Tag Archives: Olympic Games

Klimke Secures Narrow German Lead in Olympic Eventing ahead of Cross-Country

Ingrid Klimke’s anchor ride with Bob. (FEI/Dirk Caremans)

Rio de Janeiro (BRA), 7 August 2016 – A brilliant ride by Ingrid Klimke maintained Team Germany’s lead as Eventing dressage drew to a close at Deodoro Olympic Park in Rio de Janeiro (BRA). But her score of 39.50 with Bob gives the defending Olympic champions only a fractional advantage of 0.2 penalties over the feisty French side going into Monday’s much-anticipated cross-country phase.

In a typical Olympic contest, during which some competitors exceeded expectations while others couldn’t find the performances they were looking for, it was the mark of 39.20 earned by Mathieu Lemoine and the elegant Bart L that put the French right into the frame. So, fourth-last to go, Klimke could feel the pressure, but the 48-year-old daughter of dressage legend Reiner Klimke, who scooped eight Olympic medals during his spectacular career, kept a cool head.

It wasn’t all plain sailing, however.

“Bob was quite excited outside in the warm-up and he was bucking, but when he came into the arena he just went, ‘OK, here I am, I’m ready – if you want let’s go for it!’” she said afterwards.

Little

There’s very little between the leading group of countries going into Monday’s cross-country phase, with the Australians lying third, just over four penalty points behind the French, and the British just one more point further adrift in fourth. The Irish moved up a place to fifth thanks to a great performance from Jonty Evans and Cooley’s Rorkes Drift, while New Zealand and USA share sixth.

First-day leader, Great Britain’s William Fox-Pitt, remains at the head of the individual standings with Australia’s Christopher Burton hot on his heels, and Lemoine has slotted into third and Klimke into fourth, while defending double-Olympic champion, Michael Jung, is next in line in fifth place. With less than five points separating the top 10 riders, however, and few, if any, expected to avoid time penalties while negotiating the tough track set by French course designer, Pierre Michelet, the stage is set for a tremendous day of cross-country action Monday.

“I haven’t seen such a challenging course since Sydney (2000 Olympic Games). My Bobby is fast and he is a mature horse so he should cope well and I’m looking forward to it. But we know that when we go out there we have to do a very precise job tomorrow,” Klimke said.

Surprises

There were surprises of various kinds as the day-two session played out, with some dreams beginning to unravel while others were just starting to take shape. The latter was the case for Jonty Evans who produced a personal-best score at championship level when posting 41.80 with Cooley’s Rorkes Drift. This has left him lying ninth individually and has anchored his country’s chances going into their more-favoured cross-country phase. The judges clearly appreciated the quality of the canterwork of his 10-year-old gelding, one of 11 Irish-bred horses in the field of 65 starters. Evans said, “I’m thrilled to bits with him; he couldn’t have done any more today – he couldn’t have tried any harder.”

China’s Alex Hua Tian enjoyed some moments of brilliance in his test, but had to settle for 42.40 and 12th place at the end of the day with Don Geniro. “I made two big mistakes; the judges really wanted to give me good mark – but I nailed all the changes I think,” he said. “The first entry was great; he has a massive extended trot but he took an unbalanced step and broke into canter. It’s very frustrating because it’s the extended that gives him his big scores!” he pointed out.

Belgium’s Karen Donckers slotted herself into seventh individually when posting 41.10 with Fletcha van’t Verahof, but it was two competitive results from Lemoine and Thibaut Valette (Qing du Briot) who put 41.00 on the board that kept the French team right in the frame. Meanwhile, Australia’s Shane Rose really did the business with CP Qualified whose 42.50 ensured the 56.80 posted by Stuart Tinney and Pluto Mio could be discounted.

Tense

Many of the horses were tense coming into the arena, but Rose reassured his 13-year-old Holsteiner gelding with a big pat on the neck before going to work into the arena, and was rewarded with a very pleasant performance. Last-line British rider, Kitty King, found herself struggling from the start, however, with the Dutch-bred Ceylor LAN. And another for whom things didn’t go quite the right way was New Zealand’s Jonelle Price whose nine-year-old, Faerie Dianimo, broke into a canter during their early trot-work, eventually posting 49.50. “I was very disappointed,” she said “He was really hot in the warm-up but I was hoping for better in the arena. It was too bad it happened at the Olympic Games, but I’m hoping for a much better day tomorrow.”

Klimke’s vital anchor ride for Germany might also have been blighted by over-enthusiasm, but she managed to get all the fizz under control at just the right moment and pulled off that all-important score that has kept Germany out in front in the race for the team medals. “I was so pleased in the end; he did a fabulous test,” she said of the 12-year-old Bob.

Influencing

Every one of the riders agrees, however, that dressage will not be the all-influencing factor in Eventing at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. Pierre Michelet has thought long and hard about how to challenge the most experienced riders in the sport along with those who have relatively less mileage on the clock.

“I want the best to win without asking too big questions of the less experienced riders. The reputation of the sport is important. I want to challenge the riders and I ask them to find clever solutions for the many options on offer. To get on the podium they will need to be brave, accurate and bold,” he said. There has indeed been a lot of course-walking going on over the last few days as riders make their plans and then alter them and settle on new ones that will get them home on the quickest and safest route.

“This course is not about one signature fence; it’s about clearing all of them! I ask the difficult questions from the start; that is my signature. The first water will be fence no. 4 already. The riders need to be ready from step one.”

Track

Talking about creating the lovely track that wends its way up and downhill through the land that surround the Deodoro military complex, he explained, “We started three years ago, first with an architectural firm to map out the track and the walkways and then the track builders started to work with improving the ground. Then we decided the spots for the fences. I came to Brazil in December for a month and the final details took two weeks. The layout was the same for the test event in 2015, but all the fences are new because of the different level of difficulty,” he pointed out.

Cross-country day looks set to be a thriller, and it seems it’s going to be a wide-open race for the medals right down to the final day. There is almost nothing between the Germans and French at the head of affairs, and with the British so close to the Australians who are currently in bronze medal spot and Ireland, New Zealand and USA a real threat to any of those ahead of them who might lose their grip there’s no room for error over a course that, the night before they take it on, may well be giving many of the world’s top event riders a restless night’s sleep.

Quotes:

Pippa Funnell (GBR): “I was really, really pleased with his [Billy the Biz] performance; I was thrilled with him. There were a few little bits here and there, but if I’m honest I think I’m being greedy; if I think of where he came from three years ago I’m thrilled.”

Kitty King (GBR): “It was slightly disappointing because he’s capable of a lot better; he did some good work but he just made a couple of uncharacteristic mistakes. One of his highlights is usually his medium trot, but it’s a massive atmosphere for the horse and he’s only nine. Today wasn’t quite what we’d hoped for but hopefully we’ll pull some back tomorrow.”

