Tag Archives: endurance

CHI Royal Windsor Horse Show Unveils All-Star International Line-Up

CHI Royal Windsor Horse Show welcomes the world’s best horses and athletes from 8-12 May 2019. The Show will play host to elite equestrian competition across four FEI equestrian disciplines: Show Jumping, Dressage, Driving, and Endurance.

International CSI5* Show Jumping

Current World No. 1 and winner of the FEI Jumping World Cup™ Final 2019, Steve Guerdat will headline the shortlist of leading riders set to compete in the prestigious Castle Arena at Royal Windsor Horse Show. On Sunday 12 May, in the Rolex Grand Prix – the highlight of the event’s Show Jumping action – Guerdat will be looking to emulate last year’s victorious performance in the class. This year, with a record-breaking prize fund of €500,000, the Swiss maestro will be determined to maintain his position at the top of the rankings.

Guerdat is one of six of the world’s top 10 Show Jumpers set to appear at the 2019 edition of the Show, highlighting the appeal that Royal Windsor enjoys among the jumping community. Competing against Guerdat will be compatriot and this year’s FEI Jumping World Cup™ Final silver medallist Martin Fuchs and current World No. 3-ranked Swedish rider Peder Fredricson. The latter, fresh from claiming a bronze medal on home turf at the FEI Jumping World Cup™ Final in Gothenburg, will be joined by fellow Swede Henrik von Eckermann, the current Rolex Grand Slam live contender.

World No. 5 Daniel Deusser will be returning to the Show in a bid to replicate last year’s stellar performance where Germany’s Olympic bronze medallist won both the CSI5* Kingdom of Bahrain Stakes for the King’s Cup and the CSI5* Pearl Stakes. Kent Farrington rounds off the top 10, and, after returning from a serious leg injury in 2018, is beginning to reclimb the rankings. Given his pedigree, spectators can expect another bold performance from the American rider, who will be hoping to mirror his 2017 victory in the Grand Prix.

Representing Great Britain in the top 10 is Ben Maher, who will be joined by a large British contingent, featuring John, Michael, and Robert Whitaker, William Funnell, Laura Renwick, and 19-year-old prodigy Harry Charles. Also sure to receive a strong reception from the throng of British supporters will be Scott Brash, the only rider ever to have won the inimitable Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping.

One contender who will be particularly popular among music fans is Jessica Springsteen, daughter of rock legend Bruce. The 27-year-old has built a strong Show Jumping career, claiming the CSI5* Falcon Stakes at Royal Windsor Horse Show in 2017.

Travelling from Ireland will be young rider Bertram Allen, who is widely tipped as an up-and-coming talent, and will be joined by his fellow countryman Billy Twomey. Adding further international experience to the class will be Canadian Olympic individual gold medallist Eric Lamaze and Italians Alberto Zorzi and Lorenzo de Luca.

International CDI4* Dressage

Top riders from across the world will challenge some of Britain’s best when the Royal Windsor Horse Show hosts the Al Shira’aa CDI4* Dressage Grand Prix and Freestyle to Music on Thursday 9 and Friday 10 May, respectively. Among the world-renowned names confirmed to compete is homegrown hero Carl Hester, the London 2012 team gold medallist and a rider who needs no introduction. Having already achieved so much within the discipline, Hester will be looking to further add to his illustrious collection of medals and accolades, as he returns riding Nip Tuck. The duo is sure to be backed by vociferous domestic support.

Household name, and the first Dressage rider ever to win Sky Sportswoman of the Year in 2014, Charlotte Dujardin will be returning to the iconic grounds after giving spectators a masterclass in success when she claimed the Dressage title at the Show in 2018. Teammate and friend to Carl Hester, the pair will be putting their friendship to one side as they go head-to-head.

Joining the British team will be Olympian Richard Davison; after coming third – following Dujardin and Hester – in 2018, Davison will be setting his sights on the top spot, along with fellow team mates Louise Anne Bell and Vicky Thompson Winfield.

Adding to the British line-up will be a strong start list of international talent, including Caroline Chew, Katherine Bateson Chandler, Kate Dwyer, and Heike Holstein.

International CAI3*/CAIO4* Driving

The CAIO4* Land Rover International Driving Grand Prix, one of the most important driving events in the UK, and an FEI World Cup™ qualifier, returns for another adrenaline-fuelled competition. A real test of horsemanship, the event includes three stages: driven dressage, the marathon stage, and cone driving for the three competition categories: horse and pony, four-in-hand, and horse pairs.

This year’s roster of 28 competitors involves drivers from 11 nations, with arguably the most well-known in the class being Australia’s Boyd Exell. The current indoor and outdoor World Champion has had much success at Royal Windsor in the past, with a victory last year propelling him to a total of nine wins at the Show. This year, Exell will be looking to secure an impressive 10th win at Windsor and further cement his position at the top of the world rankings.

Attempting to foil the Australian’s challenge at Windsor will be four drivers from the Netherlands, three of whom feature in the top 10 of the Driving World Rankings, with both Bram Chardon and Koos de Ronde accompanying Exell in the top three. Bram Chardon will be competing against his father and multiple world champion Ijsbrand Chardon. Completing the Dutch quartet is Mark Weusthof, he himself a FEI World Driving Championships gold medallist.

The CAIO4* will be heavily dominated by British drivers, with six athletes competing, including well-known equestrian stuntman Daniel Naprous, who, in recent years, has put in a number of thrilling performances at indoor shows, such as Olympia, The London International Horse Show. Completed by experienced sisters Karen and Pippa Bassett, as well as Wilf Bowman-Ripley, James Broome, and Dick Lane, Great Britain’s four-in-hand line-up looks set to mount a strong challenge.

A back-to-back 2014 and 2015 winner, the USA’s Chester Weber is no stranger to success here and will be looking to regain the form that pushed him up the rankings. He is joined by his compatriot Misdee Wrigley-Miller.

