All posts by Associate Editor

Jung Aims to Make More History with a Hat-Trick of Gold

Germany’s Michael Jung rides his 2019 European Championship horse fischerChipmunk FRH in Luhmuhlen, (GER) and is aiming to make history with a hat-trick gold in Tokyo (JPN). FEI/ Oliver Hardt/Getty Images.

After Germany’s Michael Jung won the second of his two consecutive Individual Olympic Equestrian Eventing titles at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, he was asked what he had next in his sights. “Tokyo 2020 of course, and the Europeans and maybe the world title along the way!” he replied.

He wasn’t joking of course, because the 38-year-old who made Eventing history by becoming the first to hold the European, Olympic, and World Championship titles at the same time is one of the most formidable athletes in all of equestrian sport.

He didn’t make it to the FEI World Equestrian Games™ in 2018 when his horse had an injury, but at the FEI European Championships the following year, he took team gold and was just pipped at the post for the individual title by team-mate Ingrid Klimke.

This is a man who sets the bar really high for everyone else, and if he can do the individual hat-trick in Tokyo, then he will set a new Olympic record. Charles Pahud de Mortanges from The Netherlands came out on top in Amsterdam in 1928 and again at the following Olympics in Los Angeles in 1932, and New Zealand’s Mark Todd won in Los Angeles in 1984 and again in Seoul in 1988. Both riders partnered the same horse on each occasion, the Dutchman riding Marcroix and the Kiwi riding the legendary Charisma.

Jung was also riding the same horse, the mighty Sam, when coming out on top at London 2012 and the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. This time around he will partner his 2019 European Championship horse Chipmunk, and the world waits to see what more magic he can bring.

Team silver

He’ll be joined on the German team by two of the three athletes who helped clinch team silver in Rio, Sandra Auffarth (Viamant du Matz) and Julia Krajewski (Armande de B’Neville). However, it is the French who line out as defending team champions, with Thomas Carlile (Birmane), Nicolas Touzaint (Absolut Gold HDC), and Christopher Six (Totem de Brecey) flying the flag for Les Bleus.

The British arrive as reigning world champions with the world number one, Oliver Townend (Ballaghmore Class), number five Tom McEwen (Toledo de Kerser), and number 22 Laura Collet (London 52) in their side, backed up last-minute replacement reserve Ros Canter with Allstar B, the horse she rode to individual gold at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ 2018. There’s great strength in depth in this selection, while the Irish world silver medallists, and the Kiwi side that includes husband-and-wife Tim and Jonelle Price, also look highly competitive.

But there are further Olympic records hanging in the balance. Australia’s Andrew Hoy, Shane Rose, and Stuart Tinney have 166 years of life experience and eight Olympic medals between them. And 62-year-old Hoy could make Olympic history by becoming the first athlete to win gold medals an incredible 29 years apart. He won his first team gold in Barcelona in 1992 and if he could do it again, he’d break the all-time record set by Hungarian fencer Aladár Gerevich, who triumphed in 1932 and 1960.

Hoy went on to win two more team golds, at Atlanta in 1996 and Sydney in 2000, and just by turning up in Tokyo he will set an Australian record with his eighth Olympic appearance since his debut in Los Angeles in 1984 at the age of 25.

Changes

The sport of Eventing has been subject to many changes down the years, and at the Tokyo 2020 Games there will be a new and shorter Dressage test, which will take just under four minutes to complete. The Dressage and Jumping phases will be staged at Baji Koen Equestrian Centre in the city, while the Cross Country action will be held at Sea Forest Park in Tokyo Bay.

Following the Ready Steady Tokyo Equestrian Test event staged at Sea Forest in August 2019, during which an FEI official climate impact study and horse monitoring project took place, the Cross Country course was shortened to approximately eight minutes.

It’s all a long way from the first time Eventing was included in the Olympic programme back in 1912 in Stockholm when the competition began with Phase A, “an Endurance ride over 55km in four hours,” and Phase B, “Cross-country over 5km in 15 minutes with 12 obstacles.”

After a rest day, the all-military competitors then set out to tackle “Steeplechase over 3,500m in 5 minutes and 50 seconds with 10 obstacles,” while on day four there was “Jumping over 15 obstacles up to 1.30m high and 3.00m wide,” before finally finishing up on day five with “Dressage.” From seven starting teams, four completed and Sweden took both Team and Individual gold.