Pierre Michelet course designer (FRA), when asked about the Ground Jury’s opinion of his cross-country track: “They said it is fantastic, but they are always polite!”

Nick Turner, Irish Chef d’Equipe, talking about the competitive position of his team after dressage: “We are doing great and now we just need to keep a lid on it. They (the Irish team) just need to keep doing what they’re doing. This result is why these four riders were selected.”

Results after Eventing Dressage, Day 2 here  

FEI OLYMPIC HUB: For further information visit the FEI Olympic Hub which is dedicated to all things Olympic and Paralympic, both old and new: here.

Support Olympic Equestrian using social tags #Equestrian #Eventing #Jumping #Dressage #ParaDressage #Rio2016 #Olympics #TwoHearts

Equestrian in the Olympics

Equestrian sport has been part of the Olympic Games since 1912. Team and individual medals are awarded in three disciplines – Dressage, Eventing and Jumping.

The equestrian events in Rio will be staged in the Deodoro Olympic Park, the second largest Olympic cluster, alongside basketball, BMX, canoe slalom, fencing, hockey, modern pentathlon, mountain biking, rugby sevens and shooting.

The countries represented in Equestrian in Rio are: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Morocco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Palestine, Poland, Peru, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Republic of South Africa, Russia, Spain, Switzerland, Sweden, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay, USA, Venezuela and Zimbabwe.

They will compete in:

Jumping: 27 countries, 15 teams, 75 horse/rider combinations
Eventing: 24 countries, 13 teams, 65 horse/rider combinations
Dressage: 25 countries, 11 teams, 60 horse/rider combinations

By Louise Parkes

Media Contacts:

Rio 2016:

Anja Krabbe
Venue Media Manager
anja.krabbe@rio2016.com
+55 (21) 97556 1218

FEI:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager Press Relations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145

Leanne Williams
Manager Press Relations
leanne.williams@fei.org
+41 79 314 24 38

US Olympic Eventing Team Tied for Sixth after Dressage at Rio Olympic Games

Lauren Kieffer and Veronica (Shannon Brinkman Photo)

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – Eventing competition at the Olympic Equestrian Center at Deodoro continued on Sunday with the second day of dressage. The U.S. Olympic Eventing Team moved up from seventh place and is now tied with New Zealand for sixth place on a total of 137.50. Lauren Kieffer and Phillip Dutton gave strong performances for the U.S. in a hotly contested team competition. Germany currently leads the team standings on a total of 122, followed closely by France in second on 122.20, and Australia in third on 126.40.

Leading off day two of dressage for the U.S. was Kieffer (Middleburg, Va.) on Team Rebecca LLC’s Veronica. The pair performed a beautifully consistent test with expressive trot work, but received low marks for the final collected canter and salute, earning a 47.30. “She was really good,” expressed Kieffer of the mare. “Her trot work was really nice – probably some of her strongest trot work. The walk tends to be her more difficult gait and she was quite good through that. I was happy with the canter. I think she missed the one change, but she seemed to really get punished at the end so I am bit disappointed with our score for sure.” Looking forward to Monday’s cross-country, Kieffer said, “The cross-country is very strong and I have a feeling by the end of tomorrow, today won’t matter much. It’s certainly a very strong track, one of the strongest tracks I’ve ever done. The footing is great through. There are lots of options to get home if you are having trouble. If you want to go for the win, you are really going to have to take some risks and it’s going to be tough out there.”

Phillip Dutton and Mighty Nice (Shannon Brinkman Photo)
Phillip Dutton and Mighty Nice (Shannon Brinkman Photo)

Anchoring the U.S. team was six-time Olympian Phillip Dutton (West Grove, Pa.) with HND Group’s Mighty Nice. Giving a clutch performance, Dutton rode Mighty Nice to a personal best for the pair at the four-star level, a 43.60. They are now the highest-placed American combination in 15th. With the exception of a bobble in the final flying change, the test flowed nicely and impressed in the canter work. “Obviously, you can always be better,” said Dutton. “The last flying change wasn’t that great, but there’s a lot of atmosphere in there and I couldn’t be more proud of my horse. I was hoping to get close to 40. That’s close to as good as he can do right now.” Turning his focus to cross-country, Dutton said, “I think it’s going to be difficult. I am at an advantage to see how it’s riding [Dutton goes penultimate in the order], but it’s a pretty unique kind of course. I think time is going to play a part and it’s going to cause a fair bit of trouble. It will be interesting to see some team strategies. What they are going to do and how they are going to go. Because the time is going to be hard to get, there is pressure all the way around. It’s going to be a proper competition.”

The top of the individual leaderboard did not change much with Great Britain’s William Fox-Pitt maintaining the lead on a score of 37.0 on his horse Chilli Morning and Australia’s Christopher Burton and Santano II holding second on 37.60. Mathieu Lemoine and Bart L took over third individually on a score of 39.20 for France.

NBCOlympics.com Livestream

Keep up-to-date on equestrian competition at the Rio Olympic Games on the USEFNetwork.com. Coverage includes links to live streams and TV coverage, athlete bios, behind-the-scenes photos, and more.

Classic Communications/USEF Communications Department

Statement from FEI President on Russian National Paralympic Committee Decision by IPC

“We are very disappointed with today’s IPC decision. Like our Paralympic athletes from all other countries, our three Russian athletes have trained hard to make it to the Paralympic Games and we are troubled that today’s announcement means they cannot participate in Rio. Just as for the Olympic Games, we believe the individual International Federations should be given the opportunity to defend the rights of their clean athletes. Today’s IPC decision does not give us that opportunity. We will not embark on any reallocation process until the appeal period has expired and any potential procedures have concluded.”

FEI Media Contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Press Relations
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 787 506 142

Shannon Gibbons
Manager Press Relations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145

Leanne Williams
Manager Press Relations
leanne.williams@fei.org
+41 79 314 24 38

US Olympic Eventing Team Seventh after First Day of Dressage at Rio Olympic Games

Boyd Martin and Blackfoot Mystery (Shannon Brinkman Photo)

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – After day one of eventing competition at the Olympic Equestrian Center at Deodoro, the U.S. Olympic Eventing Team sits in seventh place. Boyd Martin and Clark Montgomery put in solid performances among the 32 combinations that competed Saturday in day one of dressage before the ground jury of Marilyn Payne (USA), Andrew Bennie (NZL), and Sandy Phillips (GBR).

The trailblazer for the U.S. team was Martin (Cochranville, Pa.), riding the Blackfoot Mystery Syndicate LLC’s Blackfoot Mystery. Martin guided the gelding brilliantly in the electric atmosphere, scoring 47.70. Martin was proud of the gelding, stating, “He’s still a bit inexperienced and he did get a little bit excited with the cheering, but he kept his cool and did a good job. I was thrilled there were no big mistakes. I couldn’t have asked for much more.” Martin currently stands in 17th place individually.

