Category Archives: Horse Care/Protection

Onaqui Roundup Concludes with 435 Wild Horses Captured

A lone horse in the Onaqui. Photo credit: Jen Rogers, Wild Horse Photo Safaris.

The Onaqui wild horse roundup in Utah concluded this week. We are sorry to report that more than 435 wild horses were captured, with one death. In 2019, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) removed 241 of the 510 wild horses they estimated lived in and around Onaqui.

Experts have long pointed to these massive roundups as the cause of poor genetic health in wild horse populations. Sharp declines in population force horses left on the range to inbreed, causing genetic concerns.

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) plans to return 104 wild horses to the range, including 50 mares who will have been given PZP fertility control. Per Western Watersheds Project, livestock grazing permits overlapping with the Onaqui HMA authorize 19,592 AUMs (Animal Unit Months) of cattle and sheep.

The Cloud Foundation and Western Watershed Project discussed the BLM’s preference for livestock grazing in Onaqui in this Salt Lake Tribune article.

For details on the Onaqui roundup, please visit the BLM’s Onaqui roundup website.

While it’s heartbreaking and discouraging that BLM pushed through with this massive roundup despite the tremendous public opposition, we must remain dedicated to our goal.

We have not lost unless we give up – and we’re not giving up. As long as we all keep fighting, our magnificent wild horses and burros have a chance.

The Cloud Foundation will continue to push for a fair and humane program, and we hope you will continue this journey with us.

If you’re interested in helping the captured Onaqui wild horses, please visit https://redbirdstrust.org/.

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Hampton Classic’s Adoption Day on Aug. 30 Offers Hope for America’s Horses in Need of Homes

The EQUUS Foundation will once again partner with the Hampton Classic Horse Show to present adoptable horses at the Hampton Classic’s Animal Adoption Day on Monday, August 30, to promote the welfare of all of America’s horses at all stages of their lives. The gathering will showcase rescued and adoptable horses – from off-track Thoroughbreds to mini horses.

EQUUS Foundation EQUUStar, top international equestrian, and event sponsor, Georgina Bloomberg, will be meeting and greeting horse lovers who attend. Bloomberg will be joined by Jill Rappaport, renown animal advocate and award-winning author and media personality, Valerie Angeli, EQUUS Foundation VP of Engagement, Lynn Coakley, EQUUS Foundation President, and other EQUUS Foundation EQUUStars, including top world-class equestrian, Brianne Goutal-Marteau.

“I am thrilled to sponsor and appear at this important day for animal welfare and adoption at the Hampton Classic once again this year,” said Bloomberg. “I love how the Hampton Classic has embraced the message of responsibility for all horses and the animals we love and has provided this day for us to spread the message and find more animals hope and homes.”

The adoptable horse demos and meet and greet will take place in Hunter Ring 2 from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM and will also feature the HEART Horse Ambulance which will be open to visitors for tours. Parking and admission are free on Monday, August 30th.

Joining the EQUUS Foundation with adoptable horses this year at Hampton Classic Adoption Day will be Rising Starr Horse Rescue, Wilton, CT; Storeybrook Farm, Waterbury, VT; Hidden Pond Farm, Brentwood, NH; and the Retired Racehorse Project, Edgewater, MD. The live event will also have a virtual component featuring the adoptable horses of EQUUS Foundation Guardian charities nationwide on the EQUUS Foundation Next Chapters platform.

“We are so grateful to be back (after COVID) and to have the opportunity to inspire Olympic and world class equestrians and horse lovers of all sorts who are excited to learn how we can all help at risk horses and to meet some rescued/adoptable horses,” said Angeli. “As a community of people who love horses, we need to step up and take care of them – all of them – and make sure they always have a safe and happy place to go.” Social media is encouraged to help spread the word about horses that need homes.

Contact the Hampton Classic at PO Box 3013, Bridgehampton, NY 11932, Tele: (631) 537-3177, E-Mail: Info@HamptonClassic.com, Website: www.hamptonclassic.com.

To learn more about the EQUUS Foundation and their mission, please visit www.equusfoundation.org.

Help End the Slaughter of American Horses & Burros

The House of Representatives recently passed the INVEST in America Act (H.R. 3684) which includes the Carter-Fitzpatrick amendment to prohibit the transport of horses and burros across state lines for slaughter.

Now we need to make sure the Senate supports the Carter-Fitzpatrick amendment so that President Biden can sign the INVEST Act and end the end the brutal and barbaric slaughter of American equines (wild and domestic) once and for all.

In May, the New York Times published an investigative story that confirms what we all have known for years — that America’s wild horses and burros are sold into the slaughter pipeline after being “adopted.”

We must end the slaughter of all horses and burros — domestic and wild.

We are very close to making this a reality.  Please click here to take quick action now!

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

The Fight to Save the Onaqui Is ON

Photo: Jen Rogers, Wild Horse Photo Safaris.

In a few weeks, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will resume their failed program of massive wild horse and burro roundups throughout the West — starting with the famed Onaqui wild horses outside Salt Lake City, UT.

