Category Archives: Horse Care/Protection

Say NO to Castrating Wild Stallions and Massive Roundup

BLM Wyoming (Lander FO) is asking for public input on their future management plan for wild horses living in the North Lander Complex. They plan to remove the majority of the 1,600 North Lander horses and have suggested castrating stallions on the range, destroying their natural wild behaviors.

Please raise your voice! Urge BLM to give wild horses their fair share, protect natural wild behaviors, and humanely manage these magnificent animals on their Congressionally-designated habitat.

We know the endless action alerts get tiring. It’s exhausting for us too. But we cannot stop.

Our action alerts get YOUR voice on the record showing there is massive public opposition to these hideous plans. Your voice matters!

We MUST continue to speak the truth and call for fair and humane treatment of our wild horses and burros.  If we persevere, we will prevail!  Please take action here.

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

EQUUS Foundation Announces Recipients of 2021 Champion of Equine Service Scholarships

Emilie McCann with Drew, a rescue horse at Rising Starr Horse Rescue awaiting his next chapter.

The Champions program, sponsored by Ariat International, rewards volunteerism on behalf of horse welfare with scholarships for volunteers to help further their undergraduate and graduate education and to assist those pursuing certification as a therapeutic horsemanship instructor.

Emilie McCann and Lily Stidham will receive the 2021 EQUUS Foundation Champion of Equine Service Academic Scholarship to further their academic education at an institution of higher learning. Emily Jones will receive the 2021 Champion of Equine Service PATH Certification Scholarship presented by Lessons in TR to cover the certification exam fee.

Despite the significant restrictions on volunteer opportunities resulting from COVID-19, these individuals made it a priority to continue to volunteer and overcome these new barriers. “Access to horses has become more challenging – never mind when there is a pandemic keeping us at home,” said Lynn Coakley, EQUUS Foundation President. “The dedication of incredible volunteers all over the country speaks to the importance of the horse-human bond in people’s lives. During this time of continued uncertainty, I am thrilled that so many volunteers like this year’s recipients were able to find joy and purpose in working with horses.”

Emily McCann
Champion of Equine Service Academic Scholarship Recipient

Emilie found Rising Starr Horse Rescue (RSHR) during a college gap year, and her time spent there quickly became the highlight of her days. Through her volunteer work, she gained invaluable experience and learned about the handling, care, training, and rehabilitation of rescue horses. At RSHR, Emilie was given the opportunity to work with Drew, one of two Thoroughbreds rescued in January 2020. Under the guidance of RSHR’s trainers, her work with Drew became one of the most rewarding experiences of her life, and rekindled her dream of someday becoming a horse trainer.

“Working with rescues is one of the most rewarding experiences I have ever had, and it has given me confidence and direction. I want to do this for the rest of my life, and I could not be more grateful to Rising Starr for providing me with the opportunity to learn and grow.”

Lily Stidham
Champion of Equine Service Academic Scholarship Recipient

No matter if Lily Stidham is on the ground or in the saddle, being around horses always makes her smile. Lily, a senior at the University of Florida (UF) pursuing a Bachelor of Science Degree in Animal Sciences specializing in Equines, plans to graduate this December. At UF, she has had the opportunity to participate in the Equestrian Club, as an undergraduate teaching assistant, in equine research, and in training a weanling and yearling.

Outside of school, she spends her time volunteering at Stirrups n’ Strides Therapeutic Riding Center, where she is able to apply her equestrian knowledge and skills through working as a barn hand, and riding. Lily began volunteering at Stirrups n’ Strides in 2017. In addition to getting the horses ready and interacting with riders in both the veterans and special needs programs, she has also had the opportunity to ride some of the horses and mentor new volunteers. After Lily graduates, she hopes to work in the horse industry. Being able to help others as they work and care for horses is one of the most rewarding parts of her volunteer work, and she hopes to be able to carry that into her future career.

Emily Jones
Champion of Equine Service PATH Certification Scholarship Recipient

Emily Jones has wanted to become a therapeutic riding instructor since she was seven years old. As a child, she loved horses. Her first introduction to the Camelot Center Therapeutic Riding Program came when she started taking lessons there. Years later, when a stall became available, she donated her own horse, Cash, to Camelot to become a therapy horse.

