Tag Archives: cross country

Tryon Fall Horse Trials: Boyd Martin Aces Advanced

Boyd Martin and Wabanaki ©Shannon Brinkman Photography.

Mill Spring, NC – September 13, 2021 – Boyd Martin (Cochranville, PA) and Wabanaki conquered the White Oak Cross-Country Course to win the Advanced A Division at the Tryon Fall Horse Trials at Tryon International Equestrian Center & Resort (TIEC) with a final score of 47.3. Sitting fourth after the Dressage and Show Jumping phases, Martin stepped up to the occasion and put in the fastest Cross-Country round of the day to add only 7.2 time penalties and take the win. Wrapping up her weekend in second place with a final score of 51.1 was Lillian Heard (Cochranville, PA) and Dasset Olympus, the 2013 Irish Sport Horse gelding owned by Debbie Greenspan. Third place honors were awarded to Lucienne Bellissimo (Wellington, FL) and Atlantic Vital Spark, the 2010 Irish Sport Horse gelding owned by Horse Scout Eventing LLC with a score of 51.6.

Martin, who topped the competition aboard Wabanaki, the 2011 Hanoverian gelding owned by The Dawnland Syndicate, began on top after a Dressage test that earned the duo a score of 32.1. Though the tough competition proved to be no big deal for Wabanaki, Martin shared that his mount is still new to the Advanced division: “It’s his third crack at the level. He was absolutely fantastic for where he is in his training. He still needs to grow, learn, and get more seasoned. Tryon put on a spectacular event. Obviously, it was a difficult and tough competition, but it was a great learning experience for the young ones.”

Martin galloped to a time of 6:43 seconds in the cross country phase of the competition, over ten seconds ahead of Heard’s time of 6:54 seconds. The White Oak Cross-Country Course with tracks set by Captain Mark Phillips (GBR) offered Martin the perfect number of challenges, while still building Wabanaki’s confidence. Martin commented, “There were a lot of difficult combinations followed by easier fences. It was good for the young ones to have a tough question and then nice and easy ones to keep them confident.

“Hats off to Tryon, because the footing feels like the golf course it is. The footing out there is spectacular,” Martin emphasized. “I love Tryon and everything about it. The venue is world class from the Dressage rings to jumping under the lights last night in front of the crowd. There’s great stabling. The Cross-Country course takes a bit of riding because it used to be a golf course, so it has those mounds and dips, which is good practice,” Martin relayed. “Tryon has been unbelievable with the irrigation system. Walking out on the course, the grass was all spongey, which the horses love.”

For full results from the Tryon Fall Horse Trials, click here.

For more info and results, visit www.Tryon.com.

Townend Back on Top and British Hold onto Lead after Cross Country Day

Oliver Townend. (FEI/Christophe Taniere)

World number one, Great Britain’s Oliver Townend, regained the individual lead he established on the first day of the Dressage phase with a perfect ride on Ballaghmor Class on Cross Country day of Equestrian Eventing at the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020 at Sea Forest. And with foot-perfect performances from team-mates Laura Collett (London 52) and Tom McEwen (Toledo de Kresker), the British team go into the final Jumping phase with four fences in hand over their nearest rivals.

Oozing confidence, and riding at the top of their game, they look unstoppable for gold. But Townend wasn’t taking anything for granted. With the second horse inspection still ahead in the morning, and a course of coloured poles to be tackled later in the day, he voiced a note of caution.

“This is a three-day sport, and you never know what you’ve got until you’re in the ring on the last day,” he said.

Snatched away

His individual lead had been snatched away by Germany’s Michael Jung as the Dressage phase drew to a close, but the double Olympic champion lost his grip on the top spot when triggering the frangible device at the corner element of fence 14, the Lone Tree Moguls, on an otherwise faultless tour of the track with Chipmunk. The German National Federation lodged a protest against the resulting 11 penalties immediately after the cross country, but the protest was dismissed by the Ground Jury.

Compatriot Sandra Auffarth’s gelding, Viamant du Matz, had a glance-off at the final element of fence nine, a left-hand corner that followed a bank out of water for 22.4.

“It came up very quickly at the beginning of course; he was super fresh and I turned a little bit too early to the step,” Auffarth said. “He’s so quick in his turns, and I came too much to the inside of the line and I think he just was not seeing the question at the corner.”

