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Margie Engle and Royce Dominate $205,000 Holiday & Horses Grand Prix CSI 4*

Margie Engle and Royce. Photo Credit ©AnneGittinsPhotography.

Wellington, FL – December 1, 2018 – Margie Engle (USA) and Royce dashed to a well-deserved victory in the $205,000 Holiday & Horses Grand Prix CSI 4* presented by Palm Beach County Sports Commission at Palm Beach International Equestrian Center (PBIEC). Engle and Royce were the only pair to finish the evening with a double clear effort, securing their win ahead of Susan Horn (CAN) and Lillyfee, who captured second place with a time of 60.14 seconds in the jump-off. Eduardo Menezes (BRA) and H5 Quintol rounded out the top three placings with four faults and a time of 49.32 seconds.

Engle and Royce are a notorious pair on the international competition circuit and with their win this evening, concluded one of their best seasons together yet as a partnership. Engle and Royce looked in top form, besting a class of 37 entries, finishing faultless in both the first round and the jump-off. The course, designed by Anthony D’Ambrosio (USA), saw rails fall throughout class and proved difficult for most entries.

“He’s been showing lightly for the last few months and has really only done big shows, probably for the whole year. I think this is only his second show that wasn’t a CSI 5*,” explained Engle. “I’ve been able to save him a little bit with Dicas coming up and the young ones. He’s quite fresh.”

Emphasizing their attentiveness to flatwork over the past few seasons, Engle commented that their efforts are beginning to pay off in the ring, as Royce’s rideability has drastically improved as a result of their commitment to dressage work.

“It’s nice because he’s been home for a little over a month and Lisa Wilcox helps work with him on the flat and whenever she works with him, he goes that much nicer,” she chuckled. “She helps me with the flatwork with quite a few of the Grand Prix horses. She does an unbelievable job and it makes my job that much easier.”

The duo is concluding a banner year together, which featured top results in nearly each of the major international competition they attended. With her new mount, Dicas, on the rise, the balance it has provided for Engle works in Royce’s favor.

“He’s felt great all week. Earlier in the week I was able to do him in the smaller class. I did the 1.45m and he was double clean and jumped great. I was able to save him and use Dicas in the qualifier and Royce jumped great under the lights and fresh. I honestly think he jumped better in the jump-off. The more I started kicking him at the jumps the higher he got.”

While the pair has been a staple combination for the United States for the past few years, Engle feels that her and Royce are beginning to hit their peak as a pair, both growing together and developing a much stronger bond in the past twelve months.

“He’s really matured. I know it sounds funny, but we’ve both matured a little late together. He’s just starting to get the rideability so nice. He’s getting more manageable and he’s really become seasoned and it’s made my job quite a bit easier. He’s always had the jump and been super careful, super powerful, but we lacked in the rideability, but now he’s riding nice so it makes my job easy.”

The two-round format of the class brought the top twelve combinations back to contest the short course and Engle knew that she sat in an enviable position with Royce heading into their final round.

“I knew going into it that there was only one more behind me that was clean and the one ahead of me that was clean had one down. I know Marilyn [Little] is very fast with Clearwater and I had better take a shot, so that even if I had one down, I’d at least get a good piece of it. I was just going to go medium fast, but the further we got around course the better he felt, so I just went with it. It felt like he was getting into so I went with it and keep going.”

For more information on PBIEC and the ESP Holiday Series, please visit www.pbiec.com.

Elliot, Libby, Stutes, Smith Selected for Jacqueline B. Mars National Competition and Training Grants

Sydney Conley Elliot competing at Great Meadow International. Photo: Shannon Brinkman Photography.

Gladstone, N.J. – Oct. 4, 2018 – The United States Equestrian Team (USET) Foundation is pleased to announce this year’s recipients of the Jacqueline B. Mars National Competition and Training Grants: Sydney Conley Elliot, Emilee Libby, Frankie Thieriot Stutes, and Tamra Smith. The grants are awarded to eventing athletes who have been identified as having an impressive record and potential to represent the United States in future international competitions. These four riders will be traveling to the East Coast to attend The Dutta Corp. Fair Hill International CCI2* and CCI3* Oct. 18-21 in Fair Hill, Maryland.

Elliot, of Bossier City, Louisiana, has been diligently training and competing with her partner of five years, Cisko A. The talented pair earned themselves a spot on the Tier 2 Training List after they performed the only double-clear cross-country round for the U.S. Nations Cup team at Great Meadow International in The Plains, Virginia, in July.

“It is such an honor that we have all the support from Mrs. Mars and the USET Foundation,” Elliot said. “It means a lot to up-and-coming riders who are trying to get where they need to go and especially for me being so far away and removed from the eventing community. It is such a huge help.”

She continued, “This is going to be our second go at Fair Hill. The last time we ran around [Fair Hill International] was leading up to Kentucky in 2016 so we’re hoping to improve upon the dressage and again have clean cross-country [rides] and hopefully no time [penalties] or rails in show jumping. That would be lovely. I feel like with the help of Phillip Dutton and Erik Duvander, we should be able to put our best foot forward. A lot of us could not do this without the help of the USET Foundation. The support they give all of us and the horses is absolutely incredible.”

Libby, of Temecula, California, made her mark on the eventing scene when she jumped around a CCI4* at just 18 years old before moving to California to source and develop top event horses.

She brought her current mount, an 8-year-old Belgian Warmblood named Jakobi, through the ranks and her dedication to his training recently paid off as he moved up to Advanced Level in May.

“I’m blown away,” said Libby. “I’m so, so happy. It kind of feels like a weight lifted off my shoulders. Doing what I’m doing now, I will be able to come to the East Coast and compete. I was a little bit indecisive originally a few months ago on whether to just come out for Fair Hill or come out early and run at Plantation. My gut was telling me to come out early and run on the grass and spend a few weeks conditioning back here on the East Coast before going, but it was going to be hard to do because I have a business back home and I have horses in training.”

Libby continued, “[The grant] is a huge, huge help. I would like to say a huge thank you to Jacqueline Mars and the USET Foundation for this opportunity. These grants are wonderful to have available to riders in the United States. I’ve had [Jakobi] for a few years now and we have quite the relationship. I think he is going to be more than ready.”

Stutes of Occidental, California, has had immense success at the CCI3* level with two top four finishes aboard her partner Chatwin, a 10-year-old Oldenburg by Contendro. The gelding, who Stutes has had since he was coming 6 years old, has never had a cross-country jumping penalty in 16 FEI starts.

“I feel incredibly honored to be chosen for this grant,” said Stutes. “It’s hard for me to even express my gratitude to the USET Foundation, Mrs. Mars and the US Equestrian (USEF) selection committee for their support and belief in Chatwin and me.”

She is especially looking forward to competing at Fair Hill International as it will give her an idea on whether she and Chatwin are ready for the CCI4* level.

“Having done Bromont and Rebecca Farm, I feel like Fair Hill is the next step in deciding whether or not we’re ready for a CCI4* next year or if we should stay at the CCI3* level longer since neither of us have ever contested a CCI4* and Chat is still just 10,” said Stutes. “Additionally, it’s an opportunity to compete against the best riders and horses in our country and see how we measure in terms of our competitiveness amongst them.”

