Tag Archives: International Museum of the Horse

International Museum of the Horse Hosts Community History Harvests for African American Equestrians

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 12, 2019) – The International Museum of the Horse is pleased to announce two upcoming opportunities to preserve the legacy of African Americans in the equine industry. History Harvests will be held on April 13 from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm and on May 18 from 9:00 am to 2:00 pm at the Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center at 300 East 3rd Street, Lexington, KY 40508.

The events provide opportunities for community participants to bring items that relate to African Americans working with horses to the Lyric Theatre to be scanned and photographed. A conversation station and refreshments will encourage attendees to connect with each other and discuss their images, documents, and memorabilia. At the May event, there will be appointments available to record oral histories. To sign up for an oral history time, email ChronicleInfo@ky.gov.

The History Harvests are free, public events dedicated to uncovering, sharing, and digitizing items of historical significance for inclusion in the forthcoming website, the Chronicle of African Americans in the Horse Industry. All participants will also be given a digital copy of their contributions to keep. The museum does not keep the participant’s items. Only scanned images, digital photographs, or audio recordings will be archived, with permission, for future use on the website.

Community partners for the event include Phoenix Rising Lex and the Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center, who are promoting the event in Lexington’s East End neighborhood. This area is significant to hold the first History Harvests, as the East End was home to the Kentucky Association racetrack, a source of steady employment for the influx of African Americans into Lexington between 1860-1870.

The IMH plans to hold more History Harvests in additional communities. They also offer the option of recording oral histories at the museum or visiting contributors at their home.

To learn more, visit www.kyhorsepark.com.

Contact: Kerry Howe
kerry.howe@ky.gov
859-259-4224

Two New Experiences Added by the International Museum of the Horse

Dates announced for “Medical Mystery” event and final International Night of the season

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 24, 2018) – The solving of a mysterious death and the celebration of international culture highlight recent events announced by the International Museum of the Horse at the Kentucky Horse Park.

A new breakout-style event, Medical Mystery, will challenge visitors to solve the death of a former Kentucky Horse Park resident.  International Nights: Mexico will celebrate the Day of the Dead with a focus on Mexican culture and its history with the horse.

On Monday, Oct. 29, the Medical Mystery event will be held at the enigmatic Salyers House, the oldest building on the park. Beginning at 6 p.m. and 7:15 p.m., guests will play a variety of games, solve riddles, and visit a cemetery to uncover the mystery death of the former resident. The event is for ages 18 and up and light hors d’oeuvres will be provided.

On Friday, Nov. 2, the International Nights: Mexico event will feature Mexican cuisine and Day of the Dead performances by Marisol Valles and her dance group. Other entertainment will include a small exhibit highlighting Mexican artifacts and family activities such as face painting, sugar skulls, and more.

The Medical Mystery event lasts approximately one hour and space is limited. Reservations are required and tickets are $15 per person. To purchase tickets in advance or to make reservations, call 859-259-4213.

Admission for the International Nights: Mexico event is $5 per carload. The event lasts from 6-9 p.m.

To learn more about the Medical Mystery, International Nights, and other happenings at the park, visit www.kyhorsepark.com.

Contact: Ashlee Chilton
ashlee.chilton@ky.gov
859-259-4232

James Messenger Donating Iconic Symbols of Horse Racing to International Museum of the Horse

LEXINGTON, KY – Emmy Winner and two-time Academy Award nominee James R. Messenger is donating two iconic symbols of horse racing to the International Museum of the Horse at the Kentucky Horse Park – Secretariat owner Penny Chenery’s ticket to the 99th Kentucky Derby and a rose from Secretariat’s “Blanket of Roses.” To this day, Secretariat’s 1:59 2/5 seconds “Run for the Roses” in 1973 remains the all-time Kentucky Derby speed record, and he was the first horse to run the Derby in less than two minutes.

“Role model excellence – some consider Secretariat the greatest of all athletes – begets excellence,” said Messenger, “and the chance for young and old to connect with such a champion directly should prove inspirational for others.”

Mr. Messenger is making this gift to the Kentucky Horse Park Foundation in the name of NFL Quarterback Tom Brady, who also serves as an athletic role model through his achievements at the highest level of human effort in sport – and who also is a big fan of the Kentucky Derby.

Bill Cooke, director of the International Museum of the Horse, stated, “These two pieces of memorabilia are a wonderful addition to our existing Secretariat exhibit, which includes three of Secretariat’s Triple Crown trophies.” Ms. Chenery’s ticket and the rose will go on display at the museum prior to the 2015 Kentucky Derby.