In the CAI3*competition, the horse pairs will contain a field of 20 athletes from 10 countries, including four-time Windsor horse pairs winner Beat Schenk. The Swiss will be looking to emulate his 2018 performance at the Show but will face stiff opposition from British competitors David Matthews, Libby Priest, and Chris Smith, the current chairman of British Carriagedriving.

Another eight drivers will compete in the CAI3* pony four-in-hand, including Roger Campbell, who picked up third place at the 2018 edition of Royal Windsor Horse Show. Campbell will believe he can elevate himself to the next level and pick up first place this year. The Netherlands’ Jan de Boer, last year’s winner, already has seven wins to his name at Windsor and will hope to perform once again to the same high standards that he holds himself to. However, he will have to contest the vocal support of the home crowd for domestic drivers Sara Howe and Rowena Moyse.

International CEI1*/CEI2* Endurance

On Friday 10 May, Windsor will welcome competitors for the Royal Windsor Endurance supported by the Kingdom of Bahrain. The long-distance event will see the best equestrians from around the world ride across Windsor and Ascot countryside, as they compete in the 80km and 120km classes, which will be a true test of stamina and teamwork.

Show Director Simon Brooks Ward said: “The quality of international entries that 2019’s Show has managed to attract is testament to Royal Windsor’s strong appeal and stature within the equestrian community, furthering its reputation as one of the world’s top shows. Once again, we welcome the world’s best horse and rider combinations to Windsor and are excited to host a number of elite equestrian competitions for our loyal spectators.”

A list of entries for each discipline can be found here.

Tickets to Royal Windsor Horse Show can be booked online at www.rwhs.co.uk or by calling the box office on 0844 581 0755 from the UK and +44 (0)121 796 6100 internationally. Windsor residents should call the Windsor Information Centre on 01753 743 589.

For more information, please contact:
Gayle Jenkins / rEvolution / gjenkins@revolutionworld.com / +44 (0)203 176 0355

Strong Interest in Hosting FEI World Championships 2022

A total of 20 countries on four different continents – Europe, North and South America, and Asia – have submitted expressions of interest to host the FEI World Championships 2022, with representatives from over 30 different venues attending a workshop for potential host cities in Lausanne (SUI).

Participants at the interactive workshop, which is a first for the FEI, were briefed on the benefits of hosting FEI world championships, including the economic impact on the host city and country, operational requirements, commercial opportunities, broadcast media rights and event promotion, support from the FEI’s team of experts across key functional areas, and the bidding process itself.

“It is extremely encouraging to have received so many expressions of interest to host the FEI world championships 2022 and to have had the opportunity to welcome potential bidders to Lausanne for today’s workshop,” FEI President Ingmar De Vos said. “We hope that this new collaborative approach, in line with the IOC’s New Norm and based on transparency, cost-effectiveness and sustainability, will result in solid formal bids, but the proof of the pudding is in the eating!

“Our sport has grown so much that an all-discipline FEI World Equestrian Games has become too big for many venues to host. By opening up the bidding process for 2022 to single and multi-discipline bids, and not excluding a full Games, we believe that we have created a more enticing formula and the high level of expressions of interest suggests that we are on the right track.”

Following the workshop, which was attended by more than 70 delegates, the process now enters the Candidate Phase, with a 7 June 2019 deadline for the submission of formal bids. A shortlist of candidates will then be drawn up by the end of June, with a draft host agreement provided to each of the shortlisted candidates.

Deadline for receipt of host agreements signed by both the candidate and relevant National Federation is mid-September, with candidates potentially being asked to present their bids to the FEI Evaluation Commission over the following month. Final evaluation of all shortlisted bids will be completed by the end of October, with recommendations provided to the FEI Board prior to allocation at the in-person Board meeting in Moscow (RUS) in mid-November 2019.

History of FEI World Championships

The FEI World Championships have a long heritage, dating back to 1953 when the first Jumping Championships were held in Paris (FRA). The inaugural World Championships in Dressage and Eventing were both staged in 1966, with Dressage in Bern (SUI) and Eventing at Burghley (GBR). Other FEI-governed disciplines followed, with the first Driving World Championships held in Münster (GER) in 1972, Vaulting in Bulle (SUI) in 1986, and Endurance at Pratoni del Vivaro (ITA) in 1986. Reining crowned its first world champions as part of the 2002 edition of the FEI World Equestrian Games™ 2002 in Jerez de la Frontera (ESP). Four years later, Para Driving world championships were hosted in Hellendoorn (NED), with Hartpury (GBR) staging the first Para Dressage world championships in 2007.

In 1990, world championships in each of the FEI disciplines were combined and the FEI World Equestrian Games™ were born in Stockholm (SWE) in 1990. Since then the Games have been staged in The Hague (NED) in 1994, Rome (ITA) in 1998, Jerez (ESP) in 2002, Aachen (GER) in 2006, Kentucky (USA) in 2010, Normandy (FRA) in 2014, and in Tryon, North Carolina (USA) last year.

Despite having two previous bidding rounds for the FEI World Equestrian Games™ 2022, no realistic bids were received and, as a result, the FEI Board last November unanimously approved the opening of a bidding process for individual world championships in all disciplines for 2022, with preference being given to multi-discipline bids. It was agreed that world championships for Dressage and Para Dressage should ideally be combined, and bids to host the full seven-discipline FEI World Equestrian Games™ will also be considered. The world championships 2022 in the Olympic and Paralympic disciplines will serve as qualifiers for the Paris 2024 Games.

FEI contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Communications
grania.willis@fei.org
+ 41 78 750 61 41

Vanessa Martin Randin
Senior Manager, Media Relations & Communications
Vanessa.Randin@fei.org
+ 41 78 750 61 73

A Record-Breaking Year for CHI Royal Windsor Horse Show

Royal Windsor Horse Show (8-12 May) is set to become the UK’s richest show for competitors by offering a record-breaking prize fund at the country’s largest horse show. Showcasing a star-studded line-up in its spectacular setting, the increased prize fund and new additions to the event reaffirm its prominence in the global equestrian calendar and popularity amongst fans.