First-time Olympian Montgomery (Bryan, Texas) was the second ride for the U.S. team, ending his dressage test with a score of 46.60 on Holly and William Becker, Kathryn Kraft, and Jessica Montgomery’s Loughan Glen. The pair has a long history of strong dressage performances; unfortunately, though Saturday’s test started out quite well, Montgomery was a bit disappointed.  “He started out really well and I don’t know what happened,” said Montgomery. “He really sucked behind my leg, where he constantly wanted to walk or stop, but I squeezed every point I could out of him. He was really good in the warm-up, but that’s the sport and that’s horses.”

Montgomery has turned his focus to Monday’s cross-country phase, saying, “He’s a very good cross-country horse. He’s quite reliable, so that’s what we’re all hoping on. That’s how we made the team. We thought coming here that clean cross-country rounds were going to be a big part of the competition and that has definitely turned out to be true with what the course looks like.” Montgomery stands in 10th place individually after day one of dressage.

Clark Montgomery and Loughan Glen (Shannon Brinkman Photo)
Clark Montgomery and Loughan Glen (Shannon Brinkman Photo)

Great Britain’s William Fox-Pitt stands as the current individual leader on a score of 37.0 on his horse Chilli Morning. Following right behind Fox-Pitt on a score of 37.60 is Christopher Burton with Santano II, riding for Australia. Michael Jung from Germany holds third place on Sam FBW with a 40.9.

In the team standings, Germany, Australia, and Great Britain are at the top of the leaderboard, respectively. The U.S. sits seventh on a total of 94.30, with all countries very close at the top of the leaderboard.

Riding for the U.S. team on day two of dressage will be Lauren Kieffer on Team Rebecca LLC’s Veronica. Anchoring the U.S. team is six-time Olympian Phillip Dutton on HND Group’s Mighty Nice.

Day one dressage results

NBCOlympics.com Livestream

Keep up-to-date on equestrian competition at the Rio Olympic Games on the USEFNetwork.com. Coverage includes links to live streams and TV coverage, athlete bios, behind-the-scenes photos, and more.

Classic Communications/USEF Communications Department

Fox-Pitt Forges the Early Lead in Olympic Eventing

William Fox-Pitt and Chilli Morning. (FEI/Dirk Caremans)

Rio de Janeiro (BRA), 6 August 2016 – It’s not everyone’s idea of the perfect rehab for a serious head injury, but Britain’s William Fox-Pitt defied all the odds to take the early lead as Olympic Eventing got underway at Deodoro Olympic Park in Rio de Janeiro (BRA).

Riding the 16-year-old stallion, Chilli Morning, the man, who spent two weeks in a coma after a fall while competing in France last October, threw down a great dressage score of 37.00.

“All along Rio has been my target, totally. It was unrealistic, but it was mine. I was in a coma for a couple of weeks and my sight was quite dodgy; I went from blind to seeing double so when I started jumping there were two jumps. It’s been a journey, but I’ve had so much support!” said the 47-year-old rider.

He was chasing the target of 37.60 set by Australia’s Christopher Burton and his regal nine-year-old gelding, Santano B, whose expressive performance was greeted by a roar of approval from the crowd. But when Fox-Pitt went out in front, the gentlemanly Brit was rewarded with another huge response from the spectators. His result, added to the 47.20 achieved by Gemma Tattersall with Quicklook V, leaves Team GB in third before the remaining 31 horse-and-rider combinations take their turn in the dressage phase Sunday.

Just behind Burton in the individual rankings is defending team and individual Olympic champion Michael Jung from Germany who scored 40.90, and with his compatriot Sandra Auffarth in fourth with Opgun Louvo the Germans head the team rankings followed by Australia in runner-up spot. There is plenty of pressure on the remaining team members Sunday, because just 1.4 points separate the two leading sides, with the British only 0.3 further behind.

Leading

A total of 33 horse-and-rider combinations stepped into the arena and it was Auffarth, ninth to go, who set the leading score at 41.60 before the lunch-break. Her test was not flawless, however – “I made a mistake and that made me make another one!” admitted the rider, who took team gold and individual bronze at the London 2012 Olympic Games.

Burton’s young Hannoverian drew gasps of delight from the crowd as he floated through extravagant extended trot to go out in front, but Fox-Pitt swept the 44-year-old Australian off the top of the leaderboard with a test the British rider said “is what dreams are made of!” And when the man they all fear most, the phenomenally consistent German Michael Jung, had a hiccup with his Badminton winner Sam, then the top of the first-day leaderboard wouldn’t change. “I made a stupid mistake in canter. It wasn’t because he was nervous; we just lost a little bit of communication,” Jung explained.

Fox-Pitt was his usual modest self. Talking about his ride with Chilli Morning, he said, “He’s good on the flat, capable of doing a very good test and I didn’t want to let him down. Today he felt happy and calm, but there are a lot of good horses to come and it will be what it will be,” he pointed out, looking forward to the next two phases.

Cross-country track

Pierre Michelet’s cross-country track is a major talking point. Fox-Pitt described it as “a decent course, the biggest Olympic course I’ve walked, but Chilli is more than ready. I just hope I can do him justice.”

He continued, “It’s a true Michelet course, four corners and four skinnies, always committing you so that if you are not right on line then you will have a run-out, always encouraging you to attack it. The distances are all on the long side; it’s the most difficult Olympic Games I’ve seen but that’s how it should be. It will be a pretty good feeling if I go clear!”

He feels Chilli Morning will tackle it without difficulty, however. “There are no worrying fences out there for him, fence six (brush corners) is ugly, but the one I really don’t like is the corner to the gate (fences 23/23, The Malmesbury Cottage), there are just four strides to do it in, and with Chilli that’s a big question because he’s big and strong,” he added.

Fox-Pitt will have plenty of support when he heads out on cross-country day, because his story is one of tremendous success along with enormous courage, determination and resilience. And he just happens to be one of the most popular competitors in the sport. “It was great to have Rio to aim for,” he said. “The Games have come at the perfect time. I’m just ready in time; I’ve been very lucky with my rehab, and my physical and mental fitness is back on track.”

He has two team silver and one bronze Olympic medal already in his trophy cabinet, but an individual one has proved elusive during his spectacular career. He has given himself every chance of putting that to rights this time around, but there is another day of dressage to go before the individual and team leaderboards take shape ahead of what looks set to be a thrilling cross-country challenge on Monday and a nail-biting conclusion in the jumping arena on Tuesday.

Quotes:

William Fox-Pitt GBR: “Chilli is lean, he’s fit and well but he lost some weight on the journey here; he’s an older horse and it’s kind of his metabolism. I’ve never lost an event because I’ve been on a skinny horse! He felt good and very together; he can be a bit sprightly so I was pleased with how we went today.”