Times have indeed moved on, but the partnership between horse and athlete remains at the heart of equestrian sport, and in Olympic Eventing that partnership is at its zenith.

How it will play out….

The Team and Individual competitions will run concurrently on consecutive days as follows: Dressage test (over two days, 30/31 July), Cross Country test (1 August), and First Jumping Competition (2 August) to determine the Team classification.

The Individual Final Jumping test will take place after the Team Jumping Final on the same day (2 August), with the top 25 battling it out for the medals.

Eventing Dressage and Jumping will both be staged at Baji Koen Equestrian Centre, with horses travelling to Sea Forest Park for Cross Country day.

To enable a finish by just after 11.00, the start time on Cross Country day will be 07.45 JST.

Horses can be substituted for the team competition, and a horse/athlete combination may be substituted by a reserve combination for medical/veterinarian reasons in any of the three tests after the start of the competition.

The top 25 horse/athlete combinations go through to the Individual Final.

The athlete rides the same horse throughout for the Individual classification.

There will be two horse inspections – on 29 July, the day before the Dressage phase begins, and on 2 August before the final Jumping phase takes place.

A drawn starting order will be used for the Dressage and Cross-Country tests but in the final Jumping test horse/athlete combinations will go in reverse order of merit.

The full list HERE.

FEI Olympic Hub HERE.

by Louise Parkes

Media contacts:

Grania Willis
Executive Advisor
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 42

Olivia Robinson
Director, Communications
olivia.robinson@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 35

Shannon Gibbons
Manager, Media Relations & Media Operations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Onaqui Roundup Concludes with 435 Wild Horses Captured

A lone horse in the Onaqui. Photo credit: Jen Rogers, Wild Horse Photo Safaris.

The Onaqui wild horse roundup in Utah concluded this week. We are sorry to report that more than 435 wild horses were captured, with one death. In 2019, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) removed 241 of the 510 wild horses they estimated lived in and around Onaqui.

Experts have long pointed to these massive roundups as the cause of poor genetic health in wild horse populations. Sharp declines in population force horses left on the range to inbreed, causing genetic concerns.

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) plans to return 104 wild horses to the range, including 50 mares who will have been given PZP fertility control. Per Western Watersheds Project, livestock grazing permits overlapping with the Onaqui HMA authorize 19,592 AUMs (Animal Unit Months) of cattle and sheep.

The Cloud Foundation and Western Watershed Project discussed the BLM’s preference for livestock grazing in Onaqui in this Salt Lake Tribune article.

For details on the Onaqui roundup, please visit the BLM’s Onaqui roundup website.

While it’s heartbreaking and discouraging that BLM pushed through with this massive roundup despite the tremendous public opposition, we must remain dedicated to our goal.

We have not lost unless we give up – and we’re not giving up. As long as we all keep fighting, our magnificent wild horses and burros have a chance.

The Cloud Foundation will continue to push for a fair and humane program, and we hope you will continue this journey with us.

If you’re interested in helping the captured Onaqui wild horses, please visit https://redbirdstrust.org/.

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games – Equestrian Dressage Preview

Celebrating Germany’s 13th Olympic Dressage team gold at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games: (L to R) Isabell Werth, Dorothee Schneider, Sönke Rothenberger, and Kristina Bröring-Sprehe. (FEI/Richard Juilliart)

Can Germany make it a fabulous 14?

Germany has a long and formidable record in Olympic Equestrian Dressage. Since the team competition was first introduced in Amsterdam (NED) in 1928, when the German side pinned Sweden into silver and The Netherlands into bronze, they have won 13 of the 20 Olympic team contests. And it’s looking very much like gold number 14 is just around the corner.

The loss to Great Britain at London in 2012 was the only blip in an otherwise seamless run that began in Los Angeles in 1984 when the great Reiner Klimke and Ahlerich led the victory gallop. Despite all the disruption of the last 18 months due to the Covid-19 pandemic and the Equine Herpes Virus (EHV-1) outbreak in mainland Europe, Team Germany arrive at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games as defending champions and strong favourites to do it all over again.

