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FEI President Celebrates Top Equestrian Sport and Clean Games at Rio 2016

By on September 1, 2016

Lausanne (SUI), 27 August 2016 – FEI President Ingmar De Vos had double cause for celebration after confirmation that all human and equine samples taken during the Rio 2016 Olympic Games had returned negative.

“Keeping our sport clean is a central part of our daily work at the FEI, but to have back-to-back clean Games in London and Rio is something for any sport to be proud of, especially as we were testing for more substances than ever before,” the FEI President said. “And that’s on top of absolutely brilliant equestrian sport in Rio, so we really have something to celebrate!”

A total of 60 equine samples – 30% of the 200 competing horses – were tested during the Games. The samples were sent to the FEI’s Central Laboratory in Newmarket (GBR), one of the five FEI Approved Laboratories worldwide, with the final batch of results returned to FEI Headquarters.

Human testing, which is conducted by the IOC during the Olympic Games, also returned 100% negatives for the equestrian athletes that were sampled.

“The sport in Rio was just incredible,” Ingmar De Vos said. “Two Olympic champions not only successfully defended their London 2012 titles, but they did it on the same horse, which is a fantastic achievement. Germany’s Michael Jung won with Sam in Eventing, and the British combination of Charlotte Dujardin and Valegro topped an all-female podium in Dressage, just as they had four years ago in front of their home crowd. And the IOC President Thomas Bach was there to see them do it.

“Switzerland’s Steve Guerdat was also bidding to do the same, but he hit the first fence in the jump-off for gold with his 2012 winner Nino des Buissonnets to finish fourth and out of the medals.

“So we finished the Games with a six-way battle against the clock and Britain’s Nick Skelton, became the oldest Olympic Jumping champion in history at the age of 58, taking gold with Big Star. Both Big Star and Nick Skelton have to overcome serious injury problems, so it shows that strength of character and determination really are key to winning at the highest level, no matter what the sport.

“And our team competitions were just as thrilling. France took team gold in both Eventing and Jumping. The Eventing team win was the first gold of the 2016 Games for France, and the winning French Jumping team included Philippe Rozier, son of Marcel Rozier, who was on the gold-medal team in Montreal 1976, so there were lots of very proud French supporters!

“Germany has always been the team to beat in Dressage. They had 12 Olympic team golds coming into Rio, although the British had claimed the title in London, but things were back to normal this time with Germany out in front, and by a distance!

“We owe a huge debt of thanks to the Rio 2016 organising committee. They were working in very challenging circumstances, but they produced a fabulous venue that provided the perfect stage for our equestrian events, and which will be ideal for the Paralympics as well.

“We couldn’t have asked for more exciting sport and now to have confirmation that clean sport and fair play have also come out as winners is the icing on the cake! I couldn’t be happier!”

Equine Testing

Equine testing was conducted by the FEI at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games under the FEI Equine Anti-Doping and Controlled Medication Regulations (EADCMRs). Samples were tested for more substances than ever before.

All individual medallists’ horses were tested, plus all fourth-placed horses. Additionally, at least one horse was tested from medal-winning and fourth-placed teams. Random testing was also carried out, with horses being picked by computerised selection, and there was also targeted testing.

Human Testing

For human testing across the Games, all top four finishers, plus two other athletes selected at random, were tested by the IOC, along with other individuals selected at random.

FEI Clean Sport

The FEI’s Clean Sport campaign, started in 2010, is part of an ongoing educational outreach programme designed to simplify the FEI anti-doping regulations, which are based on World Anti-Doping Authority (WADA) principles.

This online communication campaign, which is available in eight languages (English, French, Chinese, German, Arabic, Russian, Spanish and Portuguese), is aimed at athletes, grooms, team and personal veterinarians, and other support personnel and includes key information on prohibited substances, the Equine Anti-Doping and Controlled Medication Regulations, the testing process, and all related resources.

http://inside.fei.org/fei/cleansport

Hashtags
#Equestrian
#Dressage
#Eventing
#Show Jumping

FEI Media Contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Press Relations
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 787 506 142

Shannon Gibbons
Manager Press Relations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

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