German Chef d’Equipe, Hans Melzer, talking about the decision to replace Andreas Ostholt and So is Et with Julia Krajewski and Samurai du Thot in his team: “Sport is tough. This was a tough decision which does not earn you a lot of friends but somebody has to take responsibility. Andreas was great in training; that is why we took him, but we can’t take the slightest risk regarding the horse’s health. I can relate to his feelings, but the decision stands.”

Mark Todd NZL, talking about his test with Leonidas ll: “I was hoping for better; he was a little bit distracted and got excited before we started; the trot was tense but it got better and he went well in canter. The cross-country track is very strong… you’ll know after (fence) six if you are in with a chance or not.”

Results after Eventing Dressage, Day 1 here

FEI OLYMPIC HUB: For further information visit the FEI Olympic Hub which is dedicated to all things Olympic and Paralympic, both old and new: here.

Support Olympic Equestrian using social tags #Equestrian #Eventing #Jumping #Dressage #ParaDressage #Rio2016 #Olympics #TwoHearts

Equestrian in the Olympics

Equestrian sport has been part of the Olympic Games since 1912. Team and individual medals are awarded in three disciplines – Dressage, Eventing and Jumping.

The equestrian events in Rio will be staged in the Deodoro Olympic Park, the second largest Olympic cluster, alongside basketball, BMX, canoe slalom, fencing, hockey, modern pentathlon, mountain biking, rugby sevens and shooting.

The countries represented in Equestrian in Rio are: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Morocco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Palestine, Poland, Peru, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Republic of South Africa, Russia, Spain, Switzerland, Sweden, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay, USA, Venezuela and Zimbabwe.

They will compete in:

Jumping: 27 countries, 15 teams, 75 horse/rider combinations
Eventing: 24 countries, 13 teams, 65 horse/rider combinations
Dressage: 25 countries, 11 teams, 60 horse/rider combinations

By Louise Parkes

Media Contacts:

Rio 2016:

Anja Krabbe
Venue Media Manager
anja.krabbe@rio2016.com
+55 (21) 97556 1218

FEI:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager Press Relations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145

Leanne Williams
Manager Press Relations
leanne.williams@fei.org
+41 79 314 24 38

Swedes Steal the Show as Horse Inspection Gets Olympic Eventing Underway

Sweden’s Frida Andersen (left) and Sarah Algotsson Ostholt (right). (FEI/Richard Juillart)

Rio de Janeiro (BRA), 5 August 2016 – The Swedish contingent set the photographers alight as Olympic Eventing got underway with the first horse inspection at Deodoro Olympic Park in Rio de Janeiro (BRA). A total of 84 horses, including reserves, were trotted up in front of the Ground Jury which is headed up by USA’s Marilyn Payne, and all were passed fit to compete.

It was the eye-catching bright yellow dresses worn by Frida Andersen and Swedish sisters Sara Algotsson Ostholt and Linda Algotsson that got the shutters snapping. However, reserve rider Linda Algotsson’s inclusion in the side has come about at the expense of Anna Nilsson whose 17-year-old gelding, Luron, was withdrawn. The fourth member of the Swedish team is the equally dashing Ludwig Svennerstal.

Another reserve partnership called up was New Zealand’s Tim Price and Ringwood Sky Boy after Jock Paget’s Clifton Lush was also declared a non-runner. Tim joins his wife, Jonelle Price (Faerie Dianimo), Mark Todd (Leonidas ll) and Clarke Johnstone (Balmoral Sensation) in the New Zealand side.

Buoyant

There was a buoyant mood around the arena, with riders singing the praises of the facilities at Deodoro which British team-member, Pippa Funnell, described as “fantastic”. The 47-year-old, who is a double Olympic team silver medallist and who claimed individual bronze at the Athens Olympics in 2004, said, “We didn’t know what to expect when we came here, but so far it’s just unbelievable! It’s really super for the horses; the stables are so spacious and so cool, they are really happy because where they are living is so quiet, and there’s no noise or fuss. They’re loving it!”

Dressage is first up Saturday and first into the ring at 10.00 local time will be Canada’s Jessica Phoenix with A Little Romance, who will be followed by Frenchman Astier Nicolas (Piaf de B’Neville) and then Ireland’s Padraig McCarthy (Simon Porloe). A total of 33 horse/rider combinations will take their turn Saturday, and the remaining 32 will do their tests on Sunday.

Cross-country

However, riders are already thinking ahead to Monday’s cross-country challenge. Course designer, Pierre Michelet (FRA), has given them plenty to think about, particularly through his clever use of the terrain at the Brazilian army sports venue at Deodoro where the 2007 Pan-American Games were staged. “It’s quite tricky and big enough,” said Funnell, who will partner the home-bred Billy the Biz. “He (Michelet) has used the hills a lot, and this is definitely an Olympic track. The competition definitely won’t be a dressage test!”

She described the mood of her team, which also includes William Fox-Pitt (Chilli Morning), Kitty King (Ceylor LAN) and Gemma Tattersall (Quicklook V), as “quietly excited. We have a team of good young horses; three of the four are stepping up a level but if they can make that step up they are all very capable.”

Ireland’s Mark Kyle, also competing at his third Olympics, had plenty of good things to say about the organisation at these equestrian Games too. “Our horses all travelled brilliantly; they arrived last Saturday (six days ago) and we took them for a walk the following day and they felt great!” He also pointed out the feel-good factor for the horses who appeared to be glowing with good health in the bright sunlight. “The facility here is really good, lots of arenas and open exercise areas, so the horses are very relaxed.”

Cool

Talking of relaxation, Germany’s Michael Jung was his usual cool self, having sailed through the horse inspection with his faithful 16-year-old gelding, the spring-heeled Sam. “He’s in brilliant form,” said the man who has won all before him and who returns to defend Olympic team and individual gold with the horse he rode to glory in London (GBR) four years ago. Sam wasn’t his first choice for Rio, but when the nine-year-old Takinou was unable to compete, the 34-year-old rider had his older friend on call-up.

“He’s really ready. He won Badminton this year and he was always my second horse and did all the same training,” said the man who will lead Team Germany in chasing down a third consecutive team title here in Rio. Reserve rider Julia Krajewski (Samourai du Thot) has now been called up due to the withdrawal of Andreas Ostholt, and the remaining members of the German team are Ingrid Klimke (Bob OLD) and Sandra Auffarth (Opgun Louvo).

Jung can be expected to produce a stunning test when he enters the dressage arena Saturday at 14.58, but he also has Monday’s cross-country run on his mind. “This is a really tough course, not just because the fences are technical but because the hills will really test the condition of the horses. They will need to be very fit.”

