
Someone who abuses the process, falsifies information or maliciously abuses the process is subject to sanctions.

Does the USEF know the reporting party?
No, the U.S. Center for SafeSport will not identify or use the name of a Third-Party Reporter nor will it publicly release a Reporting Party’s identifying information.

Why can’t everyone know everything about an investigation?
Sharing details about allegations made, or an investigation, can impede the ability to thoroughly investigate a matter without interference. In some cases, law enforcement may be involved and the fact that an investigation is underway could compromise the ability of law enforcement to secure the evidence necessary to pursue an indictment.

Once a determination is made that a violation occurred, what guidelines does the U.S. Center for SafeSport follow to determine appropriate sanctions?
According to the U.S. Center for SafeSport Practices and Procedures, the following guidelines are used:

Sanctioning Guidelines

Sanctions will be reasonable and proportionate to the Code violation and surrounding circumstances with the intended effect of protecting relevant participants. One or more of the following sanctions may be recommended or imposed singularly or in combination: (a) written warning; b) educational or behavioral programs; (c) loss of privileges; (d) probation; (e) suspension or other eligibility restrictions, up to and including permanent ineligibility. The Officer reserves the right to lessen or broaden any range of recommended sanctions in the case of mitigating circumstances or egregiously offensive behavior.

Factors relevant to determining appropriate sanctions include, without limitation:

  • Seriousness of the Violation;
  • The Responding Party’s prior history;
  • Ages of individuals involved;
  • Whether the Responding Party poses an ongoing threat to the safety of others;
  • Voluntary disclosure of offense and/or cooperation by the Responding Party;
  • Disposition of an investigation by state or federal law authorities;
  • Real or perceived impact of incident on the Reporting Party, NGB(s) or USOC; and
  • Other mitigating and aggravating circumstances.

For more information refer to the U.S. Center for Safe Sport Practices and Procedures, please visit: https://www.safesport.org/files/index/tag/policies-procedures.

What is USEF’s responsibility to enforce sanctions?
Federal Law requires USEF to enforce sanctions imposed by the U.S. Center for SafeSport and interim measures, including temporary suspensions. Communicating the information to members and the media is an important way to ensure protection of our members and participants in equestrian sport.

When did USEF’s Safe Sport program start?
USEF established a Safe Sport Policy, effective December 1, 2013, prior to the Center being created.  The Policy covered the areas of prohibited conduct (sexual misconduct, emotional misconduct, physical misconduct, bullying, harassment, and hazing), training and education, criminal background checks, reporting and enforcement.  Program requirements included Safe Sport Training and criminal background checks for USEF Staff, Licensed Officials, Board Members and Team Chefs and Coaches.

What is the responsibility of USEF Recognized Affiliates and their associated organizations and activities?
A suspended or banned person is prohibited from participating, in any capacity, in any activity or competition authorized by, organized by, or under the auspices of the United States Olympic Committee, the national governing bodies recognized by the United States Olympic Committee, including US Equestrian, and/or any US Equestrian Affiliated Organization.  This prohibition affects a person regardless of whether or not they are a USEF member. Competition licensees and management are responsible for ensuring that no banned or suspended person is on the competition grounds.

From the US Equestrian Communications Department

New York Champion Say Florida Sandy Dies at 24

GEORGETOWN, KY – JULY 13, 2018 – Say Florida Sandy, a multiple graded stakes winner and one of the greatest New York-breds of all time, has died.

The 24-year-old stallion, who was retired with Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement Farm in Georgetown, KY, passed from an apparent heart attack on July 11, but a full necropsy is pending.

Michael Blowen, founder and president of Old Friends, made the announcement.

Bred by Sanford Bacon, the son of Personal Flag out of the Sweet Candy mare Lolli Lucka Lolli was a star of the New York racing circuit for much of his seven-year career. He won several New York-bred championships, including three New York Champion Sprinter titles and New York Horse of the Year honors for 2001.

Raced by Bacon before being lost for $70,000 in a claiming race in 1997, Sandy had several owners and conditioners, but won the lion’s share of his races for trainer Juan Serey and owner John Rotella.

In all, the dark bay stallion won 17 stakes during his 98-race career, including the Grade 2 True North at Belmont Park, the Grade 3 Gravesend at Aqueduct in 1998 and 2000, and the Grade 3 Philadelphia Breeders’ Cup Handicap. He retired from racing in 2003 with a record of 33 wins and earnings of $2,085,408.

Say Florida Sandy entered stud in 2004 at Buckridge Farm in Kinderhook, N.Y. where he stood for 10 years. As a sire he is best represented by stakes winner Say Toba Sandy, who won the Finger Lakes Juvenile Fillies Stakes in 2007.

Say Florida Sandy was pensioned by his syndicate and retired to Old Friends in 2014.

“It’s been a privilege to retire one of the top New York-breds of all time,” said Old Friends’s Blowen. “Sandy was a very sensitive stallion, so he was placed at Hurstland Farm in Midway, KY under the watchful eye of owner Alfred Nuckols, who took the greatest care of him,” Blowen added.

“We are grateful to breeder Sanford Bacon and to Walter Downey, who managed Sandy’s syndicate, for allowing us to care for their champion.”

For more information, please call (502) 863-1775 or visit the website at www.oldfriendsequine.org.

MEDIA CONTACT: Cynthia Grisolia, (347) 423-7322, cindy@oldfriendsequine.org; Michael Blowen (502) 863-1775, michael@oldfriendsequine.org