German pathfinder Julia Krajewski made no mistake with Amande de B’Neville, however, and goes into the final phase in silver medal spot. But the German team have dropped from second to sixth and look well out of medal contention.

Contrast

In stark contrast, both Australia and France enjoyed a superb day with spectacular performances that lifted them into silver and bronze medal spots. Lying sixth after Dressage, the Australians added just the 2.8 time penalties picked up by Kevin McNab and Don Quidam when both Shane Rose (Virgil) and Andrew Hoy (Vassily de Lassos) both kept a clean sheet.

Hoy was stopped on course when Swiss athlete Robin Godel’s Jet Set pulled up very lame after jumping the Mt Fuji water complex five from home. (See statement here.)

The Sydney 2000 Olympic team gold medallist was grateful for the cooling facilities that kept his 12-year-old gelding safe while they waited on course. “It was excellent because until I got under the tent, I could feel his temperature rising all the time. When you are galloping, you have wind in your face and on your body so you stay very cool. But as soon as you stop you don’t have that, so your temperature rises. Vasilly’s temperature went up half a degree from when it was first taken in the cooling area, but it was still very low and his heart-rate was back to 100. He’s phenomenally fit,” said the man who is competing in his eighth Olympic Games.

Defending

The French are defending the Olympic team title, but things hadn’t been going their way until Christopher Six (Totem de Brecey) added just 1.6 time penalties to his scoreline, Nicolas Touzaint (Absolut Gold) was just over the time-allowed of 7.45 minutes to add 0.4, and anchorman Karim Florent Laghouag (Triton Fontaine) was clear inside the time. On a running score of 97.10, they are now just over a single penalty point adrift of the Australians, trailed by New Zealand (104.00) in fourth, USA in fifth (109.40), and Germany in sixth (114.20).

With just their combined Dressage marks of 78.90, however, the British look well in command. Laura Collett lies in bronze medal spot individually after a great round with London 52, and feels the result has confounded her critics.

“I always said he’s a superstar and he just went out and proved to everyone just how good he is. I’m so relieved I did my job and to be selected on this team this year. I know everyone at home will understand this; we’ve had to fight for our place and he’s proved to everybody he well and truly deserved it, and I can’t tell you how proud I am of him!” she said.

The margins are small on the Individual leaderboard, however. Townend’s 23.60 leaves him just two penalty points ahead of Krajewski, and Collett is only 0.2 further adrift, with New Zealand’s Tim Price (Vitali) snapping at her heels carrying 26.80. Japan’s Kazuma Tomoto (Vinci de la Vigne) is on 27.50 and the third British team-member Tom McEwen on 28.90, only fractionally ahead of Australia’s Hoy in seventh spot.

Facts and Figures:

60 horse-and-athlete combinations started in the Cross-Country phase of Eventing.

49 completed the course.

2 Retired and 9 were Eliminated.

Sara Algotsson was announced as replacement for Ludwig Svennerstal on the Swedish team before the cross-country phase, but withdrew when the team was no longer viable due to elimination for Therese Viklund after a fall from Viscera at fence 18B.

The most influential obstacle on the 23-fence course was 14C, a left-handed corner that followed a large oxer, where there were two refusals and the frangible device was triggered seven times.

Quotes:

Oliver Townend (GBR): “Once I got into the course, I started to pick up very good quick fast distances, almost racing distances, to the straightforward fences and he answered beautifully.

“The earlier distances didn’t happen quite the way I imagined, like the first two waters; having said that, they were very comfortable distances, and I have a lot of trust in Derek di Grazia’s courses. I think the man is one of, if not the best in the world in what he’s doing, and even when I think a distance is going to be a certain way, I know even if it isn’t it’s going to be a safe distance.”

Michael Jung (GER): “I’m very happy; he was very good. I had a little mistake there (at fence 14). I didn’t realise it fell down, but when I galloped away from the fence, I heard the sound. It was quite a surprise for me. Everything else was really nice.”

Tim Price NZL, when asked what the course felt like: “It felt fast and furious, with lots of big jumps just around the corner! They come up the hill and even though they’ve warmed up over some fences, it sort of dawns on them that it’s actually another cross country day and not another training day, and it looks like it’s a fairly seriously day at the office and they have to absorb all that in about two minutes. Particularly on a young horse, you want to get them out on the track and let them find themselves, the rhythm, the breathing, the jump, the scope, and out here you don’t have time to give them an easy couple of minutes, so it’s asking quite a lot of a young horse.”