And when asked if he felt less pressure competing at his second Olympic Games with a horse he knows so well and which has brought him such extraordinary success, he replied wisely, “Yes, I can be a bit more relaxed, but I know I still need to concentrate fully. It’s easy to have a run-out, even at the simple fences, or to make a mistake if you don’t keep your mind on your job!”

Startlist for Eventing Dressage here

FEI OLYMPIC HUB: For further information visit the FEI Olympic Hub which is dedicated to all things Olympic and Paralympic, both old and new: here.

Support Olympic Equestrian using social tags #Equestrian #Eventing #Jumping #Dressage #ParaDressage #Rio2016 #Olympics #TwoHearts

Equestrian in the Olympics

Equestrian sport has been part of the Olympic Games since 1912. Team and individual medals are awarded in three disciplines – Dressage, Eventing and Jumping.

The equestrian events in Rio will be staged in the Deodoro Olympic Park, the second largest Olympic cluster, alongside basketball, BMX, canoe slalom, fencing, hockey, modern pentathlon, mountain biking, rugby sevens and shooting.

The countries represented in Equestrian in Rio are: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Morocco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Palestine, Poland, Peru, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Republic of South Africa, Russia, Spain, Switzerland, Sweden, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay, USA, Venezuela and Zimbabwe.

They will compete in:

Jumping: 27 countries, 15 teams, 75 horse/rider combinations
Eventing: 24 countries, 13 teams, 65 horse/rider combinations
Dressage: 25 countries, 11 teams, 60 horse/rider combinations

By Louise Parkes

Media Contacts:

Rio 2016:

Anja Krabbe
Venue Media Manager
anja.krabbe@rio2016.com
+55 (21) 97556 1218

FEI:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager Press Relations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145

Leanne Williams
Manager Press Relations
leanne.williams@fei.org
+41 79 314 24 38

US Olympic Eventing Team Ready to Begin Equestrian Competition in Rio

Boyd Martin and Blackfoot Mystery (Shannon Brinkman Photo)

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – The eventing horse inspection officially kicked off equestrian competition at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Friday. Over the next 14 days, 204 athlete-and-horse combinations in the three equestrian disciplines of eventing, dressage, and show jumping will compete for coveted Team and Individual medals at Rio’s Deodoro Olympic Equestrian Center. The U.S. Olympic Eventing Team of Phillip Dutton and Mighty Nice, Lauren Kieffer and Veronica, Boyd Martin and Blackfoot Mystery, and Clark Montgomery and Loughan Glen were deemed fit and ready to compete and will join a total of 65 combinations representing 24 countries. The U.S. Team will be led by U.S. Eventing Coach David O’Connor, the 2000 Olympic Games Individual Gold medalist.

“We are in pretty good spirits and have had a great prep,” said O’Connor. “The horses traveled really well and are relaxed. They have done a great job here in Brazil welcoming us and the horses. We feel good with our two lead-offs tomorrow in Boyd and Clark; both horses look like they’ve really come on and are great. Then we finish strong with Lauren and Phillip on day two. I am actually quite pleased and confident with how the horses have been going.”

The U.S. has drawn 12th in the starting order among the 13 countries participating in team competition. The U.S. riders will compete in the following order.

Dressage Day One, Saturday, August 6:

Leading off for the U.S. will be Martin (Cochranville, Pa.), a 2012 Olympic veteran, and highest-placed U.S. rider at the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games in 2014 and 2010, and Team Gold medalist at the 2015 Pan American Games. Martin will ride the Blackfoot Mystery Syndicate LLC’s Blackfoot Mystery, a 2004 Thoroughbred gelding. This partnership is only a year old but has already proven its merit with a top-ten finish at the 2015 The Dutta Corp./USEF Three-Star Eventing National Championship. In 2016, Martin and ‘Big Red’ placed sixth at the Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event presented by Land Rover.

Next in the order is Montgomery (Bryan, Texas), a first-time Olympian, who will ride Holly and William Becker, Kathryn Kraft, and Jessica Montgomery’s Loughan Glen, a 2003 Irish Sport Horse gelding. This pair has been based in England for the last three years, gaining significant competitive experience. Montgomery and ‘Glen’ had an impressive 2015, winning the CIC3* at the Belton International, CIC2* at Somerford Park International, and CCI3* at Blenheim Palace International, along with a sixth-place finish at Luhmühlen CCI4*. Most recently, this pair won the 2016 Land Rover Great Meadow International presented by Adequan.

Lauren Kieffer and Veronica (Shannon Brinkman Photo)
Lauren Kieffer and Veronica (Shannon Brinkman Photo)

Dressage Day Two, Sunday, August 7:

First into the arena for the U.S. on day two will be Kieffer (Middleburg, Va.), a first-time Olympian, who will ride Team Rebecca LLC’s Veronica, a 2002 KWPN mare. ‘Troll’, as she known in the barn, is a tough, sassy mare that has won the heart of Kieffer in their three-year partnership. This duo helped bring home a Team Bronze medal at the 2015 CICO3* at Aachen. Most recently, they were winners of the 2016 Rolex/USEF CCI4* National Championship at the Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event presented by Land Rover.

Anchoring the U.S. Team will be Dutton (West Grove, Pa.), who is contesting his sixth Olympic Games, having earned Team Gold medals in 2000 and 1996 for his native Australia. He is also a two-time Pan American Games Team Gold medalist for the U.S. and will ride HND Group’s Mighty Nice, a 2004 Irish Sport Horse gelding. Mighty Nice, known as Happy, was imported by Dutton and Bruce Duchossois in 2010. Following Duchossois’ passing in 2014, friends put together the HND Group in order to support Dutton’s goals of competing Happy at the highest levels of the sport. The pair has been consistently demonstrating its athletic prowess, earning the Reserve Championship title at the 2015 The Dutta Corp./USEF Three-Star Eventing Championship and placing fourth at the 2016 Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event presented by Land Rover.

The eventing competition commences with the dressage phase, August 6-7. The cross-country phase follows on August 8, and the competition concludes on August 9 with show jumping.

Dressage Starting Order

NBCOlympics.com Livestream

Keep up-to-date on equestrian competition at the Rio Olympic Games on the USEFNetwork.com. Coverage includes links to live streams and TV coverage, athlete bios, behind-the-scenes photos, and more.

Classic Communications/USEF Communications Department

Complete Guide to 2016 Olympic Games Now Offered on USET Foundation Website

Gladstone, N.J. – Aug. 4, 2016 – The Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil kick off on Friday, and the United States Equestrian Team (USET) Foundation is pleased to offer a space dedicated solely to the Olympics and the U.S. Olympic equestrian team on its website www.uset.org.

Under the “Newsroom” tab, users may click on “Olympic Games” in the dropdown menu to access U.S. equestrian team member bios, press releases and updates regarding the Games, a complete schedule for Olympic equestrian events, live streaming and a blog from USEF Director of Sport Will Connell. The page provides U.S. equestrian fans with a comprehensive guide to the 2016 Olympic Games all conveniently located in one place!