“I have been a volunteer [at Camelot] for over a decade and I have loved every second of it,” said Emily. “Horses have helped me through a lot of hard times, being bullied in school and struggling with serious anxiety. I am eager to become a Certified Therapeutic Riding Instructor (CTRI) – this is something I have dreamt about since my childhood. I am so thankful for this opportunity, because of this I will be able to change and impact many lives.”

To learn more about the EQUUS Foundation and their mission, please visit www.equusfoundation.org.

BLM Plans to Wipe Out Southern Nevada Burros

Last month we told you about the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) plan to eliminate burros from their own lands in California. NOW the agency is working to decimate the wild burro herds of Southern Nevada.

America’s wild burros just can’t get a break. BLM’s mismanagement keeps them at such low population levels that these gentle but hardy animals now face a genetic crisis.

PLEASE take a moment to speak up for the wild burros – and wild horses – of Nevada’s Lake Mead Complex.

Silence is complicity, so we MUST stand up and be heard. We can’t let America’s few remaining wild burros go without a fight!

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Massive Extermination of Wyoming’s Wild Horses Looms

The BLM is prepping to implement its Massive Extermination Plan for the wild horses in southern Wyoming. This is a direct assault – get rid of wild horses to accommodate the Rock Springs Grazing Association’s private livestock on our public lands.

We are not willing to accept, on any terms, this MASSIVE ROUNDUP.

Please take the time to sign our petition today.

Please share this message with your friends, family, and on social media. We must show BLM that Americans – from all walks of life and across all political aisles – want Wyoming’s Wild Horses protected.

This Extermination Plan must be stopped. Without your help these magnificent animals are doomed.

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Urge USFS to Stop Fencing Out Heber Wild Horses from Their Territory

The Forest Service (USFS) is proposing to remove more than 85% of the beloved Heber wild horses in Arizona’s Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest over the next few years. USFS wants to remove all horses outside of their designated Territory – despite the fact that they are FENCING THEM OUT.

Sadly, USFS may also use experimental drugs in their fertility control efforts rather than safe, proven PZP. Please take a moment to sign our petition urging the USFS to work with wild horse advocates to create a humane, sustainable program that works for the horses, the habitat, and the American taxpayer.

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

FEI Enhances Horse Traceability in EHV-1 Return to Competition Measures

The FEI has added new modules to the FEI HorseApp to monitor key mandatory requirements in the Return to Competition measures that will allow for a safe resumption of international sport in mainland Europe today, 12 April.

Key areas covered by the Return to Competition protocols, which were launched on 30 March, include advance PCR testing (for certain designated events only), temperature monitoring of horses, as well as enhanced Examination on Arrival procedures. Stringent biosecurity measures and mitigation plans, in line with the FEI Veterinary Regulations, also form part of the Return to Competition measures.

The measures include a number of temporary provisions that will remain in place until 30 May 2021, providing a science-based safety margin to allow for monitoring of any further related outbreaks. This date can be extended if required.

The FEI Veterinary Epidemiology Working Group has already agreed that there is currently no evidence indicating that it would be unsafe to return to international competition in mainland Europe as planned today, provided the mandated enhanced preventive measures are implemented. However, the Group will continue to monitor the evolution of the outbreaks on a daily basis.

“The recent EHV-1 outbreak has underscored the importance of early detection and prevention in disease transmission,” FEI Veterinary Director Göran Åkerström said.

“The FEI HorseApp is a crucial tool to facilitate the traceability of horses attending FEI Events, as well as for data gathering to allow for better risk assessment analysis and informed decision-making. It is a key element in ensuring a safe Return to Competition today and in minimising the impact of a disease outbreak in the future.”

The FEI HorseApp will be used for uploading negative PCR results for designated events. In addition, the FEI Veterinarian conducting the Examination on Arrival will scan the horse’s microchip with a reader connected via Bluetooth to the FEI HorseApp, and also record the horse’s temperature in the FEI HorseApp.

Under the Return to Competition measures, it will also be compulsory for all horses to be officially checked out at the Show Office using the FEI HorseApp. This ensures traceability should a disease outbreak occur.

“Data driven technologies are a key part of the solution to the current EHV-1 pandemic,” said FEI Director Information & Sports Technology Gaspard Dufour.

