Tag Archives: Horse Training

Motivation from Moshi, by Jane Savoie

My back was a bit achy this morning. While I was stretching, it dawned on me that I was not a youngster anymore. That was a bit depressing. For about an hour I moped around, realizing that I was getting older and was going to start going downhill soon. I became grumpy and snapped at Indy when he got close to my legs. I was not very nice to anyone all morning.

Then I realized that I was not following my own advice! I was concentrating on my minor aches and pains, and not thinking about how strong and fit I really am. I know if I give attention to my discomforts, they’re going to get louder and bigger. If I concentrate on how much muscle and stamina I’ve gained this season, then I will continue to “feed” my body with positive thoughts and energy!

When you check in and feel your own body, do you look for where it feels good, or where it feels bad? Most of us tend to look for the bad sensations, as a matter of habit. We search for the aches and the soreness. But, if you can make the effort to change your habits and always look for the BEST feeling in your body, you will change your energy and start feeling better and better! Even if you have a severe physical issue right now, you can help yourself immensely by giving your full attention to the places in your body that feel the BEST.

This afternoon when I was in my turnout, I decided to go for a fast run around the fence line and notice how good and strong my lungs felt as I deeply drew in life-giving oxygen. I snorted and pranced and acknowledged my incredible stamina. I felt young again! I remembered that age is much more about a state of mind that a state of matter.

How old are you in your mind? I don’t want to know how old the calendar says you are, I want to know how young your MIND says you are! I’ve decided I’m about four years old. I think I’ll stay here for a few years more.

Love, Moshi

Jane Savoie
1174 Hill St ext.
Berlin, VT 05602
Jane’s Website
DressageMentor.com

Some Tips on Getting Your Horse to Roll Back Perfectly

Practice makes the perfect rollback. Journal photo.

The rollback consists of three separate maneuvers – a stop, a 180-degree turn and a lead departure. The rollback should be one continuous, fluid motion. However, this is easier said than done. National Reining Horse Association $3 million-dollar rider Craig Schmersal describes some of the techniques he uses at home to ensure precise rollbacks.

Getting Started

1. The first thing you need on a horse before teaching the rollback is suppleness. He must be willing to give his face. Using two hands, if I pull his head to the right, I only want him to move his head. I do not want his body to move to the right until I add the left neck rein.

2. The horse needs to know how to yield to leg pressure.

3. The horse has to know how to back up. When I take hold of him and back him up, I don’t want to be pulling him back. I want him to back up on a fairly loose rein.

I want the horse to almost lock in the reverse position in the backup. I then apply the outside rein to see if the horse will step into a turn by himself. If he doesn’t, then I’ll take my direct rein and pull him through a time or two into a good spin and a half or two spins.

I’ll stop, back up and ask him with the neck rein again. I don’t want to crowd my horse too much, especially in the beginning steps of learning the rollback.

I just want him to back up, and when I add the neck rein, to come to me. I don’t want him to pick up his head. I don’t want him to take three more steps backward as soon as he feels the neck rein. When I move my hand, if I’ve done my job properly, the horse goes. He won’t get stuck.

American Quarter Horse Association
1600 Quarter Horse Drive
Amarillo, TX 79104

Horse & Country TV’s Masterclass and Barn Talk Series Makes US Debut with Laura Kraut

Photo courtesy of Horse & Country TV.

London, U.K. – July 6, 2018 – Following the success of their hit programs, Masterclass and Barn Talk (also known as Yard Talk) throughout Europe and Australia, Horse & Country TV (H&C TV) brought the popular shows stateside, starting with a training session featuring U.S. Olympic gold medalist Laura Kraut.

An international show jumper and Olympic champion, Kraut is passionate about training and her successful career has given her the knowledge and ability to produce horses and coach riders up to the highest level.

In her Masterclass USA episode, which first premiered in May, Kraut walks viewers through some of the training techniques she uses on her horses at home and with her students. Part one features a circle of four jumps.

“It appears to be a simple exercise, but it’s one that the more you do, the more difficult it becomes,” said Kraut. “It’s a great exercise to teach horses and riders control, and to teach rider position. It’s also a wonderful exercise for young horses as it teaches them steering.”