The USET Foundation is a vital part of equestrian sport in the United States. For more than 65 years, equestrian athletes have represented the United States in international competition, bringing home medals that have clearly established the United States as among the world’s equestrian elite. However, dedication, hard work and dreams alone do not bring home medals. The costs of fielding international teams are enormous. Training, coaching and transporting of human and equine athletes around the world in order to compete against the sport’s best athletes is a daunting undertaking, requiring a huge commitment of time and money.

Be a part of history and show your support of the 2016 U.S. Olympic and Paralympic equestrian teams by donating to the USET Foundation during the 2016 Olympic Games! Your contributions will help our athletes bring home medals and demonstrate the excellence of American horsemanship for the entire world to see.

The United States Equestrian Team Foundation (www.uset.org) is the non-profit organization that supports the competition, training, coaching, travel and educational needs of America’s elite and developing international, high-performance horses and athletes in partnership with the United States Equestrian Federation.

Contact: Rebecca Walton
USET Foundation
phone 561.753.3389 fax 561.753.3386
rjw@phelpsmediagroup.com
PhelpsMediaGroup.com

All Five Russian Equestrian Athletes Cleared to Compete at Rio 2016

Rio de Janeiro (BRA), 4 August 2016 – The FEI has received confirmation from the IOC that all five Russian equestrian athletes have been cleared to compete at the Olympic Games in Rio. The news comes following a detailed submission by the FEI, including confirmation that all five had no previous anti-doping rule violations.

The five Russian equestrian athletes that are now cleared to compete in Rio are:

Eventing: – Aleksandr Markov and the horse Kurfurstin; Andrey Mitin with Gurza; and Evgeniya Ovchinnikova and Orion.

Dressage: – Inessa Merkulova with Mister X; Marina Aframeeva and Vosk.

Following a meeting on 24 July 2016, the IOC Executive Board (EB) declared that Russian athletes would only be accepted as eligible for the Rio 2016 Games if they met a set of stringent criteria, including individual analysis of each athlete’s individual anti-doping record. The IOC EB also ruled that any Russian athlete that had ever been sanctioned for doping, even if they had served the sanction, would not be eligible to compete in Rio.

FEI President Ingmar De Vos welcomed the news. “This has been a very difficult time for our Russian athletes, who all have clean anti-doping records under both human and equine testing regimes, so we are very happy to have confirmation today from the IOC that all five are now declared eligible to compete.

“Our sport is not implicated in the McLaren Report, we also have confirmation from the IOC that there have been no equestrian positives in the re-testing of athletes from Beijing 2008 and London 2012, and WADA has no cases against Russian athletes in equestrian sport, but obviously we still had to go through the process as outlined by the IOC Executive Board last month.

“All five riders have been tested and we did individual analysis of their anti-doping history, which we submitted to the IOC. That documentation has undergone a detailed assessment by the CAS expert and the full process has now been signed off by the Review Panel set up by the IOC specifically to deal with the issue of Russian athlete eligibility.

“The good news has come just in time as the Eventing starts tomorrow morning with the first horse inspection at 8.30!”

International Federations were asked by the IOC Executive Board to submit detailed documentation on all Russian athletes entered for their sport, which would then be reviewed by an expert selected from a list of arbitrators at the Court of Arbitration for Sport, independent from any sports organisation involved in the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

The IOC subsequently delegated the final review of entries of Russian athletes to a Review Panel composed of three IOC EB members: Uğur Erderner (Chair of the Panel & Medical and Scientific Commission), Claudia Bokel (Chair of the Athletes’ Commission) and Juan Antonio Samaranch. This panel has now confirmed the eligibility of all five Russian equestrian athletes.

FEI Media contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Press Relations
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 787 506 142

Leanne Williams
Manager Press Relations
leanne.williams@fei.org
+41 79 314 24 38

Olympic Champion Guerdat Goes for the Golden Double

Switzerland’s Steve Guerdat and Nino des Buissonnets. (FEI/Kit Houghton)

Rio de Janeiro (BRA), 3 August 2016 – If defending champion, Switzerland’s Steve Guerdat, can claim back-to-back individual gold in Rio de Janeiro (BRA) then he will be the very first Jumping athlete to do so in the history of the Olympic Games. Since Belgium’s Aime Haegeman steered Benton ll to victory in Paris (FRA) in 1900, no rider has succeeded in coming back and doing it again, and Guerdat’s achievement would be all the more remarkable for the fact that he will be partnering the horse that carried him to glory at Greenwich Park in London (GBR) four years ago, the enigmatic Nino des Buissonnets.

Guerdat’s individual Jumping gold was the first for Switzerland in 88 years, the previous one claimed by Lt. Alphonse Gemeseus and Lucette in Paris (FRA) in 1924. It was quite a moment for the 30-year-old rider, who was just edged out for the honours in the closing stages of the FEI World Cup™ Jumping Final three months earlier. “But that was an important step to this medal,” he said after claiming the London 2012 title. “He (Nino des Buissonnets) had a big break after the World Cup and just four shows before he came here. I wanted to keep him fresh and confident. I know I have a freak of a horse under me and I knew that if I took time with him it would be easier when he came here (to London).”

Well-planned

Now 34, Guerdat is a veteran of three Olympic Games as he arrives in Rio with the 15-year-old Nino who has been given a well-planned lead-in to the big event once again. Their last major victory together was in the Grand Prix at Geneva (SUI) in December, with the brave and quirky horse otherwise mainly kept under wraps apart from a stunning double-clear in the Furusiyya FEI Nations Cup™ Jumping leg in Rotterdam (NED) in June where the Swiss team finished second.

And Guerdat is in exactly the right frame of mind himself, having secured the prestigious Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping title for the second time in two years at the Final in Gothenburg, Sweden in March. However, he will be facing formidable opposition when he rides in to the Deodoro Arena for the first Olympic competition on 14 August. And arguably the greatest threat to his quest for double-gold will come from America’s McLain Ward.

Ask any of the other top riders and his name pops up every time. The 40-year-old from Brewster, New York is also a three-time Olympian, taking double team gold in Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008. Riding with supreme confidence and with a fabulous string of horses, he has been like an unstoppable train with wins in both the US and across Europe this year. And in the 10-year-old mare, Azur, he has a willing and able partner as he sets off on his Olympic glory trail.

Stunning

It’s interesting to note, however, that one other who has been attracting a lot of positive attention is Sweden’s Peder Fredricson with the 10-year-old gelding All In, runner-up in the Grand Prix in Rome (ITA) in May before throwing down two stunning double-clears at the Furusiyya FEI Nations Cup™ Jumping legs in St Gallen (SUI) in June and Falsterbo (SWE) in July. Anyone who has studied this horse in action knows the ease with which he tackles the biggest tracks. And this has possibly contributed to the sense that the Swedes could come out with all guns blazing in the Olympic team event. Malin Baryard-Johnsson has a fantastic new ride in Cue Channa, and with Rolf-Goran Bengtsson (Unita) and Henrik von Eckermann (Yajamila) also on call-up, they look set to make a serious impact.