“We have been able to use the existing functionalities of the FEI HorseApp to actively monitor horse movement and horse health status and added new modules that provide for a safer Return to Competition.

“But importantly, the collection of this quantitative data is critical to tracking the evolution of the disease and allows us to make better informed decisions concerning the smart and safe resumption of equestrian sporting activities.”

The FEI HorseApp is available for download on the Apple Store and Google Play for Android devices. The new version of the FEI Horse App, including the Return to Competition modules, is now available for download.

The Return to Competition measures are available here.

Media contacts:

Grania Willis
Director, Communications
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 42

Vanessa Martin Randin
Senior Manager, Media Relations & Communications
vanessa.randin@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 73

USDA Must Reinstate Horse Protection Rule

As you might recall, in early 2017, the outgoing Obama Administration issued a final USDA rule on the Horse Protection Act (HPA) to end the practice of “soring” of a horse’s limb. This rule mirrors the industry-endorsed “Prevent All Soring Tactics” (PAST) Act by taking common sense measures to protect certain Tennessee Walking Horses and Racking Horses from the practice. Unfortunately, the Trump Administration suspended the HPA rule four years ago and never reinstated it.

The horse industry and its allies in Congress are currently lobbying the new Administration to bring the HPA rule back, by circulating a petition to USDA. Contact your senators today and urge them to sign the petition and reinstate the Horse Protection Rule of 2017!

American Horse Council
www.horsecouncil.org

Two-Time Graded Stakes Winner Slim Shadey Dies

Photo: Slim Shadey at Old Friends by Laura Battles.

GEORGETOWN, KY – APRIL 11, 2021 – Two-time graded-stakes winner Slim Shadey has died. The 13-year-old gelding had been a pensioner at Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement farm based in Georgetown, KY, since 2019.

Old Friends’ attending veterinary, Dr. Bryan Waldridge, released this statement: “Slim Shadey showed signs of colic and was referred for further diagnostics and treatment. Exploratory surgery revealed a twisted large intestine that was corrected. Unfortunately, he fractured a hind leg recovering from anesthesia. Bone fractures during recovery from anesthesia are uncommon, but an inherent risk of equine anesthesia.”

Slim Shadey was bred in Great Britain by Phil Cunningham and spent two seasons racing throughout England and Ireland. He made his U.S. debut for Cunningham and trainer Simon Callaghan in 2012 at Santa Anita, kicking off what was to become his banner season.

In February of 2012, Slim Shadey captured his first graded-stakes, the GR2 San Marco at Santa Anita (a race he would win again in 2013). Then, in September of that year, Slim Shadey took the top spot in the GR2 John Henry Turf Championship, which served as a steppingstone to a run in the GR1 Breeders’ Cup Turf where he finished 8th.

By 2014 Slim began a series of claims to trainers David Jacobson and John Servis (for owner Michael Dubb), before ending with owner Michael Hui and trainer Mike Maker in June of 2018 at Belmont Park.

Retired in 2019, Slim Shadey ended his career with 83 starts, 14 wins, and earnings of $1,278,855.

“Slim Shadey was on Old Friends’ radar for nearly two years,” said Old Friends President Michael Blowen. “Between Michael Dubb and Michael Hui, I knew he was in great hands. When Hui called to say he was ready, I was overjoyed. Today I was equally devastated,” Blowen continued. “You try to do what’s best and, even then, it doesn’t always work out.”

For more information, please call (502) 863-1775 or visit www.oldfriendsequine.org.

California Wild Burros Are under Attack

“Genetic Crisis.” That is how renowned equine geneticist, Dr. E. Gus Cothran, assesses the vast majority of the BLM-managed wild burro populations still remaining on Western landscapes.

Dr. Cothran attributes this crisis to burro populations too small to be considered viable. Massive BLM roundups have reduced burro herds to such small numbers that inbreeding is inevitable. Destroying the genetic health of our remaining herds dooms them to inevitable extinction.

BLM California is mounting yet another aerial assault on these gentle animals. Helicopters will swoop down in an attempt to eliminate all burros from more than 560,000 acres of our BLM-managed public lands south and west of Death Valley: Centennial Herd Management Area, Slate Range, and Paramint Herd Areas. Nearly 1,000 burros will lose their freedom if this ill-conceived plan moves forward.

