Tag Archives: Horse Care

Positive Tests of Cannabinoids (CBD) Will Result in GR4 Violations as of Sept. 1, 2019

Tasked with protecting the welfare of equine athletes and ensuring the balance of competition, the US Equestrian Federation (USEF) Equine Drugs and Medications Program consistently monitors new products and product claims. From time to time, new products appear on the equine supplement market claiming to enhance a horse’s performance. Over the last several years, cannabinoids have gained increased attention and have become nearly mainstream.

In 2018 Congress passed the Agriculture Improvement Act, also known as the “Farm Bill”, which defines “hemp” as both the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any derivatives of cannabis with less than 0.3% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). With the enactment of this bill, “hemp” is no longer considered a controlled substance under federal law, but THC remains a Schedule I drug with the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). The passage of the Farm Bill has created some potential confusion with respect to the use of these substances with competition horses.

USEF Equine Drugs and Medications Rules prohibit cannabidiols (CBD) and their metabolites. While hemp does not contain more than 0.3% THC, it does contain CBD. CBD, both natural and synthetic forms, are likely to affect the performance of a horse due to its reported anxiolytic effects. This substance is no different than legitimate therapeutics that effect mentation and behavior in horses. It is for these reasons that USEF prohibits CBD and all related cannabinoids. Horses competing under USEF rules who test positive for natural cannabinoids, synthetic cannabinoids, and other cannabimimetics will be considered in violation of GR4 beginning September 1, 2019.

It is important to note that analytical methods are being implemented to detect CBD and similar cannabinoids. Both USEF and FEI list natural cannabinoids, synthetic cannabinoids, and other cannabimimetics as prohibited substances. Caution is important when using these products as their composition widely varies and may not be representative of their label claims as there is no regulatory oversight from the FDA, nor guarantee of their safety in horses.

As published literature does not exist noting detection times of these substances in the horse, and because products can widely vary in their compositions and concentrations, detections prior to September 1 will receive warnings. They will be considered to be in “Prior” violation if there are additional detections of cannabinoids following September 1. GR411 Conditions for Therapeutic Administrations of Prohibited Substances does not apply for cannabinoids and medication report forms do not apply.

With regards to human use, any athlete who is subject to testing under the World Anti-Doping Code can refer to the regulations for human use of cannabinoids here.

by US Equestrian Communications Department

Chilean Champ Santona Euthanized at 25

Santona at Old Friends (Photo: Laura Battles)

GEORGETOWN, KY – MAY 7, 2019 – Chilean champion Santona has died. The 25-year-old mare was euthanized at Park Equine Hospital at Woodford on May 5th due to complications from colic.

Santona had been pensioned at Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement Farm in Georgetown, KY, since 2011. Michael Blowen, founder and President of Old Friends, made the announcement of her passing.

Bred in Chile by Haras Santa Isabel, Santona (Winning – Syracuse, by Sharp-Eyed Quillo) won the Grade 1 Las Oaks at Club Hipico De Santiago in 1997. That year she was named Champion grass mare in Chile, and was then brought to the United States in 1998 by owner-breeder Earle I. Mack.

Campaigned by Mack and trainer Jimmy Jerkins for four starts in New York, Santona never regained her top race form and was retired to the breeding shed.

Her colt by Grand Slam, Grand Hombre, won the Pennsylvania Derby in 2003 and earned over $900,000.

“Mr. Mack adored Santona, and Old Friends was honored to care for her for these last years,” said Blowen. “She was extremely intelligent and very competitive.  She will be missed by all of her mare friends and human caretakers.”

For more information, please call (502) 863-1775 or visit the website at www.oldfriendsequine.org.

