Tag Archives: Jane Savoie

Motivation from Moshi, by Jane Savoie

Misunderstandings happen. It’s just part of life. But it sometimes it hurts when we feel like we aren’t heard or we are misunderstood.

I thought Jane asked for a left lead canter depart but she apparently was only asking me to collect a bit more. I got confused and got upset. She was quiet and patient with me, but I was still a bit rattled. I remembered getting in trouble when I was a little colt, and that memory came back to me and frightened me. Once I understood what Jane was really asking, I got it right and we both felt better.

We perceive our lives through our personal histories. There is no such thing as an unbiased perception. For this reason, the best practice is to recognize that we all see things a little bit differently. Sometimes we need to ask for clarification or a different kind of explanation. We need to be kind and gentle with each other, and with ourselves. We are all doing the best we can.

Is there anything you are worried about today that might be a misperception? Perhaps it is time to ask the question. Would clarifying a situation make you feel better?

Let’s go for a ride today! Spring is in the air!

Love, Moshi

From Indy:

I found it! I found the secret!

What secret, you ask? Well, the big one. The one and only TRUE statement that is always true, no matter what.

There is an ancient story of a rich and powerful King who gathered all the wisest men in his kingdom and asked them to take on a quest. The King asked them to search the world for something that was true… always and forever TRUE. Then King wanted to know that there was at least one thing he could always count on, so he would always feel secure.

The wise men traveled the earth and conferred with other wise men. They searched and they pondered. They meditated and they discussed. They gathered all the information and experiences they could, and finally came up with only one answer.

The wisest of the wise men approached the King and informed him that they could only find one thing in the universe that was ALWAYS true. With great anticipation and longing the King asked what it was. The wise man looked at the King and said, “The only thing that is always true is that everything changes.”

If you know that everything, good and bad, happy and sad, up and down, will at some point change, how does that make you want to live your life today?

Nothing is permanent. You might as well enjoy the moment… If you are in a bad way right now, know that your situation will change. It is the rule.

Love, Indy

Jane Savoie
1174 Hill St ext.
Berlin, VT 05602
Jane’s Website
DressageMentor.com

Motivation from Moshi, by Jane Savoie

The world sure is an interesting place. There is so much to see and to do. And there can be a lot of things to be afraid of.

I’m afraid of fire, skunks, and anything that pops out of the bushes and startles me. It’s not that I really think I’m about to be hurt, it’s just that I’m hard wired to jump when things move fast. All horses have that instinct; we just can’t help it.

Jane knows that I would never intentionally hurt her. But she also knows that I weigh about ten times more than she does, and when she’s on my back the ground is a long way away. She knows that accidents happen and there is always the possibility that she might come off. For that reason she ALWAYS wears a helmet during our training and hacking sessions, and has even started showing in her helmet instead of her top hat.

Life has its hazards. It’s just part of living. But we can take some of the risk out of those hazards by doing thoughtful little things, like wearing a helmet every time we ride.

Do you wear your helmet every time you get on a horse? Start a trend at YOUR barn!

Love, Moshi

From Indy:

I love my friends. We may look like we are fighting sometimes, but it is all in fun and play. We like to roll around the pretend to bite each other, but we are not trying to hurt anyone; we’re just having a good time.

I have a new friend at the barn! His name is Geoffrey. He’s so much fun to be with! I tease him because he has curly hair. I actually like his curly hair, but he’s fun to tease because he pretends to get mad and attacks me. We run and chase each other and then act like we are biting each other’s necks. But we’re really not. We’re just pretending.

I’m going back to Vermont soon, and won’t be back in Florida until next fall. I’m going to miss Geoffrey. But missing friends is part of life, and I know there will be new friends in Vermont to play with.

But I’m still a little sad.

Jane told me that it’s okay to be sad. She said if we try to suppress our feelings too much, they get stronger. She told me to relax and feel my feelings, and let them shift by accepting and not fighting them. By letting my negative feelings pass THROUGH me instead of trying to push them away, I can release and transform them much more effectively.

