Category Archives: Show Jumping

Santiago Lambre and Dingeman Dash to Win $37k Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake CSI 3*

Santiago Lambre and Dingeman © Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – July 22, 2021 – Santiago Lambre (MEX) and his mount, Dingeman, took first place honors in the Tryon Summer 6 $37,000 Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake CSI 3* at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC), stopping timers at 28.935 seconds. Caelinn Leahy (USA) and Coldplay 31, a 2009 Westphalian gelding (Cassini ll x Phantom) owned by Steve Schaefer, took second place on a clear jump-off performance of 29.585 seconds, while Aaron Vale (USA) and Elusive, a 2009 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Rodrigoo x Capfucino) owned by Thinks Like A Horse, claimed third-place honors on a fault-free effort in 29.773 seconds.

The Ken Krome (USA)-designed course saw 37 horse and rider combinations in the first round, with 15 pairs returning for the jump-off. Lambre and the 2008 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Nintender x Darnels), owned by Aurora Rangel De Alba and Gestut Lewitz, were first to go in the shortened second round, so he took all risks once he walked into the ring, ensuring he would not be bested by the competition. “It was all or nothing to win; there was no room for adding strides!” he said with a grin.

For more info and results, visit www.Tryon.com.

Jumping Looks Set to Be a Testing Thriller

Nick Skelton (GBR) celebrates his gold medal win at the Rio 2016 Games with Big Star.  FEI/Eric Knoll.

Tokyo 2020 is one of the most talked-about Olympic Games of all time, and as it arrives on our doorsteps a year late and filled with challenges, for the stars of international Jumping, the questions are clear.

How will the three-rider no-drop-score format play out in the battle for the Team medals? And is there anyone to get in the way of the pair who claimed individual silver at the World Equestrian Games in 2018 and the individual European title a year later – Martin Fuchs and his super-horse Clooney – when it comes to glorious individual gold?

With so few team competition opportunities in the lead-up to these Games, it’s difficult to make any predictions. However, if the Division 1 Nations Cups that took place last month are anything to go by, then the on-form countries are Sweden, Switzerland, Germany, and The Netherlands.

A total of 75 athletes will be chasing down their individual dreams when the action begins at Baji Koen on 3 August, and athletes from 19 countries will be giving it everything they’ve got when the team contest gets underway on 6 August. It will be a fascinating four days of Olympic equestrian sport.

Defending champions

Team France are the defending champions having clinched gold for only the second time in Olympic history at the Rio 2016 Games, and Penelope Leprevost is the only member of that victorious team to line out again at Tokyo 2020 where she will be joined by Mathieu Billot and Nicolas Delmotte. Silver went to the USA five years ago, while Germany won out in a thrilling jump-off against Canada for the bronze.

Comeback king Nick Skelton won Britain’s first Olympic Individual title in Rio with Big Star, a phenomenal and emotional achievement for the 58-year-old athlete who had broken his neck in a fall 16 years earlier. Silver went to Sweden’s Peder Fredricson and the brilliant All In, and this pair – who won the individual European title in 2017 – will be joined by Malin Baryard-Johnson and her feisty mare Indiana and Henrik von Eckermann with King Edward in Tokyo.

The British have two of the team that secured Olympic gold for their country for the first time in 60 years in London in 2012, and both Scott Brash (Hello Jefferson) and Ben Maher (Explosion W) also look well set to challenge strongly for the individual medals.

But the Team and Individual line-ups are crammed full of winners, the Americans buoyed up by their victory at the FEI World Equestrian Games™, Belgium bolstered by their success at the 2019 European Championships and the Irish full of determination after clinching both Olympic qualification and the series title at the FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ Final later that year.

Record

Germany holds the record for the greatest number of Olympic gold medals, with five Individual and eight team titles since Jumping joined the Olympic programme in 1900. And with world number one Daniel Deusser (Killer Queen), Christian Kukuk (Mumbai), and Andre Thieme (DSP Chakaria) showing fantastic form, they are going to be mighty competitive once again.

Meanwhile, with world number two Fuchs, world number three Steve Guerdat, who claimed the individual title in London nine years ago, and FEI World Cup Final 2007 winner Beat Mandli in their mix, the Swiss also look fairly unstoppable.

