Tag Archives: dressage

Parra Again Qualifies String of Rising Superstars for USEF Developing & Young Horse Championships

Cesar Parra and Don Cesar, his Developing Prix St Georges contender. (Photo courtesy of digishots.nl)

Whitehouse Station, NJ (June 11, 2018) – Consistency is everything in dressage and since 2012, internationally celebrated rider and trainer Dr. Cesar Parra has been qualifying some of the brightest rising stars in the sport for the USEF Developing and Young Horse National Championships. This season will be no exception.

Dr. Parra and his team are in the process of qualifying five exceptional horses to represent Piaffe Performance and GK Elite Sport in the national championships this August 21-26 during the US Dressage Festival of Champions at Lamplight Equestrian Center in Wayne, IL. “They’re quality horses. I’m in love with all of them,” he says, referring to the extraordinary depth and breadth of talent each horse represents: Throughout the 2018 show year, all five horses – Fashion Designer OLD, GK Don Cesar, GK Sir Beckmann, Supremont, and Furstin P — have ranked nationally at or near the top of their division.

Defending their 2017 title will be Parra and Fashion Designer OLD, currently third on the USEF Developing Horse Grand Prix rankings on a 70.032% average. “He won last year and is destined to be an amazing Grand Prix horse,” he says. “I love bringing young horses like him through the stages and giving them the best chance to bring the best out of them. He’s really a character. In his stall he’s a puppy dog but under saddle, his strength and dominance show through.”

Coming into the USEF Developing Horse Prix St Georges National Championship with a 70.993% are Parra and GK Don Cesar, whom he describes as a “nice, happy horse, who is always willing to please.” Parra has shaped that same willing attitude into the current leader (8.20) on the USEF Young Horse Dressage Six-Year-Old Division leaderboard, GK Sir Beckmann: “Like all the horses qualified this year, he came to us as a three-year-old and is such an effortless performer, with an undeniable talent.”

As confident as her trainer in her own caliber is Parra’s one mare among the qualifiers, Fürstin P, who is in the top three with a 8.140 in the USEF Young Horse Dressage Five-year-old division, ridden by Roberto Brasil and owned by Dr. Heather Hornor. He adds with a laugh, “She’s a prima donna. She knows she’s good and that she’s pretty, and she’s right!” But she’s also not alone. Parra has a second rising star joining her in that division, Supremont, ridden by Merita Hagren and owned in partnership with Dr. Heather Hornor, coming in with a 7.530.

“I’m very proud of all the horses, and excited and grateful to everyone who has been so supportive and nice to us throughout the season. We have consistently qualified to go to the national championships for several years now,” says the Parra, estimating that over the last decade he has trained and ridden more than a dozen horses down USEF National Championship center lines.

Referring to his own deep well of experience competing internationally that he will bring to Lamplight Equestrian Center, the Olympian, Pan American Games Team Gold medalist, Nations Cup Silver medalist, and two-time FEI World Equestrian Games™ and FEI World Cup™ Finals veteran says, “As a rider, the more experience you have of course gives you greater possibilities. Going to the US Nationals with European experience helps (Dr. Parra and GK Don Cesar were the only horse-and-rider pair to represent the United States in the 2017 Longines FEI World Breeding Dressage Championships for Young Horses last summer), as there will be a lot of great riders and horses at our National Championships, so you can’t take anything for granted.

“It would be very rewarding to do well at the national championships and go on to represent the United States in Europe with these horses in the future.”

Consistency, in both Dr. Parra and in the horses he trains, suggests he’ll be keeping his passport handy.

Follow Dr. Parra and all the rising dressage stars he has in training and learn more about his lessons and services at www.piaffe-performance.com and on Facebook @PiaffePerformance.

Contact: Dr. Cesar Parra
GK Elite Sport
(410) 977-8352
www.gk-horses.com

Before Cross Country in Baborówko

Photo: Oliver Townend and Cillnabradden Evo.

It was very exciting day at Equestrian Festival Baborówko. After second part of CIC3* dressage for the prize of the patron of the show Roman Roszkiewicz there is a change at the position of the leader.

In CIC3*, with the total amount of prize money of 80.000 EUR, a new leader is Oliver Townend (GBR) and Cillnabradden Evo. On the second place now is Tim Price (NZL) with Pats Jester. These two riders gave the audience in Baborówko some really great sport emotions. On the third place in CIC3* after dressage is Sara Algotsson Ostholt (SWE) with Wega with only 0,2 points to Tim Price and 1,8 points to the leader of the competition.

Kai Ruder (GER) on Chicago M stands on the pole position after dressage in CIC2*. Second place belongs to Mateusz Kiempa (POL) and Libertina with only 0,4 points to the leader. On the third place is Senne Vervaecke (BEL) with Jeno with 1,7 points to Kai Ruder (GER).

After dressage and showjumping in CIC1* the leader is Yoshiaki Oiwa (JPN) and Bart L JRA. On the second place is now Paweł Warszawski (POL) with Frontiera who did a good ride from fourth place. On the third place before cross country is Anna Doring-Rossler (GER) on Schoccocina.

Maxime Livio (FRA) with Clotaire De Ferivel is the leader of CICYH1* after dressage. On the second place is now Andreas Brandt (GER) with Esra BS with 1,2 points to the leader. Third place belongs to Stephanie Bohe (GER) and Romance P.

Program, start list and results are available at: www.festiwal.baborowko.pl.

More information at:
www.festiwal.baborowko.pl
https://www.facebook.com/festiwal.baborowko/
https://www.instagram.com/eventing_baborowko/

Sara Algotsson Ostholt Is Leading in CIC3 after First Day in Baborówko

In the first part of CIC3* dressage for the prize of the patron of the show Roman Roszkiewicz after twenty competitors on the lead is now Sara Algotsson Ostholt, representing Sweden. The athlete competes with 17yo Wega with whom she won silver medal on the Olympic Games in London (2012). On the second place is Maxime Livio (FRA) with Opium de Verrieres. In CIC3* the athlete competes with three horses: with Vitorio du Montet he is on the 16th place and then he will compete with Pica d’Or. Third place in CIC3* after first part of the CIC3* dressage belongs to Yoshiaki Oiwa (JPN) and Calle 44.