Isabell Werth heads the line-up with the mare Bella Rose and holding the World number one slot. And underpinning the sheer strength of the German challenge, she will be joined by World numbers two and four4, Jessica von Bredow-Werndl with TSF Dalera BB and Dorothee Schneider with Showtime FRH. With Helen Langehanenberg and her mare Annabelle in reserve, they seem like an unstoppable force.

However, the three-per team format introduced for this year’s Games could prove highly influential. One off day for just one team member and the story could be very different indeed, because every ride will be critical.

Dynamic duo

At the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, Great Britain claimed silver and The Netherlands took team bronze and this time around the British send the dynamic duo of Charlotte Dujardin and Carl Hester once again, but both on relatively unexposed horses.

Dujardin’s decision to take the 10-year-old Gio instead of her considerably more experienced 12-year-old mare Mount St John Freestyle, who was in great form at Hagen (GER) in April and who swept all before her at the home international at Wellington (GBR) in May, came as a surprise. But the athlete, whose record-breaking partnership with the now-retired Valegro has helped popularise this sport like few before her, is backed up by the evergreen Hester and Charlotte Fry with Everdale, and she’s always going to be highly competitive.

Edward Gal with Total US and Hans Peter Minderhoud with Dream Boy headline the Dutch team, Patrik Kittel (Well Done de la Roche) leads the Swedish contingent, and Steffen Peters (Suppenkasper) will be a strong anchor for Team USA. Meanwhile, Team Belgium will be making a little bit of Olympic history as they make their first appearance since 1928.

When it comes to the individual honours all eyes will be on Denmark’s Cathrine Dufour and her fabulous horse Bohemian. The pair posted a back-to-back double of wins at the first leg of the FEI Dressage World Cup™ 2020/2021 series on home ground in Aarhus (DEN), pinning Germany’s Werth and von Bredow-Werndl into second and third.

But when the Covid cloud broke long enough for another leg to take place in Salzburg (AUT) in January, von Bredow-Werndl showed a whole new level of performance with her 2018 FEI World Equestrian Games™ gold-medal partner TSF Dalera BB, who has gone from strength to strength ever since. Now this pair looks a real threat to all the rest in the battle for individual Olympic glory.

Less obvious

However, at Olympic Games, the show-stealers are often the less obvious. Australia’s Mary Hanna, whose horse Calanta was the very first to arrive into the stables at Baji Koen Equestrian Park in Tokyo earlier this week, is a case in point. Because equestrian fans all around the world are already putting their hearts behind this mother of two and grandmother of four who, at the age of 66, is tackling her sixth Olympics.

Apart from the Beijing Games in 2008, she has been a member of every Australian Olympic Dressage team since 1996, and that’s quite some record. She’s as proud as ever to be flying her country’s flag alongside Kelly Layne riding Samhitas and Simone Pearce with Destano.

The last time Olympic Games were staged in Tokyo in 1964, Baji Koen was the venue for Dressage, which was a very different sport back then.

In the Grand Prix, the scores were announced after each ride and after the ride-off – which was filmed and then mulled over by judges Frantisek Jandl, Gustaf Nyblaeus, and Georges Margot; the public, the teams, and the media had to wait for two hours before the final results were announced. It should be a bit quicker this time around!

Swiss supremo Henri Chammartin with Woerman was eventually deemed the Individual champion, and the team title went to Germany’s Harry Boldt with Remus, Josef Neckermann with Antoinette, and Reiner Klimke with Dux.

How it will play out….

The FEI Grand Prix test, in which all athletes must participate, will take place on 24 and 25 July and is a qualifier for both the team and individual competitions. The qualification ranking will be decided by the results of all three team members.

Athletes compete in six groups, with three groups competing on each day. The composition of the groups is based on the FEI World Ranking list position of the athlete/horse combination on the date of definite entries (5 July 2021).

The top eight teams in the Grand Prix (and those tied for eighth place) will qualify for the FEI Grand Prix Special on 27 July.

During the period between the Team Qualifier (Grand Prix) and up to two hours before the start of the Team Final (Grand Prix Special), the Chef d’Equipe may substitute an athlete/horse combination. However, the substitute combination will not be entitled to compete in the FEI Grand Prix Freestyle.