The annual Show, which has witnessed some truly special moments over the years, combines the highest level of sporting action with an unforgettable shopping and gastronomic experience, and a host of thrilling live entertainment.

World-Class Equestrian Action

Having grown in both stature and importance year-on-year, Royal Windsor remains the only UK event to host first-class international competitions in four of the eight FEI disciplines: Dressage, Carriage Driving, Endurance, and Show Jumping, helping to attract some of the biggest names in equestrian sport, including Olympic, World, and European champions.

Having drawn in six of the world’s top 10 riders in 2018, including the winner of the Rolex Grand Prix and the current world number one ranked show jumper, Steve Guerdat, the heightened status of competition is expected to draw in the world’s best horse and rider combinations in Show Jumping to date. This year’s CSI5* Show Jumping will be held on 10-12 May, culminating with the most prestigious competition, the Rolex Grand Prix on Sunday 12 May. History will be made in Windsor this year as it was announced that the Grand Prix’s prize fund has been increased from €300,000 to a staggering €500,000, bringing the total prize fund to €875,000.

Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping champion, Scott Brash, who will be aiming to emulate Guerdat’s performance last year, commented: “Royal Windsor is like no other Show; it’s set in one of the most spectacular outdoor settings, and attracts an incredibly knowledgeable and informed show jumping crowd. Having such a strong line-up of world-class competitors each year really reflects the Show’s growth and importance. I believe spectators will be in for something special this year and I really look forward to competing.”

Taking centre-stage on the evenings of Thursday 9 and Friday 10 May, and adding to the event’s international-standing, will be the Al Shira’aa CDI4* Dressage Grand Prix and Freestyle to Music. Having previously welcomed a stellar line-up of entries, the Castle Arena expects to host the most dominant forces in Dressage, including Charlotte Dujardin CBE and Carl Hester MBE.

New to the event and adding a splash of invigorating up-and-coming talent to the line-up will be the Pony Club Dressage Championships and the Under 25 Show Jumping competition. Taking place on Friday 10 May and Sunday 12 May, respectively, stars of the future will be going for gold beneath the iconic Windsor Castle in two tightly fought competitions featuring the most talented young equestrians in the country.

One of the most popular events of the week, the high-octane CAIO4* Land Rover International Driving Grand Prix, firmly stands as the one of the UK’s most important Driving events, giving competitors the opportunity to qualify for the FEI World Cup™ Final. Created by The Duke of Edinburgh in the 1970s, the event takes place over four days of the Show and consists of three-phases: Driven-Dressage, the Marathon, and Cone Driving.

On Friday 10 May Windsor Great Park will host the ultimate test for horse and rider – the CEI2* Royal Windsor Endurance Ride. Set around 120km of beautiful Windsor and Ascot countryside, it is one of the most picturesque long-distance rides in the UK.

As the most important Showing competition in the UK, the event kicks off the Showing season with over 120 classes enticing thousands of competitors from across the country. With several new additions to the already extensive programme, including the in-hand pure bred Arab and part bred Arab class, and the Cleveland Bays, which brings Britain’s oldest breed of horse to the showground, it is expected to be the most competitive year yet. All eyes will be on Her Majesty The Queen and her horses, as she attempts to reproduce some of her long list of successes at the Show.

Displays and Performances

Along with the top equestrian sport on offer, ticket holders will be treated to exceptional entertainment across the five-day event. International displays include The Hungarian Csikós, Stunt riders from Azerbaijan, and performers from Oman. From home, The Musical Ride of the Household Cavalry Regiment, The Household Cavalry Mounted Band, and The Musical Drive of The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery will take centre stage in the Castle Arena throughout the week.

Adding some grassroots action and drama to the week’s performances will be the Land Rover Shetland Pony Grand National and the DAKS Pony Club Mounted Games. As firm favourites among crowds, the young age of these competitors will be no reflection of their bravery as they throw themselves into explosive races much to the delight of the spectators.

The Pageant

On the evenings of the 9, 10 & 11 May, Royal Windsor Horse Show will host The Pageant 2019, a musical feast of entertainment which celebrates the 200th anniversary of the birth of Queen Victoria. The 90-minute show will encompass everything from the Music Hall, the Industrial Revolution, Gilbert and Sullivan, Charles Dickens, and our military heritage (The Crimean War and The Great Game). More information about The Pageant 2019 can be found online here.

To book tickets for Royal Windsor Horse Show or The Pageant, visit www.rwhs.co.uk or www.windsorpageant.co.uk. Tickets can also be purchased by calling the box office on 0844 581 0755 from the UK and +44 (0)121 7966 290 internationally. Windsor residents should call the Windsor Information Centre on 01753 743 589.

For more information, please contact:
Gayle Jenkins / rEvolution / gjenkins@revolutionworld.com / +44 (0)203 176 0355

Endurance Temporary Committee Holds Third In-Person Meeting

Lausanne (SUI), 22 February 2019 – The Endurance Temporary Committee held its third in-person meeting at FEI Headquarters following previous meetings with stakeholders. Stéphane Chazel (FRA), member of the elected FEI Endurance Technical Committee, currently unable to function as a full committee, and Dr Martha Misheff (USA), member of the FEI Veterinary Committee, were invited to attend the meeting in an advisory role and share their expertise and insights on the future and sustainability of the sport.

The Committee summarised the conclusions of previous meetings, which touched on a wide range of topics, with the aim of bringing the discipline back to its roots while maintaining its competitive status.

“The input from the Groups and the ability to dialogue with our stakeholders has been an invaluable contribution to the Committee’s deliberations,” said FEI Vice President Mark Samuel (CAN), who attends each of the Temporary Committee meetings to facilitate direct communications with the FEI Board. “We noted a great deal of alignment in thinking on most subjects and a notable spirit of engagement and optimism. The priority now is to distill our work into proposals and topics of interest for consideration at the FEI Sports Forum in April.”