Roundups Are Wrong – and they must stop.

The Cloud Foundation is proud to stand with actress Katherine Heigl and coalition partners at the Wild Horse and Burro Freedom Rally in Salt Lake City on July 2nd.

Please join us at the rally. Together let’s send the message to Congress and the Administration that Americans are against wild horse and burro roundups.

With this rally, we’re calling on House Speaker Pelosi, Senate Majority Leader Schumer, and President Biden to listen to the vast majority of Americans who oppose roundups and want a fair and humane wild horse and burro program – one that keeps these American icons on our public lands where they belong, not in government holding facilities or, worse, sent to slaughter.

Please join us! Let’s show the government there is a better way.

Also, send a message to Speaker Pelosi, Majority Leader Schumer, and President Biden.

Tell them to STOP THE ROUNDUPS and require the majority of the 2022 Budget be dedicated to humane on-range management that keeps wild horse families together, wild, and free, on our public lands.

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Colorado’s Sand Wash Basin Wild Horses Need Your Voice

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is asking for public comments on a plan to remove 80% of the Sand Wash Basin herd located in northwestern Colorado. The agency wants to leave just 163 wild horses on the range – while they allowed the annual equivalent of over 180 cows to graze there last year.

Additionally, BLM is proposing fertility control methods that would destroy natural “wild” behaviors — including the use of Gonacon and artificially skewing the sex ratio which destroys wild horse social structure and increases stallion aggression.

Please join us in calling on BLM to humanely manage this herd on the range with PZP fertility control, and to allow the herd size to be reduced through natural attrition over time.

It takes just a moment to add your name and speak up for Colorado’s Sand Wash Basin wild horses!

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Butter-Stealing Witches and 9 Other Bizarre Superstitions about Horses

People have been interacting with and caring for horses for thousands of years — and over the millennia, some pretty odd beliefs came into being! Horse-keeping practices have evolved over time, but these superstitions and myths continue to be passed down from one generation of horse lovers to the next. If you choose to adopt a horse, keep these 10 silly myths in mind for a laugh when you go to throw out your horse’s old shoes or braid his or her mane.

  1. It’s well known that horseshoes are a symbol of good fortune, but did you know that the way a shoe points supposedly has a lot to do with how lucky they are? Old superstitions say that if you have a horseshoe in your home, make sure the open end is pointing upward to avoid having your luck fall out of the bottom of the shoe.
  2. Speaking of horseshoes, if your adopted #RightHorse is getting a new pair — don’t throw out the old ones! People used to believe that putting one of a horse’s old shoes in a butter churn would keep butter-thieving witches away.
  3. There are a lot of superstitions around horses and colors. In many countries it’s considered bad luck to wear or have anything green around horses.
  4. Among cowboys and the Western disciplines, green isn’t an issue — but keep your horses far away from yellow, which is believed to be unlucky and indicate cowardice!
  5. If you’ve got a cowboy hat on your head, make sure it tips upward for luck. And no matter what you do, don’t ever set your cowboy hat on a bed! It’s a commonly held superstition that a hat set on the bed invites bad luck to enter your home.
  6. If you choose to compete with your adopted horse, avoid wearing new clothes and using new gear — some believe it’s unlucky. Following that wisdom, make sure to bring your new boots to the barn several times before the big show day.
  7. If you find yourself dreaming of horses, there may be something to it. There’s a belief among horse people that a gray horse appearing three nights in a row is an omen of death. Alternatively, a black horse popping into your dreamscape signifies that a wedding might be in your future.
  8. If you’re braiding your horse’s mane, make sure you make an even number — an older superstition, that you’ll still see observed today, dictates that an odd number of braids invites bad luck.
  9. It’s considered bad luck to change a horse’s name, and even though it’s clearly just a superstition, many people to this day refuse to do it.
  10. If during morning feeding or a barn visit, you happen to find your adopted equine with knots and twists in his mane or tail, an old superstition says pixies may have visited and ridden him during the night!

Of course, the best way to bring good luck into your home is to adopt a horse of your own! Visit our horse-listing platform, myrighthorse.org, to browse hundreds of adoptable horses nationwide.

©2021 ASPCA

Say NO to Castrating Wild Stallions and Massive Roundup

BLM Wyoming (Lander FO) is asking for public input on their future management plan for wild horses living in the North Lander Complex. They plan to remove the majority of the 1,600 North Lander horses and have suggested castrating stallions on the range, destroying their natural wild behaviors.

Please raise your voice! Urge BLM to give wild horses their fair share, protect natural wild behaviors, and humanely manage these magnificent animals on their Congressionally-designated habitat.

We know the endless action alerts get tiring. It’s exhausting for us too. But we cannot stop.

Our action alerts get YOUR voice on the record showing there is massive public opposition to these hideous plans. Your voice matters!

We MUST continue to speak the truth and call for fair and humane treatment of our wild horses and burros.  If we persevere, we will prevail!  Please take action here.