I feel much better now. I told Geoffrey I will be back in a few months, and to remember me!

Do you remember any old friends you’d like to reconnect with? Pick up the phone! They’ll be happy to hear from you!

Love, Indy

Jane Savoie
1174 Hill St ext.
Berlin, VT 05602
Jane’s Website
DressageMentor.com

Motivation from Moshi, by Jane Savoie

So much time is spent doing things we don’t want to do, that we sometimes lose sight of why we do those things. But for those of us who work for a living, those activities are the price we have to pay to be able to do the things that fill our souls.

If you are irritated that you had to go to work today, just think about the payoff you receive by doing what you are doing. Does your job provide you with money so you can have a home? Does it give you enough income to buy food? Does it allow you to afford owning your own horse? IS THAT ENOUGH?

I once heard someone say that people who choose to be homeless have traded comfort for freedom. If you really examine that statement, you can see the logic to it.

Would you be willing to give up your home, your comfort, your horse(s), for freedom from having to earn a living? Most of us would not.

So thank your employer today! Be grateful for your job and your income. Look at what you receive for your efforts. It’s a wonderful thing!

My job is carrying Jane and learning new skills. My job is to do as she asks, just a couple hours a day. The rest of the time is my own. I am grateful for this job, because she pays me with food, shelter, and loving care. It is a fair exchange, and I am grateful.

When you get off work, meet me at the barn and tell me about your day!

Love, Moshi

From Indy:

My passion is fetching. It is in my DNA. I can’t help it. I LOVE to chase things! The farther Jane and Rhett can throw sticks and balls, the happier I am.

indyMy job is to protect the house, and to keep Jane and Rhett company. My job is to love them as much as they love me. It is the best job on the planet.

It’s even better than Moshi’s job because I get to live in the house!

I could be upset that I don’t have the freedom to roam the countryside by myself, but I’m not. I look at the bright side of things. I get plenty to eat, lots of love, and a purpose in life. That’s enough to keep me happy.

What makes you happy? Do you give yourself time to do what fills your heart? Do you stop and smell the flowers? Make sure you are making time for yourself. Only then will your life have balance.

Let’s go play fetch!

Love, Indy

Jane Savoie
1174 Hill St ext.
Berlin, VT 05602
Jane’s Website
DressageMentor.com

Motivation from Moshi, by Jane Savoie

Dressage riders tend to be perfectionists. I’ve noticed that dressage riders are often very tough on themselves if things aren’t exactly right.

What if your ride today was just a tiny bit better than it was yesterday? Would that be enough?

Jane tells people to invent reasons to celebrate. She knows that those “little bit betters” very quickly add up to a whole lot better!

When you go to the barn today, pick something to work on and notice if, at the end of your ride, it’s just a little bit better. Then celebrate!

Life is not a destination; it’s a journey.

Love, Moshi

From Indy:

Going for a walk with Jane is one of my favorite things to do. We can walk for miles, just looking at new things and taking in the interesting smells.

Jane likes to think when we walk. She comes up with some of her best ideas for her books and DVDs while quietly strolling down the long paths around where we live.

Walking is a great way to help your mind and your body. It helps strengthen your heart and your legs, and it helps calm your mind. When you’re stressed or upset, a nice long walk can really make a difference in how you feel.

Besides, your dog loves it. Be sure and take him with you.

See you on the path!

Love, Indy

Jane Savoie
1174 Hill St ext.
Berlin, VT 05602
Jane’s Website
DressageMentor.com

Motivation from Moshi, by Jane Savoie

Horses think in pictures. Jane says that all super-achievers have developed the ability to clearly see what they want, in great detail, before they actually achieve it.

I found learning the tempi changes very difficult. But Jane pictured what she wanted very clearly, and then I pictured what she wanted me to do very clearly, and we got it! Now I can do lots of tempi changes without making a mistake!

What are you working on today? Picture the perfect result over and over in your mind, before you go to the barn, and again before you get on your horse. Fill in all the details. Involve all five or your senses. Then add emotion to your “mental movies”.