In addition, in her Barn Talk episode, Kraut speaks one-on-one with H&C TV for an exclusive insight into her equestrian success and accomplishments.

Kraut’s episodes, which are available now on demand, will be followed by a Masterclass USA and Barn Talk with fellow U.S. international show jumper Georgina Bloomberg, premiering on Tuesday, July 10, starting at 7:30 p.m. EST.

Available in the U.S. on Roku, mobile apps, and at horseandcountrytv.us, H&C TV is committed to bringing world-class live coverage of top equestrian sports from around the world to U.S. audiences as well as entertaining and insightful television programs featuring the sport’s most renowned athletes. Offering hundreds of shows focused on horses, equestrian sport, and the country lifestyle, ranging from training tips and advice to behind-the-scenes looks into the daily lives of elite athletes, H&C TV has something for every horse lover to enjoy.

Motivation from Moshi, by Jane Savoie

I’ve been dreaming of Vermont. Lots of trees, cool nights and warm days. Big fields for Indy and me to explore, and new videos to make with Jane and Rhett. I love Vermont. We’ll be heading that way soon.

I’m going to miss my friends here in Florida, but I know I’ll be back and so will they. Next fall, we’ll have new stories to share, and new goals to achieve. In the meantime, we’ll concentrate on the work at hand and know that all is well.

Change is not easy for most people and most horses. We all like predictability and security. But with change comes the opportunity for growth. When change happens, it forces us to flex our mental muscles and learn to adapt. It is a GOOD thing, even when it’s a bit uncomfortable.

Do you have changes happening in your life right now that are uncomfortable? Many of us do. But you can learn to deal with it by looking for all the good things that are a result of those changes. It takes some mental focus, but you can do it!

What’s the best thing about the changes happening in your life, right now? Mine is finding new spring grass to eat! YUM!

Love, Moshi

Jane Savoie
1174 Hill St ext.
Berlin, VT 05602
Jane’s Website
DressageMentor.com

Motivation from Moshi, by Jane Savoie

You get more of whatever you think about. It’s true! Anything you give your attention to increases. That includes the bad stuff. This rule doesn’t have an opinion about “good” or “bad.” It just is.

You humans live in a “fix it” culture. You are trained to search for what’s wrong. That’s fine, if you’re looking for a stone in my hoof or a burr embedded in my saddle pad. But when you focus on what’s amiss with everything and everyone around you, you can really mess up your life.

The best example of this rule causing trouble is in relationships. It doesn’t matter if it is the relationship with your mate, your boss, your best friend, or your horse. If you spend more time looking for what’s wrong with that person/horse or the relationship you have together than you do looking for and appreciating what’s right, you will become out of sync with that person/horse until you will feel compelled to fight with them or leave them. It’s a rule. It will happen!

Riding is all about being in sync. As a horse, I feel Jane’s body move to accommodate my movement, and my body moves to accommodate hers. She leads the dance, but we are in sync with each other. Because she rewards me when we are in sync, I want to follow her lead even more. It feels good. Her attention to the “good” I do makes me want to do more “good.”

So, my advice is: concentrate on what you want more of. Ignore what you don’t want more of. Don’t give what you don’t want any energy. This is such a simple rule, but one that, if applied all the time, will change your life.

What do you like best about your horse? Think about that as you ride today. I promise, you’ll have a great ride.

Love, Moshi

Jane Savoie
1174 Hill St ext.
Berlin, VT 05602
Jane’s Website
DressageMentor.com

Motivation from Moshi, by Jane Savoie

I heard someone reading a book out loud to her horse the other day. It was by “Shakespeare”. He must be a very wise fellow. He said, “All the world’s a stage, And all the men and women merely players.” I believe that to be very true.

There is great power in stories. There are stories that teach us about the past, help us imagine the future, and take our thoughts on journeys to places our bodies couldn’t possibly go. The power of story has been recognized for millennia. A story can move a heart, a mind, and an entire world. The pen may truly be more powerful than the sword.