The Kentucky Horse Park Foundation, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization, fulfills its mission to enhance, expand and improve the Kentucky Horse Park by fundraising within the private sector. This partnership between private donors and the support of the Commonwealth of Kentucky is what has enabled the incredible success of the Kentucky Horse Park. Since its inception in 1985, the KHP Foundation has raised more than $25 million, which has funded critical improvements such as new facilities, research projects, new horses, landscaping ventures, and much more.

The Kentucky Horse Park is a working horse farm, theme park and equine competition facility dedicated to man’s relationship with the horse. The park is an agency of the Kentucky Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet and hosted more than 800,000 visitors and campers, as well as 18,400 competition horses in approximately 200 special events and horse shows in 2014. The park is home to the National Horse Center, which comprises more than 30 national and regional equine organizations. Located at Exit 120, Interstate 75, just north of Lexington, the Kentucky Horse Park is THE place to get close to horses. Information about the park’s programs and activities can be found online at www.KyHorsePark.com, and on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Instagram.

Laura Klumb
Kentucky Horse Park Foundation
859-255-5727
laura.klumb@khpfoundation.org

Celebrating the Year of the Horse in the Horse Capital of the World

International Museum of the Horse Hosts Exhibition of Chinese Ink Horse Paintings

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 13, 2014) – 2014 is the Year of the Horse according to the Chinese lunar calendar. To celebrate this cultural tradition within the Horse Capital of the World, the International Museum of the Horse at the Kentucky Horse Park, in partnership with the University of Kentucky’s Confucius Institute, and UK’s School of Art and Visual Studies, will host a special exhibition of ink horse paintings by Xu Qingping, a Chinese artist from Beijing, Oct. 18, 2014 to Feb. 17, 2015.

A free public lecture on horse painting will be given by the artist at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 18, in the South Theater of the Visitor Center at the Kentucky Horse Park. All attendees are welcome to tour the exhibition and the Kentucky Horse Park for free following the lecture that day.

Xu Qingping’s paintings are highly influenced by traditional Chinese ink painting within a Western academic milieu as made famous by his father, Xu Beihong. By adding color and additional elements to his work, Xu Qingping has differentiated himself from his father while still remaining grounded by his influence.

Xu Qingping was born in Beijing in 1946 and holds a doctoral degree in fine arts from University of Paris-Sorbonne. He was professor of art history and a member of the academic committee of the Central Academy of Fine Arts. Currently he is deputy curator of the Xu Beihong Museum, vice chairman of the Chinese Painters and Calligraphers Association, and dean of the Xu Beihong Arts Research Academy at Renmin University of China. He is also an adviser to doctoral students, a council member of the Chinese Artists Association and recipient of a State Council Special Fellowship.

Xu Beihong was a legendary Chinese painter whose ink horse paintings are imbued with Western techniques of anatomy mixed with the traditional dynamic free ink play of traditional Chinese painting and calligraphy. Known for his galloping horses, the symbol of unbridled spirit in Chinese culture, Xu Beihong successfully developed a synthesis of Chinese and Western traditions in his work after attending the Paris Art Academy in the 1920s.

Horse painting was an important subject in Chinese art. Images of horses appeared in paintings in the Spring and Autumn Period (770-476 B.C.). Artists from the succeeding dynasties also built quite an impressive repertoire of horse paintings culminating in the Tang Dynasty (618-906 A.D.) and Song Dynasty (960-1127 A.D.).

The exhibition will be on view through Feb. 17, 2015 – the last day of the Year of the Horse. School field trips and other activities will be scheduled during the run of the exhibition. In addition, an art contest will be organized by the Confucius Institute for both K-12 students and UK College of Fine Arts students, with awards given out at the close of the exhibition.

For additional information about the exhibition and associated programs, visit http://www.uky.edu/international/confucius_institute or www.imh.org.

The Kentucky Horse Park is open daily, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. through Nov. 2. Admission is $16 for adults and $8 for children 7-12, and includes the Next Day Free. Beginning Nov. 3, the park will switch to its winter schedule and will be open Wednesday-Sunday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Winter admission will be $10 for adults and $5 for children 7-12, and includes the Next Day Free. Children 6 and under are always admitted free of charge when accompanied by a paying adult. Admission includes the International Museum of the Horse, a Smithsonian Affiliate; and the “Showplace for Saddlebreds” – The American Saddlebred Museum & Gift Shop.