You’ll be amazed at what you can do!

See you at the barn!

Love, Moshi

From Indy:

I want to be a Veterinarian. I hear that is a great job. I’ve met lots of horse doctors at the barn, and think they are a nice bunch of folks.

indyI heard someone say that horses tend to colic, and sometimes they need surgery. So I got my favorite lobster toy and performed colic surgery the best way I knew how. Unfortunately, I didn’t know how to put the lobster back together.

Sometimes you need someone with skills you don’t have to help you. So I took my lobster to Jane. She put his stuffing back in and sewed him up. He is fine now.

Don’t be afraid to ask for help. You don’t have to do it alone.

Love, Indy

Jane Savoie
1174 Hill St ext.
Berlin, VT 05602
Jane’s Website
DressageMentor.com

Shoulder-In, by Jane Savoie

Shoulder-in is the father of all the advanced lateral exercises. What I mean by advanced lateral exercises are exercises like shoulder-in, haunches-in, half pass, walk pirouettes, and canter pirouettes.

Shoulder-in does a lot of different things. It is a straightening exercise, a strengthening of the inside hind leg exercise, and a collecting exercise. The quality that makes shoulder-in a collecting exercise is that your horse must bend while he goes sideways. If your horse isn’t bending from poll to tail then your shoulder-in becomes a leg yield. That’s fine if you want to do a leg yield. But if you want to collect your horse–meaning you want to load the hind legs, shift the center of gravity back toward the hind legs so that the forehand is lighter and freer – then your horse must bend.

The two tips that I’m going to give you today are rider tips because you want to be sure that you’re part of the solution – not part of the problem. Next month, I’ll go over some of the things you can do to help your horse become more bendable.

  1. Keep your inside leg forward on the girth. I find that it is very common for riders to come into shoulder-in and draw their inside legs behind the girth. If you draw your inside leg behind the girth, it displaces the hindquarters out toward the rail, and your horse has no option but to leg yield. Remember, if your horse is truly bending in shoulder-in, the hindquarters stay parallel to the rail as the forehand comes in on an inside track.

You want to be sure that you aren’t drawing your inside leg behind the girth and pushing the hindquarters out. As you think about stepping into shoulder-in, exaggerate your correction by thinking about putting your inside leg a little bit forward and tucking it right up behind your horse’s elbow. It’s not really going to be behind the elbow. You just want it to be on the girth in an engaging position. But if your tendency is to draw your leg behind the girth, thinking about putting your inner leg up by the horse’s elbow will prevent you from drawing it too far back.

  1. Keep your outside leg behind the girth. The other common mistake that I see is that the rider’s outside leg is either too far forward or it is completely off the horse’s side.

Remember, it takes two legs to bend your horse – one on the girth and one behind the girth. So if your outer leg is too far forward or is away from the horse’s body, there is no way you can bend your horse around your inside leg.

One of the best rider exercises that you can do in order to make sure your outside leg is behind the girth and on your horse’s barrel is to start your shoulder-in from a haunches-in. Come through the second corner of the short side, and don’t let the hindquarters finish the corner. Keep your horse in haunches-in as you start down the long side.

In haunches-in, your bending aids are the same as they are for shoulder-in. You have a little flexion to the inside, you keep the horse’s neck from over bending his neck to the inside with the outside rein, your weight is on the inside seat bone, your inside leg is on the girth, and your outside leg is behind the girth.

Shoulder-in is the first step of a 10-meter circle continued on a straight line, and haunches-in is the last step of a 10-meter circle continued on a straight line so you should be able to slide your way from haunches-in to a shoulder-in and then back into haunches-in. This exercise will help you learn the feeling of enveloping your horse with your two legs – inside leg on the girth, and outside leg behind the girth.

To start the haunches-in, slightly increase the influence of your outside aids. Close your outside hand in a fist, and press with your outside leg behind the girth. Focus on the feeling of your outside leg pressing against your horse’s barrel.