Andrew Hoy AUS: “As those that have seen Vassily run before, he’s just the most phenomenal horse cross-country. I had a really nice ride: up until the time I was stopped, it was really good, just fingertips, and I ride him in the same bridle and bit in all three phases; he’s just so on the ball and so focused.”

Results here:  https://tokyo2020.live.fei.org/

by Louise Parkes

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Team Poland in the Lead in the Eventing Nations Cup at LOTTO Strzegom Horse Trials

Photo: Leszek Wójcik.

The home team kept its leading position after a demanding cross-country trial in the Nations Cup class at the hippodrome in Morawa. Second position belongs to Germany and third to Sweden.

Poland is represented by Wiktoria Knap with Quintus, Jan Kamiński with Jard, Michał Hycki with Moonshine, and Mateusz Kiempa with Lassban Radovix. The best result in the team belongs to Kiempa, who went through the XC clear on the fences, but with quite a few points for time which cost him his third position after dressage and knocked him down to 9th. Jan Kamiński presented the fastest round in the team. “The round felt fantastic. The cross-country was very demanding. I decided to bet on accuracy, so I didn’t go very fast, but I wanted to be very precise, because there were a lot of technical challenges. I think I could have easily made up for the time, but it was not the most important thing today. The XC was hard because you had to constantly analyze what’s going on the course and adjust your riding to the coming fences. We needed a lot of attack on the last water, but at the same time it had to be calm to precisely guide the horse to the narrow fences,” said Kamiński.

The leaderboard has changed significantly in the individual classification. The new leader after a clear round two seconds over the optimum time is Jule Wewer from Germany with Ruling Spirit. Second place belongs to India’s Fouaad Mirza with Dajara 4, who went up from the 12th after dressage. Jonna Britse (SWE) sits in third with Quattrino. The dressage leader Tim Lips from the Netherlands with TMX Herby had some faults on the course and is currently 29th.

Saturday’s cross-country changed a lot in the CCI4*-L as well. The new best result belongs to Malin Josefsson from Sweden with Maggan V. Heidi Bratlie Larsen with Lonestar My Hunter is currently second, and Małgorzata Korycka (POL) with Canvalencia are placed third.

Lara de Liedekerke-Meier kept her lead in the CCI2*-L riding Formidable 62 after a clear XC round. In the junior class the best result still belongs to Agata Piskadło (POL) with Brodway, which still makes her the leader in the Polish National Championships in this category.

Germany’s Sandra Auffarth with Rosveel is now the best in the CC3*-S, and the pole position in the young riders’ class and in the Polish National Championships for this category belongs to Julia Gillmaier with Red Dream Princes.

Saturday was also showjumping day for the short-format 2* and 3* classes. In the CCI2*-S the leader is Sweden’s Louise Romeike with Caspian 15, and Nadine Marzahl (GER) with Vally K leads the CCI3*-S.

The CCIP2*-L for ponies ended with the win of Antonia Fulst from Germany riding Fernet. The winner of the Intro class is Ricarda Berkenheide (GER) with Belle Jour.

Online results: http://results.strzegomhorsetrials.pl/event.php?event=8.

Contact:
www.strzegomhorsetrials.pl
press@strzegomhorsetrials.pl

Krajewski Still in the Lead after Cross-Country

© Comité Equestre de Saumur / Photos Les Garennes.

Already at the top of the provisional classification at the end of the dressage in front of a French peloton, Germany’s Julia Krajewski, reigning Olympic team vice-champion (behind France), retains her leadership at the end of the cross country. A cross country that she puts her signature on, associated with her Selle Français Amande de B’neville, without any penalty. Five other couples finished “maxi”, including the Frenchman Karim Laghouag on Triton Fontaine, who thus climbs back to third place with the fastest time in the test. Between them, Thomas Carlile and Birmane remain in the second position which they already occupied at the end of the dressage.

On Sunday, this 35th edition of Saumur Complet ends with the CCI 4*-L Equi Action show jumping course from 2:30pm. Julia Krajewski will have to aim for a clear round if she wants to win the competition. Live broadcast on SC Sport (www.saumur.org).

Start-lists and results here.