The FEI Grand Prix Freestyle test is the Individual Final Competition which is open to 18 combinations qualified from the FEI Grand Prix. The qualified athletes will be the top two combinations from each of the six groups and the combinations with the six next highest scores.

The Dressage Tests are the FEI Grand Prix, the FEI Grand Prix Special, and the FEI Grand Prix Freestyle.

Media contacts:

Grania Willis
Executive Advisor
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 42

Olivia Robinson
Director, Communications
olivia.robinson@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 35

Shannon Gibbons
Manager, Media Relations & Media Operations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Conor Swail Conquers Tryon Summer 5 with Trio of Wins

Conor Swail and Koss Van Heiste ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – July 18, 2021 – Conor Swail (Wellington, FL) and Koss Van Heiste claimed a win in the $25,000 Tryon Resort Sunday Classic at Tryon International Equestrian Center & Resort (TIEC) after clearing the jump off in 35.49 seconds, also grabbing reserve with Count Me In on a time of 36.2 seconds. It was a winning week for Swail, who dominated Saturday evening’s $73,000 Cleghorn Gun Club Grand Prix CSI 2* aboard Vital Chance de la Roque, as well as Friday’s $6,000 Speed Stake CSI 2* with Theo 160. Though Swail and Vital Chance de la Roque didn’t win the $37,000 Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake CSI 2* Thursday, they did collect reserve honors to set themselves up for a win under the lights in Tryon Stadium.

Sunday’s $25,000 Tryon Resort Sunday Classic one-two finish was icing on the cake for Swail after a victorious week, and he walked into the ring aboard Count Me In, the 2007 Hanoverian gelding (Count Grannus x Sherlock Holmes), with only himself to beat. The Guilherme Jorge course design tested 24 entries in the first round, with only one pair challenging Swail’s two jump-off mounts: Harold Chopping (Southern Pines, NC) and Geronimo SCF, the 2011 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Veron x Mary Louise) owned by Diane Halpin, who earned third place on a time of 37.093.

Swail was first to test the jump-off track with Koss Van Heiste, the 2010 Belgian Warmblood gelding (Breemeersen Adorado x Contact Van de Heffinck) owned by Eadaoin Aine Ni Choileain, an experienced and longtime ride of his. They could have had an even faster round than their winning time, Swail admitted: “It wasn’t the round I wanted, to be honest. I wanted to be a little quicker than that! I gave Harold a little window there.” After Chopping finished his clear round with the leaderboard unchanged, however, Swail was free to ride Count Me In, a mount he’s been riding for only a few weeks, to a clear round and second place.

“It’s nice when you’re going [into the ring] last and you know that you’ve won the class anyway,” Swail admitted. “He’s a new horse to me, so I just didn’t over-ride him too much, and I had a nice round on him. We’re just getting to know each other a little better, and trying to build a good relationship and trust each other. That’s the first bigger class I’ve done on him, so I’m very pleased with him.”

For more info and results, visit www.Tryon.com.

Horses Really Can Fly, Even If They’re Not Called Pegasus

Photo: Haneda history-making: the first full cargo load of horses ever to land in Tokyo’s Haneda airport ready for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games Equestrian competitions. © FEI/Yusuke Nakanishi.

Can horses fly? Well yes, they can if they’re Olympic athletes!

In a piece of history-making, 36 of them flew into Japan last night – the first full cargo load of horses ever to land in Haneda, the waterfront airport that serves the greater Tokyo area and which is now welcoming a very different group of Olympic athletes.

“To see these horses arriving at Haneda airport is a truly historic occasion, and what makes it even more special is that these are not simply horses; they are Olympic horses,” Administrator of Tokyo International Airport Takahashi Koji said. “It’s a really big night for the airport, and particularly for the cargo team, and we see it as one of the major milestones of the final countdown to the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games.”

The four-legged time travellers are all Equestrian Dressage horses and include some Olympic superstars, among them Bella Rose, the mare ridden by Germany’s Isabell Werth, the most decorated Olympic equestrian athlete of all time.

Also landing at Haneda en route to the stunning equestrian venue at Baji Koen, owned by the Japan Racing Association, is Gio, the ride of double Olympic champion Charlotte Dujardin (GBR), who will be bidding for a three-in-a-row title in Tokyo.

