Live Online Streaming of Baborówko Horse Sale Show

Baborówko, Poland – 25 September 2018 — The organizers of Baborówko Horse Sale Show will prepare broadcasting of international and national competitions that will be held in Baborówko, Poland from 28 to 30 September.

Live online streaming will be prepared for all tests of CIC2* and CIC3* as well as for XC and show jumping of CIC1*.

The timetable of live online streaming of Baborówko Horse Sale Show:

Friday, 28.09.2018
8.30am – 6.00pm

  • Dressage CIC2*
  • Dressage CIC3*

Saturday, 29.09.2018
11.00am – 3.30pm

  • Cross CIC1*
  • Cross CIC2*
  • Cross CIC3*

Sunday, 30.09.2018
11.30am – 4.30pm

  • Show jumping CIC1*
  • Show jumping CIC2*
  • Show jumping CIC3*

The broadcasts will be available on the website of the event (www.bhss.baborowko.pl) and on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/BaborowkoHorseSaleShow/) and YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzfmxVHAbNS8XdcFRmYTV6g) as well as on ClipMyHorse (http://www.clipmyhorse.tv).

More information on:
http://bhss.baborowko.pl/eng/

Qualified Horses and Riders Announced for Washington International Horse Show

Beat Mändli and Dsarie on their way to the win in the 2017 Longines FEI Jumping World Cup Washington. Photo by Shawn McMillen Photography.

Washington, D.C. – Some of the world’s best horses and riders, including the riders on the 2018 FEI World Equestrian Games (WEG) gold-medal U.S. team, are qualified to compete at the 60th Anniversary Washington International Horse Show (WIHS) on October 23-28, 2018 at Capital One Arena in Washington, D.C.

One of the most thrilling and popular events in North America, WIHS celebrates 60 years of top sport and family-friendly entertainment this year by welcoming some of the biggest names in the sport, including Olympians, celebrated hunter riders from all corners of the nation, and rising young stars. The qualifying lists for all divisions, including the Lindsay Maxwell Charitable Fund WIHS Equitation Finals and WIHS Championship Finals, are now available online.

Coming off a historic gold medal at the WEG just three days ago, U.S. riders Laura Kraut, Devin Ryan, Adrienne Sternlicht, and McLain Ward are scheduled to compete at WIHS after bringing home the first ever WEG team gold for the United States. Additionally, U.S. Olympic medalists including 2018 FEI World Cup Jumping Final champion Beezie Madden, Kent Farrington, and Leslie Howard are also qualified.

Seven nations will make up the WIHS international roster, including Australia, Canada, Great Britain, Ireland, Israel, and Switzerland. Representing his home country of Switzerland, Beat Mändli will return to the 2018 WIHS to defend his title in the 2017 $135,000 Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ Washington, presented by Events DC.

“We are honored to host such decorated riders from around the world at the 60th Anniversary Washington International Horse Show,” said WIHS President Vicki Lowell. “Making this year’s event even more special, we are very excited to welcome the U.S. gold medal-winning WEG team to Washington, D.C. It’s the perfect opportunity for show jumping fans and spectators from the D.C. metropolitan area and beyond to come celebrate, cheer on, and even meet the stars of our sport.”

Riders from across the country compete throughout the year to qualify for WIHS in professional, junior, amateur-owner and pony hunter divisions, as well as high and low junior/amateur-owner and open jumper divisions. WIHS welcomes riders from the West Coast, Texas, the Midwest, and all along the East Coast to compete head-to-head.

Qualifiers will be excited to see their name on the list for the coveted Lindsay Maxwell Charitable Fund WIHS Equitation Finals, WIHS Pony Equitation Finals, and the $10,000 WIHS Children’s Hunter Championship, $10,000 WIHS Children’s Jumper Championship, $10,000 WIHS Adult Hunter Championship, and $10,000 WIHS Adult Jumper Championship.