MEDIA CONTACT: Cynthia Grisolia, (347) 423-7322, cindy@oldfriendsequine.org; Michael Blowen (502) 863-1775, michael@oldfriendsequine.org

Casares Portraits Immortalize Equine Rescue Efforts

Wellington, FL (April 17, 2019) – From kill pen to pony stardom: Coconut the rescue pony takes center stage in another spectacular photo shoot by Ramon Casares of Casares Fine Art Photography. Designed to immortalize the incredible journey of this equine and her rescuers, Casares’ trademark chiaroscuro shoot with Coconut combined dramatic stage lighting and his eye for artistic photography to create a stunning portrait and to transcend the connection between man and horse. Coconut, who is now in training to be a child’s polo pony, has also learned a few tricks along the rescue journey, including how to bow. As a fitting expression of her gratitude to her rescuers, Casares captured this pony’s bow in his typical fashion: with art and illumination.

The coming 4-year-old mare was rescued from a kill pen in 2017 by Pamela Flanagan and Rob Journayvaz. Both are polo players and enthusiasts, and sent the then feral Coconut to their close friend and trainer Jillian DeGeorge, who they give the most credit for turning Coco into the sweet and playful pony she is today. Recently started under saddle, Coconut’s training has focused on the polo basics, so that she may transfer that knowledge to her young riders. Flanagan, who is also an attorney, has made rescuing equines a passion to compliment her love for polo. Over the past year, Coconut has evolved from sensitive and skittish to trusting and brave, which is emphasized in her brilliant portraits. Casares’ stunning images, photographed so that she is the only source of light and detail, shine as bright as this little pony’s future.

Coconut’s shoot with Casares follows in a long line of rescued wildlife and sport horse portraits that have defined Casares’ work. Building on influences from his background as a native of Argentina and career as an exotic animal caregiver at the country’s largest zoo, Casares expanded his photographic talents to include all species of creature, from human and equine to possum and crocodile. He has photographed animals from nearly every phylum, class, and order in the animal kingdom. With Casares Fine Art Photography appearing across the globe and garnering international acclaim, his images have captured the imagination of audiences at major media outlets and international art shows.

But despite his passion for the horses and traditional commissioned work, Casares’ portrait style images of nature’s rarest and most common species are the artist’s true accomplishment and calling card, along with his trademark style devoid of background distractions and illuminated to detail each whisker, feather, or scale. Casares captures an essence with each image that underscores his own passion and vision as a photographer and conservationist. As a former keeper for the Buenos Aires Zoo, Casares was witness to the beauty, ferocity, and fragility of the animal kingdom firsthand. During the evolution of his photographic career, he began to visit wildlife rescues to document the plight of their patients. Realizing his images could generate support and awareness for those injured and recuperating commonplace species, as well as those who are in danger of extinction, Casares embarked on a mission to unite his talent for photography with his passion for conservation. BROKEN was the result.

Combining Casares’ distinctive artistic style and the plight of rescued animals, BROKEN is the final product of 3 years’ worth of photography, the resilience of each animal, and the selfless efforts of their rescuers. In the oversized fine art book, the saga of each animal is told beside their stunning and emotionally evocative images with the goal of bringing awareness to their struggle and rehabilitation. An ever-growing endeavor, Casares intends to expand the Broken: Rescued Wildlife Fine Art Project to multiple countries and continents to maximize awareness and resources for endangered wildlife.

For more information on Casares Fine Art Photography or BROKEN, visit www.RamonCasares.net.

Media contact:
PR and Marketing
Holly Johnson
Equinium Sports Marketing, LLC
www.equinium.com
holly@equinium.com
+1 954 205 7992

GJ Racing Wins Brooke USA’s Sunset Polo Tournament

Wes Finlayson on the Provident Jewelry team races Marwan Mohey-El-Dien, of team Invicta, to the ball.

Polo match supports Brooke USA’s efforts to help working equines and the people they serve in the developing world.

WELLINGTON, Fla. – March 24, 2019 – Brooke USA’s Sunset Polo™ & White Party kicked off a weekend birthday celebration for Hope Arellano. She serves as an ambassador for the organization and played for the winning team, GJ Racing, and was named Most Valuable Player (MVP). The next day Arellano played in the U.S. Open Women’s Polo Championship final, and Sunday she turned 16 years old.

“It was super fun! I had a blast playing with everyone,” she said after the event at the Wanderers Club. “Brooke USA is a great organization, and I was very pleased to be able to play in a game that benefited them.”