In CIC2* for the trophy of Kuhn Maszyny Rolnicze after first part of dressage on the first place is Kai Ruder (GER) with Chicago M. On the second place is Senne Vervaecke (BEL) with Jeno. And third place belongs to Andreas Dibowski (GER) and Brennus.

Yoshiaki Oiwa (JNP) and Bart L JRAN are leading in CIC1* for the trophy of Lotto. Second place belongs to Aleksander Kadłubowski (POL) with Senior. On the third place is Annemiek Wieken (NED) with Don Vino.

The athletes will compete in the second part of dressage in CIC2* and CIC3* classes. In CIC3* we will see among others the eventing’s world number one Oliver Townend (GBR) and competitor on the third place in FEI Ranking Tim Price (NZL).

Athletes from 15 countries compete in Baborówko and we also have the pleasure to see over 250 horses during the show. Equestrian Festival Baborówko 2018 is held from 24th to 27th of May in Baborówko (Poland). The competitors compete for the total prize money of 100 000 EUR in four international competitions: CIC3*, CIC2*, CIC1*, CICYH1*.

Program, start list and results are available at: www.festiwal.baborowko.pl.

More information at:
www.festiwal.baborowko.pl
https://www.facebook.com/festiwal.baborowko/
https://www.instagram.com/eventing_baborowko/

Gold Coast Dressage Association’s May Dressage Show Outshines the Rain

Dancing their way to a win in the Grand Prix Freestyle, Katrin Dagge and Dream of Love. (Photo courtesy of Joanna Jodko Photography)

Wellington, FL (May 23, 2018) – Rainy days don’t get in the way of the Gold Coast Dressage Association’s show committee and competitors.  The group has been running dressage shows in Wellington, Florida, for more than 35 years. In fact, the Gold Coast Dressage Association, together with the Wellington Classic Dressage winter season shows, were the inspiration for the development of the now legendary 12-week Global Dressage Festival, hosted in Wellington each winter. With so much knowledge behind them it’s no wonder the Gold Coast Dressage Association May Show on May 19-20, held at the Palm Beach Equine Sports Complex, was another successful weekend of competition.

This show featured two international 4* judges, Marian Cunningham and Claudia Mesquita, and USDF “S” judge Sandi Chohany.  Chohany celebrated her birthday during the show, and the show staff got together to celebrate after the day’s work was finished.  With over 106 entries and 184 rides it comes as no surprise that big names such as Adrienne Lyle, Kelly Lane, Marco Bernal, Nicholas Fyffe, Chris Von Martles, Shannon Dueck, and Para Equestrian superstars Roxanne Trunnell, Rebecca Hart, Kate Shoemaker, and Eleanor Brimmer came to support the show.  The highest score ride of the show came from Shoemaker aboard Solitaer 40 riding in the Para Equestrian IV Individual Test, scoring a 76.829%. To see more, follow this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JXxyUOa7x_g.

Noreen O’Sullivan is the busy president of the Gold Coast Dressage Association and manager of the May Dressage show. “We have a really action-packed show, with several FEI riders coming here looking to qualify for the upcoming Central American games. GCDA Secretary Amy Swerdlin & the Palm Beach Equine Sports Complex staff have done a fantastic job as our host facility, with excellent footing, a covered arena, an updated sound system for top notch freestyles and permanent stabling; it makes for fun, friendly shows year-round.” O’Sullivan says the Gold Coast Dressage Association also organizes educational events. “We are going to be doing a USDF educational session in July.” To check out the shows results or see what’s coming up, follow this link: http://www.gcdafl.org/2018_shows_may_dressage.htm.

The Gold Coast Dressage Association’s purpose is to organize and operate educational activities and to foster local and national amateur dressage competition. The Gold Coast Dressage Association continues to educate and promote good sportsmanship and high ethical and moral standards in horsemanship and the equestrian sports. To find out more about the Gold Coast Dressage Association, go to http://www.gcdafl.org.

For more information, contact:
Noreen O’Sullivan
President of the Gold Coast Dressage Association
Show Manager
nosullivan@wellingtonclassicdressage.com
(561) 714-9026

Interagro Celebrates Dressage Success at 2018 Adequan Global Dressage Festival

Zepelim Interagro and Pia Aragao. Photo courtesy of Interagro Lusitanos.

Wellington, FL (May 19, 2018) – Dressage and the Interagro Lusitano sporthorse are naturally synergistic; the intelligent, elegant, and athletic equines pair seamlessly with this sport of power and precision. For over four decades, Interagro has been breeding exceptional dressage horses and in the first few months of 2018, their most recent group of competitive Lusitanos stepped into the dressage arenas of the Adequan Global Dressage Festival to continue that legacy.

Journeying to Wellington, Florida from Interagro’s stud and training center in Itapira, Sao Paulo, Brazil, two stallions owned and currently standing at Interagro blazed a trail of dressage excellence. Zepelim Interagro (Quinarius Interagro x Ordenada Interagro) kicked off his 2018 show season with a 68.315% and a win in the AGDF 7 FEI Grand Prix. Ridden and trained by Pia Aragao, this impressive 16.3h gray stallion exuded a presence of power and poise in his exceptional collected work and elastic extensions. Winning his first US Grand Prix was a fantastic start, and Zepelim kept up the momentum through March in the Grand Prix and made his debut CDI performances in the Grand Prix and Grand Prix Freestyle during week 10.

As the yin to Zepelim’s yang, the 8-year-old Fellini Interagro (Nirvana Interagro x Batina Interagro) stepped out in his first US competition with increasingly spectacular efforts in the Prix St. Georges and Intermediaire I. Capped by a high score of 69.559% in the FEI Prix St. Georges during week 10, the impressive black stallion’s successful US show debut builds upon a decorated Brazilian career in the Young Horse divisions. Also ridden and trained by Pia Aragao, Fellini epitomizes the athleticism, beauty, and movement that have become the hallmarks of the Interagro sporthorse.

“Both Fellini and Zepelim went above and beyond during our Florida winter show season,” said Aragao. “Zepelim made amazing strides in the Grand Prix and continues to improve, while Fellini proved himself to be a consummate competitor and to possess all of the ability and presence of his sire, Nirvana.” Both horses returned to Brazil in early April.