International Riders qualified to compete at the 2018 WIHS:
As of Tuesday, September 25

  • Molly Ashe-Cawley (USA)
  • Erynn Ballard (CAN)
  • Georgina Bloomberg (USA)
  • Daniel Bluman (ISR)
  • Amanda Derbyshire (GBR)
  • Katie Dinan (USA)
  • Kent Farrington (USA)
  • Tracy Fenney (USA)
  • Leslie Howard (USA)
  • Charlie Jacobs (USA)
  • Quentin Judge (USA)
  • Lillie Keenan (USA)
  • Andrew Kocher (USA)
  • Laura Kraut (USA)
  • Peter Lutz (USA)
  • Beezie Madden (USA)
  • Beat Mändli (SUI)
  • Christine McCrea (USA)
  • Alison Robitaille (USA)
  • Devin Ryan (USA)
  • Adrienne Sternlicht (USA)
  • Shane Sweetnam (IRL)
  • Hardin Towell (USA)
  • Mattias Tromp (USA)
  • Catherine Tyree (USA)
  • Aaron Vale (USA)
  • Kristen Vanderveen (USA)
  • McLain Ward (USA)
  • Rowan Willis (AUS)

For more information on tickets and discounts for military, seniors, and students, visit www.wihs.org/tickets.

For more information on WIHS, please visit www.wihs.org.

Contact: Jennifer Wood
jwood@jumpmediallc.com

WEG Athletes and US Gold Medal Team Members Set to Compete at American Gold Cup

Photo: McLain Ward.

North Salem, N.Y. – Sept. 25, 2018 – As a permanent fixture on the calendars of esteemed riders, trainers, show jumping aficionados, and spectators of all ages, the 2018 American Gold Cup is set to take place Wednesday, Sept. 26 through Sunday, Sept. 30 at the breathtaking Old Salem Farm. The annual event is synonymous with world-class international show jumping competition and is aptly located in the horse-friendly county of Westchester in North Salem, New York.

This year’s American Gold Cup will celebrate its seventh anniversary at this incredible venue and its fourth year as part of the Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ North American League. As always, the event is set to host an international lineup of the world’s top equestrian athletes as well as offer a wide variety of family friendly activities and luxury shopping on Boutique Row throughout the week.

Some of the most talented horses and athletes from around the world will be vying for the coveted American Gold Cup trophy on Sunday in the $204,000 Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ New York CSI4*-W, including three members of the NetJets® U.S. Show Jumping Team, who recently won the team gold medal at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ (WEG) in Tryon, North Carolina: McLain Ward, Devin Ryan, and Adrienne Sternlicht. Ryan is also the reigning American Gold Cup champion after winning the title in 2017 on Eddie Blue.

In addition, two-time U.S. Olympic gold medalist and 2018 Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping Final champion, Beezie Madden, will also be in attendance along with fellow U.S. Olympians Margie Engle and Lucy Davis, New York native Georgina Bloomberg, Daniel Bluman (ISR), Mario Deslauriers (CAN), Peter Lutz (USA), Beat Mändli (SUI), Richie Moloney (IRL), Karen Polle (JPN), and Charlie Jacobs (USA), to name a few, representing a total of nine countries around the globe.

Fans will also have the opportunity to meet some of these competitors at an autograph signing session on Sunday, Sept. 30, following the final awards ceremony for the $204,000 Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ New York CSI4*-W on the Grand Prix Field.

Prior to the start of Sunday’s highlight event, there will be a special retirement ceremony for one of Ward’s longtime partners, Rothchild, to celebrate his standout career, which included claiming a team bronze medal and fifth place individually at WEG in Normandy, France in 2014 and the individual gold medal and team bronze medal at the 2015 Pan American Games in Toronto, Canada, among many others.

The American Gold Cup will also showcase fun and entertaining events for families and children of all ages. Beginning at 10 a.m. on Saturday and 11 a.m. on Sunday, younger spectators can enjoy face painting, magicians, a petting zoo, pony rides and more in addition to shopping on Boutique Row. New this year, the next generation of equestrians will get their chance in the spotlight on Sunday as they compete in the Leadline division, presented by Rushy Marsh Farm.

Sunday will feature additional special guests and exclusive events such as crafts and activities with Macaroni Kid Westchester North, the Animal Embassy Show starting at 12 p.m. and the Education Fair featuring the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA) and the Interscholastic Equestrian Association (IEA), presented by Miller & Associates.

For ticketing and more information, visit theamericangoldcup.com.