Brooke USA strives to improve the welfare and alleviate the suffering of working horses, donkeys and mules and the people they serve in some of the world’s poorest communities.

Three 8-goal teams competed in the six-chukker round robin tournament composed of three two-chukker games. GJ Racing won the first two chukkers 4-1 over Provident Jewelry, the defending champion. Provident Jewelry’s Henry Porter made the first goal of the game with a midfield missile straight into goal.

The first chukker closed with a goal by former 8-goal player John Gobin, who ran the ball in from a distance and scored on a cut shot for GJ Racing. In the second chukker, he assisted on two Arellano goals. With 30 seconds left in the second chukker, Arellano made the winning goal of the first round. It was a complex play, with Porter on a breakaway until Arellano ran him off it and scored.

GJ Racing won the first two chukkers 4-1 over Provident Jewelry. Provident Jewelry’s Henry Porter made the first goal of the game with a midfield missile straight into goal.

Round two (chukkers three and four) was a 2-1 victory for Provident Jewelry over Invicta. Matías Gonzalez sent a pass to teammate Justin Daniels, who made a long run to goal for Invicta. Sam Farahnak and Wes Finlayson, a Brooke USA ambassador, each scored for Provident Jewelry in the fourth chukker. Finlayson, who had dashed to the Wanderers Club after playing a high-goal game at International Polo Club, blazed past nearly everyone else on the field to score the last goal of round two.

The fifth chukker opened with an Invicta goal by Tony Calle, who moved to Wellington from Quito, Ecuador three years ago. In the sixth chukker Gobin passed the ball on two long shots to Arellano, who tied the game at 2. Gonzalez swooped past Brooke USA ambassador Benjamin Avendaño to score, ending round three 3-2 for Invicta over GJ Racing.

GJ Racing won the tournament with the highest cumulative score. The remaining places were determined by round robin rules, with Invicta second and Provident Jewelry third.

For GJ Racing sponsor Gil Johnston, a longtime sponsor of teams, youth tournaments and the Polo Training Foundation, this was her first time sponsoring a team in Brooke USA’s Sunset Polo™ & White Party event. “It’s for a good cause and a good organization, so why not?” she said, adding that she felt her team played exceptionally well.

Lisa Bair also sponsored a team (Invicta) in this event for the first time. “I couldn’t be more happy and proud,” she said. “I have attended this event for four years, and I’m impressed by Brooke USA’s work, both in its mission to help animals and in how it has raised awareness in Wellington about the plight of these animals.”

Returning sponsor Geoff Fear said Provident Jewelry came back ready to defend the title they won last year. “We wanted to win again, but the important thing is that it was a good competitive game, and everyone had fun,” he said.

Game organizer Gates Gridley said he strived to put the three balanced 8-goal teams together. “There was a lot of young up-and-coming talent on the field today,” he said, adding that the players consider it a privilege to play in Brooke USA’s Sunset Polo™ tournament because they support the organization’s cause.

Emily Dulin, executive director of Brooke USA, said she was grateful to the participating players for “giving their time to this cause to help the working equine world because like us, they truly understand the bond between people and animals.”

Longtime Coca-Cola player Julio Arellano (father of MVP Hope Arellano) selected the best-playing pony. “The last chukker is what decided it for me,” he said. “Marwan [Mohey-El-Dien] came out on a gray mare that played her heart out for him. She got him to a lot more plays than he was in before, and he did great.”

For more information or to donate, please visit www.brookeusa.org.

Danthebluegrassman, Grade 3 Winner, Euthanized at 20

Danthebluegrassman at Old Friends (Photo: Laura Battles)

GEORGETOWN, KY – MARCH 20, 2019 – Danthebluegrassman, a 2002 Kentucky Derby contender, was euthanized Monday, March 19, at Park Equine Hospital in Woodford due to an irreparable small intestinal obstruction that was causing chronic colic.

The 20-year-old gelding had been pensioned at Old Friends, the Thoroughbred retirement center in Georgetown, KY, since 2008.

