Tag Archives: Tori Colvin

Tori Colvin and Cafino Capture $40k Bluegrass Festival Grand Prix at Bluegrass Festival Horse Show

Tori Colvin and Cafino.

Hesslink Takes Blue in $5,000 Hallway Feeds USHJA National Hunter Derby to Earn Series Title

Lexington, KY – Aug. 21, 2016 – Before she heads to the Hampton Classic on Monday, Tori Colvin snuck in one more victory aboard Take The High Road LLC’s Cafino in the $40,000 Bluegrass Festival Grand Prix, sponsored by Audi of Lexington, on the final day of Bluegrass Festival Horse Show.

“This is my favorite week because the course designers bring the cool jumps out,” Colvin said. “It’s amazing to win on Cafino. I knew he was ready today, so I was really going for it out there. I’m really happy to have him going so well. Karen [Long Dwight] has been the one who helped us with him, and she’s the sponsor and the owner. She’s wonderful, and Cafino is just perfect.”

Bobby Murphy’s course still contained many elements from last night’s USHJA International Hunter Derby Championship, including the obstacle that certainly stuck in most riders’ minds: the 1.57m wall, which was set at 1.54m for the grand prix.

“The only thing I thought was just stay on at the wall, and I’m good,” Colvin laughed. “That’s it; just hang on. I loved having the wall out there. I loved this course because it was like half hunter derby and half grand prix.”

Murphy’s hunter-esque course saw 37 entries in the first round, with six entries eventually advancing to compete over the short course.

Among the jump-off-qualified horse-and-rider combinations was Shane Sweetnam and Main Road, who is owned by Sweet Oak Farm and Seabrook LLC. After a second place finish in another grand prix during the Kentucky Summer Horse Show series, Sweetnam said he was looking for a win aboard the gelding.

The duo came close, turning in the first clear round of the afternoon and setting the early time to beat at 41.775 seconds in the jump-off.

“Main Road is a very good horse,” Sweetnam said. “He’s only 8; he’s had a good summer. It was a difficult course, but I think he jumped really good in both rounds.”

It was not long until Colvin and Cafino overtook their lead, however, turning in a fast round and tripping the timers in 41.23 seconds. Colvin’s lead would hold out for the win, while Sweetnam settled for second.

“I could’ve been maybe a bit quicker turning after the double,” Sweetnam said. “I think it would’ve been harder for them to beat me if I had turned quicker. I think that’s what cost me the win. He’s still learning.”

Colvin said she began riding Cafino about a year ago, and she loves the soft, easy ride the gelding gives her.

“Cafino is the easiest thing to ride,” Colvin explained. “You literally just loop the reins. When he lands, it’s like you’re on a cloud. He’s perfect. He doesn’t land hard, he’s just soft. He has a little quirk, because he will buck when he gets a little excited, but I just have to hold on.”

A final challenger, Sloane Coles, piloted the Spring Ledge Group’s Esprit to the third place spot with a clear round completed in 43.573 seconds. Clocking a faster time, but unfortunately picking up 4 faults in the jump-off, was Sweetnam and another entry, Spy Coast Farm LLC’s Chaqui Z. Fifth place went home with Blythe Marano and Virginia Ingram’s Figeac De Reve with 4 faults and a time of 44.007 seconds. Aaron Vale and Sarah Turner’s Acolina R turned in another very fast round in 43.267 seconds, but unfortunately lowered two heights to finish on 8 faults and in sixth place.

Hesslink Takes Blue in $5,000 Hallway Feeds USHJA National Hunter Derby to Earn Series Title

It was the 20-year-old, newly-turned professional rider, Geoffrey Hesslink, who took home not only the blue ribbon and championship cooler for Sunday afternoon’s $5,000 Hallway Feeds USHJA National Hunter Derby, but also for the entire Hallway Feeds Hunter Derby Series. Saturday’s derby marked the last leg of the popular series, held during the Bluegrass Festival Horse Show at the Kentucky Horse Park.

Geoffrey Hesslink and Esco
Geoffrey Hesslink and Esco

Hesslink piloted Garland Alban’s Esco to victory, after receiving an 89 in the classic round and an 83 in the handy, collecting a lead score of 172 points to seal the win. He successfully tackled three high-option fences. While Hesslink has competed in the Alltech Arena more times than he can count due to his illustrious equitation career as a junior, it was Esco’s first time in the intimidating indoor arena.

Hesslink, of Shelburne, Vermont, said, “I started riding Esco post-circuit at the Winter Equestrian Festival this year. He’s been great. He does the Performance Hunters and the derbies. He’s been perfect.”

Hesslink enjoys participating in the Hallway Feeds National Derby Series so much that he has not missed one this year. “I love the derbies because I feel like it’s a great place to show off your horse and your handiness as well as how smooth and soft you can be,” Hesslink said. “Esco really excels at it because he doesn’t care about any of the jumps. He never spooks at anything.”

Although it was Esco’s first time in the large indoor venue, and their partnership is fairly new, Hesslink was not concerned about the 8-year-old Rhinelander.

“I know he’s always a steady eddie and he doesn’t care about those things. For sure, it’s more spooky. There’s more pressure on the horses with this atmosphere,” Hesslink acknowledged.

Hesslink has made a smooth transition into his budding career as a young professional under the guidance of Tim and Kelly Goguen of Boggs Hill Farm, as well as the generosity on behalf of Dina Testa and Garland Alban.

As the winner of the Hallway Feeds USHJA National Hunter Derby Series, Hesslink took home the $10,000 Hallway Feeds Leading Rider Bonus. “I think it’s amazing,” said Hesslink. “I think that it really helps to advertise and get the name out there for the derbies and I think it drives people to want to do them more and participate. I know Taylor [Kain], Aaron [Vale] and Sydney [Shulman] all came back and wanted to do them again and I did the same. I think it’s a great program and it’s a good thing for people who are here.”

Earning second place honors in this weekend’s derby was Courtney Baggett’s Highmark, ridden by Amanda Dougherty. She took on three high options and judges awarded the pair with an 82 in the classic and 85 in the handy. Tori Colvin rode Rivercross Onyx, owned by Rivercross Farm, to third-place honors with a total score of 167.5 points.

Hallway Feeds’ close proximity to the Kentucky Horse Park provides ample opportunity to utilize the freshest feed, manufactured with time-honored commitments to high standards of quality and the latest scientific advancements. Combining a premium nutrition package with a professional level of dedication in horsemen and women provides equine athletes with the formula for success.

For more information on Hallway Feeds, please visit www.hallwayfeeds.com.

The Hallway Feeds USHJA National Hunter Derby series would not be possible without many generous sponsors including Hagyard Equine Medical Institute, Fenwick Equestrian Products, EquiVision, Inc., Caddel Equine Therapy Center, Bauer Hay & Straw, Alfagreen Supreme, Trouw Nutrition, The Andersons, Mark Fischer Inc., Double S Liquid Feed Services, Inc., Agri-Business Insurance Services and Sweet PDZ Horse Stall Refresher.

The $40,000 Bluegrass Festival Grand Prix, sponsored by Audi of Lexington, marked the conclusion of the Bluegrass Festival Horse Show. The action will continue at the Kentucky Horse Park during the KHJA Horse Show, which begins on Wednesday.

To learn more about the Kentucky Horse Shows, please visit www.kentuckyhorseshows.com.

Media Contact: Rebecca Walton
Phelps Media Group, Inc. International
phone 561.753.3389 fax 561.753.3386
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Tori Colvin Takes Win in 1.40m Open Jumpers at Kentucky Summer Classic

Tori Colvin and Chanel B.

Gogul, Goguen and Shulman Top Professional Hunters

Lexington, Ky. – Aug. 2, 2016 – Tori Colvin is back in Kentucky, and the young professional kicked off the Kentucky Summer Classic by winning the 1.40m Open Jumpers with her longtime partner, Chanel B.

Colvin originally took the lead on Take the High Road LLC’s Austria 2, going second in the class and setting the early time to beat at 65.749 seconds.

“Today I just wanted to go around and have a nice, smooth round with Austria,” Colvin said. “She’s 7, turning 8, so I just wanted to be efficient, but not crazy.”

Her lead seemed unbeatable until Sharn Wordley entered the ring on Kerry Anne LLC’s Glamour Van De Kakebeek. Wordley sped past Colvin’s time by more than a second, finishing on a time of 64.032 seconds to become the new leader.

Colvin then returned second to last with Take the High Road LLC’s Chanel B, determined to regain the lead. After laying down a clear round and executing a number of tight turns, the duo managed to reclaim the top spot, this time finishing the course in just 62.322 seconds.