Janise Gray Retires as EAF’s Director of Grant Recipient Services

Gray (right) with EAF grant recipient Debbie Atkinson, Mary Phelps, and a friend of the foundation in 2007. Photo courtesy of Phelps Photos.

Wellington, Fla. – Sept. 24, 2018 – The Equestrian Aid Foundation announced this week that Janise Gray has retired as the foundation’s Director of Grant Recipient Services. She had held the position for over 20 years.

“For two decades, Janise has been a compassionate advocate for each and every person our foundation has assisted,” said board treasurer Marilou Case. “While we wish her the very best in her new adventures, we will surely miss her presence amidst the day-to-day workings of the foundation.”

A professional equestrian with a background in dressage and eventing, Gray joined EAF’s Board of Directors in 1996 and served briefly as the organization’s Executive Director before taking over the role of Director of Grant Recipient Services. In addition to her service to the foundation’s grant recipients, she was also involved in fundraising and event planning.

The foundation’s grant recipients characterize Gray as a true friend. “So many times I fell down trying to make my legs work, and she would say, ‘Get back on the horse!’” said Joe McCloskey, a farrier who received aid from EAF after sustaining a crush injury. “She was the first person I called when I found a new way to move my legs.”

A resident of New Jersey, Gray’s immediate plans for retirement include focusing on her four-legged children — a trio of Cirneco dell’Etna sight hounds that are both pets and agility athletes. However, the friendships she has forged in the equestrian community will remain a central part of her life.

“I am so proud to have been an integral part of this organization,” said Gray of her years with the Equestrian Aid Foundation. “I have grieved for those we’ve lost and rejoice for all who we’ve helped. I will miss all we have accomplished together to assist our fellow equestrians.”

For more information, please visit EquestrianAidFoundation.org.

Exell Wins Individual Gold as Team USA’s Golden Victory Thrills Home Crowd

Australia’s Boyd Exell (FEI / Liz Gregg)

On a day when the home nation USA secured a stunning victory in the Polaris Ranger driving team competition to round off a triumphant FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon (WEG), Australian driver Boyd Exell proved he remains in a league of his own by securing a third successive individual WEG gold medal.

Despite the valiant efforts of crowd favourite Chester Weber, who showed icy composure to drive his team to gold and also grab individual silver, no one was able to rival Exell from the moment he entered the dressage arena on day one.

First in the dressage, third in the marathon stage despite driving with broken brakes, and second in the closing cones phase, Exell finished with an overall score of 154.14, almost 10 points clear of Weber. Edouard Simonet, the 29-year-old Belgian who was once a back-stepper for Exell, took the bronze medal with a final score of 174.15.

“I love training horses. It is a relief to win, I have a huge team of people who have been with me 20 years.” — Boyd Exell (Australia)

Weber, who also finished second to Exell at the 2014 WEG in Normandy, France, was overjoyed to take an unexpected team title in front of a raucous North Carolina crowd.

“I can tell you it was a surprise. I thought we came here with a chance of a medal but if you had asked me if I was going to have a bet on whether we were going to be world champions, I would have said I am not sure,” said Weber, whose USA team finished with a winning score of 353.39.

Teammate James Fairclough, who introduced Weber to the sport as a 13-year-old, already has an eye on the future after the USA beat the Netherlands, the 2010 and 2014 champions, into second and Belgium into third.

“I hope it’s going to inspire a lot of people to come forward and try the sport. It’s a great boost for us,” Fairclough said.

Basking in the glow of winning a WEG bronze medal to go with their 2017 European team bronze, the Belgium team also served notice of their intention to change driving’s established order.

“We are the future not only of Belgium driving but of international driving,” said Glenn Geerts, who like individual bronze medal winner Simonet is 29 years old, while Dries Degrieck, the third member of the team, is just 23.

In comparison, traditional powerhouses the Netherlands finished Tryon 2018 lamenting unexpectedly poor marathon performances from their often all-conquering father and son duo Ijsbrand and Bram Chardon.

The pair did come out firing on the final day, with 25-year-old Bram Chardon producing the only double clear round. But it was not enough to deliver a third successive team gold.

“We wanted to get our spot back; that spot was meant for us,” said a dejected Bram Chardon.

