Category Archives: *Featured/Spotlights

Special features, spotlights, headlines

Daniel Schneiders the Best in Four-in-Hand Marathon at Baborówko Driving Show 2022

Marek Baryłko. M&R Photo.

Baborówko, September 3, 2022 – Day 2 of Baborówko Driving Show 2022 is already behind us. The athletes had to conquer the Section A, at the length of about 6 kilometers, and the B Section of marathon obstacles, measuring almost 9 kilometres. The key was speed, precision, and accuracy.

In the four-in-hand, for the trophy of BADIX, the best one was Austria’s Daniel Schneiders driving DANCINGSTAR, ENRIQUE H, GHANDI, and FANNO. Second went to the world ranking leader Boyd Exell (AUS) with CELVIRO, CHECKMATE, HERO, and IVOR.

“We were considering our performance at the World Cup 2.5 weeks from now, so we tried to go smooth and fast without taking any risks. And the course here is great. An amazing audience and organization of the competition together with the patron of the event, who did everything to make us feel good here. We would very much like to come back next year,” said Boyd Exell.

Third place went to Markus Stottmeister (GER). The best Polish athlete was Piotr Mazure, who finished 5th with BANKIER, BLIZARD, ERAZMUS, and SANTORINI.

In the pairs competition, for the trophy of Kuhn, the fastest one was Poland’s Marek Baryłko with JUP LIBERATOR and JISKEFET. Second place went to his compatriot Szymon John with NICO and FAVORY FONIX, and third to Rens Egberink (NED) with KULANO and JEAMON VAN DE MARTHA HOEVE TEXEL.

Livestream prepared by Świat Koni is available at www.equestrian.baborowko.pl.

More information can be found at: www.equestrian.baborowko.pl.

New Pony Book Series by #1 Best-selling Author Elaine Heney Helps Children Fall in Love with Books

A series of pony books for children aged 8 and over by the #1 best-selling author Elaine Heney has shot to the top of the Amazon best-selling charts in the USA, UK & Canada.

These charming Connemara pony books follow the lives of 12-year-old Clodagh and her pony Ozzie.  In the Forgotten Horse, the first book in the series, Clodagh’s life changes dramatically when a mysterious grey Connemara pony called ‘Ozzie’ appears in the paddock by her home. Charged with caring for him by the local manor’s owner, she quickly befriends him. But what will happen when his absent owner unexpectedly reappears and sells him to a riding school with a very bad reputation? Can Clodagh save her new pony friend? Or does she have to say goodbye to Ozzie forever?

These wholesome and heart-warming books are capturing the imagination of children all over the world, and helping them to put down their digital devices and start reading books again – much to the delight of their parents! You can find these books at www.writtenbyelaine.com.

Elaine Heney is the #1 best-selling equestrian author, award-winning filmmaker, director of Grey Pony Films, and creator of the Listening to the Horse™ documentary. She has helped over 120,000 horse owners in 113 countries to create great relationships with their horses. Learn more at www.greyponyfilms.com.

Markel Jockeys Jumping Set for Spectacular Return to London International Horse Show

The Markel Jockeys Jumping in aid of The Injured Jockeys Fund will be returning to The London International Horse Show for the first time since 2019, featuring some of the most prolific jockeys of Great Britain and Ireland. Back by popular demand, this competition sees jockeys attempt a show jumping course at the famous London Horse Show – often with hilarious results. The 2022 competition will be a girls versus boys format and takes place on the evening of Monday 19 December.

Heading the boys’ team will be 20-time champion National Hunt jockey Sir Anthony ‘AP’ McCoy, who will be seeking to reverse the 2019 result, in which the girls were victorious. From the world of Flat Racing will be Jim Crowley, who started his professional career over fences riding for the stable of show jumping legend Harvey Smith. Since his switch to the flat, Crowley has been crowned champion jockey and won many of the world’s most prestigious races, most recently the Group 1 Juddmonte International Stakes last week aboard Baaeed, currently the highest rated horse in the world.

They will be joined by 2021 champion National Hunt jockey Harry Skelton, son of Olympic double gold medallist Nick Skelton CBE. Skelton will be looking to reclaim the title he won in dramatic circumstances following a bridle malfunction in 2018. Skelton’s wife, Bridget Andrews, will be a pivotal part of the girls’ team, following a successful performance in the 2019 edition. Andrews, a Cheltenham Festival winner, will be seeking to make it a double over her husband, this time at the iconic ExCeL London.