Another Interagro stallion, Belisario Interagro, was also taking home two blue ribbons and other top finishes in the Grand Prix at the 2018 Global Dressage Festival. Owned, trained, and ridden by Kate Poulin of Fair Weather Farm in Chagrin Falls, Ohio, Belisario made his Grand Prix debut in the fall of 2017. Belisario (Quixote Interagro x Urzelina Interagro) was sold to Poulin as a 5-year-old during the 2010 Lusitano Collection International Horse Auction, hosted by Interagro in the US. Under the tutelage of her mother, USEF “S” Judge Sharon Poulin, and US Olympian Debbie MacDonald, Kate Poulin and Belisario posted personal best scores in the national Grand Prix during the 2018 Florida dressage season. “Belisario loves his work and is always so focused,” said Poulin. “This combined with his intelligence and natural talent for piaffe and passage has made him a fantastic Grand Prix horse. He is a true partner, and riding him as given me deeper insight into what dressage is really all about.”

While Interagro’s upper level stallions were taking center stage at the Global Dressage Festival, a number of geldings from the farm’s H Generation were also having success in the dressage arenas of North America. Tyra Vernon of BREC Dressage in Ocala, Florida rode Hadrian Interagro, Hawk Interagro, and Horacio Interagro to many blue ribbons and high point awards. Hawk’s first time out at 3rd Level he was High Point Champion at the Sweetheart Cup in Orlando; Hadrian competed at 3rd and 4th Level scoring 68.3% in his first show at 4th Level. This athletic grey gelding also won a 3rd Level class at the Global Dressage Festival in March. Hawk and Hadrian are now qualified for Regional Championships this fall in Atlanta, and their third Interagro brother, Horacio, recently made his First Level debut with BREC trainer Kerryann Schade, winning the class with 70.8% and putting in one score towards qualifying for Championships. Vernon purchased all three Interagro horses from Brazil with the guidance of US Sales Representative Peter van Borst, and has utilized the Interagro support system not only for pre-purchase exams, shipping, and logistics, but also for training advice and information once the horses arrive in the US. Vernon and her three 7-year-old geldings also attend numerous clinics with world class judges and 5* international judges like Janet Foy, Gary Rockwell, and Henk van Bergen on a regular basis: “All of our clinicians have had so many positive things to say about our Lusitanos and feel they all show great talent and promise as FEI competitors,” said Vernon. “We have started playing with piaffe and passage with Hadrian and Hawk and we are so excited with the quality they show for the Grand Prix. Henk said the only problem with Hadrian is that he wasn’t his! I’m very thankful to Peter and all of Interagro’s team for the opportunity to have such amazing horses. I continue to look forward to working closely with Interagro to supply myself, my trainers at BREC Dressage, and our clients with these top quality Lusitanos!”

Hobbit Interagro (Bungo Interagro x Radiosa MAC), a 7-year-old gray stallion owned by Haras dos Cavaleiros, competed at AGDF with rider and trainer Tiago Ernesto. This athletic stallion was noted for a spectacular canter, as well as his overall beauty and character, and has begun his career as a breeding stallion with Haras dos Cavaleiros. With every score over 70% and a high score of 73% in all of the Second Level Tests at Global, Ernesto stated that he was very happy with the horse’s performance overall and is looking forward to both Hobbit’s future and the future of the stallion’s offspring: “With Hobbit, his character is the most exceptional thing,” said Tiago. “But in addition, he has fantastic gaits, movement, and athletic ability, which makes him a superb competitor as well as sire. We take it day by day with him, but his desire to learn and please the rider combined with his elasticity and talent for collection make him a great Grand Prix prospect.”

For more information on Interagro Lusitanos, Interagro’s horses for sale, or the Lusitano bloodlines, visit Interagro’s website at www.lusitano-interagro.com.

Media contact:
Equinium Sports Marketing, LLC
Holly Johnson
holly@equinium.com
www.equinium.com
+1 954 205 7992

Houston Dressage Society Hosts CDI Small Tour Showdown

Bonnie Canter and Fifinella in the CDI2* Prix St. Georges. Photo by Susan J. Stickle.

The Houston Dressage Society’s (HDS) Texas-sized clash of the Small Tour horses at the Shoofly Farm CDI and Houston Dressage Classic I & II in Katy, Texas was a battle for the books.

Adult Amateur Bonnie Canter and professional trainers Nancy Hinz and Marta Renilla duked it out and each took home a win in the CDI2* Prix St. Georges, Intermediaire I and Intermediaire Freestyle April 27-29 at the Great Southwest Equestrian Center.

Canter led the class of 12 competitors in the April 27 CDI2* Prix St. Georges, where she and her own Fifinella GCF captured the win with a 68.824 percent followed by Hinz on Carzanola with a 67.843 percent and Renilla on Rhustler with a 66.569 percent.

It was the 8-year-old Fifinella’s first Prix St. Georges. Canter wasn’t keen to start the mare’s Small Tour career with a CDI, but she was persuaded to do so in order to support HDS and to be a part of the only CDI in the state of Texas.

“It was all my husband’s idea,” she said of her husband Doug, a member of the HDS board of directors. “But the CDI was a great experience. It was fun to watch all the talented pairs at work, particularly since many of them are good friends. We are lucky to have a super well-run show like this, with this level of competition, in our own backyard. A big thank you to HDS, Shoofly Farm and the other sponsors.”

Canter has owned Fifinella, a 15.1-hand, Connemara/Hanoverian cross (ES Fred Astair-South Ridge Bliss) since she was 2 and has trained the mare up the levels herself. In the last two years, they have won a championship at Second Level and two reserve championships at Third and Fourth Levels at the US Dressage Finals.

“I was happy with the ride and really, really proud of Fifi. Looking at the video you can always see things that you’d like to do better. She is just 8 this year so it’s the very early days for her.”

Since the mare has just started competing at PSG, they did not enter the other Small Tour classes at the Shoofly CDI. Instead they entered the Developing PSG class where the pair earned a 68.897 percent on April 29.

“I hope to nudge her up to I-1 toward the end of the year,” she said. “At this point, she needs the strength and we need to tidy up the loose ends before we move up a level.”

Small Tour Showdown Continues with Intermediaire I

On April 28, with 11 in the class, the standings changed and Renilla claimed the blue ribbon in the CDI2* Intermediaire I on Rhustler with a 68.725 percent to edge out Hinz by a quarter of a percentage point.

“Rhustler is a horse that is just getting stronger and stronger,” Renilla said of her 9-year-old American Hanoverian gelding (Rosseau-Rheporter, Royal Prince). “He’s taking longer than other horses. He can do everything Grand Prix but now he’s starting to show off his power in the small tour.”