Then keep your aids in exactly the same position as you advance forward into a shoulder-in position. To do this, relax your outside rein so that your horse can advance forward onto what is essentially the first step of a 10-meter circle. As he advances onto the circle, close your inside leg and look straight down the long side.

Do two or three strides of shoulder-in, and then go back to two or three strides of haunches-in. Then do two or three strides of shoulder-in and go back to two or three strides of haunches-in again. You should feel that your bending aids stay exactly the same as you swivel from haunches-in to shoulder-in to haunches-in to shoulder-in.

Jane Savoie
1174 Hill St ext.
Berlin, VT 05602
Jane’s Website
DressageMentor.com

Motivation from Moshi, by Jane Savoie

Charley and I used to hang out a lot together.

Then one day, Jane told me it was important to surround myself with positive influences.

As you can see from his picture, Charley is a “the water bucket is half empty” kind of guy. He’s negative about EVERYTHING!

He’s what Jane calls a “stinkin’ thinker”. So as hard as it was to do and as much as I didn’t want to hurt his feelings, I stopped hanging around with Charley.

I’ve learned that negative thinking is very contagious, and I don’t want to be infected!

Is there someone in your life who is dragging you down? You might have to make some tough choices about them.

But I’m here to support you!

Love, Moshi

From Indy:

I just love going to the barn to see Moshi. Some of my friends like going to the barn too.

I have one friend who is scared of horses. He thinks they are too big. My friends got together and decided to help him get over his fear by being supportive of even his smallest step toward a horse. We wanted to let him know that we are there for him.

indyEventually he found himself standing right by Moshi and having a wonderful time! With us at his side, he forgot to be afraid!

Having good, caring friends around can be a big help when you are trying something new, or working to overcoming a challenge.

Do you have friends like that? Are you a friend like that?

Let’s go to the barn! Moshi is waiting for us!

Love, Indy

Jane Savoie
1174 Hill St ext.
Berlin, VT 05602
Jane’s Website
DressageMentor.com

Motivation from Moshi, by Jane Savoie

Less is more. It’s true.

When you’re first learning something new, you usually try too hard. We all do that. Once we have the skills we find we can achieve the same thing with little effort.

Life is like too. Sometimes you just need to sit back and let things unfold. In some ways the less you do, the more that flows to you.

Where in your life to you do TOO much? What if it could be effortless?

Try doing less this week. See what happens, and notice what comes to you on its own.

Meet me at the barn and let’s see how little you have to do for success to show up!

Love, Moshi

From Indy:

I love to run. It is my favorite thing. I like to swim too. Maybe that is my favorite thing. No, on second thought, I love playing with Jane and Rhett. They are my favorite things. Hmmm, I’m not sure… now I’m confused.

indyI’m pretty good at concentrating on one thing at a time. But I get distracted on occasion.

Just for today I’m going to pick one thing and give it all I’ve got. Thinking about too many things makes me confused.

How about you? What the most important, or the most fun thing you could do today? If you could choose just one thing, what would it be?

Let’s go do that! I’m right there with you!

Love, Indy

Jane Savoie
1174 Hill St ext.
Berlin, VT 05602
Jane’s Website
DressageMentor.com

Motivation from Moshi, by Jane Savoie

QUESTIONS

Jane talks a lot about high quality questions. To understand what that means, you have to be able to know the difference between a low quality question and a high quality question.

A low quality question can only give you a low quality answer and tends to create more of what you DON’T want. A low quality question usually starts with “Why?” or “How come?”

Such as, if you say “Why did I pull on the left rein in that transition…” your mind will search for an answer and probably tell you “…because you’re uncoordinated and not a very good rider.”

So, instead of saying, “Why did I forget the ten meter circle at E?” you could say, “What’s the best way for me to remember to do a ten meter circle at E?” Another example might be “How come my horse is so resistant to stretching into the bit?” rephrased into “What’s the best way for me to learn how to teach my horse to stretch into the contact?”