A word from Julia Krajewski (GER):

“I must admit that I am very happy and above all very proud of Almond de B’neville. You have to realize that the CCI 4*-L de Saumur Complet is the most difficult competition in which she has participated in her entire career. She is eleven years old, and I am making her progress little by little. We have recently taken a step forward, since the retirement of Samourai du Thot in fact. On today’s cross country, I was careful at first, but because of the attention I paid to each technical element, it caused me to be a little behind on the clock. It could have been tight but in the end, the mare very easily made up between 12 and 15 seconds in the last five minutes, without being forced. This confirms what I already knew about her qualities as a galloper. She came back very fresh from this cross country. It bodes well for tomorrow then. Almond is an excellent jumper, but anything can happen. I keep my fingers crossed.”

Halliday-Sharp and Deniro Z Rise to USEF Eventing CCI 4*-L National Championship Lead

Elisabeth Halliday-Sharp and Deniro Z ©Shannon Brinkman Photography.

Mill Spring, NC – November 14, 2020 – Elisabeth Halliday-Sharp (USA) and Deniro Z cleared the White Oak Cross-Country Course with just 1.60 penalties for time to rise to the lead position in the highlight division of the MARS Tryon International Three-Day Event. Heading into the final phase of the BUCKEYE™ Nutrition USEF Eventing CCI 4*-L National Championship, Halliday-Sharp sits on a score of 26.10, just two points ahead of Boyd Martin (USA) and Tsetserleg, holding a score of 28.10 with the 2007 Trakehner gelding (Windfall *PG* x Buddenbrock) owned by Christine, Thomas and Tommie Turner. Phillip Dutton (USA) and Z, the 2008 Zangersheide gelding (Asca x Babouche VH Gehucht Z) owned by T. Tierney, S. Roosevelt, S. Lacy, A. Jones, and C. Moran, rounded out the top three carrying a score of 28.80 after their double-clear Cross-Country performance.

Halliday-Sharp and the 2008 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Zapatero x French Buffet XX) owned by Ocala Horse Properties and the Deniro Syndicate haven’t challenged a long-format competition since Burghley last year, she revealed, so she was thrilled with the day’s results, taking over the lead from Marilyn Little after she and RF Scandalous retired. “Deniro is amazing and I have a great partnership with him, which makes a big difference,” she emphasized. “We haven’t run for eight weeks because Chatahoochee got canceled, which is a little bit longer than I’d like before an important four-star event, but he’s such a professional. I am a little mad at myself that I didn’t make the time, but that’s not his fault!”

In fact, Halliday-Sharp continued, Deniro Z has proven himself to be stronger and more responsive in the tack than ever before, she detailed. “He’s actually just been so incredibly polite this year. I nearly pulled him up a little bit too much in front of two combinations, and he just came back so fast. Honestly, I think every fence and combination rode how I planned it, and the horse was phenomenal and he didn’t make it feel hard. He finished very fresh. I feel like it was a great day because he finished with the attitude of ‘Oh, that was easy!’”

Will Coleman and Chin Tonic HS Coast to Continued CCI 3*-L Lead

Will Coleman (USA) and Chin Tonic HS cleared the White Oak Course to hold their CCI 3*-L lead, and he called Chin Tonic’s run “the best of the day for me” despite challenging his first 3*-L with the 2012 Holsteiner gelding (Chin Champ x Quinar) owned by Hyperion Stud LLC. The duo sits on a score of 25.70 heading into the final phase. The remainder of the podium also remains unchanged: with a score of 25.90, Boyd Martin (USA) and Contessa, the 2009 Holsteiner mare (Contender x Esteban) owned by Club Contessa, hold second, while third place currently rests with Jonathan Holling (USA) and Prophet, the 2012 Trakehner gelding (Tatendrang x Pennant) owned in partnership with Chuck McGrath, on a score of 26.90.

“This was his first 3*-L. He’s just an eight-year-old, but he’s a really magic horse. You know, the light was a bit funny [by the afternoon] – he came out of the box a little looky and he felt almost green, but he’s just so honest and got better and better as he went. I was thrilled with him; his conditioning felt great, and he really jumped the jumps all very easily.