“Sharn was beating me,” Colvin continued. “And Chanel B has more experience and is really good at this height. She’s not the quickest, but she has such a big stride. Her stride and her turns really help her in winning speed classes.”

Colvin explained she has been riding the mare for over four years, and Chanel B was her High Junior Jumper mount of choice as she moved up the ranks to becoming a professional. Now 12, Chanel B still enjoys competing with Colvin in the Open division.

“I’ve done a couple of grand prixs with her, but she’s a woman,” Colvin explained. “She likes to go low sometimes and then go bigger. She loves the speed classes, too. She just zooms around.”

Wordley was not ready to surrender yet, however, and returned as the class’s final entry with Caiman De Sequoias to challenge Colvin’s lead once again. Despite turning in a clear effort and besting his first time, Wordley’s time of 63.527 seconds would only be good enough for second.

His earlier mount, Glamour Van De Kakebeek, brought home the third-place ribbon, while Trapp O’Neal and Capitano brought home fourth. Colvin’s first ride, Austria 2, ended up in fifth, while another of Colvin’s rides, Neil Jones Equestrian Inc.’s Irca Van De Eilandhoeve, took the sixth-place spot.

Earlier in the day, the 7-Year-Old Jumpers had the stage in the Rolex Arena, and it was Robert Mendoza and Allyn McCracken’s Java Van De Kleinheide who earned the win. The duo was the only ones to go double clear, cinching the victory with a time of 36.455 seconds.

“I work for Bannockburn Farm, and we imported Java last year to essentially be a broodmare,” Mendoza explained. “She has eggs harvested twice a year, but the rest of the time I get to play with her. She just started doing the 7-Year-Olds in the spring, and she’s doing great. She hasn’t shown since June, so it was really nice to have her be that eager and clean.”

The 1.35m Open Jumper followed next, and it was Blythe Marano and Balade Du Ry Z who came out with the win. Marano said she has been riding the 8-year-old mare for a year and a half now.
“Balade is extremely careful,” Marano said. “I think she’s going to be one that’s going to come up for me to do the bigger classes on. This whole year she has grown up a lot, and I was very happy with her today. She was right there for me.”

Gogul, Goguen and Shulman Top Professional Hunters

Day One of the Kentucky Summer Classic Horse Show kicked off Tuesday with the professional hunter divisions in the Stonelea.  To start off the day, Jeff Gogul and Stadium Horses LLC’s Cortes won both of the over fences in the Green Conformation Hunter division, while Jason Schnelle on Calena won the Green Conformation Hunter division under saddle class.

Jeff Gogul and Cortes
Jeff Gogul and Cortes

“I was very happy with how Cortes was today,” Gogul said. “The lines were more open than they were at our previous competition, so we made a bit of an adjustment between my rounds, and round two went even better! He is getting stronger and going better and better as the season progresses.

“Cortes is so brave and we have worked on getting him straighter and stronger because he is still pretty young,” Gogul continued.

Gogul of Cleveland, Ohio has been riding the 6-year-old Westphalian gelding for two seasons and he is thrilled with his progression. The pair will continue to show in Kentucky throughout August.

“I’ve been coming to the Kentucky Horse Park since I was 16 so it feels like a second home,” Gogul concluded.

Tim Goguen of Lexington, Kentucky won an over fences class and placed second in the under saddle and the other over fences class in the Second Year Green Hunter division on Garland Alban’s Capella.

“He is very scopey and jumps well,” Goguen said. “I’m so happy with today, the round was very fluid. He went beautifully.”

The pair competed together last year and they are no strangers to blue ribbons. He was reserve champion at Capital Challenge in the First Year Hunter Division. The 8-year-old gelding also competes with his owner in the amateur divisions and they were champions at Traverse City earlier in this year.

“I could not be happier with him,” Goguen continued. “I hope he performs tomorrow as great as he did today!”

The day wrapped up with the High Performance Working Hunters where Sydney Shulman and DK-USA Sporthorse’s Cosmeo won blue ribbons in both over fences classes and a second place ribbon in the under saddle class. Linda Radigan and Shangri-La Stables’ Geppetto won the under saddle class in the division. Shulman and Cosmeo won last week’s Visse Wedell Grand Hunter Championship in the professional division.

“I thought he was great,” Shulman said. “He jumped really well, but a bit more fresh than I would have liked for the first day. He was similar to our rounds last week because he came in today a little tense, but I thought he jumped better this round though. He gets better and better the more he goes. He is incredible!”

Shulman, 21, is based in Greenwich, Connecticut and she is appreciative of his owners for allowing her to ride the talented 10-year-old Dutch Warmblood stallion who had experience competing in the 1.40m-1.45m jumper classes in Europe.

“They sent me a video of Cosmeo in November while they were looking to buy a horse in Europe and I thought ‘Oh he is an amazing jumper!'” Shulman explained. “When they imported him I was so excited they called me to be his rider.”

Though he has experience in the jumpers, Shulman believes he has found his calling in the High Performance Hunter division.

“I really like him as a hunter,” Shulman explained. “For me, he’d be a bit too slow in the air for a jumper; he gets too round and high to be very successful as a jumper, but he is great for the hunters. He likes his job and he keeps getting better and better. I am really looking forward to his future.”

In the Regular Conformation Hunter division, Molly Sewell and Jamie Stryker’s Upcountry Charmer won the first over fences round, while Tim Goguen and Belhaven Stables LLC’s Ransom won the second over fences round and the under saddle class.

Highlight events during the Kentucky Summer Classic include the $25,000 Hagyard Lexington Classic, the $50,000 Kentucky Summer Grand Prix presented by GGT Footing and the $5,000 Hallway Feeds USHJA National Hunter Derby.

To learn more about the Kentucky Summer Horse Show, please visit www.kentuckyhorseshows.com.

Media Contact: Rebecca Walton
Phelps Media Group, Inc. International
phone 561.753.3389 fax 561.753.3386
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Colvin Unbeatable in Platinum Performance/USEF Show Jumping Talent Search Finals East

Tori Colvin and Avalanche (The Book LLC)

Gladstone, N.J. – Victoria (Tori) Colvin of Loxahatchee, Fla. lead the 2015 Platinum Performance/USEF Show Jumping Talent Search Finals East from start to finish. With her signature grace under pressure, the young superstar revealed the innate equestrian intuition for which she is famous, besting the field of 61 to win the French Leave Memorial Perpetual Trophy. Earning the highest score in each of the four phases of competition, Colvin was crowned champion aboard Betsee Parker’s Avalanche on a total score of 434.

Finishing tenth in her debut at these finals last year, Colvin appreciated the significance of the win. “It means a lot to win this class. This competition is more of a jumper-style test; it was an amazing experience as I move forward.” Dominating all four phases was the result of raw talent and extensive preparation. “The flat class is not usually my strongest, but my horse performed well and was really elegant. The gymnastics phase we had practiced a lot with [trainer] Andre [Dignelli] to get ready over the last month, so I went in there feeling confident and the exercises went smooth. This morning’s phase was my best round; it went so smooth and my horse was great.”

The Reserve Champion title was earned by McKayla Langmeier (East Granby, Conn.) aboard Linda Langmeier’s Skyfall. Skyfall was also awarded the Grappa Trophy for best horse at the finals. Langmeier entered the Phase IV ride-off in fourth place where she showcased her catch riding talents to ascend to second-place honors. Third-place accolades went to Hunter Holloway (Topeka, Kan.) aboard Hays Investment Corp.’s Any Given Sunday. Rounding out the top four placings was T. J. O’Mara (Rumson, N.J.) on Walstrib Stables LLC’s Kaskade.

Saturday’s competition began with the Phase I flat portion of the event, where the judges watched a demanding array of exercises in cold and rainy conditions. Colvin received the high score of 96, while Langmeier had the fifth highest score of the phase with an 89, closely followed by O’Mara with a score of 88 and Holloway with an 81. Phase II was the gymnastics course, where Colvin duplicated her high score of 96. Following in close second place was O’Mara with a 95 and Langmeier with a 94 to sit in third. Holloway was in fourth place at the conclusion of Saturday.

Sunday’s competition began under beautiful fall skies at the United States Equestrian Team Foundation Headquarters with Phases III and IV. Judges Chrystine Tauber and Candice King endeavored to design a challenging Phase III course for the 61 competitors and enlisted the aid of famed Olympian and course designer, Conrad Homfeld. Said Tauber, “We thought it would be nice to have a course that was designed by one of America’s top course designers, and asked (Homfeld) to consider adapting one of his 5* courses. (He) agreed and adapted the first round Nations Cup course from the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games.” The judges were pleased with the track as it tested balance, straightness, and striding.