Another husband-and-wife combination likely to go head-to-head at The London International Horse Show will be flat jockeys Tom Marquand and Hollie Doyle. Doyle will head to The London International Horse Show on the back of another record-breaking season, during which she claimed her first Classic win in the French Oaks, becoming the first British female jockey to win a Classic. Doyle holds the record for victories in a single season by a female rider in the UK and will be looking to add to her list of accomplishments in London. Marquand, also a Classic winner having won the St Leger Stakes in 2020, will add to the stellar list of jockeys taking part in the class, described by Clare Balding in 2019 as “the most extraordinary sporting event I’ve ever seen,” with more top-class participants to be announced in due course.

Looking ahead to the 2022 event, McCoy, President of the Injured Jockeys Fund, said: “At one of our previous appearances in the Markel Jockeys Jumping at The London International Horse Show, Olympic gold medallist Nick Skelton resorted to using a cable tie to fix the bridle on Harry’s horse, so let’s hope we are a bit more professional this time around!” He continued, “At our last appearance in 2019, we were beaten by the girls, so we’ll be putting that right this year. In all seriousness though, it’s for a great cause in the Injured Jockeys Fund – and we all love taking part.”

Juliet Redfern, Head of Equine Insurance at Markel, added: “Markel is delighted to be sponsoring this fabulous event, as a specialist equine insurer we are committed to supporting the wider equine industry through various charitable initiatives. We have supported this particular event for six years; it’s great fun, but more importantly provides crucial funds to the Injured Jockeys Fund, a wonderful charity that looks after its own so well.”

Taking place from 15 to 19 December at ExCeL London, The London International Horse Show hosts three FEI World Cup™ competitions in Dressage, Carriage Driving, and Show Jumping, attracting the world’s best equestrian athletes. Spectators can also look forward to entertainment from The Shetland Pony Grand National, Kennel Club Dog Agility, and two international displays, to be announced.

The Markel Jockeys Jumping in aid of the Injured Jockeys Fund will be part of the Show’s thrilling final session, which also includes the five-star London Grand Prix, featuring the finest international show jumping horse and rider combinations.

More information about The London International Horse Show, including how to buy tickets, can be found here.

The London International Horse Show
www.londonhorseshow.com
Niki McEwen / nmcewen@revolutionworld.com

BLM Targets One of the Last Two Herds in New Mexico

Photo credit ©GingerKathrens.

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) New Mexico has wiped out nearly 75% of the original wild horse habitat in the state. Now the agency plans to decimate one of the last two remaining herds – Bordo Atravesado – by removing 190 of the 230 wild horses living in the area.

PLEASE add your name to the list of people who stand against this systematic destruction of our wild herds.

BLM also plans to use Gonacon as fertility control on mares returned to the range. Studies show that Gonacon is likely permanent after just two applications. It effectively destroys the ovaries and therefore natural hormone production that drives natural, wild behaviors.

We need as many Americans ON RECORD opposing this extermination plan for the Bordo Atravesado horses as possible. Will you join us now? Please take a stand today — it takes less than a minute to add your name to the list of those who stand in resistance to BLM’s plan for our wild herds.

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

BLM Plans Research on Wild Mares

Gaelic Princess, pictured in her Pryor Mountain home with Cloud’s blue roan son, Mato Ska.

When Ginger first visited wild horses, she fell in love with these magnificent animals and their natural, wild behaviors. Observing the sophisticated herd social structure and intimate interactions in wild horse families fascinates millions of people around the world.

We know and love lead mares, like Gaelic Princess. She was Mato Ska’s first lead mare and helped him understand the job of a good band stallion. Lead mares like Gaelic Princess help organize and direct the family band. They often decide when to head to water, when to rest, when it’s playtime (and when it’s not!).

One of the biggest threats to our beloved wild horses and burros is the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM’s) pursuit of fertility control that is permanent and/or destroys the natural, wild behaviors that make wild horses who they are.

Today we’re asking you to PLEASE add your name to the list of people who stand against sterilizing our wild mares and destroying their natural wild behaviors.

Help us send the BLM a message — that We the People demand that all fertility control used in management of our wild horses be reversible and NOT destroy or interfere with their normal hormone production.

Please take a stand for them now, before we lose them forever.

Deadline for Public Comments: August 22, 2022

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Trigger’s Final Surprise, by Ginger Kathrens

A few short months ago, I got a surprise nighttime text and photos from our Freedom Family caretakers Jaime and Jeremy Wade. Mae West had a newborn foal. Knock me over with a feather.