Click here for full results.

By Luke Norman

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Blum Breezes into Jumping History Books When Clinching Individual Title at Tryon

Simone Blum celebrates winning the Bank of America Individual Jumping title. (FEI/Martin Dokoupil)

Germany’s Simone Blum (29) etched her name into the record books when becoming the first woman in the 28-year history of the FEI World Equestrian Games™, and only the second female athlete in the 65-year history of the World Jumping Championships, to take the individual title when coming out on top in the Bank of America Championship at Tryon, USA.

In a finale that kept spectators on the edges of their seats she produced two more fantastic clear rounds with the extraordinary mare, DSP Alice, to put the result beyond doubt. And it was a super day for the Swiss when Martin Fuchs (26) claimed silver with Clooney and Steve Guerdat (36) and Bianca bagged the bronze.

“This was a perfect day. Alice jumped great for the whole week; she had no fault in five rounds of competition; she was unbelievable! And she’s so careful… she has the biggest heart and I think this week she knew that she could win the hearts of all of the sport… she really wanted this win today!” — Simone Blum (GER)

In pole position as the action began, Blum made Alan Wade’s first-round course, that caught out so many of the other 25 starters, look like a walk in the park. Guerdat was one place off the medal podium in fourth spot and just over a fence off the leader. And he was on fire today with the mare Bianca, never putting a foot wrong but unable to overtake compatriot Martin Fuchs who collected two time faults in an otherwise blissful tour of the track.

When Austria’s Max Kuhner slipped out of silver medal spot with two fences on the floor from Chardonnay then Blum had a fence in hand and Fuchs and Guerdat were now stalking her. She couldn’t afford both a fence and a time fault, however, but she wasn’t quite clear about that going into the US Trust arena for the last time. “Actually, when I came into the course I was so focused that I wondered, ‘can I have one down or not?’ Maybe I should try to ride a clear round!” and that’s exactly what she did, never looking in any danger as the incredible Alice soared high and wide before galloping through the finish with just a single time-fault to add.

Going last and keeping her head is all in a day’s work for the rider who, during her early career, was often specifically chosen as anchor rider on teams because of her coolness. And although this was her very first major Championship, she was selected for Tryon because she has shown incredible form at top level in recent years, winning the German Ladies title in 2016 and then coming out to top the 2017 German Men’s Championship in which the best German ladies are also entitled to compete.

The sense of achievement of all three who were presented with their medals by IOC President Thomas Bach and FEI President Ingmar De Vos was tangible. For Fuchs it was particularly special moment because his 12-year-old gelding Clooney underwent colic surgery this spring, but has made a tremendous recovery.

And 2012 Olympic champion, Steve Guerdat, was elated – hardly surprising as Bianca produced two breathtaking tours of two enormous tracks.

“My biggest pride today is for my horse. We had a few championships where I think she jumped better than any other horse, but we kept just having one down and I always went home a bit disappointed because I really wanted to give her the medal that she really deserves. And I thought it was going to go the same again this year – she was jumping amazing since the beginning of the week; she touched two fences all week… so I tried to get it together today and I’m so proud of her and so happy that today the world can see how special she really is!” — Steve Guerdat (SUI)

When asked if it felt special to have two Swiss riders on the podium, he replied, “Yes, but to have like another brother is even more special! I think everybody knows that I’m the son of Philippe Guerdat and I have an amazing family and I have an amazing brother, but everyone also knows how special Family Fuchs is to me. We train together, we are neighbours, we talk every day. They are like my second family and they treat me like I’m their third son so that makes it as special as it gets!”

For Blum, who also collected team gold on Friday, there is now another very big day ahead. She said she owes her success to her fiancée, Hansi Goskowitz, because “he found Alice, and he is the most wonderful man for me in the world and it’s just because of him I am sitting here! I will marry him in the next four weeks – he will become Mr Blum!”

Full results here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Vaulting Championships Come to an Epic Conclusion

Chiara Congia and Justin van Gerven of Team Germany. (FEI/Martin Dokoupil)

In a breathtaking finale to Vaulting at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ in Tryon, USA, Team Germany, their individual female star Kristina Boe, and Lambert Leclezio from France all took gold under supreme pressure in the Christie’s International Real Estate arena.