Smith, of Temecula, California, also received the Jacqueline B. Mars National Competition and Training Grant in 2017 and is excited to see where the opportunity takes her this year with her horse, Mai Baum. The talented pair won the Fair Hill International CCI3* in 2015.

“Firstly, being able to have the opportunity to have the financial support is huge. We’re out on the West Coast so we travel all the way East and we have already been here for a month. It takes a significant amount of time, money and effort to come out here. [The grant] really enables us to financially be able to handle it a little bit easier. It is wonderful. It not only helps solidify that what you’re doing is on the right track, but it helps offset the costs of spending three months out here.”

In regard to Mai Baum, a German Sport Horse gelding, she said, “I feel like he has a really bright future and I’m super lucky to have him as a horse in my string. He won Fair Hill in 2015 and then had an injury, but he has come back even stronger and better. I’m super excited to now be able to go to Ocala and show what we’ve got.”

Having the support of the USET Foundation as well as Jacqueline Mars is also something that Smith is grateful for as she continues on her path towards representing the United States at the highest levels of eventing.

“It is tremendous. Their support not only helps you make yourself believe that there are people behind you, but it also helps as my goal is to ride on the United States Olympic team, so to have the USET Foundation and Jacqueline B. Mars support that is just one step closer to getting to where we are trying to go,” Smith expressed. “We want to try to be the best and get the U.S. team even better, so to have their support is unexplainable. I’m so grateful for it.”

Smith also expressed her gratitude for the USET Foundation’s support as she received another grant from Jacqueline B. Mars that will allow her to travel to Boekelo, The Netherlands with her mare, Fleeceworks Royal, to compete on the Nations Cup team.

“I just want to thank them not only for Mai Baum’s grant but also for the grant given to Fleeceworks Royal. I am so grateful for everything,” she said.

Make sure to follow these athletes as they compete at The Dutta Corp. Fair Hill International CCI2* and CCI3* Oct. 18-21 by visiting www.fairhillinternational.com.

For more information on the USET Foundation, visit www.uset.org.

Contact: Rebecca Walton
phone 561.753.3389 fax 561.753.3386
rjw@phelpsmediagroup.com

Stunning Day of Freestyle Rounds Off Para Dressage Championships

Italy’s Sarah Morganti. (FEI/Liz Gregg)

On the day of the “dancing horses,” The Netherlands’ Sanne Voets became the first ever non-British rider to win three gold medals in one major international championship before team-mate van der Horst put the icing on the Dutch cake by doing exactly the same. And topping off an incredible five days of competition there was a history-making moment when Japan secured its first ever Para Dressage medal at the Adequan© World Para Dressage Championships at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ in Tryon, USA.

Competing in the Grade V competition, and less than two years out from the Tokyo Paralympic Games, Japan’s Tomoko Nakamura and Djazz F scored 73.540 to take a surprise bronze. Nakamura said, “I was so nervous and it went so quickly and I feel so honoured to be in such a big competition.”

An imperious score of 80.150% was more than enough for Great Britain’s Sophie Wells to pick up her second gold of these Games in the grade’s Freestyle. Riding C Fatal Attraction, she finished ahead of The Netherlands’ Frank Hosmar and Alphaville N.O.P. who scored 79.155% to take his second silver.

Speaking after the test, Wells said her horse was “a little bit tense today and on edge but he’s come out this week and given me everything. When you miss out on an Individual Gold [WEG 2014] after training every day it’s hard, but to achieve this after a big gap like I’ve had is amazing. That’s why Rio 2016 was so special because I missed out on the gold in London 2012 too!”

The day started with victory for Sanne Voets, and that first ever non-British triple in the Grade IV competition. Riding her beloved Demantur N.O.P. she scored 79.645% to finish ahead of Brazil’s Rodolpho Riskalla on Don Henrico who posted 77.780%.

“This horse two years ago won the first ever Paralympic gold medal for the Netherlands, and he contributed very much to our first ever team gold medal on Friday, and now he is the first one taking home triple gold for the Netherlands in the World Games. I couldn’t be happier!” — Sanne Voets (NED)

There was double joy for Team USA too, as Kate Shoemaker claimed the bronze on Solitaer with 73.230%. It was the host nation’s second medal of the Games and comes hot on the heels of their amazing fifth place in the team competition.

A stunning display of control and grace by Italy’s Sara Morganti took the freestyle gold in the Grade I competition – her second of the Games. Riding Royal Delight, her horse for the past eight years, Morganti scored 78.867 ahead of Rihards Snikus of Latvia. Snikus, a keen DJ in his spare time, rode King of the Dance to score 76.113% and pick up his first ever global medal, having broken onto international scene at the FEI European Championships in Gothenburg in 2017, where he picked up a silver and a bronze.

“It’s incredible and so big an emotion I can’t even describe it,” Morganti said after waiting for confirmation of her win. “We won three out of three [the pair had the highest score in their grade’s team test as well] and I was hoping for a medal, but I didn’t dare hope for two gold medals. It’s a dream come true and so very fantastic!”

The two wins here at WEG will help Morganti put the disappointment of Rio 2016, when her horse didn’t pass the compulsory veterinary check, behind her. “I needed to come out here with my horse and show how good she is,” she said, “and we worked so hard at home to do our best and she’s improved. The beautiful thing is she continues performing at the top of the ranking and competitions. This is even more than a gold!”

And double US joy turned to triple when Roxanne Trunnel, riding Dolton scored 75.587 to pick up her nation’s third Para Dressage medal by taking the bronze.

There was a huge squeal of delight from Denmark’s Stinna Tange Kaastrup when she saw her score in the Grade II contest. Riding Horsebo Smarties she posted 78.947%% to take the gold ahead of Austria’s Pepo Puch on Sailor’s Blue with 75.500. The Netherlands’ Nicole den Dulk took bronze on Wallace N.O.P. with 74.573 – a replay of the grade’s individual and freestyle contests.

“I don’t think there are any words for how amazing I feel. It’s been out of this world and incredible and much more than we ever hoped for. I’m really proud and really happy. I don’t know what else to say. All the years of hard work make this all meaningful.” — Stinna Tange Kaastrup (Team Country)

The Grade III freestyle rounded off the day and The Netherlands’ Rixt van der Horst joined team-mate Voets as a triple gold winner, scoring 77.437% on Findsley. Continuing the USA’s incredible run, Rebecca Hart added silver to her bronze from the individual on El Corona Texel with an impressive 73.240%. Germany’s Angelika Trabert continued her return to the sport by taking the bronze on Diamond’s Shine, with a score of 71.840%.

“It has been such an amazing year for the Netherlands. I have no words for it, both in terms of me and what the team did!” van der Horst said.

But there was high drama when Great Britain’s Paralympic Champion Natasha Baker was thrown from her horse, Mount St John Diva Dannebrog, during her test, eliminating her from the competition. “My ego was bruised and so was my backside,” she joked afterwards, “but at least I landed on the centre line!”