The Kentucky Horse Park is a working horse farm/theme park and equine competition facility dedicated to man’s relationship with the horse. The park is an agency of the Kentucky Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet and hosted more than 800,000 visitors and campers, as well as 18,400 competition horses in more than 200 special events and horse shows in 2013. The park is home to the National Horse Center, which comprises more than 30 national and regional equine organizations. Located at Exit 120, Interstate 75, just north of Lexington, the Kentucky Horse Park is the place to get close to horses. Information about the park’s programs and activities can be on-line at www.KyHorsePark.com, and on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Instagram.

Lisa Jackson
Kentucky Horse Park
859-259-4224
Lisa.Jackson@ky.gov

International Museum of the Horse Hosts Student Artwork

Wellington Elementary School Students Exhibit Work to Celebrate the Year of the Horse

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 22, 2014) – Lexington’s Wellington Elementary School and the International Museum of the Horse at the Kentucky Horse Park will be celebrating the Year of the Horse with a special exhibit, beginning Jan. 22. “Shodo: The Art of Japanese Brush Painting,” will feature calligraphy created by the school’s third, fourth, and fifth grade students.

Each student used black Japanese ink (sumi) and bamboo brushes (fude) to paint the character for the word “horse” (uma) and their names on rice paper. Calligraphy is considered high art in the Far East, and there is a specific stroke order and ink weight for each character.

Until its adoption of the Gregorian calendar in 1912, China used the lunar calendar. The Chinese calendar works in a cyclical pattern in which each cycle is 12 years long and begins on the second new moon after the winter solstice. Within this calendar, each year is represented by an animal whose characteristics symbolize the mood of the year and those born within it.

Those born in 2014 – and every 12 years prior, each Year of the Horse – are considered to be adventurous, carefree and fun with a sense of humor. Culturally, the celebration of the Lunar New Year is still very popular in China and Japan as well as Vietnam, Korea, and Taiwan.

The students’ art will be on display at the International Museum of the Horse until April 18.  More information is available at www.imh.org.

The Kentucky Horse Park is a working horse farm/theme park and equine competition facility dedicated to man’s relationship with the horse. The park is an agency of the Kentucky Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet and hosted more than 800,000 visitors and campers, as well as 18,400 competition horses in more than 200 special events and horse shows in 2013. The park is home to the National Horse Center, which comprises more than 30 national and regional equine organizations.  Located at Exit 120, Interstate 75, just north of Lexington, the Kentucky Horse Park is the place to get close to horses. Information about the park’s programs and activities can be on-line at www.KyHorsePark.com, and on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Instagram.

Lisa Jackson
Kentucky Horse Park
859-259-4224
Lisa.Jackson@ky.gov

Kentucky Horse Park Winter Hours and Seasonal Highlights

LEXINGTON, KY (November 14, 2011) – The Kentucky Horse Park kicks off its winter season with new hours of operation and a new blockbuster exhibition.

From now until March 14, the park will be open Wednesdays through Sundays, 9am to 5pm.

The highlight of the winter season will be “The Horse” exhibition through Apr 6 in the International Museum of the Horse, in collaboration with the American Museum of Natural History.  “The Horse” graphically portrays the horse’s impact on trade, transportation, labor, warfare, culture, and sports.  It showcases spectacular fossils, models, dioramas, and cultural objects from around the world, including many from the American Museum of Natural History’s world famous collections. “The New York Times” called this exhibition “charming and illuminating” and “an uplifting example of how horses enrich our lives.”  The “New York Post” said, “You absolutely must see it.”

Continue reading Kentucky Horse Park Winter Hours and Seasonal Highlights

Equine Therapy: The Horse Exhibit, by Claire Dorotik

While the relationship between horses and humans is one of public fascination and private intrigue, it is also something that evades easy description. Although many have tried to put words to the magical connection that can occur between an equine and his human, sometimes words are not enough. And for this reason, we often look to exhibits such as “The Horse” produced in partnership by the The Kentucky Horse Park’s International Museum of the Horse, and the American Museum of Natural History. For those interested in experiencing a visual depiction of horse and human collaboration, this exhibit is not to be missed. Here is the official press release:

Prestigious American Museum of Natural History Sends Its Blockbuster Exhibition to the International Museum of the Horse

Terra-cotta horse from Tamil Nadu, India. Photo © AMNH/D. Finnin

LEXINGTON, Ky. (August 29, 2011) – The Kentucky Horse Park’s International Museum of the Horse (IMH), in collaboration with the American Museum of Natural History, announced today that it will host the exhibition, The Horse, from October 22, 2011, through April 6, 2012. The IMH is a major lender to the exhibition.