Of course the Dutch team will be hoping to continue the run of form that has seen them crowned world champions in 2014 and European champions last summer. To pile Olympic gold on top of that would be quite an achievement for Harrie Smolders, Maikel van der Vleuten, Jur Vrieling and the man who also claimed individual gold on both of those occasions, Sydney 2000 individual gold medallist Jeroen Dubbeldam.

Defending champions

The defending team champions from Great Britain send out two of their 2012 side in Nick Skelton and Ben Maher. The age profile of the majority of the British side is on the upper end of the scale, and 58-year-old Skelton joked recently that some of them might have to be “stretchered” into Rio, but nobody is going to underestimate the threat they pose. Skelton has nursed his London 2012 partner, Big Star, back to good health ahead of these Games and they have produced some seriously impressive recent performances. Meanwhile, although it may be 32 years since the legendary Whitaker brothers Michael (56) and John (60) took Olympic team silver in Los Angeles (USA), they are also right on top of their game.

However, there has been a glitch in the preparations for the defending champions because Michael Whitaker is suffering from broken ribs following a freak fall at home while training a horse just a few days ago. So often in sport the greatest plans are turned upside down by unexpected incidents and accidents, but the younger Whitaker insists he will be ready for action with Cassionato when the moment arrives.

The team competition looks set to be a fierce contest between 10 powerful nations, and the hosts from Brazil have plenty to be excited about because one of their quartet, 25-year-old Stephan de Freitas Barcha, has been really impressive with the 13-year-old gelding Landpeter de Feroleto in recent months.

With 75 of the world’s best horses and riders fighting for the individual title, the flags of 27 nations flying high and 15 countries battling it out for the team honours, the Jumping competitions at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games look set to be classics

What is jumping?

Jumping is an equestrian sport in which horse-and-rider combinations jump fences consisting of poles inside an arena, with penalties for knock-downs, refusals, horse and rider falls and for going over the time limit. There are a variety of competitions including speed events, and some will conclude with a jump-off for horse/rider combinations that have been penalty-free over previous rounds. The jump-off can be compared to a penalty shoot-out in soccer, and the result is just as unpredictable.

How it will play out….

After a horse inspection on 12 August, the first competition gets underway on 14 August with one round of jumping, and no jump-off against the clock. The starting order is decided by a computerised draw. The second competition is run over two days (16 and 17 August) – a qualifying round and a final round – over different courses, with the first day open to all, and the second open to the top eight teams.

If the scores for any of the medal placings are equal, teams will jump a shorter course against the clock and if there is still a tie, the times of the best three athletes per team are added together to decide the winning team. There is also the possibility of a jump-off for the bronze medal and this will take place before the jump-off for gold.

The horses still in contention for individual honours undergo another horse inspection on 18 August, before the individual final the following day, 19 August. The individual final is open to the top 35 horse/rider combinations after the first three days of competition. All participants start the individual final on zero (0) penalties. The top 20 from this round then go through to the final round to decide the individual medals, with the horse/rider on the lowest score winning gold

If there is more than one clear round, the medals are decided by a jump-off against the clock. If jumping penalties are the same over a shortened course, then the fastest time wins

Facts and Figures – Jumping:

75 horse-and-rider combinations

27 nations

15 teams

12 countries represented by individuals only

The London 2012 individual Olympic Jumping champions, Switzerland’s Steve Guerdat and Nino des Buissonnets, will defend their title at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

The previous 5 Olympic individual Jumping champions have also been selected – Ludger Beerbaum (GER) Barcelona Olympic Games 1992, Ulrich Kirchhoff who took gold for Germany at Atlanta in 1996 and who is now competing under the Ukrainian flag, Sydney 2000 gold medallist Jeroen Dubbeldam (NED), Athens 2004 champion Rodrigo Pessoa who is reserve rider for the Brazilian squad and Beijing 2008 champion Eric Lamaze (CAN).

Kirchhoff was also member of the winning German team at the Atlanta 1996 Games along with Ludger Beerbaum, who claimed the first of his three team golds in Seoul (KOR) in 1988 and the last in Sydney (AUS) in 2000.

USA took the team title at Athens (GRE) in 2004 and Beijing 2008. McLain Ward and Beezie Madden were on both of these teams and line out again in Rio de Janeiro alongside Will Simpson who was on the winning Beijing side and Lucy Davis, with 2008 team gold medallist, Laura Kraut, in reserve.

The British are defending team champions, and just one of the London 2012 gold medal winning horse/rider combinations will line out in Rio – 58-year-old Nick Skelton with Big Star. He is joined by two members of the Olympic silver medal winning team in Los Angeles (USA) in 1984 – brothers Michael (56) and John (60). Completing the British side is Ben Maher (33) and reserve is Jessica Mendoza (20).

The Netherlands come to the Rio 2016 Olympic Games with team and individual gold from both the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games™ 2104 in Normandy (FRA) and last summer’s FEI European Championships at Aachen (GER).

Germany’s Hans Günter Winkler holds the record for most Olympic Jumping medals. He claimed 7 during his long and illustrious career, 3 of those with the great mare, Halla.

No female athlete has ever won individual gold in Jumping, but Britain’s Marion Coakes and the extraordinary pony, Stroller, came closest, taking individual silver at Mexico City in 1968.

Jumping at the Olympic Games goes back to 1900 when Alme Haegeman from Belgium took the individual title with Benton ll in Paris.

Germany leads the medal tables in Jumping, with 5 individual and 8 team titles since 1912.

The Jumping Officials

Technical Delegate for Jumping at the Olympic Games is Spain’s Santiago Varela Ullastres, and course designer is Brazil’s Guilherme Jorge.

The Jumping Ground Jury consists of Stephan Ellenbruch (GER), President, and members Elaine Zander (BRA), David Distler (USA), Alfred Boll (SUI) and Kazuya Hirayama from Japan. The footing expert is Germany’s Christian Bauer who will work alongside FEI footing specialist Lars Roepstorff.

Venezuela’s Cesar Hirsch is both Overall Chief Steward and Chief Steward for Jumping. The team of Jumping Stewards is Maria Hernek (SWE), Eric Straus (USA), Shigeru Hashimoto (JPN) and Kate Horgan (IRL).

Other Officials

President of the Veterinary Commission is Brazil’s Dr Thomas Wolff and he will be assisted by Associate Members Dr Kirsten Neil from Australia and Mexico’s Dr Sergio Salinas. There will be two thermography vets, Germany’s Dr Gerit Matthesen and Tracy Turner from the USA.