Riding with ease and accuracy, Colvin answered all of the questions asked by the course and received a competition high score of 97. Holloway earned the second highest Phase III score of 94, with O’Mara receiving a 90, and Langmeier an 84.

In Phase IV, each rider rode a shortened course on his or her own horse, and then rode the same course on the other rider’s mounts. Colvin performed smooth, accurate rounds time after time, cementing her championship berth. The order of finish changed for the other three riders as Langmeier moved up to earn Reserve Champion honors, followed by Holloway in third and O’Mara in fourth. Tauber attributed Langmeier’s ascension in placings in the final round on her own entry, Linda Langmeier’s Skyfall, which she rode as a “forward, galloping course – it was just like you would see in a Table A against the clock. The other riders had to ride to that bar she set right from the beginning.” Skyfall continued to impress with each of the other finalists in Phase IV to earn the Grappa Trophy, which is best horse of the competition.

Colvin is trained by Andre Dignelli at Heritage Farm in Katonah, N.Y. Dignelli, himself a winner of the class in 1980, has trained an impressive nine winners of this final. He described Colvin as possessing “the incredible ability to be soft and at the same time effective. She is soft, but not weak. She brings out the best in horses, and they respond to her.” Colvin was foot perfect from day one, lead every phase of the competition, and never faltered under the pressure of being in the lead. As Dignelli states, “she lays it on the line,” praising her focus, organization, and discipline. He notes that the attribute setting Colvin apart is her “professionalism. She has basically been a professional rider for many years and she brings that perspective to the ring. If things don’t go perfectly in the schooling ring, she can leave it behind, walk in, and deliver.” Of her mount, Avalanche, Dignelli explained that he had never done this type of final before, and “the horse was breathtaking.”

The USEF Show Jumping Talent Search Finals format is designed to develop young talent for a future on the world stage of show jumping. The exceptional group that competed on the hallowed grounds of the United States Equestrian Team Headquarters in Gladstone, N.J. portends great success for the future of international show jumping for the United States.

On demand coverage of all phases of competition will be available on USEF Network.

From the USEF Communications Department

Tori Colvin and Sophia Pilla Dominate at US Jr. Hunter Nat’l Championship East Coast

Tori Colvin and Way Cool.

Devon, PA – July 7, 2015 – Tori Colvin came to the 2015 U.S. Junior Hunter National Championship East Coast as a widespread favorite to win aboard Way Cool and Ovation. Sophia Pilla came primarily just to have fun on her mounts CC Cool and Pop Rocks. But at the conclusion of the championship finals they are both going home with numerous blue ribbons, multiple division tricolors and ultimately, the 2015 national grand championship titles.

For 17-year-old Colvin of Loxahatchee, Florida, the 3’6″ Junior Hunter Grand Champion title came aboard Dr. Betsee Parker’s Way Cool, a 13-year-old Hanoverian gelding. For Pilla, a 13-year-old from Ridgefield, Connecticut, it was her own CC Cool whom she rode to the Grand Championship in the 3’3″ Junior Hunters.

Colvin and Way Cool kicked things off Monday at the Devon Horse Show grounds with a victory in the Large Junior 16-17 Hunter Classic Round, with scores from the round accounting for 40 percent of each horse and rider combination’s overall total. On Tuesday, Colvin cemented her Large Junior 16-17 division championship by finishing third in the under saddle, which accounted for 20 percent of total scores, and winning the handy round, which made up the remaining 40 percent.

“He’s been good every time he comes here [to the Devon Horse Show grounds],” Colvin said of Way Cool. “I think this would be his favorite ring. He just goes in there, perks his ears and off he goes.”

While Colvin had a commanding lead of the division, with the reserve championship awarded to Victoria Press and Melissa Wight’s Satisfaction, Way Cool’s hunt for the overall grand championship was hotly contested by none other than Colvin’s second mount, Parker’s Ovation.

Ovation earned three wins, but he accumulated slightly fewer points than Way Cool – enough however to still claim the Reserve Grand Championship title, meaning both grand and reserve would be going home with the talented Colvin.

“I’ve been lucky enough to be a part of this team [with Colvin] for a little bit more than a year now,” trainer Andre Dignelli of Heritage Farm said. “I would have to say with a lot of confidence that Tori is probably the best hunter rider that I’ve ever seen. That’s a very, very strong statement.

“She had a great show, and my hat is off to her because there was not a lot of pressure on her. She could’ve played it safe in both handy rounds because the ones that went right before her had made a few errors,” Dignelli said. “It’s impressive to me that she’s still making all of the turns and stepping up and taking all the risks. Not only did she win, she pushed herself right to the end. I think that’s always exciting.”

Dignelli concluded, “I thought this was a very well run event. This is probably the best Junior Hunter Finals that I’ve ever attended. I thought that Skip Bailey did a great job with the courses, because I thought they were a little bit more difficult than we’re used to seeing. I like to see that at a championship.”

As Colvin did, Pilla also stepped up to the challenge of the Junior Hunter Finals, and she is going home with many ribbons and trophies to show for it.

Sophia Pilla and CC Cool
Sophia Pilla and CC Cool

In the California split 3’3″ Junior 15 and Under Hunters, Pilla claimed the division championships in both section A, aboard CC Cool, and Section B, aboard Pop Rocks.

“This is absolutely amazing,” Pilla said. “We just planned to have fun and do the best we could.”

For Pilla and Pop Rocks, the “best they could” included an impressive win in Section B of the handy round and a win in section b of the classic round.

“Pop Rocks is my equitation horse for the big eq,” Pilla explained of the 8-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding. “We started in the hunters to get used to him. Then this year I started on CC, and he got qualified for here. They told us that we were also qualified on Pop Rocks from before when I was doing the hunters on him.”

As for CC Cool, the 6-year-old mare finished second in section a of the under saddle, third in section b of the handy and first in section a of the handy round, giving her the highest point total over all other 3’3″ Junior Hunter entries and securing the 3’3″ Junior Hunter Grand Championship.

“[CC Cool] does the 3’3″ pre-greens,” Pilla’s trainer, Lainie Wimberly of Brigadoon Show Stables, said. “We were extremely excited for her to do so well, being such a young horse. She didn’t mind the atmosphere or the rings or the jumps. She was beautiful. She held it together really well.”

Pilla added, “She felt great. She was listening; she was happy; she was just perfect. I love this show. It’s so pretty, and it’s so much fun. It’s a great set-up.”

In addition to CC Cool’s grand championship title, she was also presented with the Best Mare award and the War Dress Memorial Trophy as the leading horse owned by a junior rider.

Additional 2015 junior hunter national champions included Daisy Farish and Bill Schaub’s Carasco in the Small Junior 15 and Under Hunter division, Annabel Revers and Beechwood Stables LLC’s MTM Hands Down in the Large Junior 15 and Under Hunters and Emma Ecklin and her own Forever in the 3’3″ Junior 16-17 Hunters.

Reserve championships in the divisions were presented to Annabel Revers and Kingpin, owned by Beechwood Stables LLC, in the Small Junior 15 and Under Hunters; Emily Perez and her own Cassanto in the Large Junior 15 and Under Hunters; and Nicole Ciervo and her own Belvedere in the 3’3″ Junior 16-17 Hunters.

Reserve championships in the 3’3″ Junior 15 and Under Hunters went to Carly Hoft and Buffalo Therapeutic Riding Center’s Hey Sailor in Section A and Tabitha Brown and her own Quirrell in Section B.

For full results and to learn more about the 2015 U.S. Junior Hunter National Championship East Coast, hosted by the Brandywine Valley Summer Series, visit www.brandywinevalleysummerseries.com.

Emily Riden for Phelps Media Group, Inc. International

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Tori Colvin Tops Hunterdon Cup on Day One of US Jr. Hunter Nat’l Championship East Coast

Tori Colvin and Clearway.

Devon, PA – July 6, 2015 – On Sunday, Tori Colvin was earning major jumper victories in Tryon, North Carolina. Fast-forward less than 24 hours and one drive through the night with her mother, and the 17-year-old from Loxahatchee, Florida was winning every class she was entered in at the 2015 U.S. Junior Hunter National Championship East Coast, hosted by the Brandywine Valley Summer Series.

