Category Archives: Horse Care/Protection

Help Protect Nevada’s Marietta Wild Burros

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has so mismanaged America’s wild burros that the hardy little animals are currently facing a genetic crisis.

Despite knowing this, BLM does nothing to address the crisis they’ve created. Instead, they continue to round up our wild burros, knowing full well they’re keeping the burro populations so low that the animals are forced to inbreed.

There isn’t a worse example of their utter FAILURE to adhere to best practices and carry out their responsibility to manage “healthy self-sustaining populations.”

Please take a minute to speak up for the Marietta Wild Burros today.

The BLM wants to remove 400 of the 500 burros in this area — 80% of the population! We MUST stop this dangerous, broken cycle of roundups and stockpiling — and that starts with raising our voices to tell BLM we DO NOT support this plan.

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Please Speak Up for Oregon’s Wild Horses

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon is pushing a management plan that would take effect for 10 YEARS until 2032. NOW is your time to speak up!

The BLM’s plan to round up these horses, leaving just 75 in each HMA, is dangerous. It will threaten the long-term genetic health of these herds, increase the risk of inbreeding and the threat of physical health problems.

Taking these herds to such low levels will severely limit opportunities for the public to view and enjoy the horses in their natural environment.

BLM also plans to use Gonacon on these mares, a fertility control which has been shown to shut down and shrivel the ovaries. In studies, only 30% of mares reversed to fertility within 10 years after 2 shots of Gonacon. The BLM shut down that study, but based on the data, it’s safe to say that Gonacon may cause permanent sterilization after just two injections.

We’re asking you to take a stand against these actions, and to tell BLM to make sure cameras are put on helicopters and trap sites at roundups. As Americans, we have a constitutional right to observe the action of our government, and we’re demanding they provide this opportunity.

We all know that the treatment of wild horses and burros during a roundup is abusive. With video documentation will we be able to change things for these beloved animals.

Please take a minute to submit your comments NOW.  Every voice counts. Please use YOURS now — stand against cruelty to wild horses and burros.

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

FEI Publishes Second Part of EHV-1 Report on 2021 Outbreak in Mainland Europe

Lausanne (SUI), 22 April 2022 — The FEI has published Part 2 of the Report into the 2021 outbreak of the neurological form of Equine Herpes Virus (EHV-1) in mainland Europe. This section of the Report focuses on the Return to Competition protocols put in place to ensure the safe resumption of FEI Events after the six-week FEI-imposed lockdown on international sport in Continental Europe.

Part 2 of the Report also focuses on the EHV-1 By-Laws and sanctioning system, and evaluates their effectiveness, along with the elements that were subsequently incorporated into the FEI Veterinary Regulations 2022 approved at the FEI Hybrid General Assembly in November 2021.

The 30-page Report (Part 2), together with over 200 pages of Annexes, has been produced by FEI Veterinary Director Dr Göran Åkerström and Grania Willis, former FEI Communications Director and now Executive Consultant to the FEI.

“It was important to take a really forensic look at the 2021 EHV-1 outbreak itself, and this was the basis of Part 1 of the Report, but it was equally important to review the Return to Competition measures post-lockdown,” Dr Åkerström said. “This is what we have done in Part 2, along with the related By-Laws and the resulting amendments to the FEI Regulations.

“Knowing how busy the members of our community are in their daily lives, we have simplified things to make the Report a more user-friendly experience by adding a dynamic Table of Contents, so that readers can go directly to the elements/sections they wish to read, as we did with Part 1 of the Report.”

Part 2 of the Report is published here, on a dedicated page within the Biosecurity Hub of the FEI website home to all the content related to the investigation into the 2021 outbreak in mainland Europe.

It sits alongside Part 1 of the Report published on 28 February 2021, which provides a comprehensive and factual picture of the outbreak, including the series of events, causes, roles, and responsibilities, and analysis.

Part 3 of the Report, elements of which will be presented at the FEI Sports Forum 2022 (25-26 April), will incorporate further risk mitigation of EHV-1, including conclusions from the scientific EHV-1 vaccination review commissioned by the FEI, and the suggested way forward. This concluding section of the Report, with the Sports Forum presentations incorporated as Annexes, will then be published as Part 3 in May 2022.

Media contacts:

Olivia Robinson
Director, Communications
olivia.robinson@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 35

Shannon Gibbons
Manager, Media Relations & Media Operations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46+

Tell BLM to Put Cameras on Roundup Helicopters

Sick and old wild horses and burros and foals are terrorized, injured, and killed in helicopter roundups.