Tim Randle (GBR) is Foreign Veterinary Delegate. The FEI MCP veterinary experts are Britain’s Colin Roberts and Hungary’s Dr Miklos Jarmy.

The Appeal Committee is headed up by Pierre Ketterer from France with Colombia’s Yolanda Matallana as Vice-President. The Jumping member of the Appeal Committee is Belgium’s Freddy Smeets. Henrik Arle from Finland is Chairman of the FEI Tribunal.

The FEI Medical Officer is Great Britain’s Peter Whitehead.

The Teams

Argentina: Matias Albarracin (Cannavaro 9), Jose Maria Larocca (Cornet du Lys), Bruno Passaro (Chicago Z), Ramiro Quintana (Appy Cara). Reserve: Jose Maria Larocca (Eliot DWS).

Australia: Scott Keach (Fedor), James Paterson-Robinson (Amarillo), Edwina Tops-Alexander (Lintea Tequila), Matt Williams (Valinski S).

Brazil: Stephan de Freitas Barcha (Landpeter do Feroleto), Alvaro de Miranda Neto (Cornetto K), Eduardo Menezes (Quintol), Pedro Veniss (Quabri de l’Isle). Reserve: Rodrigo Pessoa (Cadjanine Z).

Canada: Yann Candele (First Chioice), Tiffany Foster (Tripple X), , Eric Lamaze (Fine Lady), Amy Millar (Heros). Reserve: Kara Chad (Bellinda).

France: Roger Yves Bost (Sydney Une Prince), Simon Delestre (Ryan), Penelope Leprevost (Flora de Mariposa), Kevin Staut (Reveur de Hurtebise). Reserve: Philippe Rozier (Rahotep de Toscane).

Great Britain: Ben Maher (Tic Tac), Nick Skelton (Big Star), John Whitaker (Ornelaia), Michael Whitaker (Cassionato). Reserve: Jessica Mendoza (Spirit T).

Germany: Christian Ahlmann (Taloubet Z), Ludger Beerbaum (Casello), Daniel Deusser (First Class van Eeckelhem), Marcus Ehning (Cornado NRW). Reserve: Meredith Michaels-Beerbaum (Fibonacci).

Japan: Daisuke Fukushima (Cornet 36), Toshiki Masui (Taloubetdarco KZ), Taizo Sugitani (Imothep), Reiko Takeda (Bardolino). Reserve: Koki Saito (Capilot).

Netherlands: Jeroen Dubbeldam (Zenith), Harrie Smolders (Emerald), Maikel van der Vleuten (Verdi), Jur Vrieling (Zirocco Blue). Reserve: Gerco Schroder (London).

Qatar: Hamad Ali Mohamed Al Attiyah (Appagino), Ali Yousef Al Rumaihi (Gunder), Sheikh Ali Al Thani (First Devision), Bassem Hassan Mohammed (Dejavu). Reserve: Faleh Suwead Al Ajami (Armstrong van de Kapel).

Spain: Edduardo Alvarez Aznar (Rokfeller de Pleville), Sergio Alvarez Moya (Carlo), Pilar Lucrecia Cordon (Gribouille du Lys), Manuel Fernandez Saro (U Watch). Reserve: Gerardo Menendex Mieres (Cassino DC).

Switzerland: Romain Duguet (Quorida du Treho), Martin Fuchs (Clooney), Steve Guerdat (Nino des Buissonnets), Janika Sprunger (Bonne Chance). Reserve: Paul Estermann (Castlefield Eclipse).

Sweden: Malin Baryard-Johnsson (Cue Channa), Rolf-Goran Bengtsson (Unita), Peder Fredricsson (All In), Henrik von Eckermann (Yajemila). Reserve: Charlotte Mordasini (Romane du Theil).

Ukraine: Ulrich Kirchhoff (Prince de la Mare), Cassio Rivetti (Fine Fleur du Marais), Ferenc Szentirmai (Chadino), Rene Tebbel (Zipper). Reserve: Ference Szentirmai (Chaccland).

USA: Lucy Davis (Barron), Kent Farrington (Voyeur), Beezie Madden (Cortes C), McLain Ward (Azur). Reserve: Laura Kraut (Zeremonia).

The Individuals

Belgium: Jerome Guery (Grand Cru van de Rozenberg), Nicola Philippaerts (Zilverstar T).

Chinese Taipei: Isheau Wong (Zekerijke V).

Colombia: Daniel Bluman (Sancha LS), Rene Lopez (Con Dios lll).

Egypt: Karim Elzoghby (Amelia).

Ireland: Greg Broderick (Going Global).

Italy: Emanuele Gaudiano (Caspar).

Morocco: Abdelkebir Ouaddar (Quickly de Kreisker).

Peru: Alonso Validez Prado (Chief).

Portugal: Luciana Diniz (Fit for Fun).

Turkey: Omer Karaevli (Roso au Crosnier).

Uruguay: Nestor Nielsen van Hoff (Prince Royal Z de la Luz).

Venezuela: Emanuel Andrade (Hardrock Z), Pablo Barrios (Antares).

The Nations

Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Egypt, France, Great Britain, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Morocco, Netherlands, Peru, Portugal, Qatar, Spain, Switzerland, Sweden, Taipei, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay, USA and Venezuela.

The FULL list of horse/rider combinations are listed here.

FEI OLYMPIC HUB: For further information visit the FEI Olympic Hub which is dedicated to all things Olympic and Paralympic, both old and new: here.

Support Olympic Equestrian using social tags #Equestrian #Eventing #Jumping #Dressage #ParaDressage #Rio2016 #Olympics #TwoHearts

Equestrian in the Olympics

Equestrian sport has been part of the Olympic Games since 1912. Team and individual medals are awarded in three disciplines – Dressage, Eventing and Jumping.

The equestrian events in Rio will be staged in the Deodoro Olympic Park, the second largest Olympic cluster, alongside basketball, BMX, canoe slalom, fencing, hockey, modern pentathlon, mountain biking, rugby sevens and shooting.

The countries represented in Equestrian in Rio are: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Morocco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Palestine, Poland, Peru, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Republic of South Africa, Russia, Spain, Switzerland, Sweden, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay, USA, Venezuela and Zimbabwe.

They will compete in:

Jumping: 27 countries, 15 teams, 75 horse/rider combinations
Eventing: 24 countries, 13 teams, 65 horse/rider combinations
Dressage: 25 countries, 11 teams, 60 horse/rider combinations

By Louise Parkes

Media Contacts:

Rio 2016:

Anja Krabbe
Venue Media Manager
anja.krabbe@rio2016.com
+55 (21) 97556 1218

FEI:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager Press Relations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145

Leanne Williams
Manager Press Relations
leanne.williams@fei.org
+41 79 314 24 38