Colvin arrived at the Devon Horse Show grounds, home of the 2015 Junior Hunter Finals, at 4 a.m. Monday, and by the end of the day she had claimed three victories, including an impressive win in the 2015 USHJA Hunterdon Equitation Cup Classic presented by Intermont Equestrian at Emory & Henry College.

A starting field of 76 entries competed over Skip Bailey’s first course in the unique class that combines the precision of equitation with the handiness of the hunters. Following the conclusion of the classic round, the top 20 riders advanced to the handy round.

At the end of the first round it was Ashton Alexander who held the lead position, having earned a first round score of 89 as just the second to go in the class, but in the second round, it was Colvin’s time to shine.

The handy course presented riders with a large number of options, including options for the directions from which they took the first two fences. Following the first two fences, riders were asked to move up to a strong hand gallop to the third fence before quickly being forced to collect to clear a skinny gate and continue over the six additional remaining fences.

Colvin and her mount, Dr. Betsee Parker’s Clearway, maneuvered a very handy, direct approach to the first two fences and turned in a beautiful trip that would shoot them to the top of the leader board with a score of 98 and a two round total of 186.

“Since I was coming in second, only by one point, we thought we should just go for it,” Colvin said. “We know he’s a very handy horse. We knew that once we landed [off of fence two] we could just gallop and go as fast as he can, and he collects easily for the gate. We made a plan for him in the handy, and it worked out well.”

Judge Jack Towell said, “I thought [Ashton Alexander] was one point better than [Tori Colvin] the first round, but the second round when [Tori] came in I was waiting on [her] do to that. That worked out perfectly, and it was over with after [she] did that. When you have a handy course, Ronnie Mutch always taught me, walk the handy-est then see what you can do. She knew she could do that.”

Alexander would hold on to a strong second place spot with a two round total score of 181. At the end of the handy round, the top ten were as follows:

  1. Tori Colvin
  2. Ashton Alexander
  3. Coco Fath
  4. Shannon Hogue
  5. Annabel Revers
  6. Thea Chafee
  7. Samantha Cohen
  8. Victoria Pres
  9. Hayley Iannotti
  10. Gabrielle Bendall

Following the completion of the second round, judges were to bring back between four and 10 riders for a third round of testing. Judges Towell and Rachel Kennedy elected to bring back the top four to jump fences one through eight again but with a twist – they were asked to swap horses.

Tori Colvin on Ashton Alexander's mount, Fernway Park, owned by Don Stewart
Tori Colvin on Ashton Alexander’s mount, Fernway Park

Hogue and Fath swapped, giving Hogue the ride aboard Fath’s mount, Carte Blanche, owned by Hillside Farm LLC, and Fath the ride on Hogue’s Wrigley. Alexander picked up the ride on Clearway, and Colvin rode Don Stewart’s Fernway Park. Each rider was given two minutes in the schooling ring and the opportunity to jump just two fences before going into the show ring.

Hogue and Fath both executed the first eight fences well, and it came down to Alexander and Colvin. Alexander was the first to come back, following receiving a little bit of advice from Colvin.

Colvin said, “I told her that he’s really tired, but he’s also really handy. His lead change she practiced in the schooling ring. That’s his only little quirk is his little hop through his change.”

Alexander handled the mount well, but she saw a long distance to the hand gallop fence and Clearway landed playful bucking off the other side. Then it came down to Colvin.

“In the second round, it just worked out where all you had to be was just careful enough,” Towell said to Colvin.

And Colvin was more than careful; she turned in another beautiful round.

“I don’t really know that horse – I hadn’t really watched it do the equitation,” Colvin said. “[Ashton] said to me that he’s kind of a bit sensitive, and he would probably buck after the jumps. I thought ‘let’s not use leg!’ When I got on him in the schooling ring, he felt sort of like a big pony. I love ponies, and I have a lot of experience with ponies, so when I went in there I sort of just marched along. You just march and turn him, and he was really easy for me to ride. So that was a fun ride to get.”

As Colvin cleared the final fence it was evident that the victory should be hers.

“You’re dealing with super stars,” Towell said. “It’s just nice to judge these shows. It’s an honor, and it’s fun. It was a lovely class to judge. All of the riders were great. I saw some really nice horses. It was a good experience judging.”

Third place went to Hogue while fourth was awarded to Fath, and Annabel Revers rounded out the top five.

“It’s always an honor to watch Tori, and it’s always an honor to watch Ashton,” Kennedy said. “It was my pleasure to pin that class today. It was nice to see kids and hear names that I haven’t ever heard before, beside Tori and Ashton and the usual top kids in the top ten. It was really, really nice and really good training and the kids were ready.”

Prior to her Hunterdon Cup victory, Colvin’s day had already gotten off to a winning start. Throughout the morning, junior hunter riders completed their classic rounds, which account for 40 percent of their overall Junior Hunter Finals scores.

Colvin topped both the $4,000 Small Junior 16-17 Classic and the $4,000 Large Junior 16-17 Classic. Colvin’s wins came aboard Dr. Betsee Parker’s Ovation and Way Cool, in the small and large division respectively. Other classic round winners in the 3’6″ divisions included Daisy Farish and Bill Schaub’s Carasco in the $4,000 Small Junior 15 and Under Classic and Emma Kurtz and Frederick, owned by David Gochman, in the $4,000 Large Junior 15 and Under Classic.

In the 3’3″ divisions, 79 total entries competed in the $2,000 Junior Hunter 15 and Under Classic and the $2,000 Junior Hunter 16-17 Classic. Coming out on top in the 15 and Under class were Sophia Pilla and Piccolino Farm LLC’s CC Cool, while the victory in the 16-17 Classic went to Autumn Janesky on her own Temptation.

Riders return to the Dover Arena Tuesday morning at 7 a.m. to compete under saddle and over the handy round course. Under saddle scores will account for 20 percent of each horse’s overall total, while the handy round accounts for the remaining 40 percent.

To learn more about the 2015 U.S. Junior Hunter National Championship East Coast, hosted by the Brandywine Valley Summer Series, visit www.brandywinevalleysummerseries.com.

Emily Riden for Phelps Media Group, Inc. International

MEDIA CONTACT:
Phelps Media Group, Inc.
12012 South Shore Blvd #105
Wellington, FL 33414
561-753-3389 (phone)
561-753-3386 (fax)
pmginfo@phelpsmediagroup.com
PhelpsMediaGroup.com

Tori Colvin Conquers 2014 ASPCA Alfred B. Maclay National Championships

Tori Colvin and Patrick by Shawn McMillan Photography.

Lexington, KY – November 2, 2014 – The history books were made to house Tori Colvin’s name. The young phenom has been winning championship titles since she was wearing garters and riding ponies. At just 17 years old, she has already won the USHJA International Hunter Derby Finals, the Artisan Farms Young Rider Grand Prix Series, and countless other awards. One major title had eluded her, and today she changed that for good at the 2014 National Horse Show when she captured the prestigious ASPCA Alfred B. Maclay Championship, presented by Dover Saddlery.

“I never thought I would win an equitation final,” said Colvin of Loxahatchee, Florida after her victory. “It feels great. I thought Patrick went amazing. I thought that my second round was better than my first round, but Patrick really produced great rounds all day.”

The Kentucky Horse Park hosted 153 of the country’s top junior riders who turned out to vie for the winning title. Judges McLain Ward and Chrystine Tauber designed a course that tested the riders’ precision and horsemanship skills with two combinations, multiple bending lines, and an inside turn to a three-stride line that would be a deciding factor for today’s winners.

Trainer Don Stewart said, “I thought today when I walked it that the people who are going to win this class are going to go inside and do three and do five correctly. They gave the option for people to play it safe by going around. That’s not how McLain wins these big classes, though. He will do the inside turns; he goes to win the class. The judges weren’t going to penalize you if you went around, but if you want to win these classes, you have to do what is hard.”

The field was narrowed down to twenty riders who were asked to return for the flat phase, with Hunter Holloway of Topeka, Kansas in the lead position, followed by Colvin and Sophie Simpson of Wellington, Florida. The flat test counted for half of the riders’ overall score, and riders were asked to complete small circles, half-passes, and two changes of lead, as well as drop their stirrups.

After the flat phase, Holloway and Colvin remained in the top two spots. The top 15 competitors then had to complete a second course with increased difficulty that included a halt, counter canter fence, trot fence, and hand gallop fence. It also had three combinations as well as multiple turns where riders had to showcase balance and accuracy. The standings were as listed and the riders were asked to return in reverse order:

Hunter Holloway
Tori Colvin
Michael Hughes
Spencer Smith
Kelli Cruciotti
Ali Tritschler
Madison Goetzmann
Virigina Ingram
Rebekah Chenelle
Caitlin Boyle
McKayla Langmeier
Vivian Yowan
Sophie Simpson
Lilly Higgins
TJ O’Mara

The delicate track separated the top riders. Michael Hughes of Allendale, New Jersey, a decorated jumper rider, had a light rub in the second combination, but demonstrated a very good halt and counter canter transition that helped him remain in third place. The Maclay Final marked the conclusion of the 18-year-old’s equitation career.