Sara Kozumplik Murphy and Otta B Quality Hold Guardian Horse Bedding CCI 2*-L Division Lead

Sara Kozumplik Murphy and Otta B Quality, the 2013 Dutch Warmblood gelding owned by Edith Rameika, maintained their hold on the Guardian Horse Bedding CCI 2*-L Division after their double-clear Cross-Country round, carrying forward their score of 25.20. Dani Sussman (USA) and Jos Bravio, the self-owned 2011 Argentinian Warmblood gelding (Jos Fapillon x Remonta Guinea), improved from fourth to second and sit on a score of 27.30 after a clear Cross-Country round, with third belonging to Tik Maynard and Galileo, the 2011 Dutch Warmblood gelding owned by Richard Maynard, who added 2.00 penalties for time to hold a score of 28.10.

“The course rode super well,” Murphy shared. “The footing was really good, and they worked so hard on it. Otter went out at 8:20am, so I went out and walked [the course] as soon as it was light out, and I was really happy with the ground. I was curious as to how it was going to ride going down the hill and things like that, but it was all lovely,” she reported. “There was a good balance going down there. As I said yesterday, the course was really appropriate for the level. It was all exceptionally well built with good designing. You had all of the questions that you needed, but it was appropriate for the level, so it encouraged the young horses or younger riders with older horses.”

For Murphy, she knew in advance that her young jumper tends to have more hang time in the air, and chose to be cognizant of her time as much as possible on course. “I knew I was going to have to go a little bit more on these courses that are a bit winding. He’s a good jumper so he has quite a bit of airtime, so I just wanted to make sure that we weren’t going to give points away because all of our Dressage scores were so close. He cruised across the ground, and still had plenty of play left at the end. He’s very proud of himself!”

Jenny Caras and Trendy Fernhill Keep Their CCI 4*-S Lead After Two Phases

Jenny Caras (USA) and Trendy Fernhill, the 2011 Irish Sport Horse gelding (Ars Vivendi x Cruising) owned by Elyse Eisenberg, jumped clear to maintain their lead on a score of 27.00. Lillian Heard (USA) and CharmKing, the 2011 Holsteiner gelding (Cassito x Heraldik XX) owned by CharmKing LLC, still hold a score of 27.40 to keep second place, with Will Faudree (USA) and Caeleste, the 2007 Holsteiner mare (Contender x Lucky Lionell) owned by Jennifer Mosing and Sterling Silver Stables, sitting on a score of 30.60 for third.

To view full results thus far from the MARS Tryon International Three-Day Event, click here.

To learn more, visit www.Tryon.com.

Marilyn Little and RF Scandalous Victorious in $50,000 MARS Eventing Showcase

Marilyn Little and RF Scandalous. Photo © SusanStickle.com.

Wellington, FL – February 9, 2020 – Victory in the $50,000 MARS Eventing Showcase went to Marilyn Little and RF Scandalous on Sunday, February 9, at Equestrian Village at Palm Beach International Equestrian Center (PBIEC). Little and RF Scandalous vaulted to the lead in the opening dressage phase on Saturday and held it through Sunday’s show jumping and cross-country phases.

From a starting field of 40 horse and rider combinations, 33 advanced to the morning’s show jumping phase, held on the beautiful grass derby field. Maintaining her lead from dressage, Marilyn Little (USA) and RF Scandalous added four faults in the show jumping phase and stood on 23.4 penalties.

With a clear round in show jumping, Buck Davidson (USA) and Carlevo moved from fourth place to second and had 28.6 penalties going into cross-country.

Six-time Olympian Phillip Dutton (USA) rode Z to a clear jumping round and sat just behind Davidson in third place following show jumping with 28.7 penalties.

Heading into the cross-country phase, which was designed by Capt. Mark Phillips, 28 combinations contested the track that included a two-stride “triple-brush arrowhead” combination, a water feature, and corners.

Little and RF Scandalous ended with 4.80 time penalties on the cross-country course, but despite that, her early lead gave her the buffer to hold onto the victory with a total of 28.20 penalties.

“I’m disappointed that the performance in the cross-country wasn’t better, but this is a three-phase event, and she also did put in two wonderful performances,” said Little. “Although she did have a rail this morning [in show jumping], the score wasn’t indicative of the performance because she’s just come so far. To me, to know what she was dealing with out there on course, I have so much respect for her.

“I wish that this afternoon had gone better, and yet, in sports sometimes we have wonderful days. We deserve to have a great placing and it doesn’t happen,” Little continued. “I was disappointed in the performance this afternoon, but the horse still deserves all of the accolades and all of the credit because her heart was so huge. It was just a rough day out there. But she still came in and she still stood in the stall very proud of herself. That is what sports are about.

