Tag Archives: Melbourne Cup

Melbourne Cup Horse Race 2019

The 2019 VRC Melbourne Cup is a Group I handicap race and it is Australia’s most famous annual Thoroughbred horse race. It is a 1.988 mile race for three-year-olds and over, conducted by the Victoria Racing Club on the Flemington Racecourse in Melbourne, Victoria as part of the Melbourne Spring Racing Carnival. It is the richest “two-mile” handicap in the world, and one of the richest turf races. The event starts at 3pm on the first Tuesday in November and is known locally as “the race that stops a nation”.

The Melbourne Cup field typically comprises a star-studded array of both local and international horse racing champions. The horses that compete in the Melbourne Cup are chosen according to a range of parameters. Inferior racehorses are balloted out based on a range of metrics, such as handicap weight and performance in certain races. If you love horse racing betting, claim the TVG promo code! You can get money back when you place your first bet.

Balloting conditions are that the race directors retain the absolute discretion to exclude any horse from the race, or exempt any horse from the ballot on the race, but in order to reduce the field to the safety limit of 24, horses are balloted out based on a number of factors which include

1000 in prize money earned in the previous two years, 9 wins or placings in certain lead-up races and 3 allocated handicap weight.

Betting on the Melbourne Cup is one of the most Australian things you can do and millions of people have a flutter every year in an attempt to snare the win. The ultimate test of stamina and staying power, the Melbourne Cup is raced over a punishing distance of 3,200 metres (1.988 miles). More grueling than any other major event in Melbourne’s Spring Racing Carnival, the prestigious race places extraordinary demands on the contestants, and bestows exceptional glory upon the winners.

In addition to the huge Australian audience that drops everything each November to follow the race, the Melbourne Cup has also captured the imaginations of countless international racing fans.

With close to half of the field for the 2017 Melbourne Cup being raiders trained outside of Australia and New Zealand, the event has blossomed into a truly global affair. Australia does not have a reputation for breeding genuine stayers so, each year, the Melbourne Cup field features more and more internationally bred and trained horses. In recent years, international horses have dominated Melbourne Cup races.

The total prize money for the 2019 race is $8,000,000, plus trophies valued at $250,000. The first 12 past the post receive prize money, with the winner Cross Counter being paid $4 million, second $1 million, third $500,000, fourth $250,000, fifth $175,000, with sixth through twelfth place earning $150,000.

Prize money is distributed to the connections of each horse in the ratio of 85 percent to the owner, 10 percent to the trainer, and 5 percent to the jockey.

For thoroughbred racehorses, the prestigious Melbourne Cup is the world’s richest handicap. The competitive landscape has changed considerably in Australia in recent times, leaving the Melbourne Cup as one of few authentic, two-mile horse races. The Andrew Ramsden Stakes at Flemington Racecourse and the Sydney Cup in NSW are the only other 3,200 metre Group 1 races on Australian shores.

The Melbourne Cup has a long tradition, with the first race held in 1861. It was originally over two miles (3.219 km) but was shortened to 3,200 metres (1.988 mi) in 1972 when Australia adopted the metric system. This reduced the distance by 18.688 metres (61.312 ft), and Rain Lover’s 1968 race record of 3:19.1 was accordingly adjusted to 3:17.9. The present record holder is the 1990 winner Kingston Rule with a time of 3:16.3.

Lasting for approximately three and a half minutes, the Melbourne Cup is the ultimate test of strength, speed, and endurance. A Bart Cummings-trained horse Kingston Rule famously obliterated the competition back in 1990 to set an all-time record of 3:16.30 minutes.

Breeders’ Cup World Championships/Melbourne Cup

By The Javelina from The Suburbs of Angels, USA – Breeders Cup 2009 001, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=35175632.

The Breeders’ Cup World Championships is an annual series of Grade I Thoroughbred horse races, operated by Breeders’ Cup Limited, a company formed in 1982. The host track for the two-day event typically rotates to varying tracks each year. Most recent notable tracks are Santa Anita, Del Mar, Keeneland, and Churchill Downs. In 2019, the Breeders’ Cup will be held at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, Calif. on Friday, November 1 and Saturday, November 2, and for a record-breaking 10th time following Breeders’ Cup’s most recent appearance at the track in 2016. An exclusive pre-sale will take place prior to the public ticket sale launch on March 4.