The Committee also discussed rule changes still to be addressed, such as mandatory rest periods, CEI1* distances, tack and equipment, and optimising the performance of FEI Officials, including education, appointments, rotation, and evaluation.

The FEI Sports Forum 2019 (15-16 April) will have a prominent focus on the sport of Endurance, with Day Two sessions dedicated to the ongoing discussions of the “Future of Endurance”. Delegates will be provided with an update by the Temporary Committee as part of the full consultation process prior to voting on proposed Rules amendments at the FEI General Assembly in November.

FEI Media Contacts:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager, Media Relations and Media Operations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Olga Nikolaou
Media Relations Officer
olga.nikolaou@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 56

Endurance Temporary Committee Meets with Stakeholders at FEI HQ

Lausanne (SUI), 21 February 2019 – The Endurance Temporary Committee, set up by the FEI Board in October 2018 to review the discipline with the remit of bringing the sport back to its original roots of Endurance riding rather than Endurance racing, has met with a total of 26 stakeholders representing each of the FEI Regional Groups, World Horse Welfare, and the Alliance of Endurance Organisers.

The purpose of the meetings was to allow stakeholders to provide the Temporary Committee with feedback on a series of topics, including the qualification system, mandatory rest periods, track design covering natural features, number of loops, access to water and proximity of cars, elimination codes, heart rates and presentation times, weight of athletes, officials, increased sanctions for anti-doping violations, limits on number of starters, and continuous crewing.

The European Equestrian Federation (former FEI Groups I and II), together with FEI Group III, was represented in the first of five sessions.

“It was a very positive meeting and it was very important for those who participated, that they were being asked for their contributions,” said Quentin Simonet (FRA), Chair of the EEF Endurance Working Group. “Our position is that we have to tackle the real problems which concern a fairly limited number of people. There are plenty of places where the sport of endurance is going very well.”

Also at FEI HQ for meetings with the Temporary Committee were representatives from Groups IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, and IX.

World Horse Welfare also met the Committee, together with representatives of the Alliance of Endurance Organisers, an affiliate of the International Equestrian Organisers Alliance.

“We are heartened that the FEI is taking the strong initiative to “take back,” in the FEI President’s words, the sport of endurance, placing far greater emphasis on equine welfare in what has been a rapidly growing, but all too often, controversial discipline,” said Roly Owers, Chief Executive Officer of World Horse Welfare. “We hope the committee will come up with substantive, and in places radical, changes to better protect equine welfare and so secure the future of endurance.”

FEI Media Contacts:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager, Media Relations and Media Operations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Olga Nikolaou
Media Relations Officer
olga.nikolaou@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 56

Opportunity Knocks with FEI World Championships 2022 Bid Process

Lausanne (SUI), 13 February 2019 — While 2019 is set to be another busy year for international horse sport, potential bidders are already vying for the possibility of hosting FEI World Championships in 2022. The FEI has already received some exciting expressions of interest for 2022, with more submissions expected before the 28 February deadline.

“I am delighted to say that the level of interest and the quality of submissions to host FEI World Championships in 2022 has been very high so far, and we are confident that we will have an interesting pool of candidates to choose from when the allocations are made later this year,” FEI President Ingmar De Vos said.

The FEI initiated a bid process for individual FEI World Championships in all disciplines for 2022 at the FEI General Assembly in Manama (BRN) in November last year.

The FEI President stressed at the time that this does not necessarily mean the end of the FEI World Equestrian Games™ concept, and bids to host the full seven disciplines together for 2022 will be considered.

The FEI Board unanimously approved the opening of a bidding process for individual world championships in all disciplines for 2022, with preference being given to multi-discipline bids. The Board also agreed that ideally the FEI World Championships for Dressage and Para Dressage should be combined. The world championships for 2022 in the Olympic and Paralympic disciplines will serve as qualifiers for the Paris 2024 Games.

“Equestrian sport has become increasingly globalised, but there are relatively few countries that have the capacity to host world championships in all disciplines simultaneously,” the FEI President said.

“The new bid process allows for the sustainable and cost-effective use of existing equestrian sports facilities and for the FEI to partner with National Federations that may have hesitated putting forward multi-discipline bids in the past. The door is now open for these Federations to consider submitting an expression of interest for an individual world championship in the discipline of their choice.”

In a key change to the bid process, the FEI will host an interactive workshop at the end of March in Lausanne for all National Federations/Organising Committees that submit an expression of interest in the 2022 World Championships.

“This interactive workshop is a key factor in ensuring that we adequately convey the structure, opportunities and minimum requirements of hosting the FEI World Championships 2022. By working more closely with the National Federations and Organising Committees from the very start of the process, we can ensure a unified vision and establish an achievable set of goals to work towards,” Ingmar De Vos said.

There are over 4,000 FEI events organised world-wide annually across the seven disciplines of Jumping, Dressage & Para-Dressage, Eventing, Endurance, Driving & Para-Driving, Vaulting, and Reining, with world championships in the Olympic and Paralympic disciplines held every four years and every second year for non-Olympic disciplines.

Timeline

  • 28 February 2019 – Deadline for receipt of non-binding expressions of interest to host one or multiple FEI World Championship(s) 2022. All information can be accessed here.
  • 26 March 2019 – Workshop to be held in Lausanne after which interested bidders will be invited to submit a formal bid, outlining their plans and visions for hosting FEI World Championships in 2022.
  • November 2019 – Allocation of FEI World Championships at the in-person Board meeting at the FEI General Assembly in Moscow (RUS). All bids will be fully evaluated over the Spring/Summer of 2019.

Questions concerning the bid process can be sent to bidding@fei.org.