The stories you tell yourself shape your life in the most profound way. How you talk to yourself, the stories you ruminate and chew on as you think about the day, literally shape how you feel. The stores you tell and re-tell in your mind about yourself, your position in life, your body, and your experiences, actually become your life!

When you call a friend, do you tell her about the wonderful things that happened that day, or do you find yourself gossiping or complaining? Do you tell more stories about your failures than you do your successes? When you think about your experiences, do you remember the happy things that happened, or are you in the habit of gnawing on all the things that went bad or not to your liking?

If you knew that just by telling the story, you would attract more of what you talked about, would you change the tale? Would you look for the parts that contain the things of which you want more? Maybe you could include something happy about me! It’s your story, and I want to be a part of it!

Love, Moshi

From Indy:

I’ve been thinking… Moshi keeps saying how much he loves going to shows with Jane. He gets pampered and doted on, and then a great massage after he performs. It’s a special time for Jane and Moshi, and I can see that they really love it.

I decided I want to go to a show too. So, I started looking for a rider. I met this terrific girl by the name of Paz. She’s the perfect size for me! I found a pillow on the couch and took it to Jane to make a saddle so Paz could ride me. I just know my jumping ability will bring home a big blue ribbon to add to Moshi’s pile!

Jane patted me on the head and told me I just wasn’t cut out for carrying a person, even someone as small and cute as Paz. I was very sad.

But then Jane reminded me that I had other things I could do that were every bit as exciting and important as carrying a person around. My job is to keep Jane and Rhett fit and strong by taking them for walks and encouraging them to throw sticks and balls for me, and to keep them safe by letting them know if there are strange noises outside during the night. These are very important jobs!

Instead of being sad that I’m not built to carry a person, I decided to concentrate on what I do best, being a great dog. I’m focusing on being the very BEST dog I can be!

Do they give blue ribbons for catching the ball in mid-air? Maybe Jane will make one for me. I want Moshi to know I can win ribbons too.

I’m meeting Paz at the barn! She’s my favorite little girl. Come on over! I’ll introduce you!

Love, Indy

Jane Savoie
1174 Hill St ext.
Berlin, VT 05602
Jane’s Website
DressageMentor.com

McLain Ward to Teach Clinic for Longines Masters of New York’s Young “Masters Squad” Riders

New York – April 3, 2018 – Young riders from the innovative “Masters Squad” program at the Longines Masters of New York will be taking advantage of a unique and coveted educational opportunity — a group clinic with U.S. Olympic team gold medalist and Longines FEI World Cup Final winner McLain Ward. The aspiring show jumpers will spend April 26-29 watching the world’s best compete at the Longines Masters of New York at NYCB LIVE, Home of the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, and then on May 5 at Old Salem Farm in North Salem, New York, they’ll be able to saddle up themselves to learn from Ward as a reward for their efforts selling tickets for the show as “Masters Squad Captains.”

In the Masters Squad program, young riders ranging in age from elementary to college students enrolled in the program as Masters Squad Captains and earned prizes according to their participation in social media initiatives and their selling of tickets to the Longines Masters of New York. Masters Squad Captains selling 115 tickets or more earned the right to participate in the clinic with Ward. All the while, a portion of each ticket sold also went back to a charity of either the captain’s or the affiliated barn’s choosing.

Ward, who is based at his family’s Castle Hill Farm in Brewster, N.Y., has been one of the top U.S. show jumpers for the past 20 years, having jumped to team gold medals at the 2004 and 2008 Olympic Games as well as winning the 2017 Longines FEI Show Jumping World Cup Final (Nebraska). Ward has been ranked as #1 in the world show jumping rankings and is one of the favorites for a spot on the U.S. team at the upcoming FEI World Equestrian Games in September.

“I look forward to working with the dedicated young riders from the Longines Masters of New York’s Masters Squad program,” said Ward. “When I was young, I benefitted from the wisdom of many top riders and I’m thrilled to be able to pay it forward by teaching young riders from New York. They showed their dedication to and enthusiasm for the sport by their promotion of the Longines Masters of New York and I’m excited to help reward them for their effort by sharing some knowledge.”