Boe, a formidable competitor and ambassador for the sport, now holds the European, World Cup, and World Championship titles.

Her innate story-telling and characterisation have been stand-out characteristics throughout her years of success in the sport.  Her astonishing achievements have been aided by her incredible relationship with lunger Winnie Schlüter and the impressive horse Don de la Mar. Posting an unbeatable combined score of 8.388, she managed to halt the challenge launched by compatriot Janika Derks.

“As a result of the new Nations Team Championships, it is the first time that it is possible to win two medals for an individual.  To come away from Tryon with two gold medals makes me speechless and more than grateful,” Boe said.

“Last night, Winnie and I sat together and said all that we hope for this last freestyle is to do one round in utter harmony, where I can enjoy my performance. I love my music, my whole programme and I didn’t even care what would come in the end. I just wanted to have that one goose-bump round.” — Kristina Boe (GER)

Derks, who took the bronze medal alongside Johannes Kay two days ago in the Pas de Deux competition, came out all guns blazing.  With Carousso Hit and renowned lunger Jessica Lichtenberg, her final freestyle highlighted her impressive strength yet was beautifully contrasted with classical music. Finishing on 8.374, she kept the pressure on Boe right to the end. Bronze went Austria’s Lisa Wild for the second time this week.

The highest freestyle score of the day went to Germany’s Sarah Kay who posted 8.880 in the final test (8.308).  However, her assault on the medals came too late in the competition as she finished on a combined total of 8.308 to line up fourth.

Lambert Leclezio from France dominated the individual male category as his execution, artistic impression, and utter control meant he was in a league of his own. “It is the accumulation of hard work over the past four years. Every day waking up with the end goal of the 2018 World Equestrian Games in mind. It is a real honour to win here for France,” he said. He got a standing ovation from the Tryon spectators as he once again changed the face of the sport.  It was his partnership with Poivre Vert and Francois Athimon that allowed him to perform with such confidence to finish on 8.744.

This lunger and horse partnered Jacques Ferarri to the gold medal four years ago in Normandy (FRA), so it was a very special moment when they did it all over again, but with a new vaulter this time around. Poivre Vert, who has done so much for the sport, will now retire.

“This was his last competition and I had the honour to finish his career. He is an amazing horse and by far the best I have competed with. I spent one year with him; it was short but really intense,” Leclezio said.

“I have had him for ten years and he is an absolute warrior! He is mentally very strong and the most incredible horse – unbelievably reliable.” — Francois Athimon (FRA)

The standard throughout the class was exceptionally high, but it was Germany that continued their impressive form to secure both second and third places on the podium. A second silver at these Games went to Jannik Heiland on Dark Beluga lunged by Barbara Rosiny, who were consistent, fluid and harmonious to finish on 8.606. Fellow-countryman Thomas Brüsewitz claimed bronze supported by Danny Boy who was lunged by 2010 Individual Male gold medallist Patric Looser (8.533), and who managed to overtake yet another of the powerful German contingent, Jannis Drewell (8.509).

The squad championship was a perfect conclusion to an amazing week. With only 0.001 separating overnight leaders Team Germany and Team Switzerland it was always destined to be a nail-biting final and it was the Germans who really rose to the occasion, leaving no doubt that they would walk away double gold medallists from these Games.

With competitors taking to the arena in reverse order of merit, it was the Swiss who were the first of the two big-hitters to stake their claim to the title. But with gold on the line they had some nervous moments and had to settle for silver together with their horse Rayo de la Luz and lunger Monika Winkler-Bischofberger (8.433). However, their head-to-head battle with Team Germany will go down as one of the greatest of all time.

Last to go, the German squad produced a stunning performance of their captivating ‘Now You See Me’ freestyle. With their horse Danny Boy and Patric Looser on the lunge they looked at ease despite the immense pressure and their freestyle, laced with big lifts and eye-catching dismounts, delighted both the audience and judges alike.  By the end of their routine gold was guaranteed (8.638).

It was Team Austria who rounded off the podium, taking bronze alongside Alessio L’Amabile and Maria Lehrmann on the lunge (8.198), with USA in fourth (8.000) and Italy in fifth (7.986).