The pair has represented Spain twice in the Nations Cup in Wellington, Florida, and in 2017, they earned a team bronze medal there. She said he got a tune-up in late March while in Florida, where she trains with Conrad Schumacher.

“I had Nations Cup and then I was able to have the clinic with Conrad,” she said. “That brought me even more feel of what I am looking for and then at the show I had a plan. Rhustler is a horse who needs his mama. When I’m on his back, the world can explode but he has mommy on top. I think when you have that partnership with your horse, it’s very special. I feel very grateful that he gives me his best every time I ride him.”

Renilla said she will continue training the Grand Prix and enter some recognized shows at that level.

“Canter pirouettes are very easy for him and canter zig-zags are a piece of cake,” she said. “He’s very talented for everything. He can do the tempis for Grand Prix effortlessly. He has big suspension and big gaits but he has to learn to get shorter and quicker behind in the piaffe. Because his gaits are so huge, he’s boing, boing. He’s a dancer. He doesn’t know how to trot average.”

Freestyle Shoot-Out

On April 29, the tables turned and Nancy Hinz edged out the others in the Intermediaire Freestyle on Carzanola, her own 11-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding (Lanola-Tuschinski, Wellington) with a 71.808 percent. Renilla took second place with a 69.933 percent.

“It was really fun,” Hinz said. “It was fun for me because it was good competition. Everybody had good rides and the numbers were close. I had been working really hard to get him ready for the PSG and I-1 and everything paid off. What I like best about that horse is, personality-wise, he is very consistent so I can count on him to do the work he knows how to do. Wherever I take him, it doesn’t matter if it’s inside or outside or noisy or quiet, he’s not reactive to the environment.”

Hinz was quick to praise the HDS for consistently putting on an organized show.

“It’s an amazing group of people. There are a good number helping out and the volunteers are just wonderful. We have some people who don’t even ride who come and learn how to be a ring steward. A mother of one of my students pitches in and she’s not really an animal person and she was happy to run tests to the judges.”

Hinz is particularly fond of the camaraderie of the other professionals at the show and she’s thankful for the support of the competitors as well as her clients. One of her junior riders, Sarah Evans, earned her USDF Bronze Medal at the show on her new horse, Winterstolz.

“She just got him in January and it was her first time competing on him,” Hinz said. “This was her first third level experience. It was just a very exciting weekend for all of us.”

Long-time show sponsor Kimberly Rathmann of Shoofly Farm also had praise for the competitors, show organizers and volunteers.

“It was a great show,” she said. “As always, it was run to perfection. The volunteers work behind the scenes to make it happen and it’s always lovely. We have a wonderful lot of great riders – people coming up to different levels and willing to try things. There’s a lot to be proud of in this group of people.”

Valentino captured blue ribbons in the Grand Prix on both April 27 and 28 with Andrew Phillips aboard.

She was quick to point out that other USDF Group Membership Organizations (GMO) in Region 9 helped contribute monetarily to the show.

“The most important thing about this show is the team of people who put it on,” she said. “They just get it done and it is better every year. We have the most wonderful group of volunteers who work tirelessly – just super-duper nice people. I appreciate HDS. They are just awesome. It’s such a joy to watch people move up and really dance with their partners. I can’t wait until next year.”

For more information, contact:
Chris Renne
President, Houston Dressage Society
president@houstondressagesociety.org

Spectacular Dujardin Dominates on Day Three of Royal Windsor Horse Show

CSI5* Show Jumping kicked off on day three of CHI Royal Windsor Horse Show, with five of the world’s top 10 riders taking to the prestigious Castle Arena over the course of the day. The highlight of the evening performance, the CDI4* Al Shira’aa Grand Prix Freestyle to Music, once again saw Britain’s Charlotte Dujardin and Carl Hester dominate, taking the top two spots for the second night in succession. Earlier in the day, there was a popular victory for Her Majesty The Queen with her homebred mare, Balmoral Mandarin, in the Highland Showing class.

DRESSAGE: FREESTYLE BY NAME, FREESTYLE BY NATURE

Mount St John Freestyle lived up to her name, winning the FEI Al Shira’aa Grand Prix Freestyle to Music. Ridden by Olympic gold medallist Charlotte Dujardin, the pair dominated the class, running away with the victory and was the only one of the 12 combinations to break the 80% barrier with a score of 81.2%.

The nine-year-old mare produced a confident programme that made the most of her off-the-floor paces, impressive passage and extensions.

“That was only her second freestyle and it’s not something we practice at home so I am really happy. Everything she does, she does so well and I can’t ask for more, especially at this stage,” said Charlotte who rode the programme to the music ‘How To Train Your Dragon’ that was originally made for Valegro. “It was Valegro’s very first music and brings back many memories and always gives me goosebumps – and I just love riding to it.”

Carl Hester also chose to introduce Hawtins Delicato to freestyle using a former successful programme, originally used for his Olympic team gold medal horse, Uthopia. Delicato, like Freestyle, however also looked at ease performing to music.

“He felt much more rideable tonight,” said Carl who bought the British-bred gelding as a four-year-old from breeder Judith Davies, and has since bought a sibling. “He is a very exciting horse and at this stage just needs nursing along.”

Former British team rider Gareth Hughes finished one better tonight to make the top three with Don Carissimo and was ‘over the moon’ with the outcome. “That is only his second outing this year and was a whole lot better than the first – he is a real trier,” said Gareth.

Once again the five British riders took the first five places, with British-based Dane Ulrik Moelgaard and Michigan completing the top six.

SHOW JUMPING: D-DAY AT ROYAL WINDSOR AS CSI5* GETS UNDERWAY

Daniel Deusser made a winning debut at Royal Windsor Horse Show, taking the feature class of the day, the 1.50m CSI5* Bahrain Pearl Stakes, in spectacular style. With 16 horses through from the first round, it was an exhilarating jump-off, with an open course encouraging forward riding and leaving no margin for error. As second to go, Canada’s Eric Lamaze and the brilliant Fine Lady 5, one of the fastest combinations on the international circuit, set the pace with a fast and faultless round that was sure to take some beating. Following him into the prestigious Castle Arena, Britain’s Robert Smith, looked like he might pose a serious threat, with an extremely tight turn to the double across the middle of the arena, but he crossed the line in a time 0.58 seconds behind Lamaze, enough for eventual fourth.