“I think not only are the courses the same that we jump in the grand prix and the high juniors, but the pressure is the same as being last in the jump-off,” explained Hughes at the end of the day. “You know what you have to do. Doing equitation really taught me that you have to go in and do it exactly as you have to do it.”

Ali Tritschler of Southport, Connecticut was able to move into fourth place ahead of Spencer Smith with a very smooth and confident round. Smith rode the counter canter transition well, but did not demonstrate enough of a hand gallop, dropping to fifth place. However, at the end of the competition, Smith was awarded the Wilson Dennehy Equitation Trophy as the rider with the best results overall from the ASPCA Maclay Final and the Pessoa/US Hunter Seat Medal Finals.

The work-off determined third through tenth place in the standings, but when Colvin and Holloway each produced flawless rounds that demonstrated their superb horsemanship skills, Ward and Tauber asked them to return for a final test, completing the same test, but swapping horses.

Colvin returned first on Holloway’s Any Given Sunday and laid down the gauntlet by taking an inside turn on an unfamiliar horse and easily riding down the outside line with a controlled halt.

“I thought it would be a lot of fun to do another horse,” admitted Colvin. “Hunter’s horse was amazing – he was like a hunter. I love riding hunters. He had more energy than Patrick.”

Hunter Holloway and Any Given Sunday
Hunter Holloway and Any Given Sunday

Holloway knew that she would need to be perfect to stay in the lead, and while she demonstrated a good trot fence and a lovely ride through the diagonal line as well as completing the inside turn with Colvin’s Patrick, an extra stride at the final fence would cost her the win with a deep distance.

“I got really nervous for the final round and I miscounted down the final line, which was very unfortunate,” explained 15-year-old Holloway. “Patrick is straightforward and fun to ride though, so it was fun.”

Holloway added, “This has always been a goal of mine. Hopefully next year we will come back and do even better. This is the best I’ve done here. I have an amazing team and amazing people in my life. It’s really special to be able to come here and do this.”

The judges were very impressed with the level of riding demonstrated throughout the day. “We had talked earlier in the year about the general concept and what we wanted to see in the way of horsemanship and the riders commanding their mounts,” noted Tauber. “I think you could see that the lines on the courses required a good connection. You had to ride leg to hand, know the track, and know how your horse had to be ridden on the course. Not every person could ride it the same. You had to ride it according to what you were sitting on. Our top riders did it beautifully. I think we were very thrilled with our top group.”

Tauber added, “The final showed whether you could go from collected to a counter canter to a hand gallop to a rollback turn and bending line with your eye on it. But, that was exactly what that course was about. It let the people who were really riding well shine. The other weaknesses were exposed.”

For Ward, the Maclay is more than just a junior championship: it is a test for riders to advance to the highest levels of the sport. “I think the basis of the courses and the thought process is that this isn’t a be-all, end-all. This is a stepping-stone to something greater,” he commented. “We hope that these events will point out the riders who are going to go on to do great things in their careers and for this country. The three kids sitting here, and all the young riders competing here today, really stepped up to the plate and had great performances.”

For Holloway, the two-time Olympic Gold medalist also commented, “Don’t worry, Hunter – second place worked out OK for me!”

Colvin’s victory today also marked a third win in as many years at the championship for Andre Dignelli and the team at Heritage Farm. “When you come to these events with someone who rides like Tori, you know you have a shot at winning,” he commented. “My goal is to try not to mess it up. I agonized for 75 rounds if I was going to have her go inside and do three to the five or do five. We took a shot and it paid off for us today. But this feeling never gets old.”

ASPCA Federal Legislative Manager Caroline Schnurr concluded, “We applaud Tori’s commitment to horsemanship as a unique talent that led to this truly impressive victory. This championship embodies not only the spirit of excellence, in equestrian sport, but in humane and responsible stewardship of equines, and in doing what is right and compassionate for horses and all animals. We now encourage Tori, and all those who compete in this prestigious competition, to join us in being a voice for the animals and helping us, and our Equine Welfare Ambassadors, many of whom are ASPCA Maclay National Champions themselves, in making a difference for animals.”

The ASPCA Maclay Horsemanship class has been held since 1933, and it is one of the most prestigious competitions for junior riders in the United States. Its winners are some of the biggest names in equestrian sport. Previous winners include: William Steinkraus in 1941, Frank Chapot (1948), George Morris (1952), Leslie Burr Howard (1972), Stacia Klein Madden (1987) and Nicole Shahinian Simpson (1992). The 2012 ASPCA Maclay National Championship winner was Jacob Pope of Columbia, Maryland, and in 2013 Lillie Keenan of New York, New York, won the title.

Founded in 1883 at the original Madison Square Garden, the National Horse Show is America’s oldest indoor horse show, firmly established as a major fixture on the national and international sports and social event calendars. The National Horse Show Association’s primary activity is the annual production of the National Horse Show and all ancillary events. Over the years, the National Horse Show has provided financial aid to many worthwhile charities.

About the National Horse Show

Founded in 1883 at the original Madison Square Garden, the National Horse Show is America’s oldest indoor horse show, firmly established as a major fixture on the national and international sports and social event calendars. The National Horse Show Association’s primary activity is the annual production of the National Horse Show and all ancillary events. Over the years, the National Horse Show has provided financial aid to many worthwhile charities.

With $755,000 in prize money offered, this year’s National Horse Show offers an International Open Jumpers with $460,000 in prize money, while the top rated hunter sections have a total purse of $195,000. Meanwhile, $100,000 in total is offered to the Amateur-Owner and U 25 Jumper sections.

For the fourth consecutive year, The National Horse Show received a top ranking from NARG, the North American Riders Group and was named the Show Hunter Hall of Fame Horse Show of the Year in four back-to-back years.

For more information, go to www.nhs.org.

2014 National Horse Show Fast Facts

What:
The Alltech National Horse Show is a week-long championship event featuring “AA”-rated hunters, open jumpers, junior/amateur jumpers, and the ASPCA Alfred B. Maclay Finals. The event will run October 28 – November 2, 2014, indoors in the Alltech Arena at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, KY, site of the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games.

Parking:
The Kentucky Horse Park has waived the normal parking fee during the Alltech National Horse Show. Parking is free. While dogs are permitted at the Kentucky Horse Park on a leash, no dogs are allowed in the Alltech Arena during the ANHS.

Directions:
The Kentucky Horse Park is located at 4089 Iron Works Parkway, Lexington, KY 40511. The KHP is 8 miles northeast of Lexington at Exit 120 on Interstate 75.

Information:
2245 Stone Garden Lane Lexington, KY 40513
Cindy Bozan
email: cindy@nhs.org
Phone: (859) 608-3709
Fax: (866) 285-9496

Email:
Cindy@nhs.org

Website:
www.nhs.org

Shopping:
Vendors offering equestrian equipment, apparel, jewelry and home furnishings are located in the Alltech Arena.

Additional Contacts:
Vendors – Matt Morrissey at matt.morrissey@stadiumjumping.com or call (941) 915-3457
VIP Table Sales – Cindy Bozan at cindy@nhs.org Phone: (859) 608-3709
Advertising and Program Sales – Dee Thomas at jmstables@aol.com Phone: 561-310-7679
Sponsorship – Mason Phelps at mpjr@phelpsmediagroup.com or 561-753-3389 or Susie Webb at webb_susie@yahoo.com or 301-520-6162

Hotels:
HILTON – DOWNTOWN – 859-231-9000 – Approximately 6 miles
CLARION HOTEL (formerly Holiday Inn North) – 859 – 233-0512 – Approximately 4 miles
FAIRFIELD INN & SUITES BY MARRIOTT – 859 -977-5870 – Approximately 4 miles
FOUR POINTS SHERATON – 859-259-1311 – Approximately 4 miles
LA QUINTA – 859-231-7551 – Approximately 4 miles
KNIGHTS INN – 859-231-0232 – Approximately 4 miles
EMBASSY SUITES – 859-455-5000 – Approximately 4 miles
MARRIOT GRIFFIN GATE – 859-231-5100 – Approximately 4 miles
RESIDENCE INN – 859-231-6191 – Approximately 5 miles
COURTYARD BY MARRIOT – 859-253-4646 – Approximately 5 miles
HOLIDAY INN GEORGETOWN – 502-570-0220 – Approximately 6 miles
RAMADA INN – 859-299-1261 – Approximately 6 miles
RED ROOF INN – 859-293-2626 – Approximately 6 miles
HAMPTON INN – 502-867-4888 – Approximately 6 miles
SUPER EIGHT – 502-863-4888 – Approximately 6 miles
MICROTEL INN & SUITES – 502-868-8000 – Approximately 6 miles

For further information on housing in the Lexington area, we invite you to visit www.visitlex.com and www.georgetownky.com.