“I’ve been so blessed to have the ride on a horse that just goes out there, and she tries every time,” said Little of the 2005 Oldenburg mare (Carry Gold x Richardia x Lario) owned by Jacqueline B. Mars and Phoebe and Michael Manders. “For me, in many ways, this is a hometown show. It’s just really one of the greatest honors of my life to ride a horse for Mrs. Mars, who I think of as one of the greatest horsewomen this country has ever known and certainly one of the greatest sportsmen and supporters of our national program. I’m so grateful that Mars Equestrian took on the sponsorship here, because I do think it’s an important event and a very meaningful one for me. I’m glad that Scandalous could be the winner of her event. It means a lot.”

For more information on the MARS Eventing Showcase and full results and scores, please visit https://pbiec.coth.com/article/50000-mars-eventing-showcase.

Unexpected Changes in the Leaderboard at Baborówko Horse Sale Show

Nadine MARZAHL with VALENTINE 18. M&R Photo.

Cross-country day has ended at Baborówko Horse Sale Show. Lars Christensson, the course designer, asked a lot of difficult questions.

The most difficult class of the show, the CCI4*-S, for the prize of Kuhn, took an unexpected turn when leader dressage Yoshiaki OIWA (JPN) riding BART L JRA had a refusal on the cross-country track. That meant that he dropped down to 24th position after the cross-country trial. The new best score belongs to Nadine MARZAHL (GER) with VALENTINE 18. Second for now is Sophie LEUBE (GER) with JADORE MOI, and Dirk SCHRADE (GER) with DAJARA 4 sits in third.

The best Polish rider after dressage, Mateusz Kiempa (POL) with Lassban Radovix, also had one refusal on the course and went over the optimum time, and he is now 25th in the class.

In the CCI3*-S for the prize of Lotto, Leonie KUHLMANN (GER) has kept her lead with HIDALGO 179. Second position belongs to Malin HANSEN-HOTOPP (GER) with QUIDDITCH K, and third to Paulina MACIEJEWSKA (POL) with JANGCY L, the only pair to finish clear inside the time.

Marta ORŁOWSKA (POL) with GENESIS KG is the new best rider of the CCI2*-S for the prize of Duon. Anna SIEMER (GER) with DEIKE 22 dropped down from her leading position to the second place. Stephanie BÖHE (GER) is currently third with ASHANTI DE LA RIBIERE.

The final trials of the national ZK1* ended. First place went to Sara ALGOTSSON OSTHOLT (SWE) riding DYNAMITE JACK. Marta ORŁOWSKA (POL) with NAOMI II C was second, and Weronika MIKOŁAJCZAK (POL) riding CZANOS took home the third place.

More information can be found at: www.bhss.baborowko.pl/eng.

What Are the Three Areas of Equestrian Eventing?

Equestrian riding is a unique sport that pairs a rider and horse together in performance. Within equestrian, there are three Olympic sports that riders can participate in and these areas involve dressage, showjumping, and cross-country. All three Olympic equestrian disciplines are very different and each demands its own skills from the rider and horse. Unlike horse racing, equestrian sports focus on a rider’s command over his or her horse as well as the completion of various tasks on the riding ground. Equestrian and horse racing fans can follow the sports with Betmgm and wager on the latest horse-based sports events including the British Champions Day.

The Summer Olympics in 2020 will feature three disciplines in equestrian. So, what are those disciplines and how do riders compete in the events?

Dressage

Dressage is all about the control a rider has over the horse. In the event, judges want to see how well a rider can get his or her horse to respond and obey commands. During dressage, a rider and horse must complete a set of instructions. This dressage test will then be examined by a panel of judges that will score the contestants.

Judges give the rider and horse a score out of 10. The higher the score, the better the team performed in their test. The lower the score, the worse the pair did during the dressage event. The winner of the dressage event is the rider and horse who scored the best out of all the competitors.

Showjumping

Showjumping is an exciting, adrenaline-pumping event in equestrian. The event features horses and riders leaping over fences and barriers. The purpose of show jumping is to test the athletic abilities of both the rider and horse. The event also demonstrates the accuracy of the pair as they must not only clear the fence and barriers, but land fluidly.

The rider and horse must jump a variety of fences and barriers. These obstacles vary in height and range from 70 centimeters to 1.60 meters. In addition to jumping over the obstacles and landing, the pair must complete the showjumping course in a specified sequence. The rider and horse to jump and clear all the obstacles in the fastest time is crowned the winner.