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

EQUUS Foundation Announces Recipients of 2021 Champion of Equine Service Scholarships

Emilie McCann with Drew, a rescue horse at Rising Starr Horse Rescue awaiting his next chapter.

The Champions program, sponsored by Ariat International, rewards volunteerism on behalf of horse welfare with scholarships for volunteers to help further their undergraduate and graduate education and to assist those pursuing certification as a therapeutic horsemanship instructor.

Emilie McCann and Lily Stidham will receive the 2021 EQUUS Foundation Champion of Equine Service Academic Scholarship to further their academic education at an institution of higher learning. Emily Jones will receive the 2021 Champion of Equine Service PATH Certification Scholarship presented by Lessons in TR to cover the certification exam fee.

Despite the significant restrictions on volunteer opportunities resulting from COVID-19, these individuals made it a priority to continue to volunteer and overcome these new barriers. “Access to horses has become more challenging – never mind when there is a pandemic keeping us at home,” said Lynn Coakley, EQUUS Foundation President. “The dedication of incredible volunteers all over the country speaks to the importance of the horse-human bond in people’s lives. During this time of continued uncertainty, I am thrilled that so many volunteers like this year’s recipients were able to find joy and purpose in working with horses.”

Emily McCann
Champion of Equine Service Academic Scholarship Recipient

Emilie found Rising Starr Horse Rescue (RSHR) during a college gap year, and her time spent there quickly became the highlight of her days. Through her volunteer work, she gained invaluable experience and learned about the handling, care, training, and rehabilitation of rescue horses. At RSHR, Emilie was given the opportunity to work with Drew, one of two Thoroughbreds rescued in January 2020. Under the guidance of RSHR’s trainers, her work with Drew became one of the most rewarding experiences of her life, and rekindled her dream of someday becoming a horse trainer.

“Working with rescues is one of the most rewarding experiences I have ever had, and it has given me confidence and direction. I want to do this for the rest of my life, and I could not be more grateful to Rising Starr for providing me with the opportunity to learn and grow.”

Lily Stidham
Champion of Equine Service Academic Scholarship Recipient

No matter if Lily Stidham is on the ground or in the saddle, being around horses always makes her smile. Lily, a senior at the University of Florida (UF) pursuing a Bachelor of Science Degree in Animal Sciences specializing in Equines, plans to graduate this December. At UF, she has had the opportunity to participate in the Equestrian Club, as an undergraduate teaching assistant, in equine research, and in training a weanling and yearling.

Outside of school, she spends her time volunteering at Stirrups n’ Strides Therapeutic Riding Center, where she is able to apply her equestrian knowledge and skills through working as a barn hand, and riding. Lily began volunteering at Stirrups n’ Strides in 2017. In addition to getting the horses ready and interacting with riders in both the veterans and special needs programs, she has also had the opportunity to ride some of the horses and mentor new volunteers. After Lily graduates, she hopes to work in the horse industry. Being able to help others as they work and care for horses is one of the most rewarding parts of her volunteer work, and she hopes to be able to carry that into her future career.

Emily Jones
Champion of Equine Service PATH Certification Scholarship Recipient

Emily Jones has wanted to become a therapeutic riding instructor since she was seven years old. As a child, she loved horses. Her first introduction to the Camelot Center Therapeutic Riding Program came when she started taking lessons there. Years later, when a stall became available, she donated her own horse, Cash, to Camelot to become a therapy horse.

“I have been a volunteer [at Camelot] for over a decade and I have loved every second of it,” said Emily. “Horses have helped me through a lot of hard times, being bullied in school and struggling with serious anxiety. I am eager to become a Certified Therapeutic Riding Instructor (CTRI) – this is something I have dreamt about since my childhood. I am so thankful for this opportunity, because of this I will be able to change and impact many lives.”

To learn more about the EQUUS Foundation and their mission, please visit www.equusfoundation.org.

BLM Plans to Wipe Out Southern Nevada Burros

Last month we told you about the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) plan to eliminate burros from their own lands in California. NOW the agency is working to decimate the wild burro herds of Southern Nevada.

America’s wild burros just can’t get a break. BLM’s mismanagement keeps them at such low population levels that these gentle but hardy animals now face a genetic crisis.

PLEASE take a moment to speak up for the wild burros – and wild horses – of Nevada’s Lake Mead Complex.

Silence is complicity, so we MUST stand up and be heard. We can’t let America’s few remaining wild burros go without a fight!

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Massive Extermination of Wyoming’s Wild Horses Looms

The BLM is prepping to implement its Massive Extermination Plan for the wild horses in southern Wyoming. This is a direct assault – get rid of wild horses to accommodate the Rock Springs Grazing Association’s private livestock on our public lands.

We are not willing to accept, on any terms, this MASSIVE ROUNDUP.

Please take the time to sign our petition today.

Please share this message with your friends, family, and on social media. We must show BLM that Americans – from all walks of life and across all political aisles – want Wyoming’s Wild Horses protected.

This Extermination Plan must be stopped. Without your help these magnificent animals are doomed.

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org