So at the end of a brilliant week of competition, The Netherlands sits comfortably atop the overall medal table, with five golds, two silvers and two bronzes, followed by Great Britain with two golds, and one silver. Denmark is third with two golds and a bronze, while Riskalla’s two silvers give Brazil the fourth spot. The USA sits fifth with one silver and three bronzes.

Results here.

By Rob Howell

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

EAF Salutes Julie Ross for Her Longstanding Commitments to the Equestrian Community

Photo: Julie Ross with her son Robert Ross.

Wellington, Fla. – July 5, 2018 – As the mother of a professional rider who worked his way up through the ranks, Julie Ross has a keen understanding of the equestrian community from her view at the periphery. She knows about the drive and dedication of the equestrian community.

Ten years ago, Julie Ross, mother of Equestrian Aid Foundation co-founder and board member Robert Ross, made a commitment to the equestrian community. “I asked my son what he wanted for Christmas.  He said he would love it if I made a donation to the Equestrian Aid Foundation,” said Julie. “So I did, and I have not stopped as it feels pretty good to give and contribute to the Equestrian Aid Foundation.”

Through her unwavering monthly commitment, Julie has singlehandedly funded over 100 doctors’ visits for horsemen whose lives and livelihoods depended on the care they received during times of medical and financial crisis.

“Her contributions help ensure Equestrian Aid Foundation has the funds to get critically ill and injured equestrians back on their feet and, in most cases, earning a living by doing the work they love,” said board member Scot Evans.

Julie is the motivation for the Equestrian Aid Foundation’s Change Rein Monthly Giving Program, an initiative that encourages members of the equestrian community to donate on a monthly basis.

“Each month your spare change can effect a huge change for an equestrian struggling to become self-sufficient again,” said Janise Gray, Director of Grant Recipient Services. “As one of our recipients told me, you’re not giving a hand-out; you’re giving a hand up.”

For questions about the Change Rein Monthly Giving Program or help setting up your donation, please contact Janise Gray at Janise@EquestrianAid.org.

For more information, please visit EquestrianAidFoundation.org.

Marilyn Little Maintains Lead in USEA Advanced Gold Cup Division

Marilyn Little and RF Scandalous. Photo Credit ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – September 2, 2017 – The fourth day of the 2017 USEA American Eventing Championships presented by Land Rover and Nutrena® saw another large group of divisions conclude with impressive show jumping rounds, while the remaining horse and rider combinations tackled their cross-country courses at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC). Riders from the Novice divisions and a single Preliminary division were honored and recognized with final awards, while the Beginner Novice, Intermediate, and Advanced divisions will conclude Sunday, September 3.

Adequan® USEA Advanced Gold Cup

Marilyn Little and RF Scandalous produced a double clear show jumping round to keep a tight hold on their lead in front of an enthusiastic crowd, as they head into the final phase of cross-country in the Adequan® USEA Advanced Gold Cup division. The pair made easy work of the track underneath the lights to remain on their score of 27.8.

“I’ve jumped a lot of classes in this ring, and it’s been a lucky ring for me so far,” said Little. “I hope I get luckier, but it’s been a great experience. It’s special to get to bring Scandalous in here to take center stage; she deserves this so it’s cool for me.”

In preparation for jumping under the lights, Little arranged for RF Scandalous, a 12-year-old Oldenburg mare (Carry Gold x Richardia) owned by Jacqueline Mars, Robin Parsky, and Phoebe & Michael Manders, to travel with her show jumping string to Balmoral Park in Chicago, IL to contest an evening class.

“I actually drove her to Chicago so I could do a night class. I was really glad that I did because it also affected her quite seriously in the warm-up area. She’s just a smart horse and she was a little nervous in the ring under the lights last time, so I didn’t know if she was still going to be that way, but, she’s such a smart horse and she’s a good partner, so she took what she learned and came out really solid tonight.”

Jennie Brannigan continues to sit in second place aboard her longtime and veteran mount Cambalda, a 15-year-old Irish Sport Horse by Balda Beau out of Cathys Lady and is owned by Nina Gardner. Brannigan, who managed an unusually sensitive “Ping” in the warm-up, encountered some trouble before heading into the ring, but produced a nearly foot perfect round to hold their placing on the leaderboard.

“I had an interesting warm-up. I don’t think I’ve ever jumped that horse under the lights before. He was quite fresh and I thought that was going to be a good thing. I warmed up with Phillip and he was building square oxers. I don’t know if it was the combination of the lights, but I crashed into a jump and fell on my hand,” she explained.

“I know that horse well and I haven’t had a bad warm-up like that ever, but he jumped well, so that’s good. He’s consistent, so I was a little worried about what he was going to do, but he jumped great once we got out in the ring.”

Angela Bowles traveled all of the way from the state of Texas to contest the 2017 USEA American Eventing Championships presented by Land Rover and Nutrena® and was thrilled with her rise up the leaderboard on Bliss III, an 11-year-old Dutch Warmblood mare (Corland x Lenja) owned by Alyssa Phillips. The pair was holding fifth place following dressage, but a strong show jumping round propelled them up the leaderboard where they now occupy third place.

“I’ve been helping Alyssa with Bliss since we imported the horse about three years ago, and I’ve ridden her on and off throughout that time as Alyssa has been transitioning from high school to college. I recently retired my upper level horse and Alyssa has been super busy with school. She has two other horses to ride, so she was really gracious to let me have the ride on her,” explained Bowles. “We targeted this because we were qualified, so we came and I’ve show jumped the horse a lot. I like to do ‘A’ shows in Texas and I’ve done a couple of grand prix classes on the mare. I did the Wellington Eventing Showcase on the mare, so I know her very well and it’s a big atmosphere.”

The pair’s last Advanced level outing together was at The Colorado Horse Park earlier in the month, so Bowles is excited to test the track at TIEC to better gauge where their blossoming partnership stands. She added, “I’m going to go have another look around the course tomorrow. I don’t know the mare as well at this level, so our first Advanced cross-country was a month ago in Colorado. I’m going to get out there in the morning and then make a plan from there.”

Boehringer Ingelheim Open Intermediate

Jennie Brannigan has been busy gathering top finishes across multiple divisions throughout the week, and called this afternoon’s cross-county run a success. “Today was good. I ate some Mexican food, took a nap and woke up to watch Lynn and Donner ride at Burghley on the replay, and I was like, ‘All right, let’s go fast.’ And they’re both cool horses. They’re both only seven years old.

“I’ve always believed in Twilightslastgleam. He loves cross-country and is a Thoroughbred, so he’s quite natural at it. He’s got a smaller step, so there’s a lot of options for doing different strides on this course, so I actually did one set of strides on one horse and one on the other, which is different for me,” she commented.

Brannigan learned that Twilightslastgleam had risen the ranks to first place while she was already on course with FE Lifestyle. “You’re always wondering whether to go for time or not. On FE Lifestyle I knew I was tied for first, but on Twilightslastgleam I wasn’t sure, and then I decided to have a crack at it anyway,” she said. “So we’ll see how tomorrow goes. Both of these are exciting horses for the Gardiners, because we need the future, and they are the future, and it’s cool to see them stepping up to the game and into the spotlight,” she concluded.