A son of Pioneering, out of the Grey Dawn II mare Stay With Bruce, Danthebluegrassman — named after raconteur Dan Chandler, son of former Kentucky governor A.B. “Happy” Chandler — was campaigned by Hall of Fame trainer Bob Baffert and owner Michael E. Pegram.

As a 2-year-old, the flashy chestnut won the Gold Rush Stakes in wire-to-wire fashion. A year later, he punched his ticket to the Kentucky Derby trail with a win in the Grade 3 Golden Gate Derby and a close 2nd in the Grade 3 El Camino Real Derby.

A long shot nevertheless, on Derby day he was installed at 50-1 morning line odds, but then later scratched after he “tied up” following a routine gallop at Churchill Downs. In June of that year he went on to another victory in the Northern Dancer Stakes at Churchill Downs.

Claimed in in 2005, Dan eventually fell down the ranks and was retired to Old Friends in the spring of 2008 after a career boasting 47 Starts and 8 wins with earnings of $423,794.

“Dan was the man — tough but gentle,” said Old Friends President Michael Blowen. “We were fortunate to know him for more than a decade, and he will be missed by all of us. Special thanks to Dr. Bryan Waldrige and everyone at Park Equine for doing the best for Dan when he needed it most.”

For more information, please call (502) 863-1775 or visit the website at www.oldfriendsequine.org.

MEDIA CONTACT: Cynthia Grisolia, (347) 423-7322, cindy@oldfriendsequine.org; Michael Blowen (502) 863-1775, michael@oldfriendsequine.org

Old Friends Welcomes Five-Time Grade 1 Winner Einstein

Einstein arrives at Old Friends (Photo: Carole Oates)

GEORGETOWN, KY – MARCH 11, 2019 – Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement farm based in Georgetown, KY, has welcomed new retiree Einstein. The Brazilian bred son of 1986 Horse of the Year and Kentucky Derby winner Spend a Buck has been pensioned by The Stonach Group’s Adena Springs to the non-profit organization.

Trained by Helen Pitts, Einstein (Spend a Buck–Gay Charm, by Ghadeer) captured the 2009 Santa Anita Handicap (gr. I) and four grade I stakes on turf, including back-to-back triumphs in the Woodford Reserve Turf Classic (gr. IT) at Churchill Downs.

Other wins include the 2008 Clark Handicap (gr. II), also at Churchill, and the Mervin H. Muniz Jr. Memorial Handicap (gr. IIT) at Fair Grounds.

In all, Einstein made 30 starts, winning 11 races. He won or placed in 13 stakes, all of which were graded, and his career earnings totaled $2,703,324.

Einstein retired from racing in 2010 to stand at Adena Springs near Paris, KY. He later stood at Adena Springs North in Ontario, Canada and at Magali Farms near Santa Ynez, CA. His top runners include grade III winner Rankhasprivileges and multiple-stakes-placed E Equalsmcsquared.

In 2015, Adena Springs also donated Breeders’ Cup Classic winner Alphabet Soup and Belmont Stakes winner Touch Gold to Old Friends.

“We’re extremely grateful to The Stronach Group for allowing us to care for Einstein, and for supporting him with a significant annual contribution,” said Old Friends President and founder Michael Blowen. “Einstein has a lot of fans and I’m sure they’ll be flocking to visit him.

“The great son of Spend a Buck didn’t peak until his six and seven-year-old campaigns,” Blowen continued, “and, as fate would have it, he defeated many of our other Old Friends retirees, including Arson Squad, Commentator, Rail Trip, and Cosmonaut.”

“Einstein was one of the most honest and consistent race horses of modern times,” said Donald Wells, Farm Manager at Adena Springs. “He came very close to being the first horse to win grade 1 races on the turf (Woodford Reserve), synthetic (Santa Anita Handicap), and dirt when he was a troubled third in the Stephen Foster in 2009.

“It has been a privilege to care for such a tough and honest horse,” Wells added. “We know he will be well taken care of at Old Friends, and we look forward to his fan base getting to know and love him the way we have.”

For more information, please call (502) 863-1775 or visit the website at www.oldfriendsequine.org.

