Tag Archives: Horse Care

Seven Horses Die Following Day One of Nevada Roundup

Dear Friends of America’s Wild Horses,
These are remarkably trying times, considering the recent deaths of our wild horses in the West. Despite a public outcry against the massive and dangerous roundups of these treasured animals, the Bureau of Land Management is pressing forward, leaving the broken bodies of our mustangs in their wake. When we have unpreventable disaster like earthquakes and hurricanes, it is indeed frustrating to watch a man-made disaster unfolding on our public lands in the West against innocent wild animals who only want to live in peace with their families.

Despite our anger at being ignored by the Department of the Interior and the Bureau of Land Management, we must not let our emotions get the best of us. Any thoughts of violent actions or illegal behavior of any kind need to be put out of our heads. Instead, we must focus on legal methods to make a difference. Here is what you can do right now, today, and for the weeks and months that follow.

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The Sanctuary Equine Sports Therapy & Rehabilitation Center Sponsors International Dressage Rider Marco Bernal

The Sanctuary Equine Sports Therapy & Rehabilitation Center in Ocala is sponsoring international dressage rider Marco Bernal. (Photo courtesy of Sharon Packer/Horse Sport Photography)

Ocala, FL (July 12, 2010) – The Sanctuary Equine Sports Therapy & Rehabilitation Center in Ocala, a state-of-the-art facility dedicated to the healing, conditioning and well being of all equine athletes, is now sponsoring international dressage rider Marco Bernal. A Colombian dressage rider and owner of Marco Bernal International Dressage in Wellington, Bernal has a long and accomplished dressage career which includes representing his country in the prestigious 2009 Rolex FEI World Cup in Las Vegas.

“I became acquainted with The Sanctuary during the Palm Beach Dressage Derby when I won a jog they were sponsoring. My farriers from Rood & Riddle also recommended them,” Bernal said. “I believe The Sanctuary has the experience and the equipment that I need for my horses.”

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Increased Relief for Kentucky Horse Owners on the Way

According to a recent report, one out of every ten work-eligible Kentuckians is unemployed.  In response to the significant increase in jobless horse owners, the Kentucky Horse Council (KHC) has modified eligibility requirements for their Equine Safety Net program.

Started in April 2007, Equine Safety Net provides feed for horses owned by individuals who have recently lost a job or suffered an injury which prevents them from working.

Through the Equine Safety Net program, KHC provides hay and grain for up to two horses for thirty days for approved applicants.  Historically Equine Safety Net supported the care of horses whose owners suffered a job loss or injury within 90 days of application.

Because of recent eligibility changes, now the program is available to those with a verifiable change in work status within six months and recipients may, for the first time, apply for a 30 day extension of Safety Net support.

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FEI Issues Mandatory Guidelines to Hypersensitivity Protocol

8 July 2010 – The FEI has undertaken a review of the Protocol for Thermography and Clinical Examination (Hypersensitivity of Legs) and, in an effort to further strengthen the Protocol, has issued the following mandatory guidelines to be applied by the Veterinary Commissions appointed for FEI Events.

The new guidelines state:

(i)                  all Horses that are tested pursuant to the Protocol for Thermography and Clinical Examination will continue to undergo a thermography examination as one part of the evaluation process for hypersensitivity;

(ii)                 no horse may be retroactively eliminated from a Competition pursuant to the Protocol for Thermography and Clinical Examination;

(iii)                the Person Responsible, or his or her designee, will be presented with a written form if his or her horse is disqualified for hypersensitivity that expressly describes the examination process and the rights of the Person Responsible under the circumstances;

(iv)               if any Horse is disqualified pursuant to the Protocol more than twelve (12) hours prior to a Competition, the Person Responsible, or his or her designee, will be advised that a written request to the Ground Jury may be submitted within 30 minutes of being notified that the horse is disqualified, for the Horse to be re-examined pursuant to the Protocol. Such request must be granted and the Horse will be re-examined prior to the next Competition at a time determined by the Ground Jury on the day of the Competition. If upon re-examination it is not clear and obvious that the horse is unfit to compete due to signs of hypersensitivity, the horse shall be allowed to compete in that next Competition. However, the horse remains eligible for examination under the Protocol throughout the entire Event. This specific written request opportunity may only be exercised one (1) time during any Event for the same horse.

The new guidelines are effective immediately.

Media Contact:

Grania Willis
FEI Director Press Relations
Tel: +41 787 506 142
Email: grania.willis@fei.org

Doubt Cast on Pilot Valley “Estray” Horses Rounded Up by BLM

July 7, 2010 – CHICAGO (EWA) – On June 23, 2010, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Elko District office buried on its website a notice that  approximately 175 “abandoned, domestic, estray” horses located within Pilot Valley, NV, were scheduled for impoundment beginning June 25. The round up was expected to take 3 – 4 days with corrals set up on nearby private land owned by Simplot Land and Livestock until the horses could be transported and placed under the jurisdiction of the State of Nevada.

According to Nevada laws, an estray is a horse that is found running loose on public lands but shows signs of domestication and the owner is unknown. A horse is considered “feral” under Nevada law if the animal was domesticated or is the offspring of domesticated horses and has become wild with no physical signs of domestication. The state of Nevada owns estray and feral horses. Wild horses and free-roaming Mustangs are protected by the BLM under the 1971 Wild Free Roaming Horses and Burros Act.