Charlotte Collier, aboard Parker Collier’s Clifford M, an 11-year-old Holsteiner gelding (Cristo x Naomi IV), sits in third after finishing with 3.6 time penalties on cross-country, improving her first day rank by two.

Novice Horse

The Novice Horse division saw Booli Selmayr and Thomas Duggan’s Kildare’s MHS Tampa, a 5-year-old Irish Sport Horse mare (Quintender x Lady Ligustra)remain in first place throughout all three phases of competition to finish on top of the division.

“The course today was so nice,” said Selmayr. “It flowed so nicely, made you think a little and not just gallop around. It tests the obedience and the stamina of the horse.”

Despite only working with this horse since the spring, Selmayr says that the young mare has taken to the atmosphere of Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC) remarkably well.

“We got here Monday after a 15.5-hour drive from NY, so I was interested in seeing how she was going to be this weekend. It’s such a big atmosphere and she’s just five, but she’s been so calm the whole time. She’s such a competitor and she’s such a workhorse. She doesn’t really get flustered by anything,” she explained.

Next, the pair will finish off the year with Young Horse Championships at Fair Hill. “After that we will take her down to Aiken, and I definitely think she can do a 1* next year. She’s a classy mare and she has the breeding to be a top-level horse, and as long as she’s still happy doing that, that’s what we are going to do.”

Ashley Giles and her own Chayenne, a 6-year-old Trakehner mare (Elfado x Charima), also stayed consistent throughout all three phases to finish in second place. Giles explained that she qualified for this week’s competition aboard Chayenne after competing and winning their first show together with a broken back.

“I got this mare back in November and I was coming back from a three-year eventing hiatus. I started bonding with her, and then we entered our first horse trial. The day beforehand, I broke my back and didn’t figure it out until after I’d competed. She’s a fabulous horse and won that horse trial, and then we qualified, which was our goal all along.”

Coming into the course, Giles was feeling the pressure, she said, but her mount performed beautifully nonetheless. “She was fabulous yesterday, and I thought the cross-country course was super fun, and I loved [how it twisted]. It was super fun to ride. I had never been sitting in this position before going into the final phase, so I was pretty nervous going into show jumping, but she went in, and she did her job. She’s a brilliant horse. Every day that I get to sit on her, I feel lucky,” she concluded.

Jennie Brannigan rode Justine Dutton’s Arctic Tiger, a 5-year-old British Sport Horse, to a third-place finish, moving up from their previously-held fourth place rank and posting two double clear rounds.

“Unfortunately Justine is hurt, so she asked me to take the ride. I had only sat on him twice before this week, and it’s his first AEC, so I know that she was really happy. I’m happy that she trusts me enough to take him out,” said Brannigan. “He’s a great mover, and this was a lot, since it’s a big atmosphere. He was a little nervous out on cross-country, but I was really impressed with him today. He went out and stepped up to the plate,” she concluded.

Novice Amateur

Bailey Snyder and her own Corina, a 7-year-old Holsteiner mare (Acorino x Phaedre), cruised through the show jumping phase to remain at the top of the Novice Amateur division, maintaining the first-place slot they had occupied since Thursday’s dressage test.

“Going into dressage she was just being a star, despite the weather and the rain, and she put in a really good test followed by a super confident cross-country round, so today there was definitely some pressure,” she said. “It’s a great division and scores were all really high, so my goal was to just go in and do the best we could. It was awesome and she was a super star.”

The pair has been climbing the ranks in eventing since Corina came to Snyder as an unbroken four-year-old, and she’s excited to see where they go from here.

“I’m going into my senior year of college, so my goal with her is to just keep her happy and healthy. I’m up for whatever she is confident enough to do. We’ve got an easy fall planned after this, and then we will look to the spring to get to some good shows that we can travel to and see some more exciting venues. We will definitely come back to Tryon to see what she can take on. She’s still a young horse so we are trying to get her more confident and ready to move up,” she concluded.

Savannah Welch and her own Langcaster, an 8-year-old Oldenburg gelding (Languster x Galiffi), maintained her second-place status throughout the week despite a hectic effort to save her horse from the path of Hurricane Harvey. “We are from Houston, so we kind of just threw the horse in the trailer and say ‘we are leaving NOW,’ two days early,” she said.

“It takes him a while to get used to everything because he is also young and is still learning how to settle in with situations like this. With dressage, he did everything right, and I couldn’t have asked more of him,” she commented. “We bought him as a four-year-old that didn’t really know anything and my trainer and I have taken him along, improving his scores and working on his confidence. Now we are just taking his education step by step.”

As a senior in college, Welch said it’s sometimes difficult to keep a strict competition schedule, but she plans to end her fall strong, adding, “Maybe we’ll compete in more Novices and hopefully move up to Training next year,” she concluded.

Krissy Smith Shellenberger and her own Invictus, a 7-year-old Holsteiner gelding (Ibisco x Viness SH) rose from fourth place to claim the third-place slot with a four-fault show jumping round.

Novice Rider

Ryan Bell and Way Jose, a 14-year-old Thoroughbred (Jose x Riverside Charmer) owned by Karen Czarick, climbed to the top of the leaderboard in the Novice Rider division at the 2017 USEA American Eventing Championships presented by Land Rover and Nutrena®. Bell, a dressage competitor that recently began eventing, won the division on his dressage score of 25.8.

“I was a dressage rider and I got bucked off a couple of dressage horses, so I got a little nervous riding my own horses and I thought ‘Okay, I really need to push myself out of my comfort zone.’ So, what’s more out of a dressage rider’s comfort zone than eventing? So here we are,” commented Bell. “It feels amazing,” he continued. “I’m a little shocked because I didn’t think it would happen. I think I got lucky, but I tried really hard and did the best I could, so I’m really happy that it all paid off.”

Lenora Evan Hollmann moved up in the standings following cross-country and rode a double clear round aboard her own Christian Grey, a 7-year-old PMU gelding. “He’s such a trier,” said Hollmann, “He’s always there for me. I want to move up to Training with him, but for now we are just having so much fun together enjoying the moment.”

Hollmann adopted the gelding as a 3-year-old from LastChance Corral in Ohio. “LastChance Corral got him at about a week old and so he was a bucket fed baby, and he was sold to me only with the description, ‘has done parades.'”

Liza Bunce and Gail Bunce’s 17-year-old Appendix Quarter Horse gelding, Chance, started out the competition in ninth and made a climb throughout the weekend to end up in third place, adding nothing to her dressage score of 27.3. Of her experience at AEC, Bunce said, “It’s been a great weekend. It’s wonderful for my horse to get this exposure. The course was incredible; the footing was amazing. We really don’t get too much of the opportunity to go from the arena to grass back to the arena. It was so different but so worth coming here to compete.”

Master Novice Amateur

Megan Northrop maintained her first-place position throughout the phases aboard her own Fleur De Lis, a 7-year-old Thoroughbred mare, to finish on top of the Master Novice Amateur division.