Management:
Kentucky Horse Shows, LLC
P. O. Box 11428
Lexington, KY 40575-1428
859-233-0492 (phone)
859-233-0495 (fax)
email: hakshows@earthlink.net
website: www.kentuckyhorseshows.com

Horse Show Secretary:
Cindy Bozan
859-233-0492
Email: secretary.nhs@aol.com

NATIONAL HORSE SHOW MEDIA CONTACT:

Re: News and Information:
Phelps Media Group, Inc.
12230 Forest Hill Blvd.
Suite 214
Wellington, FL 33414
561-753-3389 (phone)
561-753-3386 (fax)
pmginfo@phelpsmediagroup.com
www.phelpsmediagroup.com

Tori Colvin and Ovation Are Grand at National Horse Show

Tori Colvin and Ovation.

Lexington, KY – November 1, 2014 – The National Horse Show is steeped in history, and the 2014 Grand Champion Junior Hunter is a horse that is not only adding to that history, but creating quite the legacy for himself as well.

“In the history of the [United States Equestrian Federation] and the [American Horse Show Association] there has never been a Small Junior Working Hunter that has won as many of the big ones as he has. You’re looking at an animal that is historic,” said Dr. Betsee Parker.

The horse that she is describing is her own Ovation, a 14-year-old Warmblood gelding who claimed the Junior Hunter Grand Championship with Tori Colvin in the irons.

Ovation and Colvin won two of the three over fences classes and the under saddle this week at the Kentucky Horse Park before ultimately being named the Small Junior 16-17 Hunter champions and going on to receive the Overdressed Challenge Trophy as the overall champions.

Parker values each and every one of the championships that Ovation has won, but there is something particularly special about the National Horse Show.

“These qualifiers are the ones that everyone wants to get to,” Parker said. “Mason Phelps has just done a spectacular job of reviving the National Horse Show. I was one of those dyed in the wool New York City/Madison Square Garden types, but on its own right now in Kentucky it has become a stand out, magnificent first tier show.”

Finishing in reserve in the Small Junior 16-17 Hunter division, presented by Dayle Duchossois and Edward Fortino, were Kaitlyn Van Konyenburg and Triton Z.

Kaitlyn Van Konyenburg and Wish List Top the List in Large Junior 16-17 Hunters

The reserve tricolor in the Small Junior Hunters was just the start for Van Konyenburg. The 16-year-old will also be returning home to California with the Large Junior 16-17 Hunter championship cooler earned aboard her own Wish List.

“I’m really, really excited. I didn’t think it would happen, but it did!” said an excited Van Konyenburg.

“He’s just a good guy,” Van Konyenburg said of the 11-year-old Hanoverian gelding. “Riding him, you have to be really still. He gets really nervous if you’re not still enough, which I had to learn because I’m a little bit sloppy sometimes. He made me learn how to sit still. He’s just a really fun ride. You can trust him over everything because you know he’s going to go over everything. He’s never stopped at a jump. He’s just a good all-around solid guy.”

For the last six years, Van Konyenburg has been training with Carleton Brooks and Traci Barmen Brooks and their Balmoral Farm in the heart of Los Angeles, only about 500 feet from Sunset Boulevard. Van Konyenburg credits them with helping her get to where she is today: winning multiple top honors at one of the most prestigious horse shows in the country.

“We’re a really good team because we can be serious, but we can still have fun which is good because I like to have fun,” Van Konyenburg said. “I like this sport with them because I can have a lot a lot of fun and be good, but not be one of those kids who has to feel like winning is everything.”

Traci added, “It’s been a long road, but she’s come so far. When we first met Kaitlyn she was scared to jump an X. We had to beg her, and we had to make her sing a song while she went over it… She’s come a long way from that.”

“She has natural talent. There’s no question,” Carleton said. “The empathy for the horses carries over. The horses know it right away.”

Van Konyenburg also gives her mom a lot of credit for her support of her riding and showing over the years.

“I love my mom so much. She literally is the best cheerleader,” Van Konyenburg said. “I have three brothers and sisters, so she’s really dedicated a lot of time to coming to the horse shows. She’s such a good role model for me. These two too; Carleton has been really good with helping me learn how to be a good person, and so has Tracey.”

Lilli Hymowitz Dominates in Junior 15 and Under Hunters

In the Junior 15 and Under Hunters, Lilli Hymowitz is quick to thank her horses, and on Saturday there were two in particular who received a little extra praise.

Hymowitz dominated the Junior Hunters for her age division, winning both the Small and Large Junior 15 and Under Hunter Division championships aboard Enjoy and Tiffani respectively.

“Enjoy is amazing,” Hymowitz said of her day’s first winning mount, an 8-year-old Holsteiner gelding previously ridden by her sister, Cloe Hymowitz. “He was a challenge. This is my first time being at Indoors on him. Harrisburg and Capital Challenge and Washington were all good. I had little mistakes in all of my classes like a hard rub or a swap or something. It’s nice for it to all come together.”

Hymowitz continued, “You have to let him do his own thing and let him find the jump. If you leave him alone, he’s perfect. He’s the sweetest in the barn out of all of mine for sure. He’s so nice and gives kisses.”

While Enjoy might be the sweetest, Hymowitz’s Large Junior Hunter, Tiffani, is the one who really has her heart.

“She’s probably my favorite,” Hymowitz said. “She’s not as friendly in the barn, and as soon as she goes in the ring, she knows it’s time to work. She really does anything that you tell her to do as long as you give her instructions, so it’s very different from Enjoy. You leave him alone, and she’s more ‘tell me what to do.’ I like Tiffani’s ride better because I’m just more in control, but I’ve learned how to ride Enjoy too.”

Reserve in the Large Junior 16-17 Hunters, presented by Susie Humes, went to Kerry McCahill and Imagine. Reserves in the Junior 15 and Under Hunter divisions went to Victoria Press and Akinda in the Smalls and Kelly Arani and Antwerp in the Large division.

In the Junior 3’3″ Hunter division, the championship honor went to Hailey Livingston and Brego, and the reserve championship went to Grace Finerman and Carlsson.

Saturday marked the conclusion hunter competition at the National Horse Show, but the competition continues on Sunday with the highly anticipated ASPCA Maclay Horsemanship National Championship Final.

Watch the Maclay Finals live online at www.usefnetwork.com, and find out more about the show at www.nhs.org.

About the National Horse Show

Founded in 1883 at the original Madison Square Garden, the National Horse Show is America’s oldest indoor horse show, firmly established as a major fixture on the national and international sports and social event calendars. The National Horse Show Association’s primary activity is the annual production of the National Horse Show and all ancillary events. Over the years, the National Horse Show has provided financial aid to many worthwhile charities.

With $755,000 in prize money offered, this year’s National Horse Show offers an International Open Jumpers with $460,000 in prize money, while the top rated hunter sections have a total purse of $195,000. Meanwhile, $100,000 in total is offered to the Amateur-Owner and U 25 Jumper sections.

For the fourth consecutive year, The National Horse Show received a top ranking from NARG, the North American Riders Group and was named the Show Hunter Hall of Fame Horse Show of the Year in four back-to-back years.

For more information, go to www.nhs.org.

2014 National Horse Show Fast Facts

What:
The Alltech National Horse Show is a week-long championship event featuring “AA”-rated hunters, open jumpers, junior/amateur jumpers, and the ASPCA Alfred B. Maclay Finals. The event will run October 28 – November 2, 2014, indoors in the Alltech Arena at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, KY, site of the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games.

Parking:
The Kentucky Horse Park has waived the normal parking fee during the Alltech National Horse Show. Parking is free. While dogs are permitted at the Kentucky Horse Park on a leash, no dogs are allowed in the Alltech Arena during the ANHS.

Directions:
The Kentucky Horse Park is located at 4089 Iron Works Parkway, Lexington, KY 40511. The KHP is 8 miles northeast of Lexington at Exit 120 on Interstate 75.