As fifth to go in the jump-off, Deusser, riding the fourteen-year-old mare Equita Van T Zorgvliet, rode a beautifully smooth and deceptively fast round to shave 0.15 seconds off the previous fastest time and take the lead, stopping the clock in 37.63 seconds. With 11 riders to follow, the win was by no means certain, but no-one could topple Deusser from pole position. The notoriously fast Emanuele Gaudiano, riding Chalou, posed the biggest challenge as last to go, but despite exceptionally tight turns throughout, his time of 38.22 seconds was only good enough for third place.

Speaking after the class, Deusser said, “I am very happy with my horse Equita Van T Zorgvliet. I know she has a very big stride and is naturally very fast. I saw a bit of Eric’s round, so I knew I had to try hard to beat his time, but everything went well and I’m really happy about that. It’s my first time here at Windsor and I was very impressed when I walked onto the showground; it’s a beautiful showground; there’s a lot of space to ride and it’s great to see such a big crowd on a Friday afternoon. I must say congratulations to the organisers!”

Earlier in the day, it was a Belgian one-two in the opening CSI5* competition of the Show, the Manama Speed Stakes, a 1.45m two phase competition. As first to go, Ireland’s Cian O’Connor set the standard with a double clear aboard Veneno, however compatriot Bertram Allen was the first to lay down the gauntlet, knocking over eight seconds off O’Connor’s time, to put the pressure on the remaining competitors. Belgium’s Francois Mathy Jr, a recent winner at CSI4* Hagen, jumped an impressive round, keeping his foot to the floor throughout and making an exceptionally tight turn to the Big Ben fence at 12, to post a time of 28.93 and take the lead. Crowd favourite, Britain’s John Whitaker, came close to challenging with a time of 30.25, but it was not until the penultimate to go, Wilm Vermeir, riding the twelve-year-old chestnut mare Gentiane De La Pomme, that the lead was jeopardised. Taking a stride out to the planks at 11 and galloping to the last, Vermeir managed to knock 0.27 seconds off Mathy Jr’s time to take the victory.

SHOWING: ROYAL WINDSOR DEBUTANTE TAKES VICTORY

A Welsh Section C stallion was this year’s judges’ choice as Horse & Hound Mountain and Moorland Supreme In-Hand champion. Moorcroft The Master, a 13-year-old bay stallion owned and bred by the Howard family from Wales, looked majestic in the sunshine as he strode away with this most prestigious award.

Janine Sehne’s versatile Connemara mare, Tyan Ma’Lady, was reserve in the capable hands of Sue Deakin, who will partner the eight-year-old in the BSPS Ridden Mountain and Moorland section.

Her Majesty The Queen, who as always took a keen interest in these classes, posted her second win of the Show when her home-bred mare, Balmoral Mandarin, headed her Highland class and stood reserve champion of the breed.

Oxfordshire-based producer Jo Bates clinched The Count Robert Orssich Hack Championship for the second year running with Suzanna Welby’s 2016 Horse of the Year Show (HOYS) champion, Elusive, after some of the strongest classes seen for some years. In the Castle Arena finale, the elegant bay pipped the reigning HOYS victor, Young Lochinvar, who won the Small Height division.

The Martin Collins Enterprises Cob Championship went to Lancashire-based home producer Anne Gilliver after a sparkling performance on Sue Benson’s “low-mileage” lightweight winner, Whitegate Dazzler. Although Anne has ridden at the Show before and judged here three times, this was her first Royal Windsor championship and her joy was clear to see.

“I think a lot of this horse — we don’t show him much but he’s so sensible and straightforward that he takes it all in his stride,” she said of the seven-year-old. “However, you never know what’s going to happen so this is the most tremendous thrill.”

DRIVING: A CLOSE CONTEST IN THE LAND ROVER INTERNATIONAL DRIVING GRAND PRIX

Competitors in the Land Rover International Driving Grand Prix horse pairs class face a close competition after today’s Dressage phase as just five penalty points separate the first four names on the leader board. In first place is last year’s winner here – Lars Schwitte from Germany – who counts his 2017 Royal Windsor win as his most memorable sporting achievement. Driving his KWPNs he drove an accurate test to take the lead less than two penalties ahead of experienced Swiss horse pairs competitor Beat Schenk.

Schwitte’s win was all the more satisfying for him in that he was a late entry. Eager to compete here, he was put on a waiting list by his Federation and the Show, with his entry confirmed only in the last few weeks. As a warm-up, he competed in the Dressage phase at a GB national competition in Essex last weekend where his smooth test impressed those watching. With four international wins to his credit from 2017, he was a member of the silver medal winning team at the Horse Pairs World Championships in Slovenia.

Second-placed Schenk first competed here in 2006, when he won the horse pairs class, repeating this achievement in 2009 and 2011. In 2017, he was third at Royal Windsor, won the international event at Saumur, France and was a bronze medallist at the Horse Pairs World Championships in Slovenia.

Only just behind him in third place is Baroness Amely von Buchholtz from Argentina, a regular competitor here over the years. She took third place in the dressage phase in 2017.

ENDURANCE: ROYAL WINNER AT ROYAL WINDSOR ENDURANCE

Royal Windsor Endurance, supported by The Kingdom of Bahrain, provided another memorable day of sport, and Bahrain itself celebrated a win in the CEI2* with HH Sheikh Nasser Bin Hamad Al Khalifa riding Vipper De Luriecq coming in first in a time of 05:04:48. Portugal took top honours in the CEI1* with Rui Pereira riding a sublime three laps on Bloodie Mary finishing in 03:33:13.

HH Sheikh Nasser Bin Hamad Al Khalifa said, “It was an absolute pleasure to be able to ride in Windsor Great Park today and to be able to shake hands with her Majesty the Queen. What a pleasure, aside from winning, to come here and raise my flag and perform.”

British riders were also out in force with 68 entered across the three classes. One notable success was Carri Ann Dark from Wiltshire, who finished a brilliant third in the CEI1* on former Team GB Gelding, HS Drift.

Tickets for Royal Windsor Horse Show are still available via www.rwhs.co.uk.