But the hosts from Japan can’t be overlooked. They finished sixth in Olympic-level company at the last of the four legs of the FEI Nations Cup series in Rotterdam just two weeks ago and under the stewardship of German legend Paul Schockemohle, and mounted on some fabulous horses, Daisuke Fukushima (Chanyon), Koki Saito (Chilensky), and Eiken Sato (Saphyr des Lacs) will be giving it more than their all on home soil when the Games begin.

They’ve only ever taken one Olympic medal, when Takeichi Nishi came out on top with Uranus in Los Angeles in 1932. That was an interesting Games because, staged in the throes of a world-wide depression, only three teams showed up – Mexico, the USA, who were considered big favourites, and a Swedish side made up of their Eventing squad. And not one of them finished.

There were three riders on each team and American chances were dashed when Lt John Wofford was eliminated. So when Sweden’s Lt Arne Francke suffered the same fate along with all of the Mexicans, no team medals were awarded. But Japanese Baron, Takeichi Nishi, produced a brilliant ride with his French-bred horse to take the Individual honours.

There will be three riders per team this time around as well, so just like back in 1932 when mistakes proved more than costly, there will be no room for error in the team competition, and Individual glory will go to only the best of the best.

How it will play out…

There will be two Individual Competitions and two Team Competitions, taking place on different days.

The first Individual competition takes place on Tuesday 3 August and is a qualifier for the Individual Final the following day. It will be Table A not against the clock and without a jump-off. Athletes will place according to their penalties and in case of a tie they will be separated by the time of their round. If still tied, they will be placed equal.

The Individual Final is open to the 30 best-placed athletes from the first Individual competition and will be Table A, one round against the clock, with a jump-off for the medal placings if there is a tie on penalties. All athletes start on a zero score in the Individual Final and starting order will be in reverse order of merit following the first Individual competition.

The first Team competition is open to 19 teams of three athletes and all teams will start on a zero score. It will take place on 6 August and is a qualifier for the Team Final on 7 August. It will be Table A not against the clock and without a jump-off in the event of equality of penalties for first place. Disqualification of one athlete will result in the disqualification of their entire team.

Team scores will be decided by adding the penalties incurred by all three team members. Athletes who withdraw, are eliminated, or retire from the competition will not be given a score and their team will be placed according to the combined scores of the remaining two team-members. Three-member teams will be placed ahead of teams of two.

The best 10 teams, including those tied for 10th place, will qualify for the Team Final which will be Table A not against the clock over one round with a jump-off in the event of equality of penalties for the medal placings. Starting order will be in reverse order of merit from the first Team competition.

After the first two athletes from each team have competed there will be a compulsory 20-minute break. An intermediate classification of the teams will decide the starting order of each team’s third athlete.

One substitution of an athlete/horse combination is permitted per team. Substitutes are not permitted to compete in a jump-off.

THE FULL LIST here.

FEI Olympic Hub HERE.

by Louise Parkes

Media contacts:

Grania Willis
Executive Advisor
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 42

Olivia Robinson
Director, Communications
olivia.robinson@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 35

Shannon Gibbons
Manager, Media Relations & Media Operations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Conor Swail Conquers Tryon Summer 5 with Trio of Wins

Conor Swail and Koss Van Heiste ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – July 18, 2021 – Conor Swail (Wellington, FL) and Koss Van Heiste claimed a win in the $25,000 Tryon Resort Sunday Classic at Tryon International Equestrian Center & Resort (TIEC) after clearing the jump off in 35.49 seconds, also grabbing reserve with Count Me In on a time of 36.2 seconds. It was a winning week for Swail, who dominated Saturday evening’s $73,000 Cleghorn Gun Club Grand Prix CSI 2* aboard Vital Chance de la Roque, as well as Friday’s $6,000 Speed Stake CSI 2* with Theo 160. Though Swail and Vital Chance de la Roque didn’t win the $37,000 Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake CSI 2* Thursday, they did collect reserve honors to set themselves up for a win under the lights in Tryon Stadium.