We need your voice! Please take action NOW to oppose to this horrific plan.

The Cloud Foundation Calls for Halting Roundups & Independent Audit of Wild Horse Program

The Cloud Foundation is calling on newly-confirmed Interior Secretary Deb Haaland to halt roundups and conduct an independent evaluation of the broken Wild Horse and Burro Program.

Record numbers of our wild horses and burros are currently warehoused in government holding facilities — more than 53,000 animals. By halting the roundups, we can work together to create win-win solutions and establish a fair and humane program that will benefit wild horses and burros, the range, and American taxpayers.

Read the press release.

This Is Why We Fight!

Sometimes, we all need a reminder of why we we’re in this fight. In honor of the California burros who stand to lose their freedom, we bring you a delightful short video. Burros are gentle, playful animals, as you can see. Enjoy!

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Update Regarding Equine Herpesvirus Results at Winter Equestrian Festival

Equestrian Sport Productions (ESP) reports that a horse in Tent #17 was reported with a fever in the late morning of Thursday, April 1st.

The horse – Horse A – was isolated to the quarantine stalls immediately on Thursday for Equine Herpes Virus testing and treatment. Nasal and blood tests were pulled and sent out for rapid testing.

Friday night at 7 pm, the results came back from the lab that the nasal test was positive for EHV-1 and the blood was negative.

At 7:30 pm a teleconference was held with Palm Beach Equine Clinic Veterinarians and the State Vet. The decision to place the single barn aisle where the horse was stabled in quarantine was made.

Management met with the barn owner last night and established a barrier at the end of the aisle and went over biosecurity protocols.

The State Vet met with ESP management and the Horse A barn owner. At this point, two aisles in Tent 17 are under mandatory quarantine, and a third aisle is voluntarily quarantining. The rest of Tent 17 is considered not to be at risk.

Horse (A) remains isolated and is currently bright and not showing any neurologic signs. The owner made the decision to have the horse transported to the University of Florida for treatment.

ESP has been working closely and in direct communication with Palm Beach Equine Clinic and the State Vet to ensure we are receiving the most accurate information as quickly as possible since the fever was first noted in Horse A.

ESP has long-standing strict protocols in place regarding rapid isolation and testing of febrile horses and we are confident these protocols will limit transmission and enable us to continue showing safely.

It is our shared responsibility to keep our horses safe. Similar to the suggested protocols in place for humans due to COVID-19, we urge all equestrians to please remember and abide by the following biosecurity measures:

  • Take all horses’ temperatures daily and report any horse with a temperature above 101.5 degrees Fahrenheit or any signs of respiratory or neurological disease to your veterinarian and/or show management.
  • Take the temperature of all horses prior to shipping to WEF or AGDF, and do not bring any febrile horses to the show.
  • Avoid mixing of horses where possible; practice equine ‘social distancing’.
  • Ensure good hygiene and biosecurity at the show and your home farms.
  • Make sure your horses are currently vaccinated for influenza and EHV. Under no circumstances should a horse that has been vaccinated compete within 7 days.
  • You should be able to document your horse’s normal temperature before arrival. Please do not ship horses with elevated temperatures. It is recommended that you establish a log of temperatures taken at least twice daily. If there is an elevated temperature for more than a 24-hour period, please consult your local Veterinarian immediately.
  • Every effort should be made to minimize stress and commingling of horses shipped long distances. Extra hours on a horse van or moving from stable to stable is the fastest way to compromise your horses’ and your neighbor’s horses’ health.
  • Please take the time to review equine good hygiene practices and impress its importance to your grooms and barn managers in everyday care.

Further biosecurity protocols and additional resources can be found here:

United States Department of Agriculture Information on Equine Herpesvirus

American Association of Equine Practitioners FAQ on Equine Herpesvirus

United States Equestrian Federation Biosecurity Measures for Horses at Home and at Competitions

ESP has longstanding protocols to manage such events and will provide isolation facilities if and as required. Experience has taught us that early identification is key when dealing with disease outbreaks, and this requires cooperation from everyone within the community.

If you have any questions or concerns about your horse’s health, please contact our veterinary partners: Palm Beach Equine Clinic at 561-793-1599.

For more information, please visit www.PBIEC.com.