Gayle Telford, Revolution Sports + Entertainment
E: gayle@revolutionsports.co.uk T: +44 (0)203 176 0355

Every Day at the Barn Is Mother’s Day

Faye with the Welsh Pony M.E. Don’t Come Back Jack and Eloise with the Andalusian Robusto AF. Photo credit: Gina Falcone/Courtesy of Carlyn Nuyda-Calloway.

In families where parents and children both ride, that experience can be especially fulfilling. That’s what California-based fashion designer and Meditation Studio owner Carlyn Nuyda-Calloway and her daughters, Eloise and Faye, have found. The three are the latest in a line of female equestrians in their family who have shared the connection with horses down the generations, from the East Coast of America to the Philippines and now in Southern California.

“For me, it creates such a strong bond with them. I get to share their joy, and they get to share mine,” Carlyn said of equestrian life with her daughters. “It’s also about teamwork. Sometimes we disagree, but, because there’s a horse involved, we have to agree to disagree. We have to come to a point where we’re all in this together. We are able to finish each other’s sentences beyond the barn partly because we spend so much time together in the barn. It’s made us so much closer as a family. Although my husband is allergic to horses, he does come to the shows and he does his part, too. But the whole thing has definitely created a synergy between me and my girls.

“And it’s just so much fun!”

“Whenever I’m at the barn, and especially when I’m riding, it reminds me that equestrianism is the only sport where your equipment can decide not to cooperate,” said Eloise, 14. “And you can’t really get mad at them when they go against what you want, because it doesn’t really help. I think it teaches us all to sit back and go with the flow. It teaches us to look at the bright side of things and be satisfied with what we have and work through it, patiently.

“It’s definitely strengthened our relationship,” she added. “Being there forces us to ask each other for help. You know, I wouldn’t always want to ask my little sister for help outside the barn, because that’s the way siblings are with each other. But being at the barn, we’re all equal and friends.”

Faye, 11, explained it succinctly. “At the barn, everything is happier!” she said. “We get along much better and can relate to things much better — not saying that we don’t do that at home, but it just feels so free at the barn.”

Carlyn’s mother, Rocio Nuyda, now retired, also frequently accompanies her daughter and granddaughter to the Los Angeles Equestrian Center, where Eloise and Faye ride. In fact, the love of horses has been passed down through several generations of women on Carlyn’s father’s side of the family.

“I’ve always been a horse girl for as long as I can remember,” said Carlyn, who grew up in the Philippines. “My grandmother was an amazing horsewoman, and she was the one who influenced me to really love and embrace that whole world.”

Carlyn came by her love of horses honestly. Her grandmother, Evelyn Rollins Nuyda, brought equestrianism with her when she moved from Washington, D.C. to the Philippines after marriage. “She was an English hunter jumper rider, and she also did steeplechases,” Carlyn said, adding that her grandmother competed for the Philippines in competitions both as an equestrian and as a swimmer. “We never had the opportunity to ride together. I was a young girl when I watched her ride at the Manila Polo Club.”

One day her grandmother told Carlyn, then about five or six, “Someday you’re going to want to ride your own horse.” She handed the girl a belt, as if it were a pair of reins. Holding the ends of the reins — where a bit would go on a real set of reins — Carlyn’s grandmother tugged slightly against Carlyn’s hands. “’That’s what you call contact,’ she said. Then she pulled the belt, and the leather slipped out of my hands. She said, ‘When that happens, you no longer have contact. Now I’ll show you how to hold the reins.’ She put the belt between my three fingers and my pinkie, and then she tugged again, and this time the ‘reins’ didn’t slip. She taught me about contact and also about feel, about give and take. I remember that.”

Throughout much of her childhood, Carlyn’s riding centered around ponies rented for the Christmas holidays. “I would practice that contact my grandmother taught me,” Carlyn said, recalling that her grandmother’s instruction was to use the hands only when necessary, and after applying the seat and leg first.

“In my mind, on those ponies at Christmastime I was a grand prix rider!” Carlyn recalled. “I could be riding the shaggiest pony on an old Western saddle, but I didn’t care — I thought I was a grand prix rider.”

As a young adult, now a resident of Los Angeles, Carlyn began riding lessons as a hunter jumper at the Traditional Equitation School at the Los Angeles Equestrian Center — always mindful of her grandmother’s words on the importance of soft, quiet hands. She later tried some combined training with trainer Linda Bierma, adding beginning dressage to her riding experience, and leased a Hanoverian mare named Schwann. But when she got pregnant with her first child, Eloise, she took a break from the saddle.

Happily, the girls — first Eloise and then Faye — showed signs of loving horses from an early age. “I waited until they were both old enough to start riding with me, and then we started riding together on rented horses. It was my way of getting back to horses and staying all together.”

Eventually, the family fell in love with a Tennessee walking horse named Dixie, who became a horse of a lifetime for Carlyn and her daughters — and found her “forever family,” as Carlyn puts it — after trainer Dana Kanstul allowed Carlyn to adopt the mare.

“The moment I got on Dixie, I felt this rush that overwhelmed me,” Carlyn explained. “It was unlike anything I’ve ever felt in my life, a surge of warm energy. I could feel her talking to me. I fell in love with her. And I knew this was the horse that was going to teach my children to love the whole experience of horses.

“I don’t think they would have become the horsewomen they are without her,” she continued. “She taught them humility and about being gentle and being kind. That was the gift she gave us: to have that reverence for the horse and to understand the privilege of being on their backs. That is not to be taken for granted.”

Eloise and Faye blossomed as young equestrians in their own right, earning blue ribbons or high-point awards in disciplines as varied as saddle seat, Western and English pleasure and equitation, and dressage. Dixie died last October after a long and happy life, but the happy experiences she gave Carlyn and her children have carried on.

Eloise’s focus is now on dressage, in which she has recently been showing at Training Level with her 10-year-old Andalusian, Robusto AF. The family bought “Robbie” from Nancy Latta of Amandalusian Farm.

“The breed is known not only for its long history and beauty, but also for its versatility,” Carlyn said. “They can do dressage, saddle seat, hunt seat, Western — you name it. Our thought was that, since this is her first horse and dressage is very new to her, we’d consider buying a horse who could change his job title in case dressage didn’t turn out to be her cup of tea. He’s absolutely stunning and very kind, and the Andalusian temperament really suits our personalities as a family.”