Members of the New York University (NYU) equestrian team are among the Masters Squad Captains that earned the privilege of riding with Ward by selling 115 tickets to the Longines Masters of New York. Shelby Phillips, a co-captain of the NYU equestrian team alongside Madison Charlton, said that the NYU riders were not only eager to watch the sport’s stars in the Longines Masters of New York, but also inspired by the Masters Squad opportunity. “We’re really excited to share this incredible opportunity with our friends, and we cannot believe we’re getting a clinic out of it!” said Phillips.

The Longines Masters of New York organizers conceived of the Masters Squad program as a way to energize young riders about show jumping and to help them aspire to compete in the show ring, learn from the sport’s top riders, and meet their heroes. By selling tickets and participating in social media initiatives, the Masters Squad participants helped grow the fan base of the sport and build enthusiasm about the Longines Masters of New York. Other prizes won by the Masters Squad Captains came after the sale of just 25 tickets to the show and include in-ring recognition during the Longines Speed Challenge on the April 27 evening session of the show, Longines Masters posters, Masters Squad Captain hats and hoodies, a Sport Horse Lifestyle gift pack, Masters Squad saddle pads, an EquiFit gift pack, and a special invitation to a Masters Squad BBQ with a 5* rider.

In spectating at the Longines Masters of New York, Masters Squad members and the rest of the audience have a chance to see top-ranked riders from all over the world race against the clock in the Longines Speed Challenge on Friday, April 28, face off in a Riders USA versus Riders Europe duel in the second leg of the inaugural Riders Masters Cup on Saturday, April 28, and jump for the biggest prize money of the week in the Longines Grand Prix on Sunday, April 29. Even when the horses aren’t jumping, the event’s Prestige Village shopping opportunities and live music provide plenty of entertainment.

Captains are still selling to reach their goals with a deadline of April 13th as a closing date. Find a captain by using the hashtag #masterssquad and support their efforts to ride with one of the best!

For full information on the event, please visit www.LonginesMasters.com.

For questions, contact Moriah Robbins at mrobbins@eemworld.com.

Motivation from Moshi, by Jane Savoie

Learning never stops. I am competing now at the highest level available, but I’m still learning more. I’m refining and improving all the time. There is never an end to journey, just new paths and new heights to reach.

Have you ever met someone who believes they already know all there is to know? I overheard one of the horses in the pasture next to mine say, “I’m not arrogant; I really do know everything.” I was so sad for this lovely mare, for she will never improve, never move forward, and never learn anything more. Yes, she is talented and has a lot to offer, but her cup is already full. Her belief that she’s already arrived at the pinnacle of her game will keep her stuck right where she is.

Dressage is a challenging sport. It attracts people who like precision, rhythm, and rules. Dressage riders tend to be a bit didactic, meaning once an idea of how something is done is accepted as THE way, they want it done that way every time.

But what if there’s another way? What if someone comes up with a new way that works better?

My suggestion is to do your best to always have an open attitude. No matter how good you are or how much you know, continue to learn and grow. Imagine yourself as an empty cup. Take in all the information you can, decide what works for you, and let go of what doesn’t. Just because it’s always been done a certain way, doesn’t mean you have to keep doing it that way.

You’re not old until you stop learning. Always approach life as if there’s something new for you to learn, and you will.

Love, Moshi

From Indy:

How old would you be if you didn’t know how old you are?

I’m still considered very young, even in dog years. I hear people complain all the time about getting older and the aches and pains that come with it.

Did you know that your body hears you? Your body hears your thoughts and your words. So, if you want your body to feel old, go ahead and tell it to feel old. After all, the years are marching by so there is evidence that this is true.

But if you want your body to keep feeling young and strong, do your best to send it young and strong messages. Notice where you’re still flexible and fit, and give that some thought attention. Appreciate all the ways your body continues to work well, and you’ll have more of that! If you think about the aches and pains, you’ll have more of THAT! Which one would you prefer?