FEI contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Communications
grania.willis@fei.org
+ 41 78 750 61 41

Vanessa Martin Randin
Senior Manager, Media Relations & Communications
Vanessa.Randin@fei.org
+ 41 78 750 61 73

Endurance Temporary Committee Holds First In-Person Meeting at FEI HQ

Lausanne (SUI), 12 December 2018 – The Temporary Committee, established by the FEI Board in October to urgently review the Endurance rules in order to address the issues currently affecting the discipline, held its first in-person meeting at FEI Headquarters in Lausanne (SUI).

Dr Sarah Coombs (GBR), who chairs the Temporary Committee, said after the meeting: “Today’s meeting generated really strong and productive debate and, together with input from a broad spectrum of stakeholders, we have already drawn up a list of our key focus areas. Your voices are being heard. We are under no illusions about the challenges of the task ahead, but the future of the discipline is under the spotlight and we will do whatever is necessary to rebuild the trust of our community and restore the image of a discipline that has every right to remain a part of the FEI, provided the rules are adhered to and enforced to ensure that our horses are protected and cheating is stamped out.”

The Temporary Committee has already received a huge amount of feedback from the Endurance Community on a number of key areas, including:

  • Increased testing of horses for prohibited substances;
  • Increased sanctions for horse abuse;
  • Review of speeds;
  • Reassessment of rules on mandatory rest periods;
  • Redefinition of elimination codes (particularly Catastrophic Injury);
  • Elite athlete status and “jockey riders”;
  • Qualifications, including qualification as a combination;
  • Increased completion percentage before allowing upgrade to next level;
  • Reinstate and redefine two-hour invasive treatment rule;
  • Hyposensitivity screening (the use of the FEI Hyposensitivity Control System (HCS) was voted in at last month’s FEI General Assembly for implementation in 2019);
  • Heart rates and presentation times at Vet Gate;
  • Definition of and registration of trainers;
  • Over-training/over-competing;
  • Mandatory medication logbook and out of competition testing;
  • Extended provisional suspension for horses testing positive to Banned Substances
  • Course design
  • Tack and equipment
  • Crewing numbers

This first meeting also provided the Temporary Committee with the opportunity to establish the methodology it will use to fulfil its remit to carry out an in-depth review of the rules that will bring the discipline back to its original roots of Endurance riding as opposed to Endurance racing, with horse welfare and horsemanship at its core, while still maintaining the competitive aspect of the sport. The Temporary Committee also agreed a consultation process that will involve further liaison with stakeholders to avail of their expertise and in-depth knowledge of the discipline.

In addition to the chair Dr Coombs, the other members of the Temporary Committee are Endurance athlete and member of the FEI Athletes’ Committee Tarek Taher (KSA), chef d’équipe of the Dutch Endurance team Pieter Wiersinga (NED), FEI Veterinary Committee member Dr Tim Parkin (GBR), who heads up the scientific research conducted at the University of Glasgow as part of the FEI’s Global Endurance Injuries Study (GEIS), and Valerie Kanavy, a former member of the FEI Athletes’ Committee and the Athletes’ Representative on the Endurance Committee (2014-2018).

FEI Vice President Mark Samuel (CAN) joined the meeting and will facilitate communications between the Temporary Committee and the FEI Board. The FEI Secretary General Sabrina Ibáñez, FEI Endurance Director Manuel Bandeira De Mello, FEI Veterinary Director Göran Akerström, and other FEI staff members also attended the meeting.

The Temporary Committee will hold its next in-person meeting on 15 January 2019 and there will be a dedicated Endurance session at the FEI Sports Forum 2019 (15-16 April) during which the Temporary Committee will provide an update to delegates.

Media contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Communications
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 42

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

FEI Bureau Sets Up Temporary Committee to Create Roadmap for Future of Endurance

Lausanne (SUI), 22 October 2018 — The FEI Bureau has set up a Temporary Committee with a remit to urgently assess the issues currently affecting the sport of Endurance and carry out an in-depth review of the rules in order to identify the most effective way of bringing the discipline back to its original roots of Endurance riding as opposed to Endurance racing, with horse welfare and horsemanship at its core, while still maintaining the competitive aspect of the sport.

The Temporary Committee, which has been established under Article 36.1 of the FEI Statutes*, will be chaired by Dr Sarah Coombs (GBR), a top FEI Endurance veterinarian who has many years’ experience of officiating at FEI Endurance events. Dr Coombs was formerly the British Endurance team vet, is a Trustee of the global equine charity World Horse Welfare and is also chair of its Veterinary Advisory Committee.

The members are Tarek Taher (KSA), an international Endurance athlete and recently-elected by his peers as a member of the FEI Athletes’ Committee; Pieter Wiersinga (NED), Chef d’Equipe of the Dutch Endurance team, a Police Commissioner and former Head of the Mounted Police in the Netherlands; Dr Margaret (Meg) Sleeper (USA), who has competed in FEI Endurance since 2005 and is also a trainer, official veterinarian and veterinary cardiologist; and Dr Tim Parkin (GBR), who heads up the scientific research conducted at the University of Glasgow as part of the FEI’s Global Endurance injuries Study (GEIS) and is a candidate for election as a member of the FEI Veterinary Committee.

In order to underline the importance of this discipline review and to facilitate communication between the Temporary Committee and the FEI Bureau, FEI 2nd Vice President Mark Samuel (CAN) will also be involved in the work of the Temporary Committee.

“We need to bring the discipline back to the principles of the FEI where welfare of the horse and horsemanship prevail,” FEI President Ingmar De Vos said. “The Temporary Committee will conduct a thorough review of the discipline with the aim of getting back to real Endurance riding with the focus on horsemanship and the partnership between horse and human.

“The sport has evolved and there needs to be a recognition of that, but the essence of the sport must remain the same. What we need are rules that place greater emphasis on completion of the event, rather than the ‘win at all costs’ mentality that is more and more threatening our sport.

“We have a strong Chair in Dr Sarah Coombs, who has a long-standing and in-depth understanding of the sport, particularly the horse welfare and veterinary aspects. With this new role she will be helping steer this crucial next step by leading a committee of extremely knowledgeable members that is focused on regulatory change driven by science with horse welfare at its heart.”