MEDIA CONTACT: Cynthia Grisolia, (347) 423-7322, cindy@oldfriendsequine.org; Michael Blowen (502) 863-1775, michael@oldfriendsequine.org

Horses Helping Horses Does It Again

ARREDONDO DRESSAGE SOCIETY
Presents the 10th Annual Horses Helping Horses

A day to benefit the HORSE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA
Saturday, March 16, 2019
Canterbury Equestrian Showplace, Newberry, Florida
In the Covered Arena

Join us and some of the regions most talented dressage instructors as they donate their time and skills to perform a benefit clinic for Horse Protection (HPAF). The Arredondo Dressage Society Website lists the clinicians, ride times, and instructions for bidding on the clinics (arredondodressage.org).

The day is a day all about horses, and a day to raise awareness about equine rescues and sanctuaries and the lifesaving work they do year-round to care for the at-risk horses in their communities who have often been abused or neglected. Horses are majestic, loving animals, and we hope our local and loyal supporters will come out so that we can continue our lifesaving efforts for years to come.

To support this cause, Arredondo Dressage Society will sponsor events throughout the day. The clinics offer riders and spectators a chance to see actual dressage training and work. In addition, there will be lunchtime demos including vaulting, reining, and dressage. There will also be a used tack sale and raffles throughout the day.

Arredondo has an online auction on its website which will be finalized at the 5:00 Wine and Cheese Reception, with a live auction and bidding. Horse Protection staff will showcase some of the rescued animals and they will be on hand to answer questions and to educate the public about the work being done on behalf of the equines of Florida.

Come for a fun day and support this most worthy cause!

HORSE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA
Horse Protection Association of Florida (HPAF) is located on 140 acres in Micanopy where herds of upwards of 60 rescued horses are cared for. These horses have been abused, abandoned, or neglected and have been seized, surrendered, or otherwise rescued by Morgan Silver and her team. The horses usually arrive at HPAF in an emancipated condition and they are typically weak and scared. Some have never known a kind human touch, but under the loving care of Morgan and the women and men who work at the farm, the horses are given the care they need. They receive veterinary care, farriers work on their feet, their diets are customized for their needs, and each horse is handled and worked with until they recognize that these humans are there to help.

Each horse has its own stall and is trained to walk into its stall each morning and night for feeding. Each horse is Parelli trained with a rope halter and rope so that they are used to handling and develop ground manners. Each horse is groomed on a daily basis before being turned out to pasture.

The HPAF website (hpaf.org) shows some of the work being done at the farm, and shows the horses that are ready for adoption. Once a horse is sound and properly trained, it will be ready to be adopted. Of course, there are some that will remain at HPAF as their forever home. Right now, there are 4 distinct herd groupings. The mares with an occasional senior or quiet gelding are kept in one barn and pasture. The geldings have another barn and pasture. There is also a senior barn and pasture, and finally, there is the mums and babies barn. We have 4 new babies this year, and just recently, the mums have been taken to a new farm and the babies have been weaned. After a few days of protesting, the babies have all settled down and happily romp around in their own pasture.

Contact:
Heather Stalker, stalkhj@peds.ufl.edu, (352) 231-0670

Australian Champion Bint Marscay Euthanized

Bint Marscay at Old Friends (Photo: Laura Battles)

GEORGETOWN, KY – JANUARY 29, 2019 – 1993 Golden Slipper winner Bint Marscay has died. The 28-year-old mare, who resided at Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement Farm in Georgetown, KY, was euthanized Monday evening due to complications of chronic arthritis.

Bred and campaigned in Australia, the daughter of Marscay (AUS) out of the Sir Tristram mare Eau D’etoile (NZ), had 10 starts Down Under, winning four of them.

A champion 2-year-old, the outstanding filly won the Kindergarten Stakes at Warwick Farm and the Magic Night Stakes (GR2) at Rosehill before capping her champion status with a win in the Tooheys Golden Slipper Stakes (GR1).

Bint Marscay retired from racing in 1994 with career earnings of $1,034,821.