Concurrently on another hemisphere, you have the 2019 VRC Melbourne Cup group I handicap race in Australia – its most famous annual Thoroughbred horse race. It is a 1.988 mile race for three-year-olds and over, conducted by the Victoria Racing Club on the Flemington Racecourse in Melbourne, Victoria as part of the Melbourne Spring Racing Carnival. It is the richest “two-mile” handicap in the world, and one of the richest turf races. The event starts at 3pm on the first Tuesday in November and is known locally as “the race that stops a nation.”

Melbourne Cup 2019 promises to yet again be an unrivaled racing spectacle! Year after year the event continues to grow in popularity and attracts new fans worldwide. If you want to join in on the hype for the race that stops a nation, learn about Melbourne Cup favorites and get the latest Melbourne Cup tips all you need to do is read through our comprehensive guide.

The Melbourne Cup field typically comprises a star-studded array of both local and international horse racing champions. The horses that compete in the Melbourne Cup are chosen according to a range of parameters. Inferior racehorses are balloted out based on a range of metrics, such as handicap weight and performance in certain races.

Balloting conditions are that the race directors retain the absolute discretion to exclude any horse from the race, or exempt any horse from the ballot on the race, but in order to reduce the field to the safety limit of 24, horses are balloted out based on a number of factors which include 1000 in prize money earned in the previous two years, 9 wins or placings in certain lead-up races and 3 allocated handicap weight.  Betting on the Melbourne Cup is one of the most Australian things you can do and millions of people have a flutter every year in an attempt to snare the win.

Back to United States, there are a maximum of 14 starters are allowed in each of the Breeders’ Cup Championships races (depending on track dimensions, some races such as the Turf Sprint or Dirt Mile may be limited to 12 starters). Breeders’ Cup Limited has adopted a field selection system to select runners in the event fields are oversubscribed. Winners of the “Win and You’re In” Breeders’ Cup Challenge races automatically qualify. Other pre-entries are ranked by (1) a point system for graded stakes performance during the year, and (2) the judgment of a panel of racing experts. After pre-entries are taken approximately two weeks before the Breeders’ Cup, the ranking determines eligibility in oversubscribed races. After pre-entry, any vacancies in the fields are filled by horses in order of panel preference.

In 2018, there were 14 races in total, all but one of which were Grade 1. The Breeders’ Cup typically marks the end of the North American horse racing season, even though a few grades I events take place in late November and in December. The Breeders’ Cup is two full days of events that you can place bets on. There is a lot to cover but follow this guide for breeders cup entries to give you some highlights of horses that Breeders’ Cup betting participants staked their money on. It’s always important to thoroughly research your bets, especially during Breeders’ Cup betting season. Use our guide as a good starting point. In addition, you will find out the best Breeders’ Cup live stream places to watch.

From 2008 to 2014, the Breeders’ Cup was held at either Churchill Downs or Santa Anita Park, both major tracks with a demonstrated record of success in hosting the event. In 2015, however, Keeneland was selected as the host track for the first time, in large part because of Lexington’s position as the center of the North American thoroughbred breeding industry. Although concerns were raised over Keeneland’s limited amount of permanent seating, the 2015 event was considered a success, with record Friday attendance and a sell-out on Saturday.

2015 marked the first time a Triple Crown had been won since the inception of the Breeders’ Cup, and thus the first opportunity to win the so-called Grand Slam of Thoroughbred racing, consisting of the Triple Crown and Breeders’ Cup Classic. American Pharoah completed the feat in a decisive wire to wire victory. In 2016, Santa Anita had the record upon hosting the Breeders’ Cup for a record ninth time. The 2017 event was held at Del Mar for the first time.

The 2018 event was held at Churchill Downs. For the 2018 event, the Friday card was known as “Future Stars Friday” and featured five races for two-year-olds, including the new Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Turf Sprint. The Distaff moved back to the Saturday card. Additional Breeders’ Cup changes arrived with the Breeders’ Cup Future Wager, similar to the Kentucky Derby Future Wager, and the first time the Equestrian event which was intermingled with Breeders’ Cup and Churchill Downs activities.