“Show jumping tends to be my weakest phase, and I felt a little rattled coming in on the top. My mare jumped so great yesterday,” she said. “She has grown so much this year. I knew she was brave and I knew that if I just left her alone a little bit, she would go. She got a little too forward on me a couple of times today, and I had to correct that, but for the most part, she did what I asked and I’m really proud of her for that.”

Sarah Wildasin and James Wildasin’s Totally Awesome Bosco, a 17-year-old Irish Sport Horse gelding, improved their third-place spot to finish in second. “I was just very happy to remember where I had to go,” she commented. “My horse is amazing and does everything. I just have to steer and go along for the ride!”

Jenny Brinkley and her own Guinness X, a 17-year-old Irish Sport Horse gelding, rose from fifth place after cross-country to collect third in the division final. “I have one of those once in a lifetime horses,” she said. “I did the first AEC that they ever held, and then topped out at Preliminary level with him. He was so talented that my trainer took him through Advanced, and then my daughter took him out at Intermediate and was very successful at Young Riders with him,” she continued. “[My daughter] went off to college and then I got him back, and my goal was to get back here to AEC. Now, I’m just happy to be here.”

Junior Novice

Sunny Courtwright and her 9-year-old Irish Sport Horse mare, Around Midnight, were crowned the final champions of the 2017 AEC. Courtwright lead the Junior Novice division from start to finish on her dressage score of 23.5.

“Marble was really good today. I just can’t believe this,” said an awe-struck Courtwright. “I loved the course. I was just worried about the distractions, but she was perfect. This whole week has been so fun. It’s gone by so fast and I’m sad it’s going to be over soon.”

Courtwright and third place finisher Suzanne Stevens both ride out of Mike Huber’s Gold Chip Stables in Fort Worth, TX. “It’s really fun to be here with Sonny and my other barn mates from Texas,” commented Stevens.

Kira Cibak and her own October Tryst had a clear round in the show jumping to move them from fourth to second. She and the 11-year-old Morgan gelding finished on their dressage score of 27.8. Cibak said, “This was my first AEC so I was really happy with my horse. We are going to try to move to Training, we are going to try to move up and see where that goes!”

Suzanne Stevens and her own Smokin’ Boots, a 7-year-old Thoroughbred mare (More Smoke x Miss Boot Scoot) ended in third on a 28.8. “This is the biggest show my horse has been to, so it’s been a great experience for the both of us. She’s come so far,” Stevens concluded.

Beginner Novice Horse

Amanda Ruane and her own Bally Lord Who, a 9-year-old Irish Sport Horse gelding, maintained their lead in the Beginner Novice Horse division, mastering the track and continuing on their original dressage score of 22.3 to hold top honors heading into show jumping.

“He felt so good today. Cross-country is always his favorite phase,” said Ruane. “The biggest thing with him is that he’s 17hh. He’s a big horse, so we need to work on not eating up the time so quickly. A couple of times I had to check my watch and then say ‘Okay, let’s take a breather and tone it down a notch.’ He’s bold and brave, and he’s a really fun ride.”

Beth Stelzleni and Mighty Handsome, a 5-year-old Thoroughbred gelding (Mighty Magic x SPS Whitney) kept their second-place position with a score of 25.8, while Holly Payne-Caravella piloted Benjamin Button, a 4-year-old Thoroughbred gelding (Classic Alliance x Lively Lady) owned by Kathleen Hall, also maintaining their 25.8 score to remained tied with Stelzeni for second place.

Beginner Novice Amateur

After moving up from third place, Leah Backus and her own Diamond of Truth, a 5-year-old Irish Sport Horse gelding (Salute the Truth x Mainways Queen of Diamonds), have taken the lead in the Beginner Novice Amateur division heading into the show jumping phase.

Backus bred Diamond of Truth and has enjoyed bringing him along for the past few years, she said, and was excited to achieve her goal of making it to AECs this year. “I liked going up on the hill so that you could look out over the [cross-country] course,” she said about her ride.

“When we got up there, my horse kind of looked out over the field, and our course was going pretty well at that point, so it was pretty exciting. For tomorrow, he’s never been in a ring that big, so I think he’ll be excited. He’s enjoying the show scene, so I think he’ll like it, and maybe he’ll perform extra well.”

Despite two time penalties, Diane Zrimsek aboard her own Coronado Charlie, an 8-year-old Thoroughbred gelding (Bwana Charlie x Pleasure Hunt), sit tied for second place with Nicole Thomas and her own Here N’ Now, an 18-year-old Canadian Sport Horse gelding.

Beginner Novice Rider

After two phases Kathleen Bertuna and her own Millye’s Mojave, a 12-year-old OTTB gelding (Mojave Moon x Slew the Dragoness) have moved from third to first place in the Beginner Novice Rider division following their clear cross-country round.

Bertuna was happy with her mount’s focus on the fences and said the course encompassed the many tests of horse and rider she’s seen all year. “There were a lot of tests, from the changes in terrain to riding towards and away from the warm up area, towards and away from the barn area, and the difference between the ring and the wet, sometimes muddy grass, up and down the hill-it definitely tested all those facets that we’ve been working on all year in all the different courses and put them all into one big course,” she explained.

After nineteen years away from the sport and wanting to return on a safe horse, Bertuna connected with Millye’s Mojave last November. The Seattle Slew-bred gelding is “just a prince,” she said, and the pair will likely move up to Novice.

“He is wonderful. He takes care of me and has gotten me back into the business very nicely. At the beginning of this season Beginner Novice was looking really big, but now it’s looking more manageable, so I’m hoping that there will be a nice move up in the spring.” For now, she’s just looking to put in an accurate and forward course in the show jumping phase.

Kymberly Pullen and Sara Webb’s Homer, a 15-year-old Thoroughbred gelding (Golden Missile x Zaza), currently sit in second place 1.5 points behind Bertuna, while Amber Duncan and her own Renegade, a 10-year-old paint gelding (Reflecting Merle x Windy’ Rascal Dottie), hold third place.

Master Beginner Novice Amateur

Carrie Griffen continues her lead going into the show jumping round, clutching first place aboard her own Feuertanzer ES, a 12-year-old Belgian Warmblood gelding (Nicholas x Daybreak) on their original dressage score of 23.3.

Robin Barr and her own Tout Fini, a 9-year-old Thoroughbred gelding (Purge x Firehouse Waltz), maintain their second-place spot with a score of 24.8, while Cindi Moravec and her own Holloway have a new hold on third place after receiving a 27.3.

Junior Beginner Novice Fourteen and Under

Ashley Stout and her own Deo Volente, an 11-year-old Hanoverian gelding, remain on top of the Junior Beginner Novice Fourteen and Under division following their clear round in the cross-country phase.

Stout commented that her ride was a huge improvement from the pair’s two most recent cross-country runs, so she’s pleased with her mount’s effort. “I felt like it went really well. We were a little looky at some fences, but we managed to get over them and push through it and he was very willing with everything.”

“We were actually a little fast-we had a minute left at the third to last jump, so we ended up doing some circles and making it through with four minutes and thirty seconds. I’m super proud of him,” she explained. “My plan [for tomorrow] is to get through without knocking anything down. I’ve looked at the course, and it’s challenging, but not too bad,” she concluded.