“We are thrilled to be able to bring this world-class exhibition to Kentucky,” said Bill Cooke, director of the Kentucky Horse Park’s International Museum of the Horse. “The American Museum of Natural History is truly one of the world’s great natural history museums, and they did a masterful job in developing an exhibition that not only illuminates the timeless union between humans and horses, but does so in an amazingly entertaining way. We are excited that this will be our first blockbuster-level exhibition while schools are in session. I have no doubt that both teachers and their students will love The Horse.”

Continue reading Equine Therapy: The Horse Exhibit, by Claire Dorotik

The Horse: Acclaimed Exhibition Coming to the Kentucky Horse Park

Prestigious American Museum of Natural History Sends Its Blockbuster Exhibition to the International Museum of the Horse

Terra-cotta horse from Tamil Nadu, India. Photo © AMNH/D. Finnin

LEXINGTON, Ky. (August 29, 2011) – The Kentucky Horse Park’s International Museum of the Horse (IMH), in collaboration with the American Museum of Natural History, announced today that it will host the exhibition, The Horse, from October 22, 2011, through April 6, 2012. The IMH is a major lender to the exhibition.

“We are thrilled to be able to bring this world-class exhibition to Kentucky,” said Bill Cooke, director of the Kentucky Horse Park’s International Museum of the Horse. “The American Museum of Natural History is truly one of the world’s great natural history museums, and they did a masterful job in developing an exhibition that not only illuminates the timeless union between humans and horses, but does so in an amazingly entertaining way. We are excited that this will be our first blockbuster-level exhibition while schools are in session. I have no doubt that both teachers and their students will love The Horse.”

From the horse’s earliest ancestors grazing on the plains of what is now Nebraska to a magnificent contemporary Deborah Butterfield horse sculpture, the eternal bond between horses and humans is explored in the largest equestrian traveling exhibition ever assembled. The Horse graphically portrays the horse’s impact on trade, transportation, labor, warfare, culture, and sports.  It showcases spectacular fossils, models, dioramas, and cultural objects from around the world, including many from the American Museum of Natural History’s world famous collections.

Continue reading The Horse: Acclaimed Exhibition Coming to the Kentucky Horse Park

New Exhibition Set to Open at the Kentucky Horse Park

“Ancient Bronzes of the Asian Grasslands” Will Be Presented by the Arthur M. Sackler Foundation

An ornament from Inner Mongolia, third to fifth century BCE, from the exhibition.

LEXINGTON, KY (June 2, 2011) – Continuing its tradition of offering world-class exhibitions to the public, the Kentucky Horse Park’s International Museum of the Horse – a Smithsonian Affiliate – is making final preparations for its next exhibition, Ancient Bronzes of the Asian Grasslands from the Arthur M. Sackler Foundation, June 24 – Oct. 9.

Ancient Bronzes of the Asian Grasslands presents a major sampling of steppe art from the collections of the late Arthur M. Sackler, M.D.  Curated by Trudy S. Kawami, Ph.D., Director of Research for the Arthur M. Sackler Foundation, the exhibition presents eighty-five works illustrating the personal decorations and equipment of the horse-riding steppe dwellers of the second and first century BCE.

The Eurasian grasslands, also known as the steppes, cover a region extending from northern China westward through Mongolia, to the plains of Eastern Europe.  This exhibition focuses on the eastern or Asian steppes whose rolling grassy plains are punctuated by snow-topped mountain ranges like the Tien Shan (Heavenly Mountains), and deserts like the Gobi and the Taklamakan.

Continue reading New Exhibition Set to Open at the Kentucky Horse Park

Legacy Horse Statue Dedication at the Kentucky Horse Park

March 16, 2011 — Lexington, KY — The Lexington Convention and Visitors Bureau (LCVB) officially dedicated a life-size statue of Big Lex to the International Museum of the Horse. This version of the Lexington Convention and Visitors Bureau’s “blue horse” was signed by all gold medal winning athletes during the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games.

The signed statue along with a display describing the eight disciplines featured at the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games is now housed as a permanent exhibit in the Sport Horse Gallery at the International Museum of the Horse. Big Lex will serve as a permanent reminder of the tremendous success of the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games.

Big Lex was inspired by Lexington, the great stallion from the late 1800s who was named in honor of the city of his birth. The greatest sire of his time, Lexington helped to solidify the title of “Horse Capital of the World” for the city. Lexington still holds the record for number of years he lead America’s sire list with 14 consecutive years and two additional years. On permanent loan from the Smithsonian, the bones of Lexington are now on display at the International Museum of the Horse.

Continue reading Legacy Horse Statue Dedication at the Kentucky Horse Park