Sunday’s $25,000 Tryon Resort Sunday Classic one-two finish was icing on the cake for Swail after a victorious week, and he walked into the ring aboard Count Me In, the 2007 Hanoverian gelding (Count Grannus x Sherlock Holmes), with only himself to beat. The Guilherme Jorge course design tested 24 entries in the first round, with only one pair challenging Swail’s two jump-off mounts: Harold Chopping (Southern Pines, NC) and Geronimo SCF, the 2011 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Veron x Mary Louise) owned by Diane Halpin, who earned third place on a time of 37.093.

Swail was first to test the jump-off track with Koss Van Heiste, the 2010 Belgian Warmblood gelding (Breemeersen Adorado x Contact Van de Heffinck) owned by Eadaoin Aine Ni Choileain, an experienced and longtime ride of his. They could have had an even faster round than their winning time, Swail admitted: “It wasn’t the round I wanted, to be honest. I wanted to be a little quicker than that! I gave Harold a little window there.” After Chopping finished his clear round with the leaderboard unchanged, however, Swail was free to ride Count Me In, a mount he’s been riding for only a few weeks, to a clear round and second place.

“It’s nice when you’re going [into the ring] last and you know that you’ve won the class anyway,” Swail admitted. “He’s a new horse to me, so I just didn’t over-ride him too much, and I had a nice round on him. We’re just getting to know each other a little better, and trying to build a good relationship and trust each other. That’s the first bigger class I’ve done on him, so I’m very pleased with him.”

For more info and results, visit www.Tryon.com.

Aaron Vale Begins with a Bang in $37,000 Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake CSI 2*

Aaron Vale and Prescott ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – July 15, 2021 – Aaron Vale (USA) and Prescott soared to victory in the $37,000 Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake at Tryon International Equestrian Center & Resort (TIEC), conquering the jump-off course with a time of 38.307 seconds. Vale also claimed the yellow ribbon along with Elusive, the 2009 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Rodrigoo x Capfucino) owned by Thinks Like A Horse, with a time of 38.954 seconds. Conor Swail (IRL) and Vital Chance de la Roque, the 2009 Selle Francais gelding (Diamant de Semilly x Rivage Du Poncel) owned in partnership with Adeline Hecart, rode to second place with a time of 38.642 seconds.

The course, designed by Guilherme Jorge (BRA), challenged 53 horse-and-rider combinations in the first round of competition. Twenty pairs jumped clear to return for the second round jump-off. Vale and Prescott, the 2012 Holsteiner gelding (Lordanos x Unknown) owned by Thinks Like A Horse, re-captured the lead after Elusive’s clear round and previous winning time was bested by Swail.

Vale’s plan going into the jump-off with Prescott, a less experienced horse than Elusive, was to leave out strides and go as efficiently as possible, he shared. “I was really fast! I probably did two strides fewer to the combination. He was balanced, jumped it easily, and was really quick coming out of the combination. We left one out of the next vertical. And at that point, I felt like I was up by quite a bit, so I felt like I just wanted to stay in my rhythm and not press it. I felt if I left the last three jumps up, I’d done enough to win it, and that was how it played out!”

For more info and results, visit www.Tryon.com.

It’s All Go for Tokyo

Photo: Baji Koen Equestrian Park.

Before the action even begins, the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games are already unforgettable. Running a year later than scheduled and with multiple challenges along the way, the best of the best are now putting in their final preparations ahead of the Opening Ceremony on 23 July 2021.

It has been a difficult lead-in period, with so many interruptions due to the pandemic that has affected the entire world and the Equine Herpes Virus (EHV-1) impacting Mainland Europe, then this week’s news that there will be no spectators at any of the venues in order to ensure safe and secure Games. But the statistics for equestrian sport are more impressive than ever, with a record number of countries fielding teams and individuals in the three disciplines of Dressage, Eventing, and Jumping.

The Tokyo 2020 sport entries (FEI Definite Entries) reveal that the flags of 50 nations will fly high during two weeks of spectacular sport. A total of 200 athlete-and-horse combinations are listed, along with an additional 48 Alternate/Reserves.

Formats

The new three-member format has changed the dynamic of the team competitions. Not only is the pressure more intense as each individual performance will count for so much, but it has also opened the door for many more countries to take part.