Avery Cascarino remains in second aboard Gloria Cascarino’s Dudley Do Right, a 13-year-old gelding, with a score of 20, while Viktorija Petraitis and Our Little Secret, a 15-year-old Arabian gelding owned by the Petraitis Family, continue to hold third place with a score of 25.

Junior Beginner Novice

Brynn Hershbine and Rowan Edmonds both went around the cross-country without a hitch, so they remain tied for first in the Junior Beginner Novice division. If they both jump double clear in show jumping, it will be Hershbine who is named champion as she crossed the finish line closer to the optimum time of 5:02 with Julie Hershbine’s Cadenza Aria, an 11-year-old Oldenburg mare (Turnofthecentury x Whisper).

Edmonds, riding Liberty Bell, a 9-year-old Thoroughbred mare (Hellion x Beth) owned by Michelle Jones was eight seconds faster.

Sydney Lee accrued 1.2 time penalties with Sweet Georgia Brown, dropping her from third to fourth. Carson Birdsong moved up into third with Ballygrace Laralai, an 11-year-old Irish Draught mare (Glenlara x Significadre) owned by Brooke Birdsong.

Preliminary Horse

Jennie Brannigan moved up from second place to finish on top of the Preliminary Horse division concluding with a clear round in the show jumping phase aboard Grayson Wall’s Balmoral Oakey, a 10-year-old Australian Warmblood mare (Falchrich x Diamond Sea Road).

Brannigan explained that Balmoral Oakey is for sale, and that this horse has the potential to move past the Preliminary division. “I knew [coming into today] that she hadn’t had a rail in like two years or something like that, so I was a little bit nervous thinking ‘Wow,’ I’m going to be the one to mess that up,’ but she jumped great. She’s obviously a super horse so I just trusted her to do her job, and she obviously knows what that job is.”

Brannigan has been winning across multiple divisions this week and currently sits in second place in the competitive Adequan® USEA Advanced Gold Cup division aboard her longtime mount Cambalda.

“I was joking around [earlier] because last year I brought a bunch of horses and I think only placed 15th with one of them, so I’d say this year has gotten off to a better start. I’m really grateful for that and I just hope that I can continue to keep things going in the right direction,” she commented.

Leslie Law and Beatrice Rey-Herme’s LCC Vogue, a 6-year-old Irish Sport Horse gelding (Kroongraaf x Clear Cavalier), rode to a second-place finish, and he said that LCC Vogue has only done a handful of Preliminary level competitions so far. “We could have gone at this at training level, but I thought that the Prelim would be a decent challenge for him, and would be much more educational,” he said. “He’s a lovely horse and he has an incredible future. I’m excited that he was second. I think that this facility is a wonderful experience for the younger horses, and I think in the end it was all done very well,” he noted.

Third place went to Alexandra Knowles aboard Katherine O’Brien’s Business Class, a 7-year-old Selle Francais gelding, moving up from sixth place after cross-country. Business Class was imported from Ireland at the beginning of this year.

“I actually haven’t done a lot with him due to an injury in March, but he’s an absolutely fantastic horse. He’s cool as a cucumber, and all of the pressure is on me to do it right because if I do it right, he’ll definitely step up to the plate. He cruised around cross-country this week, and was great. I really enjoy riding him and am looking forward to moving up to the next level with him,” she commented.

“I thought the course was very fun, and it was very different from anything that I have done before. I really enjoyed it. The facility is second to none-it’s been a great experience. I never want to leave! Everything you need is here, and it’s beautiful. It doesn’t get much better than this,” Knowles concluded.

For more information on the 2017 USEA American Eventing Championships presented by Land Rover and Nutrena®, please visit www.useventing.com and to learn more about Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC), please visit www.tryon.com.

Eric Lamaze and Rosana du Park Top $86,000 Suncast 1.50m Championship Jumper Classic

Eric Lamaze and Rosana du Park. Photos copyright Sportfot.

Allison Sinclair and Somekindawonderful Earn Autism Speaks Small/Medium Children’s Pony Hunter Championship

Wellington, FL – March 13, 2016 – Week nine of the 2016 Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF), sponsored by Douglas Elliman Real Estate, concluded on Sunday, March 13, with a win for Eric Lamaze (CAN) and Rosana du Park in the $86,000 Suncast® 1.50m Championship Jumper Classic. Kent Farrington (USA) and Aron S finished second, and Olivier Robert (FRA) and Quenelle du Py placed third. The 12-week WEF circuit runs through April 3 offering more than $9 million in prize money.

Alan Wade (IRL) set the courses in the International Ring at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center (PBIEC) for week nine and finished the week with 64 entries in the 1.50m. His first round track yielded 11 clear rounds, and nine of those also jumped clear over the tie-breaking short course. Lamaze was third to go in the jump-off, clocking the winning time of 36.74 seconds with Artisan Farms and Torrey Pines Stables’ Rosana du Park, an 11-year-old Selle Francais mare by Kannan.

Farrington and Alexandra Crown’s Arons S finished second in a time of 37.91 seconds. Robert took third place honors with his time of 37.95 seconds aboard Quenelle du Py, owned by the rider along with Pierre Fr. and Chantal Buffandeau. Meredith Michaels-Beerbaum and Windward Farm and Jessica Suida’s Unbelievable 5 placed fourth in 38.07 seconds, and Lorenzo de Luca (ITA) finished fifth in 38.32 seconds riding Stephex Stables and T&L NV’s Halifax van het Kluizebos.

Speaking of the competition, Lamaze stated, “I think Alan Wade has done a great job all week. When I walked the WEF (Challenge Cup) I thought it was very big and difficult, but at the end there were seven clear and there were no bad experiences. Then the grand prix was spot on yesterday, and the same thing with this competition. This competition actually walked a lot easier than it rode. It was a really nice competition for bringing your young horse along to the 1.50m level.

“Going back early in the jump-off with Rosana, I had some fast people after me like Kent Farrington and Tiffany (Foster),” Lamaze detailed. “I knew I had to go quick, and quick she is. I thought I would let them chase me and try to put in a quick round. These 1.50m competitions are very important and thank you to Suncast for putting them on because there are the competitions that make up young horses and let the 1.50m horses earn money, if that is what they do for a living. To have great prize money for a 1.50m horse is fantastic and to bring a young horse along to compete for $86,000 in this competition is great.”

Lamaze plans to compete Rosana in the Suncast® 1.50m Championship Jumper Classic Final during week 12 and feels good knowing that she has gained valuable experience throughout the circuit.

“We all like to come here with healthy, fresh horses, and the most important thing for them is to leave feeling good about the circuit, having learned something, having earned some prize money, and then putting them back in the stall at the right time and not asking any more than what they can do in a 12-week circuit,” Lamaze stated. “I think we have the right formula with our horses.”

Also competing in the International Ring on Sunday, Mckayla Langmeier and the Charlie Group’s Charlie were victorious in the $10,000 Sleepy P Ranch SJHOF High Junior Jumper Classic. Langmeier also went on to win the $10,000 Hollow Creek Farm Medium Junior Jumper Classic aboard Linda Langmeier’s Durosa W.