Cross-Country

Cross-country is similar to showjumping as the rider and horse must leap over obstacles. The difference between cross-country and showjumping has to do with the size of the course and the obstacles the pair must jump over.

Cross-country tests a horse’s endurance, quickness, and leaping over the length of the event. A cross-country test can be done as part of a full evening show alongside showjumping and dressage. However, it can also be held by itself due to the nature of the event.

One of the biggest differences between cross-country and showjumping is the size of the courses. A cross-country course can be two to three kilometers in size. This gives a horse ample opportunity to showcase their speed and endurance during the event. No two cross-country courses are alike.

German Legend Jung Sets Up Germany to Go for Gold Again

Michael Jung and fischerChipmunk FST (FEI/Oliver Hardt for Getty Images)

The German team is on course for another rich medal haul on home turf at the Longines FEI European Eventing Championship at Luhmühlen (GER).

Brilliant Cross Country performances by Michael Jung (GER) on new ride fischerChipmunk FST and defending champion Ingrid Klimke (GER) with the evergreen SAP Hale Bob OLD, who are in individual gold and silver medal positions, ensured the hosts retained their lead over defending champions Great Britain. They now have a three-rail advantage over their rivals going into the final Jumping phase.

“fischerChipmunk is a fantastic horse,” said Jung (37), who was visibly thrilled, but refusing to get ahead of himself by envisaging a record fourth individual European title. “Today was a great feeling. We went a bit fast at the beginning so I slowed down but he was always ahead of the time.

“It was a great feeling around the course everywhere. It was so nice to see so many people here supporting our sport.”

Klimke, 51, described her round as “pure fun – I felt like a passenger.” She commented: “For sure there was pressure. Hans Melzer [team manager] said to me, ‘Don’t pat your horse until you get to the finish line,’ because sometimes when I am so thrilled I pat him all the time. I say, ‘Bobby you are my hero’, so I wanted to really focus. He really loves cross country. It’s his job and he loves it.”

A cluster of early riders, notably British and Irish pathfinders Pippa Funnell (Majas Hope, 21st) and Ciaran Glynn (November Night, 23rd), made Mike Etherington-Smith’s beautifully presented, flowing course look easy, but there was plenty of drama. There were 44 clear rounds, 22 horses came home inside the optimum time of 10 minutes 10 seconds, and a total of 20 of the 71 Cross Country starters remain on their Dressage score – but all nations had their difficult moments and this made for a thrilling day’s sport.

Kai Ruder, second out for Germany, stayed admirably calm when Colani Sunrise inexplicably refused to go into the start box, which cost the pair 16 time penalties, and Britain’s third starter, Kristina Cook, had an expensive run-out with Billy The Red at the skinny brush fence exiting the second water (12c).

“I was having a super ride,” said Cook sadly, “but he’s an experienced horse and I can’t make excuses. At the moment I am just very disappointed, for me and for the whole team.”

Ireland’s Sam Watson will also be kicking himself after crossing his tracks at the bird fence in the final water (20b) with Tullaberg Flamenco. Italy’s anchorwoman Vittoria Panizzon (Super Cilious) incurred 11 penalties for hitting the frangible gate at 10a and Belgian pathfinder Laura Loge on Absolut Allegro fell at the Rathaus fence (17) in the main arena.

Laura Collett (GBR), third after Dressage, was “gutted” to part company with London 52 after a mis-stride before the influential carved bird at the final water. Four others fell here and Dutch pathfinder Merel Bloom (Chiccolino) retired.

Jung, who has never been out of the individual medals in five European Championships, does not have a fence in hand over his compatriot Klimke. In turn, she has no margin for error over Luhmühlen first-timer Lt Col Thibaut Vallette (FRA), who rode superbly on the 15-year-old Qing de Briot – coincidentally this is the same final rider line-up as at Blair Castle (GBR) in 2015.

The cost of one Jumping rail covers the next seven: Tim Lips (NED), currently fourth on Bayro, Oliver Townend, who restored Britain’s fortunes with a perfectly judged round on Cooley Masterclass SRS, in fifth, Ireland’s Cathal Daniels, sixth on his super mare Rioghan Rua, French individual Christopher Six (Totem de Brecy, seventh), Italian team member Pietro Roman (Barraduff, eighth), British team member Piggy French (Quarrycrest Echo, ninth), and British individual Kitty King, 10th on Vendredi Biats.