At the Rio 2016 Olympic Games a total of 27 nations lined out in Jumping, with 15 of those sending teams, while this time 20 teams and individuals from a further 15 countries will take part to boost the number of National Olympic Committees (NOC) represented in Tokyo to 35. In Eventing the number of participating countries has increased from 24 to 29, with 15 teams compared to 13 in Rio, and in Dressage the numbers jump from 25 to 30 nations and from 11 teams to 15.

Centred

The equestrian events of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games will be principally centred at Baji Koen Equestrian Park in Setagaya. This is a public park owned by the Japan Racing Association, which was also the venue for Dressage at the Tokyo 1964 Olympic Games.

Back then Eventing was staged in Karuizawa and Jumping took place at the National Olympic Stadium. For the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, the fully refurbished Baji Koen will host Dressage, Jumping, and two of the three phases of Eventing.

Course designer, Derek di Grazia (USA), has spent the last five years creating the Eventing Cross Country course on what was previously a landfill site at the waterfront at Sea Forest with a stunning backdrop of Tokyo Bay and the city. Equestrian shares the venue, which will become a public park after the Games, with Olympic rowing and canoeing.

The Games of the XXXII Olympiad promise to be like nothing that has gone before and equestrian sport is already breaking records.

Media contacts:

Grania Willis
Executive Advisor
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 42

Olivia Robinson
Director, Communications
olivia.robinson@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 35

Shannon Gibbons
Manager, Media Relations & Media Operations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Harold Chopping and Catchphrase Collect $50,000 USHJA International Hunter Derby Win

Harold Chopping and Catchphrase ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – July 9, 2021 – Tryon International Equestrian Center & Resort (TIEC) hosted its second $50,000 USHJA International Hunter Derby of the season during the Tryon Summer 4/Tryon Riding & Hunt Club Charity II Horse Show, with top honors earned by Harold Chopping (CAN) and Catchphrase, who combined for a two-round total score of 384. Havens Schatt (USA) and Cascartini, the Holsteiner gelding owned by Ken and Amy Wexler LLC, were named to reserve after their two-round score of 378. Finishing on a score of 374, Dorothy Douglas (USA) and MTM Lolah LOL, the 2013 Westphalian mare (Los Angeles x Palma) owned by Abigail Davenport, took home third-place honors.

Chopping and the 2010 Zangersheide gelding (Marome NW x Prelude) owned by Barbara Scott were leading on a score of 181 after the classic round, and navigated the Andres Christiansen (USA) course design with a past loss in mind to maintain their lead, Chopping revealed.

“Years ago, I remember I was leading by quite a bit going into the handy round on a horse that I really trusted – he was really a winner – and I was a bit conservative and I ended up second. I cannot forget riding around in the ring that night because it drives me crazy that I didn’t just walk in there and try and win both rounds,” he explained. “So, my strategy this time was to just be aggressive and try and put in a good score.”

For more info and results, visit www.Tryon.com.

Abigail McArdle and Victorio 5 Victorious in $25k Tryon Resort Sunday Classic

Abigail McArdle and Victorio 5 ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – July 5, 2021 – Abigail McArdle (Wellington, FL) and Victorio 5 conquered the competition in the $25,000 Tryon Resort Sunday Classic at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC) to conclude Tryon Summer 3 competition. Kady Abrahamson (Loveland, OH) and Vancouver, the 2009 Westphalian gelding (Valentino x Cocco) owned by Abrahamson Equestrian LLC, collected second-place honors with a time of 40.78 seconds. Rounding off the podium and earning third place was Hector Florentino (Rutherfordton, NC) aboard D’artagnan, the 2008 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Mr. Blue x Tamellie) owned by Santiago Lambre, with a jump-off time of 41.05 seconds and one rail to the floor.

McArdle stopped the jump-off timers after a mere 39.846 seconds to take the win on Victorio 5, the 2006 Hanoverian stallion (Uccello x Graefin) owned by Victorio Equine Group LLC. Fourteen riders tackled the first round alongside McArdle and Victorio 5, but the pair topped a three-horse second round. After her win, McArdle shared that her connection with Victorio 5 has developed to cultivate a winning strategy. “He [Victorio 5] has been my mount for almost three years now. I know him very well and we’ve had a lot of Grand Prix wins together,” she explained. “I don’t want to say it was an easy class, but I know him well that I just went in, rode my plan, and came out with success!”