One way looks for problems, which programs you for more problems and destroys your self-confidence. The other way looks for solutions, which programs your mind for solutions. It may seem like a small difference, but it really isn’t small at all. It’s HUGE!

Your horse is very excited to know you’re going to be at the barn soon!

Love, Moshi

From Indy:

Rhett and I have a lot of fun playing together. He’s very good at throwing the ball. He can throw FAR! Sometimes I bring the ball back, and sometimes I like to keep it. Rhett doesn’t like it when I won’t return the ball. He chases me and makes loud noises. It is great fun!

Jane asked Rhett one day why I don’t always bring back the ball. Rhett said he didn’t know, but decided to watch what happens if he doesn’t make a big fuss over me not retrieving the ball.

indyThe next time we played I decided I’d keep the ball for myself. Rhett didn’t get mad. He just turned away and went to do something else. He left me with nothing to do! That was no fun at all. It was much more fun when he chased me and tried to get me to give it back.

So, I took the ball to him, dropped it at his feet, and asked him to throw it for me. He did!

I caught it and considered keeping it. But I realized that I wouldn’t get any attention if I didn’t take the ball right back to him. When I did, Rhett praised me and gave me a good pat. Then he threw the ball again. That was wonderful! I decided that I like attention I get doing the right thing more than I like keeping the ball and being ignored. I decided that from now on I’m going to take the ball right back to him.

Many training issues are like that. If you don’t give them attention or energy, they dissipate. If you give them lots of attention, they fester and grow.

Positive reinforcement for doing the right thing is much better than a correction for doing the wrong thing.

Let’s go play ball! I promise I’ll bring it back.

Love, Indy

Jane Savoie
1174 Hill St ext.
Berlin, VT 05602
Jane’s Website
DressageMentor.com

Motivation from Moshi, by Jane Savoie

What do you value? Is it money? Is it fame? Is it blue ribbons?

What you value will change throughout your life. When you look back at your past, you’ll probably wonder why certain things were so important to you. Ideas such as physical beauty and riches often lose their luster as they are slowly replaced with the broader concepts of fulfilling relationships and positive life purpose.

So, what jazzes you? What brings you fulfillment at this point in your life? When focusing on the next goals you’d like to achieve, what’s your criteria? Having an idea of what is fulfilling to your soul at this stage of your life is very important when figuring out what direction to take next.

There is no wrong answer. But there are some answers that fulfill your current internal needs more than others. Having a goal of more money, becoming more beautiful, improving your health, or increasing your riding skills are all valid goals. So are goals of being kinder to others, taking on an important social cause, or helping someone in need. Just be sure the goals you choose are filling that space in your heart where value fulfillment is missing.

My goal is to perfect my canter pirouettes. I can already do them well, but I’d like to bend with as much flexibility to the right as to the left. Jane is helping me reach that goal. I also have a goal of compiling these messages into a book. Many people have suggested it. Hearing that people enjoy reading my words creates wonderful value fulfillment for my inner being. Thank you for the encouragement! Your kind notes make ME smile!

Love, Moshi

IndyFrom Indy:

I’ve decided I want to learn to dance. I saw a dancing dog on YouTube, and realized I could do that too. Jane is working hard at improving her dance skills, so when I see her practicing in the living room, I join her. I’ve begged her to let me go to the dance studio with her, but so far she’s always gone without me. I think her dance instructor is worried I might outshine him in the Tango. I’m great at the Tango.

Dancing is such great exercise! It doesn’t feel like work at all. I enjoy it so much! Do you? It doesn’t matter if you’re a good dancer or not. Just crank up the music and move your body! It’s good for your heart and your soul. Get your blood moving and your heart pumping! It will help keep you young!

And if you have trouble finding a partner, let me know! I’ll run right over. I’ll bring the red rose stem for our Tango. Thorns removed, of course.

Love, Indy

Jane Savoie
1174 Hill St ext.
Berlin, VT 05602
Jane’s Website
DressageMentor.com