The 36 equine passengers will be flying the flag for teams from Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Great Britain, Netherlands, Portugal, and host nation Japan, as well as individuals from Brazil, Estonia, Finland, Ireland, and Morocco. They will be joined by a further group of Equestrian Dressage stars flying into Tokyo.

The first Olympic flight out of Europe saw the horses travelling from Liege in Belgium, where there’s even a special airport horse hotel, flying on an Emirates SkyCargo Boeing 777-F to Dubai, a 90-minute refuel and crew change and then on to Tokyo.

From a sustainability perspective, Emirates has implemented a number of initiatives to improve fuel efficiency and reduce emissions where operationally feasible, including its long-standing operation of flexible routings in partnership with air navigation service providers to create the most efficient flight plan for each flight. The airline, which operates one of the world’s youngest aircraft fleets, also uses advanced data analytics, machine learning, and AI in its fuel monitoring and aircraft weight management programmes.

Like human passengers, all horses travel with a passport. They will already have undergone a 60-day health surveillance period prior to a seven-day pre-export quarantine. They all also have an export health certificate and are thoroughly checked over by veterinarians prior to boarding.

Business class travel

The horses fly two per pallet, or flying stable, which is the equivalent of business class. Their comfort and safety is ensured by flying grooms and an on-board veterinarian. Unlike two-legged passengers, the horses not only get their in-flight meals (including special meal requests of course), but are able to snack throughout the trip, on hay or haylage, except when they are taking a nap.

So as they are flying business class, does that mean the horses get flat beds to sleep in? Although horses might occasionally indulge in a spot of lying down to snooze in the sun at home, they actually sleep standing up. They have something called the “stay apparatus,” which allows tendons and ligaments to effectively lock the knees and hocks (in the hind legs) so that they don’t fall over while they’re dozing off. So there’s no need for flat beds on the flight.

A total of 325 horses will be flown into Tokyo across the two Games and the complex logistics for this massive airlift have been coordinated by transport agents, Peden Bloodstock, which has been in charge of Olympic and Paralympic horse transport since Rome 1960 and is the Official Equine Logistics Partner of the Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI), global governing body for equestrian sport. Peden Bloodstock became title partner of the FEI Best Athlete Award in 2019.

A convoy of 11 state-of-the-art air-conditioned horse trucks, owned by the Japanese Racing Association, transported the precious equine cargo – and 13,500 kilograms of equipment – on the final transfer from Haneda to Baji Koen where the equine superstars had the chance to settle into their Olympic Athlete Village, a.k.a. the stables.

“Like all the athletes arriving into Tokyo for the Olympic and Paralympic Games, the horses are honed and ready to compete on the sporting world’s biggest stage,” FEI President Ingmar De Vos said. “After all the challenges the world has faced, finally we’re almost there and now it’s only a matter of days before we hear those magical words, ‘Let the Games begin!’”

Equestrian sport in Tokyo 2020

A record number of countries – 50 – will be competing in the equestrian events at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games following the introduction of new formats that limit teams to three members, meaning that more countries will have the opportunity to compete on the Olympic stage than ever before.

A total of seven countries will be fielding full teams in all three Olympic disciplines, including the host nation Japan. The others are Australia, France, Germany, Great Britain, Sweden, and United States of America.

Unique gender equality

Equestrian is the only sport in the Olympic movement in which men and women compete head to head throughout the Games, making it a totally gender neutral sport. And the FEI doesn’t need a policy regarding transgender athletes as there are no requirements for our athletes to state their gender in order to participate in FEI competitions, or at the Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Equestrian is not a gender-affected sport that relies on the physical strength, stamina, and physique of an athlete as there are no gender based biological advantages. Success in equestrian is largely determined by the unique bond between horse and athlete and refined communication with the horse.

Sustainability

Sustainability is a key theme across the Games, and equestrian is very much a part of that. In line with Pillar 1 of the IOC Sustainability Strategy: Minimum Environmental Burden, the redevelopment of the Japan Racing Association-owned Baji Koen Park as the equestrian venue for Tokyo 2020 has minimised environmental impact and ensured the legacy of the venue used for the Tokyo Games in 1964.