You’ve probably heard the phrase, “energy follows thought.” If you’re still young in your thoughts, your body will stay young longer too! It just takes some conscious determination to move your thoughts from one to the other. Simple, but often not easy. But worth the effort, I assure you!

Of course, a daily swim in the pond helps keep you young too. Grab your towel and let’s go! Geoffrey is going to meet us there!

Love, Indy

Jane Savoie
1174 Hill St ext.
Berlin, VT 05602
Jane’s Website
DressageMentor.com

How to Be Good Turnback Help

Great herd help, both turning back and in the corners, must have the ability to scan and react to any situation in the cutting pen. They are also able to evaluate the cutter, his horse and read cattle with a sixth sense.

Earning respect as “great turnback help” takes a little natural aptitude and a lot of experience. Paying attention and being aware of the overall pen scene is optimum.

Pay Attention

To help turn back or work the corner during a cutting, you must be mounted on a good horse, make yourself available and always pay attention. Manpower is in demand during those long days, with the best helpers spending long, hard hours in the saddle. Knowing what it takes to be useful turnback help will also help you find the best help when it is your turn to cut.

Paying attention to the many unscripted movements during a run is very important to people working outside the herd, too. Even when just practicing at home, turnback help should keep the run moving at a reasonable pace without letting the action cease.

American Quarter Horse Association
1600 Quarter Horse Drive
Amarillo, TX 79104

Motivation from Moshi, by Jane Savoie

A good friend left the barn today. I was sad to know that he wasn’t coming back. His person took a new job in another city so he had to go to a new place. I will miss his funny nicker and his terrific sense of humor.

Letting go of friends, jobs, or situations can be hard. It can hurt. But letting go is a natural part of life. Change is inevitable, so it is wise to put some perspective on the feelings and understand how to move beyond the discomfort.

Everything changes. Everything! Resistance to change can be one of the most challenging natural traits to overcome. And yet, all you have to do is relax, let go of your need for things to be a certain way, and trust that there is more going on than meets the eye. There is a plan, an order to the Universe, that we can’t possibly know. It’s that leap of faith in trusting that all is well, even when it is uncomfortable and unknown, that’s the key to letting go of our discomfort with change.

I will probably never see my friend again, but I am grateful to have known him. And I know new friends will fill the void. For now, I’ll let myself feel sad at his leaving, but tomorrow I’m going to direct my thoughts toward being happy to have known him. And I will be looking forward to all the new friends coming into my life.

I’m sure you’ve heard the saying, “When one door closes, another door opens.” Let’s watch for the next open door! It’s there, if we’re willing to look for it.

Love, Moshi

From Indy:

I was startled by a snake today. I can’t tell you what kind it was, but it was big and scaly and scary. I jumped about eight feet in the air when I saw it slithering in the grass! Snakes are so strange looking, with that forked tongue and long, skinny body. It gave me the creeps!

Jane saw me jump and came to investigate. The snake was gone by the time she got to me, but she knew something had frightened me. Just having her acknowledge my fear and give me a pat on the head to reassure me was a big help. It’s nice to know I have her support.

Fear is a very natural thing. Without it, we would get hurt all the time. The key is not to let fear take over and paralyze us. We have to use good judgment — like giving a snake a wide berth so we don’t get bitten. But fear shouldn’t keep us from living life to the fullest.

Is there something you’d like to do, but you’re afraid to take the chance? What’s the worst that could happen? Could you live with that? What’s the best that could happen? Is it worth the risk?

Perhaps there is someone in your life who could support you while you take that risk. A friend, a trainer, or even a dog can be a great support. Facing fear and doing it anyway is a fabulous way to enhance your personal growth.

Jane walked with me as we investigated the grass, looking for that snake. With her at my side, I wasn’t afraid. I faced my fear and nothing bad happened. Of course, I know that snake lives nearby so I’ll be keeping an eye out for him. But I trust that we’ll stay out of each other’s way. Playing in the grass is way too much fun to avoid it just because of a silly snake!

Let’s make some noise and scare away the snakes!

Love, Indy

Jane Savoie
1174 Hill St ext.
Berlin, VT 05602
Jane’s Website
DressageMentor.com