Results here.

By Hannah Eccles

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Stunning Day of Freestyle Rounds Off Para Dressage Championships

Italy’s Sarah Morganti. (FEI/Liz Gregg)

On the day of the “dancing horses,” The Netherlands’ Sanne Voets became the first ever non-British rider to win three gold medals in one major international championship before team-mate van der Horst put the icing on the Dutch cake by doing exactly the same. And topping off an incredible five days of competition there was a history-making moment when Japan secured its first ever Para Dressage medal at the Adequan© World Para Dressage Championships at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ in Tryon, USA.

Competing in the Grade V competition, and less than two years out from the Tokyo Paralympic Games, Japan’s Tomoko Nakamura and Djazz F scored 73.540 to take a surprise bronze. Nakamura said, “I was so nervous and it went so quickly and I feel so honoured to be in such a big competition.”

An imperious score of 80.150% was more than enough for Great Britain’s Sophie Wells to pick up her second gold of these Games in the grade’s Freestyle. Riding C Fatal Attraction, she finished ahead of The Netherlands’ Frank Hosmar and Alphaville N.O.P. who scored 79.155% to take his second silver.

Speaking after the test, Wells said her horse was “a little bit tense today and on edge but he’s come out this week and given me everything. When you miss out on an Individual Gold [WEG 2014] after training every day it’s hard, but to achieve this after a big gap like I’ve had is amazing. That’s why Rio 2016 was so special because I missed out on the gold in London 2012 too!”

The day started with victory for Sanne Voets, and that first ever non-British triple in the Grade IV competition. Riding her beloved Demantur N.O.P. she scored 79.645% to finish ahead of Brazil’s Rodolpho Riskalla on Don Henrico who posted 77.780%.

“This horse two years ago won the first ever Paralympic gold medal for the Netherlands, and he contributed very much to our first ever team gold medal on Friday, and now he is the first one taking home triple gold for the Netherlands in the World Games. I couldn’t be happier!” — Sanne Voets (NED)

There was double joy for Team USA too, as Kate Shoemaker claimed the bronze on Solitaer with 73.230%. It was the host nation’s second medal of the Games and comes hot on the heels of their amazing fifth place in the team competition.

A stunning display of control and grace by Italy’s Sara Morganti took the freestyle gold in the Grade I competition – her second of the Games. Riding Royal Delight, her horse for the past eight years, Morganti scored 78.867 ahead of Rihards Snikus of Latvia. Snikus, a keen DJ in his spare time, rode King of the Dance to score 76.113% and pick up his first ever global medal, having broken onto international scene at the FEI European Championships in Gothenburg in 2017, where he picked up a silver and a bronze.

“It’s incredible and so big an emotion I can’t even describe it,” Morganti said after waiting for confirmation of her win. “We won three out of three [the pair had the highest score in their grade’s team test as well] and I was hoping for a medal, but I didn’t dare hope for two gold medals. It’s a dream come true and so very fantastic!”

The two wins here at WEG will help Morganti put the disappointment of Rio 2016, when her horse didn’t pass the compulsory veterinary check, behind her. “I needed to come out here with my horse and show how good she is,” she said, “and we worked so hard at home to do our best and she’s improved. The beautiful thing is she continues performing at the top of the ranking and competitions. This is even more than a gold!”

And double US joy turned to triple when Roxanne Trunnel, riding Dolton scored 75.587 to pick up her nation’s third Para Dressage medal by taking the bronze.

There was a huge squeal of delight from Denmark’s Stinna Tange Kaastrup when she saw her score in the Grade II contest. Riding Horsebo Smarties she posted 78.947%% to take the gold ahead of Austria’s Pepo Puch on Sailor’s Blue with 75.500. The Netherlands’ Nicole den Dulk took bronze on Wallace N.O.P. with 74.573 – a replay of the grade’s individual and freestyle contests.

“I don’t think there are any words for how amazing I feel. It’s been out of this world and incredible and much more than we ever hoped for. I’m really proud and really happy. I don’t know what else to say. All the years of hard work make this all meaningful.” — Stinna Tange Kaastrup (Team Country)

The Grade III freestyle rounded off the day and The Netherlands’ Rixt van der Horst joined team-mate Voets as a triple gold winner, scoring 77.437% on Findsley. Continuing the USA’s incredible run, Rebecca Hart added silver to her bronze from the individual on El Corona Texel with an impressive 73.240%. Germany’s Angelika Trabert continued her return to the sport by taking the bronze on Diamond’s Shine, with a score of 71.840%.