Prior to the creation of the new Temporary Committee, the FEI Bureau had received and accepted the resignation of Dr Brian Sheahan (AUS) as Chair of the Endurance Technical Committee due to ill health. His eight-year term in office was due to expire in 2020. The President has thanked Dr Sheahan for his dedication and passion for the sport and wished him a speedy recovery.

In a further development, the Bureau has provisionally relieved Ignasi Casas Vaque (ESP) of his rights and duties as Deputy Chair and Member of the Endurance Committee due to pending legal proceedings for alleged incorrect behaviour at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ 2018.

The FEI Legal Department last week initiated a disciplinary action against Dr Casas Vaque, based on evidence provided to the independent Equestrian Community Integrity Unit during its investigation into the cancelled Endurance event in Tryon (USA) on 12 September 2018. Any additional disciplinary actions against other individuals involved in events at Tryon last month will be announced in due course.

Due to the resignation of the Chair and the pending legal proceedings involving the Deputy Chair, the Endurance Committee is currently unable to function as a full committee. However, the remaining members of the Endurance Committee – Shanie Bosch-Fourie (NAM) (2014-2018), Rocio Echeverri (CRC) (2015-2019) and Stéphane Chazel (FRA) (2016-2020) – will remain as members for their terms and until further notice. The Temporary Committee will be asked to consult with them to ensure their expertise is not lost during the review process.

The Temporary Committee will start work as soon as possible, with the plan to hold a session dedicated on Endurance at the FEI Sports Forum 2019 allowing the Temporary Committee to provide an update to delegates.

*FEI Statutes, Article 36. Other Committees and Sub-Committees

36.1 The Bureau may establish Temporary Committees for particular purposes. The Bureau shall appoint the Chair and members, define the terms of reference and decide the date when any such Committee shall make its report. Any such Committee shall consist of not more than five (5) and not less than three (3) members, including the Chair. A Bureau member who is appointed to any such Committee shall automatically become the Chair of such Committee.

Media contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Communications
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 42

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

McCutcheon Steals the Show as United States Retains Reining Team Title

Cade McCutcheon and Custom Made Gun. Photo Credit ©Sportfot.

Tryon, NC USA – September 12, 2018 – The United States underlined their domination of Johnson Controls Reining competition by taking Team Gold at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon 2018 on Wednesday, September 12. The American team, led by the brilliant 18-year-old Cade McCutcheon on his grandfather’s horse, Custom Made Gun, claimed a comprehensive victory from Belgium in second and third-placed Germany. It was Team USA’s third successive FEI World Equestrian Games™ Gold medal triumph as they claimed the Johnson Controls Reining crown on a team score of 681 points.

Belgium, meanwhile, completed a hat trick of silver medals, while Germany’s bronze was a Reining first for them at WEG.

For Cade, who was joined in the team by Casey Deary, Daniel L Huss and Jordan Larson, it continued the family’s remarkable connection to WEG success, given that his father won Individual Gold in 2010 and his mother Mandy claimed silver four years ago.

“I was real nervous, but all the guys really helped me and that made a huge difference,” Cade said. “My grandfather owns my horse and he’s trained it as well. He is a pretty good owner to work for.”

And Deary added, “Cade did an amazing job. He showed all that he had and we are all extremely proud of the job he did.”

Reflecting on another second-placed finish, Belgium’s Bernard Fonck said, “I think everybody did everything that they could do with their horses and although it was a strong competition, I think Belgium was also pretty strong.”

With the crowd adding to a memorable atmosphere by getting fully involved in the action, there was also plenty for Germany to celebrate as they completed the podium places.

“This is the fifth WEG I have been a competitor at,” said Grischa Ludwig. “All the other competitions we’ve always been fourth and fifth, we’ve been beaten so many times by a half point and one point and now we’ve beaten the others (Austria) by a half point, which makes this feel even sweeter.”

“I did not think that it takes five FEI World Equestrian Games to get a medal! But, in the end, we really deserve it. This team really deserved it. We’ve been consistent. We had no low score and we were really fighting for the medal.”

Endurance Competition Canceled

Competition for the discipline of Endurance at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ 2018 Tryon was cancelled on Wednesday.

Equestrian sport’s governing body, Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI), said in a statement that the decision was made “due to a potentially dangerously high combination of heat and humidity, and the conditions out on the trail following heavy rain this afternoon.”

“The decision to cancel, which is in accordance with FEI General Regulations, Article 109.12 was unanimous between the President of the Ground Jury, Technical Delegate and President of the Veterinary Commission, and the Organizing Committee.”

Earlier in the day, the event was reduced from its original 100-mile (160 kilometers) distance to 74 miles (120 kilometers) – and from five course loops to four – after it was announced that some teams had been “unfortunately misdirected” at the 6:30 am EST start.

The competition was stopped at the first Vet Gate inspection and each horse underwent a vet check before the race could restart. No substitution of horses was allowed.

A restart took place 45 minutes after the last horse was inspected and a statement released on behalf of the FEI read: “As there is no possibility to reschedule the ride tomorrow, the President of the Ground Jury, the President of the Veterinary Commission, Foreign Veterinary Delegate and the Organizing Committee agreed that this was the only pragmatic solution.”

The FEI said the cancellation decision “was also in line with the FEI Code of Conduct for the Welfare of the Horse, which states ‘extreme weather – competitions must not take place in extreme weather conditions that may compromise welfare or safety of the horse’.”

President of the Veterinary Commission, Thomas Timmons, said: “This was a difficult decision to make, but it was done with horse and athlete welfare in mind as the conditions this afternoon after the rain resulted in extremely high levels of humidity and combined with rising heat, it was deemed unsafe to continue the ride.”

British scientist Dr. David Marlin, who has been working on heat and humidity studies for the FEI for more than 20 years, provided the Ground Jury with data from the Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) index which showed a reading of 31. Anything over 25 is monitored very closely, and the officials agreed unanimously that 31 presented an unacceptable risk to horse welfare for the sport of Endurance.