Our aging stallion Trigger passed away last fall, and I imagined that with his death, there would be no more foals. Before he passed, we had darted Mae West (our only mare to foal in the past few years) with the safe and reversible fertility control PZP. But every once in a while, a mare will not respond to the vaccine. Mae sure fits into that category, but who can be sorry when the result is so beautiful?

Last week, great friends of The Cloud Foundation, Cynthia Smoot, her husband Bill Weller, and their friend Karen traveled east with me to visit our “Freedom Family” mares and our still unnamed filly. She is bold as brass and gave Bill a chance to nearly touch the wild!

Would you help us name her? We want to have a naming contest. When you make a donation of any size to help us support the Freedom Family, you can submit one name to be considered for Trigger’s ‘last surprise.’

With a father named Trigger, mom Mae West, and sisters Josie and Calamity Jane, we hope you have fun coming up with a name for this little filly. As a thank you, we’ll send an autographed 8×10 photograph of her if your name is selected.

It truly takes a village to both keep wild horses in the wild and to keep our Freedom Family horses safe and protected in their Colorado home. Please consider helping us name this new member of the Freedom Family and making a donation to support our important work.

Submit your suggestions by next Sunday, August 21st to be considered.

Happy trails,
Ginger

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

USEF Pony Finals Makes Thrilling Return to Kentucky Horse Park

Finley Baras and Spring Fling.

Lexington, Ky – August 9, 2022 – Young riders were eager to enter the famed Rolex Arena at the Kentucky Horse Park Tuesday morning for the 2022 USEF Pony Finals presented by Honor Hill Farms. The Bluegrass State welcomed bows and braids back for another year of promising young talent to showcase their dedication to the sport through three elements of hunter competition.

Day one of competition kicked off with the Small Green Pony Hunter Model and Under Saddle, and Regular Large Pony Hunter Model and Under Saddle. At the conclusion of the Regular Large Pony Division, it was Payton Flanders and Best Blonde to top the pack of 153 ponies in the under saddle, while Jole Kosloske and Chic In Time took the blue ribbon in the model. The Small Green Pony Hunters rounded out the competition day with Vivian Golden and Preston besting the field of 43 ponies to win the model, and Finley Baras and Spring Fling winning the under saddle.

Read more.

For more information, please visit www.KentuckyHorseShows.com.

Soring, the Scar Rule, and Self-Regulation: GT’s Equine Industry Group Examines the HPA

Tennessee Walking Horse.

West Palm Beach, FL (August 9, 2022) – The Horse Protection Act (HPA), 15 U.S.C. § 1821 et seq., passed in 1970 and amended in 1976, outlaws the practice of horse “soring,” an inhumane practice of causing pain to horse’s foot or leg to produce a more desirable gait. “Soring” is defined as the application of any chemical (e.g., mustard oil or diesel fuel), mechanical agent (e.g., overweight chains), or practice (e.g., trimming a hoof to expose the sensitive tissue) inflicted upon any limb of a horse that can cause or be expected to cause the horse to suffer physical pain or distress when moving.

The practice of soring is aimed at producing an exaggerated show gait for competition, and is primarily used in the training of Tennessee Walking Horses, racking horses, and related breeds. Although a similar gait can be obtained using selective breeding and humane training methods, soring achieves this accentuated gait with less effort, and over a shorter time frame. An individual showing a “sored” horse has an unfair competitive advantage over individuals showing horses that are not sore. Under 15 U.S.C. § 1828, Congress empowered the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to promulgate regulations to implement the provisions of the HPA. The Secretary exercised this authority soon after HPA’s 1976 amendments and, through the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), issued regulations governing inspections to detect the use of devices, equipment, and chemical substances designed to cause soring (9 C.F.R. § 11.1, et seq.). Section 11.1 permits horse industry organizations (HIOs), defined as “organized group[s] of people, having a formal structure, who are engaged in the promotion of horses through the showing, exhibiting, sale, auction, registry, or any activity which contributes to the advancement of the horse,” to hire and license private individuals known as designated qualified persons (DQPs) to perform soring inspections, enforce penalties, and administer appeals of those penalties. The regulations provide certain minimum licensing requirements, and DQPs must be either veterinarians with equine experience or “[f]arriers, horse trainers, and other knowledgeable horsemen” with relevant experience that are trained and licensed by an HIO. See § 11.7.