Information:
2245 Stone Garden Lane Lexington, KY 40513
Cindy Bozan
email: cindy@nhs.org
Phone: (859) 608-3709
Fax: (866) 285-9496

Email:
Cindy@nhs.org

Website:
www.nhs.org

Shopping:
Vendors offering equestrian equipment, apparel, jewelry and home furnishings are located in the Alltech Arena.

Additional Contacts:
Vendors – Matt Morrissey at matt.morrissey@stadiumjumping.com or call (941) 915-3457
VIP Table Sales – Cindy Bozan at cindy@nhs.org Phone: (859) 608-3709
Advertising and Program Sales – Dee Thomas at jmstables@aol.com Phone: 561-310-7679
Sponsorship – Mason Phelps at mpjr@phelpsmediagroup.com or 561-753-3389 or Susie Webb at webb_susie@yahoo.com or 301-520-6162

Hotels:
HILTON – DOWNTOWN – 859-231-9000 – Approximately 6 miles
CLARION HOTEL (formerly Holiday Inn North) – 859 – 233-0512 – Approximately 4 miles
FAIRFIELD INN & SUITES BY MARRIOTT – 859 -977-5870 – Approximately 4 miles
FOUR POINTS SHERATON – 859-259-1311 – Approximately 4 miles
LA QUINTA – 859-231-7551 – Approximately 4 miles
KNIGHTS INN – 859-231-0232 – Approximately 4 miles
EMBASSY SUITES – 859-455-5000 – Approximately 4 miles
MARRIOT GRIFFIN GATE – 859-231-5100 – Approximately 4 miles
RESIDENCE INN – 859-231-6191 – Approximately 5 miles
COURTYARD BY MARRIOT – 859-253-4646 – Approximately 5 miles
HOLIDAY INN GEORGETOWN – 502-570-0220 – Approximately 6 miles
RAMADA INN – 859-299-1261 – Approximately 6 miles
RED ROOF INN – 859-293-2626 – Approximately 6 miles
HAMPTON INN – 502-867-4888 – Approximately 6 miles
SUPER EIGHT – 502-863-4888 – Approximately 6 miles
MICROTEL INN & SUITES – 502-868-8000 – Approximately 6 miles

For further information on housing in the Lexington area, we invite you to visit www.visitlex.com and www.georgetownky.com.

Management:
Kentucky Horse Shows, LLC
P. O. Box 11428
Lexington, KY 40575-1428
859-233-0492 (phone)
859-233-0495 (fax)
email: hakshows@earthlink.net
website: www.kentuckyhorseshows.com

Horse Show Secretary:
Cindy Bozan
859-233-0492
Email: secretary.nhs@aol.com

NATIONAL HORSE SHOW MEDIA CONTACT:

Re: News and Information:
Phelps Media Group, Inc.
12230 Forest Hill Blvd.
Suite 214
Wellington, FL 33414
561-753-3389 (phone)
561-753-3386 (fax)
pmginfo@phelpsmediagroup.com
www.phelpsmediagroup.com

Colvin, Torano and Boyd Rise to Top of Round 1 at USHJA International Hunter Derby Finals

Tori Colvin and Inclusive put in an outstanding round to win Round 1.

Lexington, KY – August 15, 2014 – After an injury months ago that sidelined the 11-year-old Warmblood gelding Inclusive, rider Tori Colvin has the successful mount back in winning shape. She showed him off today during the Classic Round of the USHJA International Hunter Derby, gaining a score of 95 from one judge panel, and two other scores in the 90s, as the two-day competition got underway at the Bluegrass Festival Horse Show. Jimmy Torano, on his seventh mount of the day, produced results with Mindful procuring second place. Last year’s winner, Brunello, claimed third place with rider Liza Boyd just recently returned to riding after maternity leave.

Despite an injury earlier in the season, Colvin said she was not worried about how Inclusive, owned by Dr. Betsee Parker, would perform today. “We showed him at Devon and at Junior Hunter Finals, but we wanted to keep him ready for this, and we thought he’d be perfect to go right into Derby Finals,” she explained.

Colvin thought the course was open and beautiful and not too spooky for a first round. Her favorite jump, a high-option oxer with wagon wheels, proved challenging to many other pairs, but Colvin knew Inclusive would love it because the jump was somewhat ramped, a specialty of Inclusive.

Tomorrow’s Handy Round will feature increased difficulty and new challenges but Colvin isn’t feeling the pressure.

“I’m feeling amazing going into tomorrow. I’ve never had a really good round going into the handy, so it’s very different being on top going into tomorrow,” said Colvin. “I’m just going to go in and see how he feels and how it all plays out.”

Jimmy Torano made his last ride count on Mindful
Jimmy Torano made his last ride count on Mindful

Jimmy Torano, who grabbed second place on Mindful, a Hanoverian gelding owned by Glefke & Kensel, took over all seven of Kelly Farmer’s mounts when she broke her collarbone several weeks ago.

“I’ve never ridden any of these horses; I barely know them. I watched some videos of them last week just to see how they go. Larry called me last week and asked me to do this and I thought he was out of his mind,” said Torano jokingly.

Torano’s other mounts had some bad luck, but everything came together on his last ride of the round and the third to last entry in the class.

“They say to save the best for last and going in I thought that Mindful was the horse that could do it and I thought he was my best mount of the day,” said Torano. “I think there was a lot of pressure riding on me, but because it was Mindful I was very relaxed. That horse could jump the course by itself; he’s that easy to ride. I’ve ridden thousands of horses but he’s the most straightforward, direct and easy horse I’ve ever sat on.”

With a solid mount taking him to the Handy Round, Torano is looking forward to what he thinks will be a more challenging ride tomorrow.

“Today the course wasn’t too imposing and nothing was crazy high, but I’m sure for tomorrow the screws will be turned. I think tomorrow will be more of a rider’s course and we’ll just have to try to ride to the top,” said Torano.

As last year’s Derby Finals winner Brunello, the 16-year-old Hanoverian gelding, went into the ring, anticipation was high. Not only was the mount carrying hopes for a repeat winner, but his rider and partial owner Liza Boyd was only just returning to riding after being on maternity leave. Despite the challenges, Boyd and Brunello displayed their athleticism and claimed third place, positioning themselves well for the rest of the Final.

Boyd and Brunello are in a good position to defend their title
Boyd and Brunello are in a good position to defend their title

Despite his age (“He has his driver’s license now,” quipped Boyd), Brunello is feeling great, she said.

“He had a nine-month maternity leave as well,” said Boyd. “But he actually feels fitter than ever, even better than last year.”

In order to keep up with Brunello, Boyd was incredibly eager to get back to riding after giving birth and even snuck in a few rides.

“I have tortured myself to get back into shape; I’m not kidding,” she said. “Two weeks after the baby I wasn’t really supposed to be riding, but I did sneak in a little ride while everyone was away at a show. I was cantering around and doing a couple jumps and my mom drove by and yelled at me. My daughter caught me putting on a riding pants one day and called my husband.”

Boyd said the hard work was all worth it because she really wanted to be fit for Brunello. “Who knows how many more years he has; he doesn’t owe me anything, but he feels great,” said Boyd.

Tomorrow the hunters will return to the Rolex Stadium at the Kentucky Horse Park for the Handy Round and the USHJA International Hunter Derby Final during the Bluegrass Festival Horse Show.

For more information on the Kentucky Summer Horse Shows, including this week’s Bluegrass Festival Horse Show, visit www.kentuckyhorseshows.com.

Kentucky Summer Series Fast Facts

Events:
Kentucky Summer Horse Shows, USEF National Pony Finals, Bluegrass Festival Horse Show and KHJA Horse Show, and the 2014 USHJA International Hunter Derby Finals.

What:
The Kentucky Horse Show LLC’s 2014 series includes five weeks of top competition throughout the summer. These premier hunter/jumper competitions host the Hagyard Challenge Series with seven grand prix competitions that culminate with a Leading Rider Award, as well as the Hallway Feeds National Derby Series.

Where:
Kentucky Horse Park, Lexington, KY, site of the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games™. Home to the United States Equestrian Federation.