As a broodmare Bint Marscay foaled three stakes winners, including Bollinger, who won the Coolmore Classic (GR1) and later foaled Kentucky Derby contender Friesan Fire.

Relocated to the U.S. at Vinery, Kentucky, Bint Marscay was plagued by reproductive issues and did not produce a foal after 1999. She was retired to Old Friends in 2013.

“I am saddened to hear of the passing of Bint Marscay,” said longtime trainer Richard Freedman via email. “She was one of the greatest 2-year-olds to race in Australia, and she remains a yardstick by which Australian 2-year-olds are still measured today. She gave me, my family, and her racing connections so much joy.

“I thank Old Friends for taking such loving care of her in her retirement; she deserved no less,” Freedman added. “Her final years were happy, and her passing was peaceful. RIP old girl; you will be remembered.”

“She was a wonderful race mare, a wonderful broodmare, and a wonderful retiree,” said Old Friends’ Michael Blowen. “We’re so thankful to Vinery for donating her to Old Friends and allowing us to care for her in her final years.

“She was deeply loved by everyone here,” Blowen continued, “but especially by our dear friend and resident photographer Laura Battles. She was Binty’s ‘special person,’ who doted on her every single day. They had a very special relationship.”

“Bint Marscay just stole my heart three years ago,” said Battles, “and she took a big chunk of it with her when she left us yesterday.”

For more information, please call (502) 863-1775 or visit the website at www.oldfriendsequine.org.

MEDIA CONTACT: Cynthia Grisolia, (347) 423-7322, cindy@oldfriendsequine.org; Michael Blowen (502) 863-1775, michael@oldfriendsequine.org

Unparalleled Support: The Role of Veterinary Technicians at Palm Beach Equine Clinic

Yessica Arrua assisting with an electroacupuncture treatment. Photo by Jump Media.

Wellington, FL – Palm Beach Equine Clinic (PBEC), based in Wellington, FL, is home to world-renowned surgeons, board-certified specialists, and state-of-the-art diagnostic technology. In addition, PBEC is home to 30 veterinary technicians who provide support to the veterinarians they work alongside.

PBEC takes pride in the diligence of the technicians who work in collaboration with the veterinarians to maintain the daily functionality of the clinic. The typical responsibilities of an equine veterinary technician include:

  • Manage veterinarians’ schedules
  • Stock veterinarians’ mobile unit with supplies, equipment, and medications
  • Accompany veterinarians on barn calls and emergency response
  • Consult on cases with veterinarian
  • Care for and monitor horses admitted to the on-site clinic hospital
  • Plan patient care and follow-up
  • Oversee billing and invoices

According to Dr. Marilyn Connor, veterinary technicians are the right hands of the doctors they work with. PBEC employs 30 technicians and the hands-on experience they have access to gives them invaluable opportunities to learn.

“One thing that is special about PBEC is that we have a full staff of technicians day and night,” said Dr. Connor, who first joined PBEC as an intern and now works as a full-time veterinarian. “They are the ones feeding and caring for horses, administering medications that do not require a doctor, and assisting veterinarians on cases. During the peak of season, there are roughly 40 doctors with very diverse caseloads for technicians to learn and gain experience from.”

Yessica Arrua is one PBEC technician who has become an accomplice for veterinarian Dr. Natalia Novoa and the clinic in general. Arrua, 22, was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina but now calls Florida home and is a pivotal part of the PBEC team.

Five questions for PBEC veterinary technician, Yessica Arrua:

  1. How did you first get involved with horses?

I have been around horses since I was three years old. Both my parents have been working with horses since before I can remember. My dad works with polo ponies and my mom with dressage horses. They both traveled to Florida to pursue work with horses here and that is how I came to be a resident of Wellington and a team member with Palm Beach Equine Clinic.

  1. What are your day-to-day responsibilities at PBEC?

I work with Dr. Natalia Novoa, who focuses on both traditional veterinary medicine and alternative therapies like chiropractic adjustments and acupuncture. My day-to-day responsibilities include making sure our truck is stocked with the equipment and medications that we may need. I also look after all the invoices in our system on a monthly basis. Overall, my role is to ensure Natalia has everything she needs and is prepared for our farm call visits.