They are chased in extreme heat in the summer and below freezing temperatures in winter. They are driven countless miles — no one knows for sure how many, because no one monitors the helicopters.

Heavily pregnant mares are sometimes pursued so long and hard that they miscarry their foals, sometimes on the run, due to the physical stress caused by the chase.

We know how the Bureau of Land Management uses helicopters is inhumane — and The Cloud Foundation is dedicated to changing BLM policy, to get cameras on the roundup helicopters, trap sites, and roundup holding facilities.

Just like law enforcement cameras, this would help to ensure transparency, accountability, and added protection for our wild horses and burros.

PLEASE TAKE ACTION NOW!

Submit your personalized comments by clicking here and demanding BLM incorporate cameras on each stage of the roundup activity — on helicopters, on the trap, and on holding sites.

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Zippy Chippy, Racing’s Loveable Loser, Dead at 31

Zippy Chippy, left, and Red Down South at Cabin Creek by Connie Bush/Tiger Eye Photography.

GREENFIELD CENTER, NY – APRIL 16, 2022 – Zippy Chippy, horse racing’s most loveable loser, has died.

A retiree at Old Friends at Cabin Creek in Greenfield Center, NY, a satellite of Kentucky’s Old Friends Thoroughbred Retirement, the son of Compliance was 31.

Campaigned by owner-trainer Felix Montserrate — who acquired the horse in 1995 by trading a truck — Zippy is known more for losing races than winning them. In 100 starts, he never crossed the finish line first. But he earned fame in other ways — for being cantankerous and for putting on carnival exhibitions where he once raced against a baseball player.

In 2000, People Magazine even voted Zippy Chippy one of the year’s “Most Intriguing Characters.”

Banned from numerous tracks due to such antics as refusing to break from the gate, Zippy finally retired from racing in 2004 and had a brief second career as an outrider’s pony at his home track, Finger Lakes in New York.

In April 2010, the aging campaigner found a home at Old Friends at Cabin Creek. Under the guidance of Cabin Creek owner and manager JoAnn Pepper, Zippy finally found solace with a paddock mate, Red Down South, a chestnut New York-bred gelding.

In recent years, they were the stars of Cabin Creek.

“Zippy was our main character here, and he lived his life his way,” said Cabin Creek’s Pepper. “He was so content, and would not do anything he wasn’t in the mood for. He taught me so much about life, and I’ll miss him forever.”

“Zippy found his greatest success as a retiree,” said Old Friends founder and President Michael Blowen. “JoAnn and all of the volunteers at Cabin Creek adored him, and he attracted hundreds of fans to the farm each year. He was finally a star. Our thanks to JoAnn and Mark Pepper and everyone at Cabin Creek for the wonderful care they gave Zippy,” Blowen continued. “I know he will be deeply missed by all.”

For more information, please call (502) 863-1775 or visit www.oldfriendsequine.org.

Update on Situation in Ukraine and Support to Ukrainian Equestrian Community

A webinar was held 30 March for the European Equestrian National Federations and associated European Equestrian Federation (EEF) members to provide a comprehensive update on the situation in Ukraine.

Jointly hosted by the European Equestrian Federation (EEF), Ukrainian Equestrian Federation (UEF), UEF Charity Foundation, and the Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI), the meeting included a thorough overview of the current actions and priorities in Ukraine, as well as an interactive discussion to establish the most efficient processes required to support the equestrian community (including the horses) in Ukraine and those who have fled to neighbouring nations.

The meeting also highlighted the strong collaborative spirit between the National Federations and the willingness from the equestrian community to provide both financial and logistical support through donations of supplies and materials, offers to host individuals, and/or horses and employment opportunities.

Since the onset of the war, the FEI, EEF, and UEF have worked together and tirelessly to provide support and aid through the UEF Charity Foundation and the FEI Solidarity Relief Fund.

Current situation in Ukraine

The UEF Charity Foundation, which was set up at the start of the conflict and has the full support of the FEI and EEF, manages the logistics and coordination of humanitarian aid, the evacuation of horses, and the general information flow to/from the community and those externally wishing to help. Through the website www.helpukrainehorses.eu, offers of material aid (feed, shavings, etc.), monetary donations, and accommodation have been received from across Europe and overseas. To date, over 375 tonnes of material aid have been received at their central hub in Poland and over €75,000 has been donated directly to the Charity Foundation.