“The original plan for equestrian put forward by the Tokyo Organising Committee was for a totally temporary venue in the Tokyo Bay area, but when the FEI was consulted on this as an option, we pushed for the alternative which was to re-use the 1964 Olympic equestrian venue at Baji Koen,” FEI Secretary General Sabrina Ibáñez says. “This was the optimal choice from a sustainability perspective as it minimises environmental impact, but it also ensures the legacy of this wonderful venue.”

The Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic & Paralympic Games (TOCOG) has incorporated a further sustainability initiative into the equestrian venue with the incineration of used bedding from the horses’ stables for power generation.

Aligned with Pillar 2 of the IOC Sustainability Strategy: Urban environment plans harmonising with nature, only native species that integrate well with local flora and fauna have been planted at the Sea Forest cross country venue. This includes the use of a native grass species, Zoysia japonica, for the footing on the course itself.

Click here for more information on Equestrian at the Olympic Games.

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Aaron Vale Begins with a Bang in $37,000 Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake CSI 2*

Aaron Vale and Prescott ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – July 15, 2021 – Aaron Vale (USA) and Prescott soared to victory in the $37,000 Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake at Tryon International Equestrian Center & Resort (TIEC), conquering the jump-off course with a time of 38.307 seconds. Vale also claimed the yellow ribbon along with Elusive, the 2009 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Rodrigoo x Capfucino) owned by Thinks Like A Horse, with a time of 38.954 seconds. Conor Swail (IRL) and Vital Chance de la Roque, the 2009 Selle Francais gelding (Diamant de Semilly x Rivage Du Poncel) owned in partnership with Adeline Hecart, rode to second place with a time of 38.642 seconds.

The course, designed by Guilherme Jorge (BRA), challenged 53 horse-and-rider combinations in the first round of competition. Twenty pairs jumped clear to return for the second round jump-off. Vale and Prescott, the 2012 Holsteiner gelding (Lordanos x Unknown) owned by Thinks Like A Horse, re-captured the lead after Elusive’s clear round and previous winning time was bested by Swail.

Vale’s plan going into the jump-off with Prescott, a less experienced horse than Elusive, was to leave out strides and go as efficiently as possible, he shared. “I was really fast! I probably did two strides fewer to the combination. He was balanced, jumped it easily, and was really quick coming out of the combination. We left one out of the next vertical. And at that point, I felt like I was up by quite a bit, so I felt like I just wanted to stay in my rhythm and not press it. I felt if I left the last three jumps up, I’d done enough to win it, and that was how it played out!”

For more info and results, visit www.Tryon.com.

Hampton Classic’s Adoption Day on Aug. 30 Offers Hope for America’s Horses in Need of Homes

The EQUUS Foundation will once again partner with the Hampton Classic Horse Show to present adoptable horses at the Hampton Classic’s Animal Adoption Day on Monday, August 30, to promote the welfare of all of America’s horses at all stages of their lives. The gathering will showcase rescued and adoptable horses – from off-track Thoroughbreds to mini horses.

EQUUS Foundation EQUUStar, top international equestrian, and event sponsor, Georgina Bloomberg, will be meeting and greeting horse lovers who attend. Bloomberg will be joined by Jill Rappaport, renown animal advocate and award-winning author and media personality, Valerie Angeli, EQUUS Foundation VP of Engagement, Lynn Coakley, EQUUS Foundation President, and other EQUUS Foundation EQUUStars, including top world-class equestrian, Brianne Goutal-Marteau.

“I am thrilled to sponsor and appear at this important day for animal welfare and adoption at the Hampton Classic once again this year,” said Bloomberg. “I love how the Hampton Classic has embraced the message of responsibility for all horses and the animals we love and has provided this day for us to spread the message and find more animals hope and homes.”

The adoptable horse demos and meet and greet will take place in Hunter Ring 2 from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM and will also feature the HEART Horse Ambulance which will be open to visitors for tours. Parking and admission are free on Monday, August 30th.