McArdle and Victorio 5’s long-standing partnership led to a jump-off performance that was more than a second faster than the previous leader. With a tight cohort of competitors challenging the jump-off test. “For the jump-off, I had to go all-out, because I didn’t know what was going to win it,” she admitted. “I did all of the inside turns, and it turned out great!”

McArdle and her mount will continue to compete at TIEC for the next two weeks. She hopes to have the same good fortune in the weeks to come, and plans to enter the $137,000 Night in the Country Grand Prix CSI 3* during Tryon Summer 4. “We love Tryon!” she concluded. “All of our clients and horses love showing here. It’s a great place to be with lots of space to ride, and the stables are excellent.”

For more info and results, visit www.Tryon.com.

Rolex Grand Slam Riders Watch

Ben Maher riding Explosion W (Photo: Rolex / Kit Houghton)

As the countdown to the next Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping Major continues, with the CSIO Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ taking place from 8-12 September 2021, there is no shortage of Rolex Grands Prix action to whet fans’ appetites in the build-up.

For three weeks from 23 June will be the Rolex-supported Knokke Hippique, featuring horses and riders at all levels, from the future stars in the Young Horse competitions, to world-class international jumping, with the CSI3* Top Series Grand Prix taking place on the Sunday of each week. The Rolex Grand Prix took place on Sunday June 27th and was brilliantly won by Jérôme Guery aboard Quel Homme de Hus.

From 1-4 July, attention turned to CHI Royal Windsor Horse Show, taking place in the private grounds of Windsor Castle. Reigning champion of the Rolex Grand Prix, Henrik von Eckermann (SWE), returned to the famous Castle Arena to defend his title; however, he faced stiff competition from Steve Guerdat (SUI) and Kent Farrington (USA), also former winners of the prestigious competition. The Rolex Grand Prix was eventually won by Briton Ben Maher and his exceptional gelding Explosion W, with Guerdat finishing a brilliant second with his gelding Venard de Cerisy, and Martin Fuchs (SUI) aboard Clooney 51 and Harry Charles (GBR) with Borsato finishing in third and sixth places, respectively.

Show jumping returns to Chantilly Racecourse from 8-11 July for the Masters of Chantilly, the highlight of which will be the Rolex Grand Prix on the final day. This ground-breaking new event – which sees Rolex join as Title Sponsor and Official Timekeeper – will take place in front of the Château de Chantilly and its Great Stables, and is set to be a spectacular four days of competition.

For four days from 30 July, the Val-Porée Equestrian Center will host Jumping International Dinard CSI5*, which culminates with the Rolex Grand Prix on Sunday 2 August. Located a stone’s throw from the sea and recognised for requiring precision and technicality, Jumping International Dinard is a popular show on the international show jumping circuit and is once again set to host the world’s best horses and riders as they vie to take the Rolex Grand Prix Ville de Dinard title.

Read more here.

© 2021 Rolex – Rolex Grand Slam

British Show Jumpers Dazzle Delighted Crowds on Final Day of Royal Windsor Horse Show

2021’s edition of the Royal Windsor Horse Show closed in spectacular style, with champions crowned across the disciplines of Show Jumping, Driving, and Showing. Once again, the enthusiastic and informed spectators were treated to the very best displays of world-class equestrian talent by both horse and rider.

Opening the final day of the Show was the Under 25 Jumping, featuring Britain’s up-and-coming Show Jumping stars. The title went to Lily Freeman-Attwood riding Cor-Leon VD Vlierbleek Z, who jumped a double clear, posting an impressive time of 32.64 in the jump-off. Flo Norris, with her striking grey Gin Chin Van Het Lindenhof, formerly ridden at 5* level by the likes of Bertram Allen and Geir Gulliksen, was a close second with Oliver Fletcher coming home in third.