Working hand in hand and funded by the FEI Solidarity Relief Fund, the Foundation has also managed the creation of a logistical hub in Granat, located between Lviv and the Polish border, able to accommodate up to 40 horses so they can be prepared for transfer into the European Union. Individuals should contact the UEF Charity Foundation for more information. It is expected this hub will be at full capacity in the coming days.

Whilst the achievements so far have been remarkable, the UEF Charity Foundation gave a stark warning that the requirement for aid is ongoing. Over the next month, an expected 2,000 horses will require support from the Foundation which would equate to triple the number of supplies currently held. As such, there is a need to continue working cooperatively across Europe in order to facilitate the supply of aid.

FEI Solidarity Director Jean-Phillippe Camboulives took this opportunity to urge all National Equestrian Federations “to designate an official representative to first coordinate the offers of support and supplies nationally, and then liaise with the FEI, EEF, and UEF to ensure logistical efficiency.”

Among other things, this would entail that offers for accommodation or employment be coordinated through National Federations, prior to reaching the UEF Charity Foundation and the FEI Solidarity Relief Fund.

Camboulives added that the “FEI Solidarity Relief Fund has been able to provide great support to individual members in the Ukrainian community through neighbouring and European member federations such as the Ukrainian Vaulting team which is currently training and living in Slovakia thanks to the efforts of the host National Federation and the determination of their Secretary General Zuzana Baciak. And there are many examples like this at the moment. We must continue to work together and to coordinate our efforts and use our resources effectively.”

EU Regulations on the movement of horses

FEI Veterinary Director Göran Åkerström provided an update on the situation regarding the transfer of horses from Ukraine into neighbouring EU countries, as well as the essential biosecurity protocols and sanitary requirements, which must be respected to safeguard horse welfare and horse populations both inside and outside of Ukraine. Among the topics covered, he also informed member nations of recent amendments to the existing Health Certificate published this week by the European Commission and taking effect on 29 March through to 15 December 2022 which could facilitate the transit of horses. Given the recent publication, the documents are currently under review by the FEI and clear guidance will be shared to all relevant stakeholders in the coming days.

Looking ahead and planning the future 

Reflecting on the complete collapse of the Ukrainian equestrian industry, the EEF and the FEI gave their full support to help rebuild the Ukrainian Equestrian Federation and the community.

To conclude the meeting, EEF President Theo Ploegmakers said, “The situation in Ukraine is devastating, but the collaboration we have seen across Europe through our members and the FEI is incredibly encouraging. There is still a huge amount of work to be done to help both the equines and the wider equestrian community in Ukraine and I believe through our network in Europe we can continue to provide the necessary support.”

FEI Solidarity Relief Fund:

The FEI set aside a CHF 1 Million Solidarity Relief Fund for the equestrian community in Ukraine, following the invasion by Russian military forces. The allocation was approved by the FEI Executive Board during a meeting convened on 28 February 2022, where members also unanimously condemned the invasion and agreed to remove all international equestrian events in Russia and Belarus from the 2022 FEI calendar. The United States Equestrian Federation (USEF) has also joined forces with the FEI Solidarity Relief Fund, establishing the USEF Ukraine Relief Fund to Support Ukraine horses and equestrians, with 100% of funds raised going to the FEI Solidarity Relief Fund to be distributed by the FEI.

EEF:

Founded in 2009, the European Equestrian Federation (EEF) is the representative body for the European based National equestrian Federations. Working closely with the Federation Internationale Equestre (FEI) and the National Federations, the EEF works to maximise the potential and development of equestrianism throughout the continent. The EEF is committed to promoting the sport equestrianism and its good practices, developing the sport across Europe, and providing leadership for a collective European voice in the sport.

UEF Charity Foundation:

The Charity Foundation is registered in Belgium and its mission is to help the Ukrainian equestrian community during the crisis. The Foundation works closely with the FEI and national equestrian federations. For all the latest information and activities, visit https://helpukrainehorses.eu/

Media contacts:

FEI
Olivia Robinson
Director, Communications
olivia.robinson@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 35

EEF
Alice Ward
Communications Manager
alice.ward@euroequestrian.eu
+33 6 40 62 81 97

March 30th Live Screening – The Mustangs – America’s Wild Horses

Join the EQUUS Foundation for the live screening of “The Mustangs” on March 30 in Wellington, Florida at 5 pm, presented by the Robb Report. The screening will feature a “Meet & Greet” with the film’s producer and co-director, Steven Latham, and a live Q & A with others involved with the film’s production.