And dressage suits Eloise well, the young rider says. “I guess you could say this about pretty much every equestrian sport, but it’s the connection between the horse and the rider,” Eloise said. “But, for some reason, in dressage it seems so different. One day I watched a video of Charlotte Dujardin riding Valegro, and I don’t know why, but I just started crying. That’s when we knew I had to do dressage. Everything feels like it’s in slow motion, and there’s almost a kind of telepathy, where we’re reading each other’s minds in slow motion.”

Faye, meanwhile, also began training in dressage on a 25-year-old Welsh Pony named Jack — short for M.E. Don’t Come Back Jack — that the Calloways previously leased from Bryce Quinto at Lehua Custer Dressage.

“It felt like Jack and I were connected, like we were one person,” said Faye. “When I rode him, everything felt like I was in a different, perfect world. It was an amazing feeling. I recently had to end my lease with Jack because our training program has changed, but I will always have a special place in my heart for Jack. He taught me so much, and I’m very grateful.”

Today, the family rides with Tim Keeling at Quiet Canyon at the LAEC.

“I know I’m a mom who is proud of her children,” said Carlyn, “but even back when they were riding rented horses around Griffith Park, Eloise and Faye were constantly connected to the horses. Even if they were talking to each other, they were constantly aware of their horses and communicating with them.”

Carlyn recently acquired an 18-year-old Andalusian, too. “After Dixie’s passing, Amadalusian Farm trainer Sandy Shields offered to have me take over her beautiful horse Centello H,” Carlyn explained. “He has had many years on the show circuit. Having a disability like multiple sclerosis, it’s very important to be able to feel confident and safe around horses. Centello is kind, well-behaved, and a true gentleman to me. He and the kids and I are beginning to bond with one another similarly to the way Dixie did when we first laid eyes on her. He came from heaven, really, thanks to Sandy Shields.

“I ride for pleasure,” she added. “I go out on a hack, and I just love being around the horses.”

That bond between horse and human — and among family, too — is something Carlyn believes will continue to carry on through her daughters, thanks to the experiences they’re all sharing now.

“I like being their cheerleader, and I like being there on days when they feel helpless or despair or when they feel challenged,” she said. “We are sharing our joy together. If they didn’t want to ride, that would have been fine, and I wouldn’t want to be the mom who made them ride if they didn’t want to — it’s not fair to the horse if you’re not committed to them. But I’m glad they did.”

The kids seem glad, too, and they’re appreciate the character-building and the happiness people derive from working with horses.

“When I’m at the barn there are times when I’m doing things and thinking, ‘Oh, why am I having to do this? It’s so irritating!’ or ‘This bucket is so heavy!’” said Eloise. “But then I think to myself, ‘When you get older and have the money to pay for your own things, sure, you can think that. But, right now, you’re not the one who’s doing this for you. Everyone else around you is making this possible: your mom and dad, you sister, your grandmother, your aunts and uncles.’ The reason I’m getting to any of this is because of my family. They’re sacrificing things in their life to make this possible for me.”

Whether you’re a mom or not, Carlyn and family recommend a little barn time. It’s not just for holidays, after all.

“If you’ve got the chance to be with a horse, you’ve got to make it count, because it’s not often you get to interact with one of God’s most majestic creatures at that level,” said Carlyn. “It’s like your soul is entwined with theirs, and that’s so special.”

by Glenye Cain Oakford
© 2018 United States Equestrian Federation

Dujardin Dazzles on Second Day of Royal Windsor Horse Show

International competition got well underway on the second day of CHI Royal Windsor Horse Show. The CDI4* Dressage kicked off with the Al Shira’aa Grand Prix which saw Britain’s best duo, Charlotte Dujardin and Carl Hester, take the top spots aboard their exciting new partners, Mount St John Freestyle and Hawtins Delicato.

DRESSAGE: BRITISH RIDERS LEAD THE WAY

It might have been only the third grand prix together for Charlotte Dujardin and Mount St John Freestyle but it was another winning one. The pair gained their third victory in The Al Shira’aa Grand Prix with Charlotte heading off trainer, mentor and British team mate Carl Hester with Hawtins Delicato.

Freestyle, a nine-year-old mare owned by Emma Blundell of the Yorkshire based Mount St John stud, belied her main ring inexperience impressing the judges with her ground covering paces and relaxed attitude to the atmospheric arena to produce a winning score of 78.58%.

“I am chuffed to bits with her,” said the British Olympic gold medallist. “She’s so chilled and really takes everything in her stride especially as she has really done next to nothing at this international level – I am so, so happy.”

Carl was equally happy with his ride, the British-bred Hawtins Delicato, who was also competing in only his third Grand Prix and was not far behind the winning score – some judges even had the pair of riders and horses on near equal terms.

“You literally have no idea with these young horses how they will react but this is such a good arena and space and does give you an idea of how they will cope with the big occasion,” said Carl who is aiming Delicato for a team place for the FEI World Equestrian Games™ that will be held in the USA in September. “He is such a lovely horse with so much presence and the judges must, like me, also think highly of him.”

Richard Davison rounded off a British one-two-three, taking third place with his homebred Bubblingh (70.8%) while British riders Hayley Watson-Greaves and Rubins Nite, and Gareth Hughes with Don Carissimo were fourth and fifth, respectively.

Iranian rider and Windsor first-timer Litta Soheila Sohi might have finished at the other end of the leader board but was simply thrilled to be competing at the Show.

“I will never forget this moment,” said Litta, who is aiming to compete in the Asian Games in Jakarta later in the year. “This is no ordinary Show – there is so much going on at the same time; it is overwhelming. Just to be a part of it is as good as winning and I am just thrilled to be through to the freestyle tomorrow night.”

SHOWING: ROYAL WINDSOR DEBUTANTE TAKES VICTORY

Royal Windsor debutante Vikki Smith, from Hapton, Lancs, was as surprised as she was delighted to head the largest section of the Show so far. Riding Michelle Cuerden’s 14-year-old traditional stallion Del Boy, Vikki beat more than 100 entries to take the coveted Coloured Ridden Championship, having topped a line of 35 in her Native and Traditional class.

“I can’t believe a traditional pony could have beaten all the plaited horses,” Vikki said, “but Del Boy is an out-and-out showman and just loves his job.”

She now takes her place in Sunday afternoon’s Royal Windsor Ridden Supreme Showing Championship.