Allison Sinclair and Somekindawonderful Earn Autism Speaks Small/Medium Children’s Pony Hunter Championship

Competing on Saturday and Sunday during week nine, the Autism Speaks Small/Medium Children’s Pony Hunter division awarded championships honors to Allison Sinclair and Iwasaki & Reilly’s Somekindawonderful after the pair earned first and second place ribbons over fences. The reserve championship was presented to Aerin Genatt with Joe Currais’s Look at Me, who earned a second place ribbon over fences and a win under saddle.

Allison Sinclair and Somekindawonderful
Allison Sinclair and Somekindawonderful

Sinclair, an 11-year-old rider from Winnetka, IL, trains with Maria Rasmussen at Sea Change Farm and has been riding since she was four years old. Her championship win came with Somekindawonderful, a 15-year-old New Forest Pony (by Justice H.R.), known in the barn as Ronald.

“He is new. He is showing in the Medium Pony Hunters with Natalie Jayne and then I show him in the Children’s Ponies,” Sinclair detailed. “He loves peppermints, especially before he goes into the ring. He is really cute, and he is fun to ride. He also loves to snuggle, and he is really friendly.”

Speaking of her first and second place finishes over fences, Sinclair explained, “My rounds were good yesterday. I am working a lot on my position right now, and so I just made sure I sat up and looked up, and it helped a lot. Ronald is really experienced. He is pretty forward, and he has a big stride. He is also really fun to jump. He has a lot of scope and he loves it, so he is just fun.”

This is Sinclair’s first year competing at WEF, and although she did not want do the competition at first, she has had a great time. She was also champion of the Small/Medium Children’s Pony Hunter division in week two with another pony, Webster, and won the championship in week five with Somekindawonderful.

“This is my first year at WEF. I did not want to come at first because I was a little overwhelmed and nervous, but then I finally said, ‘Okay, fine, I will go.’ It has been really fun,” Sinclair stated. “There are so many good riders and good ponies, and it feels really good to win here.”

Sinclair will compete at the Devon Horse Show, moving up to the Medium Pony Hunters, since Somekindawonderful is already qualified. Her plans then include competitions in Kentucky and Michigan throughout the summer followed by goals to qualify for indoors.

The 2016 Winter Equestrian Festival continues with its tenth week of competition, sponsored by Horseware Ireland, on March 16-20, 2016. The week features the $130,000 Horseware Ireland Grand Prix CSI 3* on Saturday, March 19. For more information and full results, please visit www.pbiec.com.

Lauren Fisher for Jennifer Wood Media, Inc.
info@jenniferwoodmedia.com

Andres Rodriguez Retains Narrow Hagyard Challenge Lead

Andres Rodriguez and Fifty Fifty 111.

Kelli Cruciotti Tops Hallway Feeds Standings

Lexington, KY – July 28, 2015 – This spring, Andres Rodriguez took over the lead in the 2015 Hagyard Challenge Series with combined second and fourth place finishes in May, but three riders sit tied for second and are hot on his heels in a close second. In the Hallway Feeds USHJA National Hunter Derby Series, junior rider Kelli Cruciotti continues to top of the standings after earning two second place ribbons during the Kentucky Spring Horse Shows.

In the Hagyard Challenge Series, Bedoya picked up the most recent victory during the Kentucky Summer Horse Show on Quattro, and is tied for second with the winners from the Kentucky Spring Series, Emanuel Andrade of Venezuela and Argentina’s Ramiro Quintana. Rodriguez is in the lead by just 20 points. The Hagyard Challenge Series consists of seven grand prix classes to be held during the 2015 show series at the Kentucky Horse Park. Following the final event, a cash prize of $50,000 will be awarded to the rider accumulating the most points throughout the series, as well as a $10,000 prize for the reserve champion.

The Series concludes with the $65,000 Hagyard Lexington Classic during the Kentucky National Horse Show. Following that exciting competition, the winner of the $50,000 Leading Rider will be announced and presented with the prize by the Hagyard Equine Medical Institute. New this year, Brook Ledge Horse Transport will be awarding a $1,000 shipping voucher to the Leading Rider and a $500 shipping voucher to the Reserve Champion Leading Rider.

Hagyard Equine Medical Institute is one of the oldest and largest equine veterinary practices in the world. Founded in 1876, the institute offers a staff with qualifications unparalleled by any single non-university veterinary group in the equine industry, and Hagyard veterinarians have dedicated themselves to the health and wellbeing of the horse.

The facility at Hagyard Equine Medical Institute offers 13 Digital Radiology systems, 1.5 Tesla Siemens MRI, Nuclear Scintigraphy, an on-site laboratory, an on-site pharmacy, full surgical services, 24-hour emergency services and Hyperbaric Medicine. The institute has practiced veterinary medicine since 1876 and is currently composed of over 50 experienced veterinarians, with 13 board certifications in specialty areas of Medicine, Surgery, Critical Care, and Theriogenology. For more information about the Hagyard Equine Medical Institute, please visit hagyard.com.

Kelli Cruciotti and Totem Pole
Kelli Cruciotti and Totem Pole

Several generous sponsors have helped make this exciting series event happen. These gracious supporters include: title sponsor MWI Veterinary Supply, and presenting sponsor Zoetis, as well as Audi of Lexington, Dean Dorton Allen Ford, Hagyard Pharmacy, Brook Ledge Horse Transportation, Hallway Feeds, Pike and Preston, and Stoll Keenon Ogden.

The Kentucky Summer Horse Show also hosted the second event in the Hallway Feeds USHJA National Hunter Derby Series. After earning second place during both of the spring horse shows with Totem Pole, Kelli Cruicotti holds the lead. There are four junior riders at the top of the standings, with Lily French ranked second over Helen Voss in third and Emma Kurtz in fourth. Professional riders Molly Sewell, David Beisel, Steve Heinecke and Sarah Sturges are tied with Amateur-Owner rider Missy Luczak-Smith for fifth place.

The five-part series will feature a $5,000 Hallway Feeds USHJA National Hunter Derby throughout the spring and summer, and at the conclusion of the series the Leading Rider Awards for the Series will be presented. The $15,000 Hallway Feeds Leading Rider Awards will present a $10,000 cash prize to the professional rider accumulating the most points in the five classes that make up the Series. The amateur rider and junior rider accumulating the most points will each receive a $2,500 cash prize. Riders will receive points only on their highest placed horse in each of the classes. The awards will be presented at the conclusion of the Hallway Feeds class at the Bluegrass Festival Horse Show on August 16, 2015. Returning for the second year, the winning professional rider will win a free flight for a horse in the continental U.S., thanks to Tex Sutton.

Hallway Feeds’ close proximity to the Kentucky Horse Park provides the opportunity to utilize the freshest feed, manufactured with time-honored commitments to high standards of quality and the latest scientific advances. Combining a premium nutrition package with a professional level of dedication in horsemen and women provides equine athletes with the Formula for Success.

For more information on Hallway Feeds, please visit www.hallwayfeeds.com.