“It has been such an amazing year for the Netherlands. I have no words for it, both in terms of me and what the team did!” van der Horst said.

But there was high drama when Great Britain’s Paralympic Champion Natasha Baker was thrown from her horse, Mount St John Diva Dannebrog, during her test, eliminating her from the competition. “My ego was bruised and so was my backside,” she joked afterwards, “but at least I landed on the centre line!”

So at the end of a brilliant week of competition, The Netherlands sits comfortably atop the overall medal table, with five golds, two silvers and two bronzes, followed by Great Britain with two golds, and one silver. Denmark is third with two golds and a bronze, while Riskalla’s two silvers give Brazil the fourth spot. The USA sits fifth with one silver and three bronzes.

Results here.

By Rob Howell

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Brakes Off but Pressure Was On for Untouchable Aussie Boyd Exell

Boyd Exell with his carriage of horses Celviro, Checkmate, Daphne, and Zindgraaf. (FEI / Christophe Taniere)

Not even broken brakes could prevent Boyd Exell (AUS) from tightening his grip towards a third successive individual gold medal as the Polaris Ranger driving marathon test delighted the packed crowds at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon (WEG).

The Netherlands’ notorious marathon specialist Koos De Ronde won the day with his score of 117.28 points, helping him jump 10 places in the overall individual standings to sit fourth with just the cones test to come. But nothing could stop the relentless Exell from once again grabbing the headlines.

The Australian noticed early on that his braking system was compromised and yet still the 2010 and 2014 WEG Individual champion managed to get round the Richard Nicol-designed course in a score of 121.93, the third best of the day. That was enough to extend his overall lead to 7.00 points over second-placed Chester Weber.

“It caused a problem in hazard one; we came in hot because there is a big long gallop into gate A and we drifted too wide and they (the horses) looked to the left rather than being able to square up the turn – that was a bit disappointing hazard one, gate A, first mistake,” Exell said, with a wry smile.

“Hazards three, four and five are all up and down dips, so the reins were around my head one moment and then on the floor and then round my neck. But we fought. We didn’t give up; we kept fighting all the way.” — Boyd Exell (Australia)

Home favourite Weber kept up the pressure on the all-conquering Australian with a controlled display, backed up by an intricately planned strategy designed to combat the searing heat and humidity.

“We have done a lot of studying of lactate levels and heart rates to try and get the horses ready for this,” Weber explained. “When the temperatures get hotter, the heart rates get higher and lactates grow. We trained them at home (Florida, USA) with gallop sets – you can actually train them to drop their heart rate.”

Hitting his pre-planned targets all the way round, Weber brought home his carriage in 125.51, the fifth best score of the day. The 29-year-old Belgian Edouard Simonet sits just behind him in the overall standings, after adding a confident marathon drive to his solid dressage score.

A protégée of Boyd Exell’s, Simonet is a real threat to the big two with his favoured cones test to come.

“I love the game, so let’s play tomorrow,” Simonet said.

Dutchman De Ronde’s magnificent drive saved what was otherwise a disastrous day for the men in orange. Father and son Ijsbrand and Bram Chardon both made significant, uncharacteristic errors dropping the Dutch, winner of the team competition in 2010 and 2014, down to third in the standings. Team USA leads on 338.55 points, more than 15 points clear of Team Belgium.

“It was terrible. It’s a big disappointment for us both but eventually it will make you stronger and for now we have to keep the team together,” said Bram Chardon. The 25-year-old was 18th quickest on the day with his father just two places better off.

Click here for full results.

By Luke Norman

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
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Lawsuit Filed to Stop “Barbaric” BLM Wild Horse Sterilization Experiments

Citing violations of the U.S. Constitution and three federal laws, an alliance of wild horse protection and animal welfare advocates filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court in Portland. The groups seek to enjoin the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) from proceeding with controversial and dangerous surgical experiments to remove the ovaries of wild mares at BLM’s Wild Horse Corrals in Hines, Oregon.