Executive produced by Robert Redford, Patti Scialfa Springsteen, and Jessica Springsteen, “The Mustangs” explores the complicated history and challenges currently facing America’s Wild Horses but also highlights some hopeful solutions and features people who are helping these icons. There are more than 80,000 wild horses on our public lands and more than 50,000 in government corrals.

Wednesday, March 30, at 5:00 pm
Movies at Wellington
Wellington, FL 33414
$25 per person
Complimentary to Stepping Out Registrants
Meet & Greet & Live Q&A with Film Producer & Co-Director Steven Latham
Mask Recommended for Admittance

RSVP by Tuesday, March 29, here!

“America’s wild horses represent freedom, strength, and resilience. This film takes audiences on an exciting journey throughout the country to understand their plight,” said Latham in first announcing the film at an EQUUS Foundation event in 2019. The EQUUS Foundation is matching the first $25,000 raised during the EQUUS Foundation Stepping Out campaign, which has been extended to run through June 15, to benefit America’s Wild Horses. Learn more and register here.

To learn more about the EQUUS Foundation and their mission, please visit www.equusfoundation.org.

Can Lawsuits Save Wild Horses and Burros?

From The Cloud Foundation

If we had a nickel for every time someone said we should sue the Bureau of Land Management, we’d never need to ask for donations again! The truth is, we WISH we could sue over everything that enrages us about the wild horse and burro program. Unfortunately, the ins and outs of wild horse/burro litigation aren’t simple.

Many of you write to us with terrific legal questions, wanting to understand. So we’re doing something we’ve NEVER done before. On Wednesday, March 30th, our legal team at Eubanks & Associates is joining us LIVE on Zoom to answer YOUR questions about wild horse litigation.

Our lawyers are some of the most successful in this arena. They’ve been on the frontlines for years, fighting relentlessly for wild horses and public lands. Their track record is nearly unparalleled.

We will be LIVE on Zoom Wednesday, March 30th at 3:00pm ET.

Register here to join us for an open discussion on the current state of affairs AND a live Q&A. If you can’t make it on the 30th, no problem. Register and we’ll send you the recording after the event.

You can submit your questions in advance on the registration form OR email them to: info@thecloudfoundation.org.

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Livestock Proven Responsible for Degraded Rangelands

A recent High Country News article reported that PEER (Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility) has just released data clearly showing that over 50 MILLION acres of BLM-managed lands fail to meet the agency’s own land health standards.

What is the “primary culprit” responsible for land deterioration?

PRIVATE LIVESTOCK.

Wild equids are outnumbered by millions of commercial cattle and sheep — there’s no way they can be faulted for all rangeland degradation.

This important truth is exactly why we hosted two free webinars (linked here) on effective advocacy featuring award-winning journalists Cynthia Smoot and Vickery Eckhoff. Vickery’s groundbreaking grazing data sheet (linked here) is a valuable asset that shows how the Bureau scapegoats wild horses for rangeland damage while failing to mention livestock at all.

NOW it’s time for Congress to get the message – and we need YOU to send it. Here is your CALL TO ACTION for today —

  • CLICK HERE to send a message to Congressional Leadership with the facts — livestock, not wild horses, are overgrazing our ranges.
  • Then, SHARE this action on all your social media platforms.
  • Add the hashtag #HoldAWildHorseHearing to your posts and call on your personal representatives to hold the Bureau accountable.

The first step in preparing to fight is to get informed. Please visit the GET INFORMED page of our website to learn more about the science behind the wild horse/burro issue. We need all hands on deck, armed with the FACTS, to win for the animals.

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Alamo of the Onaqui, a Mustang Mission

Alamo in the wild ©GreigHugginsPhotography.

Cloud Foundation Volunteer Coordinator and founder of Mustang Mission Wild Horse Rescue, Erin Phillips, was recently featured with her wild mustang Alamo in the Effingham Herald this week.

Alamo is one of the lucky ones. While Erin, and all of us, prefer that Alamo could live out his life in the wild, we recognize how fortunate he is to have found a safe home off the range, especially as an older stallion.

Click here to read this heartwarming story of how a young woman from Georgia is taking on the fight to save wild horses.

As part of her research while she awaited Alamo’s arrival, Erin made it a mission to track down photographs of her mustang in the wild.

Her search led her to the very talented wild horse photographer, Greig Huggins, who captured Alamo in all his wild glory on the Onaqui range in Utah.

If you’re as in love with wild horses as we are, check out Greig’s work at www.utahwildhorses.com.

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org