What We Can Learn from Last Year’s Melbourne Cup

This Photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA.

The 2017 running of the Melbourne Cup was one for the ages. The thrilling finish between winner Rekindling and runner up Johannes Vermeer was the stuff of broadcasters’ dreams. Over 90,000 fans packed the Flemington Racecourse, with the atmosphere simultaneously tense and jubilant during the last few seconds of the race.


Rekindling’s win was the second Melbourne Cup victory for his jockey Corey Brown, who had also won the marquee event back in 2009 on Shocking. It also made six Melbourne Cup victories for owner Lloyd Williams, which is a record in the race.

However, the real headline stealer was Rekindling’s trainer, 24-year-old Joseph O’Brien. Being a son of a sporting legend like Aiden O’Brien is never an easy thing, but the younger O’Brien now has something that his father’s illustrious resume lacks – a Melbourne Cup victory. All the more remarkable given his young age.

Main protagonists should return for Melbourne Cup 2018

Despite being months away, the excitement has already started building for the 2018 Melbourne Cup. There are already early Melbourne Cup free bets available to use on the race and several major bookmakers have released their odds. The betting picture currently looks like this:

Johannes Vermeer 21.00
Rekindling 21.00
Ace High 26.00
Albert 26.00
Idaho 26.00
Stradivarius 26.00
Lord Fandango 26.00
Humidor 34.00
St Michel 41.00
Crocodile Rock 41.00

*Selected runners from Ladbrokes. Others available.

There are plenty of takeaways from the 2017 race that can be applied to betting on the 2018 event, however:

Williams is the owner to watch once again

As mentioned, Lloyd Williams now has a record six winners as an owner in the Melbourne Cup. He first tasted victory back in 1981 with Just a Dash. But, crucially for punters, his grip on the Cup has seems to have intensified in recent years. He is the owner of the last two winners, and four out of the last eleven have been in his colours.

This Photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY-ND

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rekindling and Johannes Vermeer could have special rivalry

The finish to the 2017 race was spectacular. Johannes Vermeer can count himself very unlucky not to have crossed the line ahead of Rekindling, which is evident in the fact that they are neck and neck in the betting markets for 2018. However, for the neutral, it will be wonderful to see them renew their rivalry across the season, culminating in another battle for the Melbourne Cup in November. They should both be at the forefront of punters’ minds when it comes to the betting.

Foreign trained horses becoming the norm

Eight out of the top ten finishers in the 2017 Melbourne Cup were foreign-trained. While it is common sense to follow the horses of the O’Briens, there are other ‘tourists’ who are keen to leave their mark on the event. Willie Mullins, who is at the forefront of jumps racing in the UK and Ireland, had three well-placed runners in the race – Max Dynamite (3rd), Thomas Hobson (6th) and Wicklow Brave (10th). Despite spending the majority of his time training horses for national hunt events, Mullins is a driven winner who will be keen to add a Melbourne Cup to his long list of achievements. Keep an eye on him.

Horse Racing = Injury and Death for Horses

Annual Melbourne Cup Brings Another Devastating Outcome

Another year has come and gone again in Australia, and with it, the passing of another November. For Australians, it’s the time to get dressed up in your classiest clothes, take a day off work to meet up with friends or colleagues, and bet on horses… many of whom will end up dead or injured as a result.

Onlookers at the Melbourne Cup, one of Australia’s biggest horse racing events, were torn with mixed emotions after this year’s race. There was excitement over the first ever female jockey winning the Melbourne Cup, but for many animal rights activists and spectators alike, the real focus was on a ‘fan favorite’ horse, Red Cadeaux, being injured. Luckily, Red Cadeaux was not injured enough to be killed. But this injury should come as no surprise to spectators watching this cruel and inhumane “entertainment.”

Two horses died after the 2014 Melbourne Cup. Admire Ratki collapsed shortly after the race with a heart attack and died. Araldo, shattered his leg in the race, and was then killed due to the injury. Many more horses are ‘euthanized’ once their race days are over.

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