The complaint was filed on behalf of The Cloud Foundation (TCF) and its executive director Ginger Kathrens, who is also the Humane Advocate on the BLM’s National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board; the American Wild Horse Campaign (AWHC); the Animal Welfare Institute (AWI); and wildlife photographer Carol Walker, who is also a Director of Field Documentation for the Wild Horse Freedom Federation, by Nick Lawton of the public interest law firm Meyer, Glitzenstein and Eubanks LLP.

A key demand of the legal action is the right to meaningful public observation and video recording of the experiments to improve public awareness of how the BLM is treating these federally protected wild horses and help the public inform BLM that this inhumane form of sterilization is not socially acceptable.

“To date, the BLM has refused to allow a meaningful opportunity for media or the public to observe and record these procedures,” said Nick Lawton of Meyer, Glitzenstein and Eubanks. “The BLM’s refusal to allow meaningful access to observe and record these experiments thwarts the important newsgathering objectives that Plaintiffs aim to achieve by observing and documenting the BLM’s treatment of wild horses, and thus violates Plaintiffs’ rights under the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.”

The legal action also alleges that the experiments, which involve performing an outdated surgical procedure called ovariectomy via colpotomy (a blind surgery in which a veterinarian inserts his arm into a mares’ abdominal cavity through an incision in the vaginal wall, manually locates the ovaries, then twists, severs and removes them using a rod like tool with a chain on the end) are unscientific, inhumane, and dangerous, and will result in pain, suffering, and potentially life-threatening complications for wild mares.

Video of the procedure, which has been called “barbaric” by equine veterinarians, can be seen here.

This is the BLM’s second attempt to conduct research on the surgical removal of the ovaries of wild mares. In 2016, AWHC and TCF sued to uphold their First Amendment right to observe the experiments, a major objective of which was to determine the social acceptability of the procedure. The BLM cancelled the experiments, which it intended to conduct in partnership with Oregon State University — instead of providing public observation.

In its renewed attempt to conduct the research this year, the BLM dropped the objective of determining social acceptability in order to avoid providing meaningful observation. Instead, the BLM is offering limited observation through the doorway of a room adjacent to the surgical suite on a first-come, first-served basis with no independent veterinary observation provided.

When the agency re-released the sterilization research proposal, the BLM announced that it would be conducting the experiments in conjunction with Colorado State University (CSU). The University was to provide expertise in monitoring and assessing the welfare impacts of the surgeries on the wild mares. However, in August, CSU withdrew from the project. Instead of finding another academic institution with expertise in animal welfare monitoring and assessment, the BLM dropped CSU’s scientific observation of animal welfare from its study design.

Then, on September 13, 2018, the BLM announced that it was moving forward with the spay feasibility study despite opposition from the public and veterinarians, a warning from the National Academy of Sciences that the procedure was “inadvisable” due to health risks, and after two major research institutions – CSU and OSU – ended their affiliations with the project.

As soon as next month, the BLM plans to start rounding up 100 percent of the wild horses in the Warm Springs Herd Management Area in southeastern Oregon. An estimated 685 horses will be permanently removed and another 100 mares will be surgically sterilized. The experiments carry a high risk of mortality from bleeding, infection and evisceration (fatal protrusion of bowel through the surgical incision) and will subject pregnant mares to risk of miscarriage and associated complications. (More details on the BLM’s plan can be found here.)

“It is unconscionable to conduct invasive and dangerous surgeries on wild mares, ripping their ovaries out with a chain, destroying their fetus, then returning them out into a dirt corral with little to zero pain management before releasing them into the wild,” states Ginger Kathrens, Executive Director of the Cloud Foundation and the Humane Advisor on the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board. “This is a rare, last ditch operation in the world of domestic mares. I would hope we, as a society, are beyond this kind of cruelty, particularly when humane, safe, and scientific alternatives to control wild horse reproduction have existed for decades.”

Contact: Lisa Friday, Director of Communications
lisa@thecloudfoundation.org| 804-389-8218

The Cloud Foundation
107 South 7th St
Colorado Springs, CO 80905
www.thecloudfoundation.org

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