The decision was backed by Netherlands Chef d’Equipe Pieter Wiersinga, who said: “The race was stopped, and I was asked as the Chef d’Equipe if I was okay with the decision.

“I spoke to my veterinary (team) and asked them what they thought. They said that in terms of it [race] continuing that for horse welfare it might be a problem and then I told them I was okay with that. It was the right decision. For horse welfare, yes, always,” he concluded.

In an update, meanwhile, on events in the morning, the FEI said: “Following this morning’s false start, the FEI has tasked the independent Equestrian Community Integrity Unit (ECIU), which is onsite here at Tryon, to do a full investigation into the circumstances that resulted in some horse/athlete combinations being misdirected.

“The investigation will include interviews with the officials, volunteers, Organizing Committee and all other relevant personnel to provide a full picture of what happened.

“The findings will be presented to the FEI Bureau and the conclusions will then be made.”

Germany Marking the Territory for Team Gold in Helgstrand Dressage

Team Germany is reaching out for the next medal in their collection by building up a strong lead in the Helgstrand Dressage discipline at FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon 2018. After two riders out on the first day of competition at Tryon International Equestrian Center, the current champions sit on 76.677%, aiming to complete their medal dozen. Jessica von Bredow-Werndl leads the individual ranking and Dorothee Schneider currently sits in third place with a 75.062%.

Sweden came out as the day’s surprise when veteran Tinne Vilhelmson Silfvén and Juliette Ramel both turned in top performances for ranking their team second on 75.248%. Ramel squeezed in between the favorites on silver position individually, presenting her gelding Buriel K.H. in a much improved way. “Most of that is my trainer’s doing. Patrik Kittel gives me a lot of confidence and he believes in us. That makes me stronger,” Ramel explained.

Adrienne Lyle and Steffen Peters brought the U.S. team to third position. Lyle’s score of 74.581 % has her and stallion Salvino sit fourth individually. “I was really pleased with him, especially considering we warmed up in a downpour and then it’s blazing hot the next second. Fitness is a big factor – he’s a big dark horse and I’ve done my best to get him fit, and I’m glad that I did, because it took every ounce of fitness today,” Lyle beamed.

It was rain and shine at the opening of the Helgstrand Dressage competition, not only because of changing weather. Isabel Cool from Belgium had to retire when her stallion Aranco V quit following her aids, leaving her team without a scratch result.

But, for Australian Alexis Hellyer, day one of the competition already felt like an unexpectedly happy end. The first-timer at WEG had to present her horse Bluefields Floreno for re-inspection only in the morning of the competition and was relieved to find that the stallion was considered fit to compete. “His infection in the foot got better at the last minute. If I am called into the team ever again, I hope it is a little smoother,” she said, placing 23rd in Wednesday’s ranking.

Will the Price Be Right for New Zealand Eventing Couple?

Husband and wife dream team Tim and Jonelle Price will turn their attention to possible world domination of Eventing at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon 2018 (WEG).

The New Zealand riders have enjoyed a stellar season, with Jonelle claiming her first Badminton Horse Trials title in May before Tim landed the United Kingdom’s other major four-star event – the Burghley Horse Trials – in early September.

Now they are part of a New Zealand team that also features double Olympic champion Mark Todd and twice World individual gold medalist Blyth Tait, as they chase a third WEG crown in the Mars, Inc. Eventing.

“It is obviously a different situation here than Burghley,” Tim Price said. “But it was only a couple of weeks ago of being out there with a bit of pressure, and I will keep reminding myself of Burghley.

“But this is very much a team effort, and it is not going to be about one single individual performance.”

Lining up alongside them, though, are a host of teams and riders with serious gold medal aspirations in both the team and individual competitions.

Defending world champions Germany might be without the genial reigning Olympic champion Michael Jung, but it says everything about their remarkable strength that the team still features current world champion Sandra Auffarth and 2017 European Individual Gold medal winner Ingrid Klimke, who was part of German World Equestrian Games-winning teams in 2006 and 2014.

“I am really happy to be here with my horse,” Klimke said. “We are ready for the next adventure. We have a wonderful venue and I am very proud to be here and be a part of it all.”

Great Britain, world title winners in 1994 and 2010, might have seen a major selection surprise with current world number one Oliver Townend not making their team, but few can doubt claims to a podium finish, given the presence of multiple major championship medalist Tina Cook, world number three Ros Canter and 2011 Olympic Test event winner Piggy French.

And the quality is further emphasized by France fielding two members of their Rio 2016 gold medal-winning team in Thibaut Vallette and Astier Nicolas, the United States being led by Rio individual Bronze medalist Phillip Dutton and Australia featuring Andrew Hoy, a three-time Olympic team gold medal winner.

Considerable interest, too, will surround a Japanese team led by the highly experienced and reigning Asian Games champion Yoshiaki Oiwa two years out from the Tokyo Olympics.

A total of 83 combinations from 23 countries were presented at Wednesday’s first horse inspection in front of judges Anne-Mette Binder (Denmark), Jane Hamlin (USA) and Andrew Bennie (New Zealand), with all being accepted.

Belgium’s Joris Vanspringel with Imperial van de Holtakkers was held, but then passed on re-inspection, along with the Netherlands’ Merel Blom and Rumour Has It N.O.P, but they also passed after being held.

For more information on the FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon 2018 and to view start lists and results, please visit www.Tryon2018.com.

Stars from across the Globe Fly the Flag at World Equestrian Games Opening Ceremony

Photo Credit ©Sportfot.

Tryon, NC USA – September 11, 2018 – The FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon 2018 were officially opened with a stylish two-hour ceremony at the Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC) on Tuesday, September 11, 2018.