Joining the EQUUS Foundation with adoptable horses this year at Hampton Classic Adoption Day will be Rising Starr Horse Rescue, Wilton, CT; Storeybrook Farm, Waterbury, VT; Hidden Pond Farm, Brentwood, NH; and the Retired Racehorse Project, Edgewater, MD. The live event will also have a virtual component featuring the adoptable horses of EQUUS Foundation Guardian charities nationwide on the EQUUS Foundation Next Chapters platform.

“We are so grateful to be back (after COVID) and to have the opportunity to inspire Olympic and world class equestrians and horse lovers of all sorts who are excited to learn how we can all help at risk horses and to meet some rescued/adoptable horses,” said Angeli. “As a community of people who love horses, we need to step up and take care of them – all of them – and make sure they always have a safe and happy place to go.” Social media is encouraged to help spread the word about horses that need homes.

Contact the Hampton Classic at PO Box 3013, Bridgehampton, NY 11932, Tele: (631) 537-3177, E-Mail: Info@HamptonClassic.com, Website: www.hamptonclassic.com.

To learn more about the EQUUS Foundation and their mission, please visit www.equusfoundation.org.

TIEC to Host USEF CCI4*-L Eventing National Championships for 2021 and 2022

Lexington, KY – June 24, 2021 – US Equestrian is pleased to announce that the USEF CCI4*-L Eventing National Championship will return to the Tryon International Equestrian Center in Mill Spring, N.C. in 2021 and 2022. The National Championship will be held in conjunction with the Tryon International Three-Day Event.

The USEF CCI4*-L Eventing National Championship was held at TIEC for the first time in 2020, and competitors had high praise for the facilities at the venue and the staff’s dedication to producing a world-class event. Tryon’s White Oak cross-country course was created for the 2018 FEI World Equestrian Games™ and is known for its scenic rolling terrain in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

“We are very excited to host the Tryon International Three-Day Event CCI4*-L again this November,” said Sharon Decker, President of Tryon of Tryon Equestrian Properties, Carolinas Operations. “Our 2020 event was extraordinary, and with spectators welcomed this year, we will have the chance once again to showcase the highest levels of this sport on what many of our riders have declared one of the best cross-country courses in the world. We cannot wait!”

The 2021 Tryon International Three-Day Event is set to take place November 10-14. The event will host CCI1*-L, CCI2*-L, CCI3*-L, and CCI4*-S divisions in addition to the CCI4*-L. Additionally, the East Coast Final for the inaugural Adequan® USEF Eventing Youth Team Challenge will be held in conjunction with the event, making for an exciting week of late-season eventing.

For more information, visit Tryon.com/eventing.

Clara Propp and Arabesque Emerge Victorious at USEF Jr. Hunter Nat’l Championship – East Coast

Clara Propp and Arabesque.

Devon, Pa. – July 14, 2021 – The final day of competition at the 2021 Adequan®/USEF Junior Hunter National Championship – East Coast, hosted by the Brandywine Horse Shows, concluded Wednesday in the Dixon Oval of the Devon Horse Show Grounds with the Junior 3’3” Hunters. Bringing forth some of the nation’s top up-and-coming junior riders, competition was stiff as horse-and-rider combinations vied for the Grand Junior 3’3” Hunter Champion title. After seeing a total of 213 entries in the Small Junior 3’3” Hunter 15 & Under, Small Junior 3’3” Hunter 16-17, Large Junior 3’3” Hunter 15 & Under, and Large Junior 3’3” Hunter 16-17 divisions, Clara Propp and Arabesque emerged victorious to be crowned Grand Junior 3’3” Hunter Champions.

Read more here.

Phelps Sports
info@phelpssports.com

Help End the Slaughter of American Horses & Burros

The House of Representatives recently passed the INVEST in America Act (H.R. 3684) which includes the Carter-Fitzpatrick amendment to prohibit the transport of horses and burros across state lines for slaughter.

Now we need to make sure the Senate supports the Carter-Fitzpatrick amendment so that President Biden can sign the INVEST Act and end the end the brutal and barbaric slaughter of American equines (wild and domestic) once and for all.

In May, the New York Times published an investigative story that confirms what we all have known for years — that America’s wild horses and burros are sold into the slaughter pipeline after being “adopted.”

We must end the slaughter of all horses and burros — domestic and wild.

We are very close to making this a reality.  Please click here to take quick action now!

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org