  1. What do you enjoy most about working with equine veterinarians and the horses they treat?

Other than being around horses every day, which is the best part of my job, I really enjoy being able to experience all the different types of cases that come through Palm Beach Equine Clinic. Especially during the winter season, we see so many interesting cases from emergencies to routine exams.

  1. Do you have a favorite case?

My favorite cases to work on are the ones where horses have anhidrosis, which we see often in the Florida heat.

(What is Anhidrosis? According to the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP), anhidrosis is a compromised ability to sweat in the face of exercise or high ambient temperatures. This is a potentially dangerous condition for horses, especially working horses, because they thermoregulate (maintain a consistent body temperature) primarily through sweating.)

There is no universal or proven treatment for anhidrosis, but people often try salts, electrolytes, thyroid supplements, and even beer. But Dr. Novoa has been able to help these horses with acupuncture. We had one case where the horse didn’t respond to any traditional treatments, but started sweating right away during our first acupuncture treatment.

  1. What can we find you doing when you aren’t working at PBEC?

You will find me at the beach, reading, and spending time with my family!

To find out more, please visit www.equineclinic.com or call 561-793-1599.

Contact: Lindsay Brock
lindsay@jumpmediallc.com

PBEC Case Study: Ethmoid Hematoma

Dr. Michael Myrhe and Dr. Weston Davis performing the Ethmoid Hematoma procedure. Photo courtesy of PBEC.

A horse was recently admitted to Palm Beach Equine Clinic (PBEC), based in Wellington, FL, with symptoms that included bleeding from the nostril. The patient’s referring veterinarian had diagnosed the horse with an ethmoid hematoma, which in layman’s terms is essentially a mass that fills with blood in the nose or sinus cavity.

The patient was placed under the care of PBEC’s board-certified surgeon Dr. Weston Davis and Dr. Michael Myhre. They performed an airway endoscopy to locate and evaluate the hematoma that the referring veterinarian had identified. After confirming the diagnosis, Dr. Davis and Dr. Myhre were eager to ensure that it was the one and only hematoma they were battling.

PBEC is one of an elite group of equine veterinary clinics to have a computed tomography (CT) machine in their arsenal of diagnostic imaging equipment. A CT gives veterinarians a unique look at the head, neck, and spine of a horse that they would never be able to accomplish with other imaging modalities. After a CT of the patient’s sinuses, more masses were indeed identified.

“This was a fairly typical presentation of an ethmoid hematoma, but there were certainly more masses than normal,” said Dr. Myhre. “It’s for this reason that the CT was very useful. If we were not able to obtain the scans that we did, we may have missed the masses that were located deeper in the sinus.”

Click here to watch the CT scan that spotted the additional masses in progress.

The cause of an ethmoid hematoma is unknown, but the mass resembles a tumor in appearance and development without being neoplastic. Horses with extensive masses may have reduced airflow and an expanding hematoma can cause pressure necrosis of the surrounding bones, but rarely causes facial distortion. Treatments of the condition can range from conservative management to surgery. The conservative treatment route includes the injection of formalin – a mixture of formaldehyde gas and water – into the mass using a guarded endoscopic needle. Once injected, the mass typically regresses rapidly, but recurrence is common. For some cases, surgical excision is achieved via a frontonasal bone flap procedure.

Due to the location and advances nature of the masses in this case, injection was not an option and the CT imaging was used to plan a surgical approach. “After sedation and a local block, we went into the sinus through a flap approach where we took a section of bone, cut it into a flap, and moved it back so we could go into the sinuses through a nice window,” said Dr. Myhre. “We removed a mass four centimeters in diameter as well as several smaller masses two to three centimeters in diameter, then flushed the area and closed.”

According to Dr. Myhre the advantages of a standing procedure included fewer risks from bleeding and fewer risks of recovering from anesthesia.

Post-surgery, the bone flap will require several weeks to heal, but the skin itself healed within one to two weeks, which is when the horse was cleared to return to normal activity.

Jennifer Wood, Jump Media
jennifer@jumpmediallc.com