It went to the wire on the final day of the DAKS Pony Club Mounted Games. With only a few points separating two of the five teams, England was just ahead on 88 points, and Wales closely followed on 83. With it all to play for, the Games began! It was fast and furious with seven disciplines to master, but it was the persistence and precision of the Welsh team that paid off. They took the glory and the win, with 141 points to England’s 138, and the Three Nations finishing third on 106 points. The Welsh team comprised Sam Hopkins, Megan Hopkins, Charlie Gallagher, Poppy Latham Hill, Sophie Locking, and Rose Connor Jones. Team Wales managed to keep their ponies’ heads cool, and they certainly look like ones to watch.

The ever-dominant Australian Boyd Exell claimed his 11th Royal Windsor title after a near flawless display in the Obstacle phase of the Driving competition. Scott Brash trounced the rest of the field in the CSI5* Manama Rose Show Stakes, while it was home favourite, Ben Maher and his exquisite chestnut gelding, Explosion W, who took the honours in the pinnacle Show Jumping class, the CSI5* Rolex Grand Prix – much to the delight of the iconic Castle Arena’s vocal crowd. The Show finished on a jubilant high for Her Majesty The Queen, whose home-bred, Fools Illusion, finished a very respectable second in the Small Riding Horse class.

Scott Brash, recently announced as part of the British team heading to the Tokyo Olympic Games, landed the spoils in the CSI5* Manama Rose Show Stakes with his 12-year-old bay gelding Hello Shelby. Both horse and rider looked calm and collected in what was an incredibly neat and nippy round. The 1.50m class was one round against the clock and had a total of 17 riders taking on the 12-jump test. The course looked tight, with sharp turns required between fences two – an oxer – into three – an upright – with a similar set-up between six and seven, requiring both precision and agility from horse and rider.

John Whitaker was first to go, going clear and setting a comfortable time of 61.54. Scott Brash, next to go, wiped six seconds off Whitaker’s time, making him the one to beat. Italy’s Lorenzo de Luca recorded a time of 58.98, with America’s Lillie Keenan – fresh from her win in Friday’s CSI5* Manama Speed Stakes – one hundredth of a second slower with 58.99. In the end, however, Brash and Hello Shelby’s scorching time was unbeatable.

Speaking after his victory, Brash was full of praise for his horse: “I just tried to keep it as neat and tidy as I could. Hello Shelby is naturally a very fast horse; he is very experienced and used his strength keeping it tight, and he jumped great.”

The pinnacle Show Jumping event of Royal Windsor Horse Show, the Rolex Grand Prix, took centre stage in the Castle Arena for the final session of the 2021 Show and did not disappoint the jubilant crowd. A top-class field of 29 contested the 1.60m course, designed by international course designer Bernardo Costa Cabral. The field included five of the top six ranked riders in the world. With 10 combinations going through to the jump-off, pressure was on from the start.

First to go, Britain’s Harry Charles – travelling reserve for the Tokyo Olympic Games next month – set the standard, jumping clear in 38.21 seconds. However, with some of the best riders in the world to follow, Charles had a nervous wait as the remaining nine riders took on the challenging shortened course. Reigning RWHS Rolex Grand Prix champion, Henrik von Eckermann, as fifth to go, put in an impressive effort aboard the aptly named King Edward to take over pole position, although his lead was short lived. He was followed into the Arena by the current European Champion and World No. 3, Martin Fuchs, riding the phenomenal grey gelding Clooney 51, who made up speed across the ground, jumping clear in 36.87 and topping the leaderboard.

Next up was Britain’s Ben Maher with his Tokyo Olympic mount Explosion W. The 12-year-old chestnut gelding put in an exceptional performance, demonstrating his scope and athleticism, and posting a remarkable time of 35.16 – over a second faster than Fuchs. Swiss World No. 2, Steve Guerdat, put in a worthy challenge but his effort aboard Venard de Cerisy was only good enough for second place.

Maher, the current World No. 4, said: “I’ve said it before, but Explosion is just incredible; he helped me out a bit today, but he jumps better faster and he was fantastic. Royal Windsor is such a special show; it hasn’t been my luckiest show in the past, so it’s nice to finally win here in front of my owners and in front of a British crowd, and in the Queen’s back garden. It doesn’t get any better than that.”