Nevada authorities plan to sell the horses rounded up by the BLM at auction on July 10. The horses will be available to all buyers and are therefore at risk of ending up at slaughterhouses in Mexico or Canada.

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Bronson Announces Accreditation of Ag Law Enforcement and Inspector General

TALLAHASSEE — Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services Commissioner Charles H. Bronson has announced the reaccreditation of his Office of Agricultural Law Enforcement (AgLaw) following a rigorous review by the Commission for Florida Law Enforcement Accreditation (CFA). The office first gained accreditation in 2007 and in April was re-evaluated for renewal of that status.  For the first time, the department’s Inspector General’s Office has also received accreditation following a full on-site visit.

The CFA reviews all aspects of an agency’s policies and procedures, management, operations and support systems to verify compliance with 276 recognized standards of excellence.  Accreditation by the CFA is voluntary but considered a significant accomplishment and this status is held in high esteem by the criminal justice community.

“This meticulous review of the facilities, personnel and programs within AgLaw measures our professionalism in a meaningful way, ensuring we meet the high standards dictated by law enforcement across the state and the nation,” Bronson said.  “The Office of Agricultural Law Enforcement has continued to expand its duties and responsibilities over the years in protecting our citizens and visitors and clearly our peers have determined we are meeting and exceeding expectations.”

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Second Slaughter Mouthpiece Installed to Head “Unwanted” Horse Coalition

July 5, 2010 – CHICAGO (EWA) – The recent appointment of Dr. Douglas Corey to the top spot of the Washington lobby group, The Unwanted Horse Coalition (UHC), has made their loudly proclaimed stance of being neutral on the contentious issue of horse slaughter difficult to swallow.

Corey follows Dr. Tom Lenz, former head of American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP). Both Lenz and Corey pull no punches on their enthusiastic support of horse slaughter. The two veterinarians with close ties to animal agriculture refer to horse slaughter as an end-of-life option that is needed. Regrettably, with the UHC parent group, The American Horse Council, this front for unscrupulous breeders and the meat industry, often has the ear of Congress and is considered a respected and respectable humanitarian organization.

The daring hypocrisy of both organizations is stunning and Corey’s own words prove it. Few equine rescue organizations are members of the UHC, shunning the prohibitive cost of membership to join. Rescue groups, dependent upon donations, would prefer to spend their funds on feed and hay.

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Western Radio Addresses Unwanted Horse Issue

The Horse Radio Network’s Western Radio Show Explains the Dilemma of Unwanted Mustangs

Horse Radio Network at www.horseradionetwork.com

Lexington, KY – One of the Horse Radio Network’s newest shows, The Western Radio Show, takes a look at the controversial mustang situation in a way that anyone can understand.  With the help of Dr. Don Hoglund, author of Nobody’s Horses, The Dramatic Rescue of the Wild Herd of White Sand, hosts Alan Moorhead and Jymmy Kay Cox guide you through the history, the controversy and the possible solutions to this topic.

There are over 34,000 formally free roaming mustangs currently in holding pens across America. The disposition of these horses has been the subject of heated debate and emotions recently. This two part series on the Western Radio Show at www.westernradioshow.com offers a better understanding of the mustangs’ displacement and disposition alongside the options currently available.

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Update from Cloud’s Mountaintop

A letter from Director Ginger Kathrens

Dear Friends of Cloud and all wild horses:

We just returned from a wonderful week with the wild horses of the Pryor Mountains.

Abundant rain has turned the range emerald green. All the horses are fat, and most are sleek, except for a few yearlings who still have remnants of their scraggly winter coats. There were twenty-some babies atop the mountain, including a charming trio of foals sired by Cloud’s son, Bolder. I can’t help but remember another trio of foals 15 years ago, sired by the magnificent black stallion, Raven. His son, Cloud, was a leggy white foal who loved to pester his two sisters, Smokey and Mahogany, and make wild runs around the clusters of fir trees after sunset.

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National Equine Resource Network (NERN) Launches, Prepares to Assist Struggling Equine Welfare Organizations

Horse rescues & sanctuaries are struggling with high costs, low donations and a never-ending supply of horses. A new organization brings them hope…

Encinitas, CA (PRWEB) June 8, 2010 — Each year, more than 100,000 American horses cross the borders into Canada and Mexico where they are sold for slaughter. Countless thousands are seized by animal control officers in cases of abandonment, abuse or neglect, while an untold number of horses suffer silently in barns and backyards around the country. It seems an unfair fate for the animal that has, throughout history, given so much to mankind. Fields were plowed, battles were won, new frontiers were discovered and nations were built – all on the back of a horse.

Over the last decade, hope for a brighter future has blossomed in the widespread emergence of equine welfare organizations. While these organizations have begun to provide a safety net for America’s horses, the need for them is increasing exponentially. Rising costs of fuel and hay, coupled with an economic downturn, has thrust more equines than ever into at-risk situations. At the same time, feeling the economic pinch, Americans have decreased their charitable giving and equine welfare organizations are seeing fewer, smaller donations. The result is an industry that is financially struggling and has reached or is nearing capacity, in a climate where the need for these organizations is urgent and continuing to grow. Now, more than ever, the equine welfare industry needs to thrive.

Continue reading National Equine Resource Network (NERN) Launches, Prepares to Assist Struggling Equine Welfare Organizations