The team medals are equally close: Britain has nothing in hand over the French team, which only has a one-fence advantage over Italy. The Italians, currently in bronze medal position, have no margin over Sweden – both nations are seeking Olympic qualification – and Ireland is a mere 2.2 penalties behind the Swedes in sixth place.

“I think it was a really great day for the sport and for us in Luhmühlen,” said Event Director Julia Otto. “I would like to thank my whole team – they are just amazing the way they work.”

“We have seen some spectacular riding and some great decisions by people who may be riding at this level for the first time today,” Course Designer Mike Etherington-Smith (GBR) commented.

“I didn’t expect quite so many to get the time, but when you have great weather like this with excellent footing, it happens, but it could have been pouring with rain and, in my view, you have to prepare a course for all weather. It’s all about achieving a standard, so full marks to everyone. For me, it’s been a fascinating day. There’s always something new to learn, and if you think you know it all you might as well give up.”

Follow all the medal action in what’s sure to be a thrilling finale with FEI TV.

For full results and start times, click here.  

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Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
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+41 78 750 61 46

Great Britain Wins Double Gold in Eventing

Photo: Leszek Wójcik.

British riders have defended their last year’s title and stood on the highest step on the podium twice: individually and as a team. The silver medal went to France, and bronze to Ireland.

The British team won with the following squad: Finn Healy with Midnight Dancer, Ibble Watson with Bookhamlodge Pennylane, Freya Partridge with Master Macky, and Daisy Bathe with SF Detroit. They took the lead after dressage and kept it until the end of the competition.

The best score in the team, and the best one in the individual ranking, belonged to 15-year-old Finn Healy – 31,7. Although he was tenth after dressage, a clear round inside the time on the cross-country course and only one point for time during the showjumping have earned him his gold medal.

“It was a testing cross-country track, very technical; it required some reactive riding; we all did that and got ourselves in the position to win. It didn’t really sink in yet. It’s a dream come true,” said Finn Healy.

Silver went to his teammate Ibble Watson and bronze to Camilla Luciani (ITA) with Camelot Damgaard.

Daisy Bathe had an unlucky round in the jumping and finished the championships on the seventh position.

Dressage

The Danish have won three gold medals at this year’s Pony European Championships in dressage: team, individual, and freestyle, where riders performed their rounds to music of their choosing.

The individual medalists have repeated their success. The highest score belonged to the world ranking number one – Alexander Yde Helgstrand with Adriano B – 82,140.

“It’s totally amazing. I didn’t expect to win three times. I choose my music on my own. I’ve actually had this music for quite some time. My pony knows the program and the music, so I think it really fits Adriano,” said the winner after the prizegiving.

The second silver medal went to his teammate Liva Addy Guldager Nielsen riding D’Artagnan 187, and Germany’s Shona Benner with Der Kleine Sunnyboy WE won the bronze medal again.

Showjumping

The final class of the European championships for ponies in Strzegom determined the individual medals for showjumping.

31 pairs have competed in the two-round competition. 12 of them had a good chance to win gold. Four riders entered the final with a clean slate, and eight with only four penalty points.

The course designer, Szymon Tarant, set up a demanding course in the first round, and only three riders have managed to go clear. The second part of the class, high up to 135 cm, has determined the winner. Max Wachman riding Cuffesgrange Cavalidam became the gold medalist of the 2019 Pony European Championships.

“It’s a great feeling. My pony is top class. The first round was quite tricky, very technical. The second round was less technical and a bit bigger. I’m out of ponies now, so I will focus on big horses and hopefully qualify for the Junior European championships next year,” said the winner.

The audience in Strzegom witnessed a jump-off for the silver medal, between riders from France and Great Britain. Holly Truelove (GBR) was the first one to go. She took a risk riding to the last oxer, which gave her a quick time and made it challenging for her rival. Ilona Mezzadri (ITA) with Callas Rezidal Z took up the glove, but had two down, which gave her a score of 8 penalties, and bronze medal in the final classification.

153 riders from 18 countries competed in three Olympic disciplines during the FEI Pony European Championships in Strzegom.

Full results: https://zawodykonne.com/zawody/50/tour/84.

Contact:
www.strzegomhorsetrials.pl
press@strzegomhorsetrials.pl