Oxfordshire-based working hunter specialist, Rory Gilsenan, went one better than last year to regain the section title he last won in 2016 with Aoife, the Land Rover Lightweight Working Hunter. His partner this time was Christian Kwek’s versatile mare Kenlis Carrera, class winner and reserve Champion last year, whose fluent clear round was one of only seven over a testing course in a strong Lightweight class. A storming gallop in the Castle Arena finale then clinched the overall title ahead of the Heavyweight class victors, Katy Green and I’m a Diamond, who produced one of only two clears in her division.

Sofia Scott, of Norfolk-based Team Hood, partnered her own former flat racer L’Amiral David to win the ROR Tattersalls Thoroughbred Ridden Show Series, and then stand Champion.

SHOW JUMPING: BRITISH DUO VICTORIOUS ON FIRST DAY OF INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION

The opening Show Jumping class of day two, the Land Rover Grades B & C Jumping Competition, went to British Olympic team gold medalist, Ben Maher, riding Eracantos, a horse recently acquired from The Netherlands for which Maher has high hopes for the future. With 12 double clears in the 36 horse class, Maher’s second-half draw proved advantageous as he shaved 0.05 seconds off runner-up Georgia Thame’s round. Tracy Priest, who set the pace from an early draw, finished in third with her grey mare Diamants Aurora.

The first CSI2* Class of the Show, the St George Two Phase, went to Joseph Davison, riding Vilenco, a homebred Je T’Aime Flamenco mare owned by his father, Dressage supremo Richard Davison. Davison’s double clear in a time of 31.20 seconds was 0.14 seconds faster than South African Charles Luyckx in second, with Scarlett Charles, daughter of London Olympic gold medal winning Show Jumper Peter Charles, in third.

Luyckx secured his second runner-up placing of the day in the following class, the CSI2* Thames Speed Stakes sponsored by Suregrow Fertiliser Ltd, which was won by Britain’s Tracy Priest on Caristo VDL. The twisty course allowed riders to take a few risks with tight turns throughout, but it was Priest who negotiated the quickest route to take the victory.

Later in the day, the focus shifted to the young horses of the future, with the Jumping Competition for Six-Year-Old horses. 49 combinations started the 1.20m single phase competition, which proved challenging, with only eight combinations jumping a double clear. William Rekert’s exceptionally speedy round with Hot Bluebird took the spoils, over two seconds faster than Megan James in second, with Alfie Bradstock a further second behind in third.

DRIVING: WORLD-CLASS START FOR WORLD NO.1 IN THE LAND ROVER INTERNATIONAL DRIVING GRAND PRIX

Reigning world champion and eight times Royal Windsor winner, Boyd Exell (AUS), got off to the best possible start in the Horse Four-in-Hands in the Land Rover International Driving Grand Prix, storming to the top of the leader board a clear five penalties ahead of his closest challenger. Driving his mixed team of black Swedish and Dutch horses, his dressage test earned him top marks from all five judges.

“The horses moved beautifully as a team,” remarked President of the Jury, Bert Jambon from Belgium. He continued, “It was an accurate test with, above all, excellent transitions.”

Following him into the arena was Chester Weber (USA) winner at the Show in 2014 and 2015. His bay Dutch horses completed a fluent, forward test, but a few small mistakes put him in second place. Only these two competitors posted scores in the thirties.

In third place, seven penalties behind Weber, is France’s Benjamin Aillaud with his impressive Arab x Friesians. He last competed here ten years ago, after which he took a break from competing horse four-in-hands until just a couple of years ago. GB’s highest placed competitor is Wilf Bowman-Ripley, in 18th place.

Also completing this first dressage phase were the Pony Four-in-Hands which saw last year’s winner Tinne Bax (BEL) take the lead from the Netherlands’ Jan de Boer, who has recorded five previous Royal Windsor wins. Less than two penalties separate these two with Jacqueline Walter (GER) driving her eye-catching palomino team of Welsh Bs taking third place. Great Britain’s Roger Campbell is well in touch in this class in 5th place.

Tickets for Royal Windsor Horse Show are still available via www.rwhs.co.uk.

Gayle Telford, Revolution Sports + Entertainment
E: gayle@revolutionsports.co.uk T: +44 (0)203 176 0355

Dressage Is Tracking Up at the Jacksonville Equestrian Center

Photo courtesy of SDP Photography.

Jacksonville, FL (May 7, 2018) – With top tier arenas, an indoor coliseum like no other in the area and over 400 permanent stalls, the Jacksonville Equestrian Center provides everything a dressage rider needs to enjoy competing with their equine partner.  The Jacksonville Equestrian Center is becoming the go-to destination for dressage-focused equestrians, so it should come as no surprise that in the past month there were two dressage shows and in the upcoming month two more are on the calendar.

Host to the First Coast Classical Dressage Society’s annual shows and clinics, the Jacksonville Equestrian Center, a premier Northeast Florida venue, offers a world-class showing experience to the society’s members. Lisa Beardsley, Vice President of the First Coast Classical Dressage Society, said, “We have been having shows at the Jacksonville Equestrian Center since 2014. Our first year, we held 3 shows.  Since then, we have put on 5 shows a year; all but one have been held at the equestrian center.”

The First Coast Classical Dressage Society plans to stay with the Jacksonville Equestrian Center long-term. “We have dates booked with the Jacksonville Equestrian Center through the end of 2018, and ‘requested to reserve’ show dates through 2020,” said Beardsley. During the Spring Dressage Challenge held April 21, they had thirty entries featuring a unique event called a showposium. “The show was enjoyed by all.  Our judge for the weekend, Cheryl Holekamp, “S”, from Ocala, came up on Friday to host private lessons with our members. Education spilled over into the weekend during our Showposium, with each entry riding their test and receiving immediate feedback and hands on training right afterwards.”

In addition to the Spring Dressage Challenge, the NFDA Schooling Show was held on April 21. The event ran two arenas all day with classes ranging from Western Dressage to Fourth Level test one.  Judges on hand were Charlotte Trentelman and Lisa El-Ramey.

Coming up in the month of May, South East Horse Shows will host the May Day Qualifier on May 12th, and on May 19th NFDA is hosting another Schooling Show.

For more information about the Jacksonville Equestrian Center, visit www.jaxequestriancenter.com.

Jacksonville Equestrian Center
Tim Jones
904-255-4215
tjones@coj.net
13611 Normandy Blvd.
Jacksonville, FL 32221