In two cases decided in 2016 and 2020, the HPA’s regulatory system for detecting and preventing horse soring came under scrutiny and criticism. The first case is McSwain v. Vilsack, 2016 WL 4150036 (N.D. Ga, May 25, 2016), which involved a regulation promulgated by the Secretary of the USDA in 1979 known as the “Scar Rule.” A horse is “sore” under the Scar Rule if it shows signs of previous soring. The Scar Rule sets forth criteria for an examiner to determine whether any scar tissue on the horse is a result of impermissible soring rather than normal wear and tear. In McSwain, Plaintiffs Keith and Dan McSwain sued the Secretary and the USDA, alleging that the Defendants had disqualified their prize Tennessee Walking Horse, “Honors,” on multiple occasions under an unwritten “once-scarred-always-scarred” rule, in which a prior disqualification under the Scar Rule is used as a basis to disqualify the horse in subsequent competitions. Plaintiffs claimed that application of a “once-scarred-always-scarred” rule effectively ends a horse’s career without any due process, since disqualification under the Scar Rule is not subject to challenge or review. This result, claimed Plaintiffs, can be much harsher than the penalties provided under 15 U.S.C. § 1825, which require notice and an opportunity for a hearing. In granting Plaintiffs’ motion for a preliminary injunction, the court held that the Plaintiffs had a constitutionally protected interest in showing Honors without unreasonable government interference, and enjoined Defendants from disqualifying Honors under the Scar Rule without providing Plaintiffs an adequate pre-deprivation process, including notice and the opportunity to be heard.

The second case scrutinizing the HPA’s regulatory system is Humane Society of the United States v. United States Department of Agriculture, 2020 WL 4286826 (D.C., July 27, 2020). In Humane Society, Plaintiffs brought an action for declaratory and injunctive relief, alleging various violations of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) in connection with a proposed, but never published, HPA regulation known as the “2017 Rule.” The 2017 Rule grew out of a 2010 report issued by the USDA’s Office of the Inspector General (OIG), concluding that APHIS’ program for inspecting horses for soring was not adequate to ensure that the animals were not being abused. The report recommended that APHIS abolish the DQP program and instead provide independent, accredited veterinarians to perform inspections at sanctioned shows. In 2016, APHIS published a proposed rule that would replace the HIO-administered scheme with USDA-licensed inspectors, and prohibit certain devices, equipment, and foreign substances with no legitimate purpose other than to cause horse soring. Under the proposed rule, APHIS would train and license DQPs to inspect horses at horse shows, exhibitions, sales, and auctions for compliance with the HPA. On Jan. 11, 2017, the proposed rule was sent to the Office of Federal Register (OFR) for publication as a final rule.

However, on Jan. 20, 2017, President Trump’s chief of staff issued a memorandum directing all agencies to immediately withdraw any rule that had not yet been published in the Federal Register. Because the proposed rule had not yet been published, the USDA sent a letter to the OFR requesting that it be withdrawn from the public docket. The court granted Defendants’ motion to dismiss all the Plaintiffs’ claims, holding that Plaintiffs lacked standing since they failed to allege any injury stemming from withdrawal of the 2017 Rule; neither the APA nor the caselaw prevented agencies from withdrawing rules prior to publication in the Federal Register.

The U.S. Equestrian Federation (USEF), the sole national governing body for equestrian sport, self regulates the welfare of horses within the 11 breeds that it recognizes, as well as horses within three unrecognized breeds that participate in USEF-licensed competition. USEF’s General Rule 839 (4)(o) addresses soring in connection with Tennessee Walking Horses, Rack Horses, and Spotted Saddle Horses (breeds not recognized by USEF), and states that “[s]oring and/or the use of an action device on any limb of a Tennessee Walking Horse, Racking Horse, or Spotted Saddle Horse. . . in any class at a Federation Licensed Competition is prohibited.” The term “action device” is defined broadly and is consistent with the definition provided in the HPA. Rule General Rule 839 (4)(p) prohibits “[s]oring of any horse” and defines soring as “including but not limited to the application of caustic chemicals to a horse’s legs or hooves, in order to cause pain and/or affect a horse’s performance, and/or used as a training technique.”