Some of equestrian sport’s most famous names took a central role for their countries during the traditional parade of flags that highlighted proceedings at a packed Tryon Stadium before a crowd of athletes, grooms, National Federation staff, and spectators. Rising country musician Joe Lasher opened for Grammy-nominated artist Hunter Hayes, while athlete representatives were welcomed into Tryon Stadium to officially commence the start of competition.

Carrying the American flag was dressage sensation Laura Graves, who said, “Tonight is really special for me. It is September 11, so getting the chance to raise this flag was very emotional.

“I am looking forward to a really great next few days of competition. It is going to be exciting for us in Dressage and it looks like all the horses have a terrific venue and great facilities. We are ready to get going,” she continued.

Triple Olympic Team Eventing Gold medalist Andrew Hoy had the honor for Australia and he said, “Last time I rode in a World Eventing Championship in America it was in 1978, so it is absolutely wonderful to be back.

“It is a great honor to be a flag-bearer for my country. I’m looking forward to getting out there and the competition starting.”

Dressage rider Julio Mendoza, who represents Ecuador, but lives relatively locally to the venue, added, “I’m really excited to be here in Tryon. This is my first FEI World Equestrian Games and I am beyond happy to be here representing my country and to have such a great opportunity. To be in the same ring with such amazing athletes and great horses is so exciting and I can’t wait for the competition to get started,” he concluded.

Eventing icon Ingrid Klimke (GER), a winner of numerous major championship medals, did the honors for Germany and she commented, “I am really happy to be here with my horse. We are ready for the next adventure. We have a wonderful venue and I am very proud to be here and be a part of it all.”

China’s Alex Hua Tian is also set to be among the field when Eventing gets under way on Thursday.

“I am here in the U.S. for the first time ever, competing in my second FEI World Equestrian Games. It’s the largest equestrian festival in the world, so to fly the flag for China for the first time ever in Eventing is a wonderful thing.”

Meydan Endurance Set to Launch Competition

Meydan Endurance will have the honor of launching the eighth FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon 2018 (WEG) on Wednesday, September 12. Eight different equestrian disciplines governed by the Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI) will be showcased throughout the duration of the two-week event, which will conclude on Sunday, September 23.

The discipline of Endurance takes center stage from before sunrise, beginning at 6:30 a.m. EST, when competitors tackle a course of 100 miles (160 kilometers) that will traverse through the states of both North and South Carolina.

More than 100 athletes from 40 countries will head into the countryside with the winner expected to return home and across the finish line later in the evening.

The long-distance competition, viewed as the ultimate test of the partnership between horse and rider, is against the clock and tests speed and stamina of both horse and rider, challenging each combination to ensure an effective use of pace and navigational skills of undulating terrains. Mandatory veterinary inspections are required following each course loop, where horses are cooled, their heart rates monitored, and jogged for soundness in order to further continue. Rest periods are also a key aspect of the competition, ensuring horse and rider welfare throughout the 100-mile test.

The Tryon 2018 track will feature the region’s natural and spectacular terrain, starting and finishing on the main TIEC property.

The horse inspection took place on Tuesday afternoon, with a bumper nominated entry list being highlighted by defending champion HH Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed Al Maktoum from the UAE, who won the world title in Normandy four years ago.

A strong finish is also expected of Spain’s Jaume Punti Dachs, who starred when his country won 2010 Team Endurance Gold and is aiming for a top finish in this year’s competition.

Host Nation Aiming to Rein In Their Rivals

It should come as no surprise whatsoever that the United States remains Johnson Controls Reining’s dominant force.  Other countries have barely had a look-in since the WEG first welcomed the discipline of Reining during the early 1990s. The United States has won a remarkable seven titles, with only Canada breaking that sequence 12 years ago.

Reining originates from the working movements of horses and riders when herding cattle and is a judged event designed to show the athletic ability of ranch-type horses in an arena setting.

With large fast circles, flying lead changes, 360-degree spins and sliding stops all required within individual performances, Reining is a truly thrilling spectacle. It is also the only western discipline showcased at WEG.

There is also considerable crowd involvement, with the audience clapping and cheering loudly at every turn as competitors go through their paces. Team USA newcomer Cade McCutcheon, a first time WEG competitor, comes from a long lineage of top Reining competitors, and will take center stage at the international event.

Dark Horses Face Each Other in First Day of Helgstrand Dressage Competition

Dressage is predictable, people say, but it won’t be at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon 2018.

Horses from 31 countries were declared fit to compete on Tuesday following their jog inspection. Discipline competition opens with the Grand Prix over two days and deciding the medals for teams, to be handed out on Thursday. The top 30 move on to the Grand Prix Special on Friday with the top 15 showing their Grand Prix Freestyle to music on “Super Sunday” on September 16, concluding the first week of WEG.

Isabell Werth from Germany might add more gold to the already incredible seven WEG medals she already holds. Werth stunned insiders by her decision not to bring her top horse Weihegold OLD, instead opting to bring her favorite mount, Bella Rose, who has recently returned from a long-term illness.

One of Werth’s strongest contenders will be one of her own teammates. The scores for Sönke Rothenberger and Cosmo have been rising since they were members of the winning 2017 European Championship team for Germany.

The United States’ has hopes set on Laura Graves and her ride Verdades, breathing down the current necks of both Werth and Rothenberger since the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, where they finished fourth, followed by a second-place finish at the FEI World Cup™ Finals in early 2018.

Adding to this roster of elite riders, the defending champion from the WEG in Normandy, France, as Charlotte Dujardin and her new partner, Mount St John Freestyle will represent Great Britain. The mare is only nine and the “dark horse” of the competition. “I’m not sure what to expect, but she’s felt brilliant this far and taken everything on board, so we’ll see what the next few days bring,” Dujardin said confidently.

Team Germany won their 11th World Championship Gold medal in Normandy 2014 and brings a strong squad to Tryon, to complete the dozen. Fourteen other teams will attempt to prevent that, with the USA, Great Britain, the Netherlands and Sweden set to be the most optimistic for a medal.

For more information on the FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon 2018, please visit www.Tryon2018.com.