When:

NORTH AMERICAN JUNIOR & YOUNG RIDER CHAMPIONSHIPS – July 15-20, 2014
KENTUCKY SUMMER HORSE SHOW – July 23-27, 2014
$25,000 Hagyard Lexington Classic
$50,000 Rood & Riddle Kentucky Grand Prix
$5,000 Hallway Feeds USHJA National Hunter Derby

KENTUCKY SUMMER CLASSIC – July 29 – August 3, 2014
$25,000 Hagyard Lexington Classic
$50,000 Kentucky Summer Grand Prix sponsored by GGT Footings
$5,000 Hallway Feeds USHJA National Hunter Derby

2014 USEF PONY FINALS – August 5-10, 2014
BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL HORSE SHOW – August 12-17, 2014
USHJA International Hunter Derby Finals
USHJA Pre-Green Incentive Championship
$25,000 Hagyard Lexington Classic
$40,000 Bluegrass Festival Grand Prix
$5,000 Hallway Feeds USHJA National Hunter Derby
WCHR Member Event

KHJA HORSE SHOW – August 20-24, 2014
$10,000 Hagyard Welcome Stake
$30,000 KHJA Grand Prix
$5,000 Hallway Feeds USHJA National Hunter Derby

Sponsors:
A special thanks to the generous sponsors of the Kentucky Summer Horse Shows: Hagyard Equine Medical Institute, Hallway Feeds, Audi of Lexington, GGT Footing, Equestrian Services International, Johnson Horse Transportation, Farm Vet, Dietrich Insurance, Take2 Thoroughbred Program, Sleepy P Ranch, and the Official Hotel The Clarion

Hours:
8am – 5pm daily

Parking:
Horse Show Exhibitors may purchase a weekly parking pass at the main Horse Park entrance for $15.00. Dogs are permitted at the Kentucky Horse Park on a leash.

Directions:
The Kentucky Horse Park is located 8 miles northeast of Lexington, Kentucky at Exit 120 on Interstate 75.

Information:
Before Show – (859) 233-0492, Email: hakshows@earthlink.net
During Show – Telephone: (859) 254-3343, Fax: (859) 231-6097
Stabling – Email Tom Blankenship at tomblank@bellsouth.net
Stable office – Before Show: (843) 269-4737, During Show: (859) 255-0605
Prize List Advertising – Email Cindy Bozan at cindy@kentuckyhorseshows.com or call (859) 608-3709
Vendors – Email Cindy Bozan at cindy@kentuckyhorseshows.com or call (859) 608-3709

Shownet – www.shownet.biz

Website: www.kentuckyhorseshows.com

Ring Dimensions/Specs:

The Stonelea Ring, Murphy Ring, Walnut Ring, Stonelea/Murphy Schooling Ring, the Alltech Arena and the Rolex Stadium have Otto Sport footing consisting of fine sand and synthetic fiber on pvc mats. The Claiborne, Annex, and Covered Arena (old) rings’ footing consists of a sand cushion on limestone base. The dimensions of the competition areas are as follows:

Stonelea: 140′x 280′, Murphy: 135′x 280′, Stonelea and Murphy Schooling: 110′x 400′
Walnut: 300′x 370′, Claiborne: 140′x 270′, Annex 130′x 250′, Covered Arena (old): 145′x 285′ Rolex Stadium: 360′ x 384′, Alltech Arena: 132′ x 265′

Shopping:
Vendors offering equestrian equipment, apparel, jewelry and home furnishings are located adjacent to the Stonelea Ring.

Hotels:

CLARION HOTEL (Formerly Holiday Inn North) – 859-233-0512 – Approximately 4 miles (OFFICIAL HOTEL)
Discover the place where elegant comfort in an ideal location meets excellent service and affordability. At the Clarion Hotel Lexington, you’ll find well-appointed accommodations with options of double/doubles, double queens, king rooms or suites, exceptional amenities such as our free hot breakfast buffet, and Southern hospitality at its finest. The best hotel for Keeneland – located in the heart of Kentucky’s Bluegrass Region – home of the Kentucky Horse Park, the Lexington Convention Center, University of Kentucky, and the Kentucky Bourbon Trail – our Lexington hotel is on Newtown Pike at Exit 115 on I-75, close to all the big attractions, and is the perfect place to stay whether you’re here to get down to business or have some fun. Best of all, bring your furry friends for any trip because the Clarion Hotel in Lexington is also pet-friendly.

CAMPGROUND RESERVATIONS:
Reservations may not be made through the Horse Show office. To reserve a campsite at the Kentucky Horse Park for any of the horse shows, please call the Campground store at (800) 370-6416 or 859-259-4157 or email Sherry Logan at sherryd.logan@ky.gov. Be specific as to the show name and the dates you wish to stay. Check-in time is 2:00 p.m. and check-out is 12:00 noon. You must make arrangements with the Campground store if you plan to arrive earlier than 2:00 p.m. or stay later than 12:00 noon. Vehicles that are not removed from a campsite by check-out time will be towed.

Management:
Kentucky Horse Shows, LLC
P. O. Box 11428
Lexington, KY 40575-1428
859-233-0492 (phone)
859-233-0495 (fax)
email: hakshows@earthlink.net
website: www.kentuckyhorseshows.com

Media Contact:
Phelps Media Group, Inc.
12230 Forest Hill Blvd.
Suite 214
Wellington, FL 33414
561-753-3389 (phone)
561-753-3386 (fax)
pmginfo@phelpsmediagroup.com
www.phelpsmediagroup.com

Inclusive and Tori Colvin Head to Devon Following Successful Kentucky Spring Classic

Tori Colvin and Inclusive.

Lexington, KY – May 18, 2014 – After a few months away from the show ring, Dr. Betsee Parker’s Inclusive is back and not missing a beat. The gelding returned to competition this week at the Kentucky Spring Classic and won both of the Large Junior 16-17 Hunter over fences classes this morning, clinching the division championship with Colvin in the irons.

“This was his first show back, and he’s been great,” Colvin said. “He’s just had some relaxing time, and now we’re bringing him back before [the Devon Horse Show].”

The Kentucky Spring Classic at the Kentucky Horse Park serves as the ideal, competitive stopping point before Devon, and based on their performance this morning, which earned them scores of 89 and 90 over the Bobby Murphy designed courses, Colvin and Inclusive are more than ready for the Dixon Oval at Devon this coming week.

Colvin continued, “He never spooks or anything, so even though he hasn’t shown in a little bit, we weren’t really worried about that. He had a big stride, and he just felt great today.”

The championship with Inclusive was the first of multiple hunter tricolors for Colvin today as she continued to dominate the Junior 16-17 Hunter divisions. She also earned the reserve championship in the Large Junior 16-17 Hunters aboard Parker’s Way Cool.

Tori Colvin and Way Cool
Tori Colvin and Way Cool

Way Cool came in to the day as the frontrunner in the division with two wins under his belt from yesterday’s over fences rounds in the Claiborne Ring, but Inclusive edged out his barn mate today in the Stonelea Ring for the championship title.

“He got a little spooky today,” Colvin said of Way Cool. “He liked the Claiborne yesterday, but today he was looking at the fences like they were a little much.”

While spookiness may have been evident in his first round, it was not at all evident as he cantered around the second course and turned in a score of 87 for the second place finish and additional points toward the reserve championship.

With the 2014 Kentucky Spring Classic championships to their name, Inclusive, Way Cool and Colvin are now making the drive to Scott Stewart and Ken Berkley’s River’s Edge Farm in New Jersey before heading to Devon later this week.

Also making the trip to the Devon Horse Show after an enjoyable and successful week at the Kentucky Spring Classic is fellow junior rider Emma Kurtz. While Colvin led the championship charge in the Junior 16-17 Hunters, Kurtz did the same in the Junior 15 & Under Hunters.

She kicked off the morning by sweeping the Small Junior 15 & Under Hunters with two different horses: Rose Hill Farm’s Enjoy and Oscany, Inc.’s Clooney. The morning’s first blue ribbon over fences and blue ribbon under saddle were both awarded to Enjoy, while Clooney earned the day’s second top call over fences. At the end of the day, the two horses sat tied for the championship title with 34 points apiece. With more points earned over fences, the championship was awarded to Clooney while Enjoy took the reserve spot.

Kurtz also swept all three of the morning’s Large Junior 15 & Under Hunter classes and took home the tricolor with Rendezvous Farm’s Prologue. The reserve championship in the division was awarded to Sophie Simpson and Rose Hill Farm’s Statement.

Today marked the end of the Kentucky Spring Classic, but hunter jumper competition at the Kentucky Horse Park continues this summer with the Kentucky Summer Horse Shows, kicking off on July 23.

To learn more about the Kentucky Spring Horse Show, please visit www.kentuckyhorseshows.com.

Emily Riden for Phelps Media Group, Inc. International

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Wellington, FL 33414
561-753-3389 (phone)
561-753-3386 (fax)
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