Similar to the HPA’s notice and hearing provisions, USEF has a grievance procedure for athletes wishing to challenge a denial or threatened denial to participate in competition due to rule violations. While USEF’s rules do not appear to have a complementary provision to the Scar Rule, the soring prohibitions under the HPA and USEF’s regulatory scheme are intended to be complementary. USEF states on its website that it supports both the HPA and the USDA regulations designed to implement the Act’s provisions. However, one of the findings in the USDA’s 2010 OIG report discussed in Humane Society was that DQPs were reluctant to issue violations, since excluding horses from shows inconvenienced their employers, and made it less likely that they would be hired for other shows. Given the withdrawal of the 2017 Rule, detractors might criticize the HPA and USEF’s rules as allowing the horse industry to regulate itself, and as failing to prohibit certain devices, equipment, and foreign substances that have no purpose other than to cause horse soring. It remains to be seen whether the USDA will seek to resurrect some form of the 2017 Rule, and how the caselaw under the HPA will develop.

Media contact:
Equinium Sports Marketing, LLC
Holly Johnson
holly@equinium.com
www.equinium.com

Triple Gold for Ireland and Germany; French Rider Defends Eventing Title

Mia Allegra Lohe, Tovdals Golden Future Imperial, GER. Photographer: Leszek Wójcik.

All of the medals have been decided at the 2020 FEI Pony European Championships in Strzegom. The rivalry ended in the eventing, showjumping individual final, and dressage Freestyle.

Eventing

Irish riders Ben Connors with Cornafest Fred, Josh Williamson with Ardeo Fireman, Matthew Love with Lucky for Some, and Claire O’Ryan with Carhu Melody took the lead after brilliant cross-country trials. Even three knockdowns and the added 12 penalties could not threaten their win, with the result of 104,1, and they took home the gold medal. The best one of them was Ben Connors, who was clear in the jumping trial and finished with the silver individual medal (28,9).

Team silver went to Germany, with the result of 107,6. They kept their second position through all of the trials. Team member Merle Hoffmann with Penny Lane WE finished with the bronze medal individually (31).

The French, defending their last year’s title, lost their dressage lead in the cross-country, after one of their riders had a run-out at the last combination and that knocked them down into third. They added 8 penalties to the score, but that kept them in the bronze medal position, finishing with the score of 108,9.

The best one of them was once again Mae Rinaldi aboard Boston Du Verdon. The dressage leader went over the XC clear and perfectly inside the time, and delivered yet another perfect round, to finish at 25,6. “It’s amazing. My pony was fantastic all week. Yesterday’s cross-country was long, with demanding fences and combinations, but Boston was great as always. Today we were under a lot of pressure, but my pony jumped great and I’m really happy to win the European Championships for the second time in a row!”

Dressage

Germany was unbeatable this year. Their riders took home the gold medal twice, winning both the team classification and Freestyle, and took all the spots at the podium in the individual class.

In the Freestyle, the best one of them was Mia Allegra Lohe with Tovdals Golden Future Imperial – 80,355%; the silver went to Maddy Dijkshoorn from the Netherlands with Boogie De L’Aube – 77,795%.

There was also a historic success for a Polish rider. Veronica Pawluk with D’Artagnan 187 took home the bronze medal, with the result of 77,490%.

Showjumping

Ireland took it all, both in the team and individual classifications. In the individual final, the two decisive rounds have confirmed the amazing form of the Irish, that have dominated the podium. Two riders in green jackets finished all of the 5 courses at this year’s championships on a zero-penalty score. The champion had to be determined in the jump-off. There the win belonged to James Derwin with Rincoola Babog – the same one that secured the team’s gold medal on Friday with his faultless round. Silver went to James Brennan aboard the 9-year-old MHS Glow, and bronze to Coen Williams with Saxton Freedam, who also did not make any mistakes on the jumps throughout the week, but finished the first round with three points for time.

Results: https://zawodykonne.com/zawody/6/tour/865

Contact:
www.strzegomhorsetrials.pl
press@strzegomhorsetrials.pl

BLM Ends Roundup in Colorado’s Piceance East Douglas HMA

©GingerKathrens.

The Bureau of Land Management has ended their Piceance East Douglas roundup 190 wild horses short of their planned removal.

Thank you for taking action on behalf of these innocent animals!

According to BLM’s website, they’ve captured 864 wild horses including 166 foals. They returned 41 stallions to the range, and we understand they are treating some mares with fertility control and holding them for release in 30 days.

Hundreds of Piceance wild horses have been spared the trauma of the chase and capture in the sweltering summer temperatures — thanks to YOU.

Thank you for NEVER giving up and for TAKING ACTION on behalf of our wild horses! Without YOU, the helicopters would still be flying.

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org