Five-time world champion, Boyd Exell produced a near perfect Obstacle Driving masterclass on the final day of Royal Windsor Horse Show, finishing with 131.03 points. Accruing just one time penalty, the Australian beat the Dutch contingent of Koos De Ronde (136.74 points) and IJsbrand Chardon (138.58 points) into overall second and third places, respectively. After former Royal Windsor champion and Friday’s Dressage winner IJsbrand had an Obstacle Driving phase to forget – knocking down one ball and exceeding the time limit – De Ronde leapfrogged his compatriot into second place in the overall standings, where he stayed after a flawless double clear, the only one of the final phase, a test of the driver’s competence and the horses’ obedience.

On his 11th title victory at Royal Windsor Horse Show, Exell commented: “I lived in the UK for 25 years, so it’s like driving at home. But that also brings pressure, the same as when we drive at Olympia. We’ve got a really good team of people, and really good horses. We just keep our focus over the course of the weekend, through ups and downs, and do our best for the sport. It was so nice to see everybody yesterday on the cross-country, not quite as many as other years, but that’s understandable. The good thing is that the sport carries on, and we keep fighting on for our passion and our horses. My left leader, Zac did his first cones course competition at an international, and I’m delighted that he did a really good job for me in there. Taking a young horse around an international course isn’t ideal, but it was really worthwhile for his experience.”

This year’s Showing classes concluded in fine style, and among the last finales to the 2021 Show was the Riding Horse Championship sponsored by Mr & Mrs Phil Swallow, decided against a backdrop of an appreciative crowd.

Katie Jerram-Hunnable was able to give Her Majesty The Queen further cause for celebration when her home-bred Small Riding Horse, Fools Illusion, stood a close second in a very strong class, pipped only by the eventual champions, Jayne Ross and Casino 111.

Illusion, now five, is a son of Her Majesty’s former Riding Horse winner here, Stardust – who was also ridden by Katie during her Showing career – and in only a few outings this year, has already gained his ticket to Horse of the Year Show.

The ever-popular Working Hunter Pony section saw some memorable performances, none more so than the flying 143cm class winner Charleville Farah, beautifully ridden by a delighted Bea Wheeler.

Team Walker struck yet again in Show Hunter Pony ranks when Zara Brookes piloted the consistent 153cm campaigner Parkgate Royal Visit William to the very top spot.

For full results from Royal Windsor Horse Show, CLICK HERE.

To find out more, visit www.rwhs.co.uk.

For more information, please contact:
Niki McEwen / rEvolution / nmcewen@revolutionworld.com

Kayla Savard and Bogota Nantuel Win $73k Cleghorn Golf & Sports Club Grand Prix CSI 2*

Kayla Savard and Bogota Nantuel ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – July 3, 2021 – In their first class under the lights and on the eve of America’s Independence Day holiday, Kayla Savard (USA) and Bogota Nantuel broke a tie by nearly three seconds to win the $73,000 Cleghorn Golf & Sports Club Grand Prix CSI 2* at Tryon International Equestrian Center & Resort (TIEC), with a time of 36.653 seconds. The second-place tie was captured by two riders with a jump-off time of 39.02 seconds: Richie Moloney (IRL) and Coco Beach, a 2012 Holsteiner mare (Casall x Miss Marpel) owned by Equinimity LLC, and Victoria Heurtematte (PAN) and her own Flying Dutchman, the 2010 Dutch Warmblood stallion (Quasimodo Van De Molendreef x Burggraff).

Forty-one horse and rider combinations challenged the course designed by Andy Christiansen (ECU), with 13 pairs returning for the second round jump-off. Savard and her 2011 Selle Francais mare (Dollar Dela Pierre x Carnute) conquered the shortened course, going in with a third place standing and jumping to a first place win.

Savard praised her rookie mare for her efforts during the evening, sharing, “This is her first FEI class, and both of our first class under the lights! She’s awesome. She’s naturally so fast, so that’s how I was able to be so much faster. She just lands and goes!”

Despite being new to competing under the lights, the pair managed to pull out a win in the jump-off, finishing far ahead of the second place winners. The pair sped around the jumps starting from the second they walked into the ring. “My coach, Alberto Michan, gave me instructions to go from [jump] one to two as quickly as I could, so I did that, then the rest I just went tidy,” Savard shared. “I think jump one to two was the spot to win that people were missing.”

For more info and results, visit www.Tryon.com.