The Hallway Feeds USHJA National Hunter Derby Series would not be possible without many generous sponsors including Hagyard Equine Medical Institute, Alfagreen Supreme, Sweet PDZ Horse Stall Refresher, Caddel Equine Therapy Center, Trouw Nutrition, EquiVision, Fenwick Equestrian Products , Tack Shop of Lexington, Tex Sutton, Turf Town Properties and PNC Bank.

To learn more about the Kentucky Summer Horse Shows, please visit www.kentuckyhorseshows.com.

Kentucky Horse Shows 2015 Horse Show Series Fast Facts

Events:
Kentucky Summer Horse Shows, USEF National Pony Finals, Bluegrass Festival Horse Show and KHJA Horse Show, and the 2015 USHJA International Hunter Derby Finals and the Pre Green Incentive Championship.

What:
The Kentucky Horse Show LLC’s 2015 series includes five weeks of top competition throughout the summer. These premier hunter/jumper competitions host the Hagyard Challenge Series with seven grand prix competitions that culminate with a Leading Rider Award, as well as the Hallway Feeds National Derby Series.

Where:
Kentucky Horse Park, Lexington, KY, site of the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games™, home to the United States Equestrian Federation.

When:

NORTH AMERICAN JUNIOR & YOUNG RIDER CHAMPIONSHIPS – July 14-19, 2015

KENTUCKY SUMMER HORSE SHOW – July 22-26, 2015
$25,000 Hagyard Lexington Classic
$25,000 Under 25 Grand Prix
$50,000 Rood & Riddle Kentucky Grand Prix
$5,000 Hallway Feeds USHJA National Hunter Derby

KENTUCKY SUMMER CLASSIC – July 28 – August 2, 2015
$25,000 Hagyard Lexington Classic
$50,000 Kentucky Summer Grand Prix sponsored by GGT Footings
$5,000 Hallway Feeds USHJA National Hunter Derby

2015 USEF PONY FINALS – August 4-9, 2015

BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL HORSE SHOW – August 11-16, 2015
USHJA International Hunter Derby Championship
USHJA Pre-Green Incentive Championship
$25,000 Hagyard Lexington Classic
$40,000 Bluegrass Festival Grand Prix sponsored by Audi of Lexington
$5,000 Hallway Feeds USHJA National Hunter Derby
WCHR Member Event

KHJA HORSE SHOW – August 19-23, 2015
$10,000 Hagyard Welcome Stake
$30,000 KHJA Grand Prix
$5,000 USHJA National Hunter Derby

Sponsors:
A special thanks to the generous sponsors of the Kentucky Summer Series: Hagyard Equine Medical Institute, Hallway Feeds, Hollow Creek Farm, GGT Footing, Rood and Riddle, Audi of Lexington, Sleepy P Ranch, CWD, Farm Vet, Dietrich Insurance, Take2 Thoroughbred Program, and the Official Hotel The Clarion

Hours:
8am – 5pm daily

Parking:
Horse Show Exhibitors may purchase a weekly parking pass at the main Horse Park entrance for $15.00. Dogs are permitted at the Kentucky Horse Park on a leash.

Directions:
The Kentucky Horse Park is located 8 miles northeast of Lexington, Kentucky at Exit 120 on Interstate 75.

Information:
Before Show – (859) 233-0492, Email: hakshows@earthlink.net
During Show – Telephone: (859) 281-7979, Fax: (859) 231-6097
Stabling – Pat Duncan (503) 510-8797
Stable office – Before Show: (503) 510-8797, During Show: (859) 255-0605
Prize List Advertising – Email Cindy Bozan at cindy@kentuckyhorseshows.com or call (859) 608-3709
Vendors – Email Cindy Bozan at cindy@kentuckyhorseshows.com or call (859) 608-3709
Shownet – www.shownet.biz

Website: www.kentuckyhorseshows.com

Shopping:
Vendors offering equestrian equipment, apparel, jewelry, and home furnishings are located adjacent to the Stonelea Ring.

Hotels:
CLARION HOTEL (http://www.clarionhotellex.com) (Formerly Holiday Inn North) – 859-233-0512 – Approximately 4 miles (OFFICIAL HOTEL)
Discover the place where elegant comfort in an ideal location meets excellent service and affordability. At the Clarion Hotel Lexington, you’ll find well-appointed accommodations with options of double/doubles, double queens, king rooms or suites, exceptional amenities such as our free hot breakfast buffet, and Southern hospitality at its finest. The best hotel for Keeneland – Located in the heart of Kentucky’s Bluegrass Region – home of the Kentucky Horse Park, the Lexington Convention Center, University of Kentucky, and the Kentucky Bourbon Trail – our Lexington hotel is on Newtown Pike at Exit 115 on I-75, close to all the big attractions, and is the perfect place to stay whether you’re here to get down to business or have some fun. Best of all, bring your furry friends for any trip because the Clarion Hotel in Lexington is also pet-friendly.

CAMPGROUND RESERVATIONS:
Reservations may not be made through the Horse Show office. To reserve a campsite at the Kentucky Horse Park for any of the horse shows, please call the Campground store at (800) 370-6416 or 859-259-4157 or email Ryan McGaughey at Ryan.mcgaughey@ky.gov. Be specific as to the show name and the dates you wish to stay. Check-in time is 2:00 p.m. and checkout is 12:00 noon. You must make arrangements with the Campground store if you plan to arrive earlier than 2:00 p.m. or stay later than 12:00 noon. Vehicles that are not removed from a campsite by check-out time will be towed.

Management:
Kentucky Horse Shows, LLC
P. O. Box 11428
Lexington, KY 40575-1428
859-233-0492 (phone)
859-233-0495 (fax)
email: hakshows@earthlink.net
website: www.kentuckyhorseshows.com

Media Contact:
Phelps Media Group, Inc.
12230 Forest Hill Blvd.
Suite 214
Wellington, FL 33414
561-753-3389 (phone)
561-753-3386 (fax)
pmginfo@phelpsmediagroup.com
www.phelpsmediagroup.com

The Excitement Begins at Live Oak International with Yellowframe FEI Driven Dressage

Chester Weber starts the 2015 Live Oak International competition off with a win in the FEI Four-in-Hand dressage phase, scoring 33.44. (Photos courtesy of www.PicsofYou.com)

Ocala, FL (March 20, 2015) — Beautiful horses and beautifully appointed drivers opened the first day of competition at the Live Oak International with the Yellowframe Farm FEI Driven Dressage classes for Single, Pair, and Four-in-Hand horses and ponies.

Appearing for the first time as a new father at his family’s annual driving and show jumping extravaganza, Ocala horseman and 11-time USEF National Champion Chester Weber had one of the best dressage phase scores of his career, 33.44, for an early lead in the FEI Four-in-Hand horse division. Sarasota, FL entry, Misdee Wrigley-Miller, earned reserve with a score of 46.13.

“It was a good test,” said Weber’s wife, My Weber, who explained today’s placement of his near-perfectly synchronized KWPN team. “Ultra was left leader, Splash was right leader, Dancer was right wheel, and left wheel was Boris.”

Promising a hotly-contested title in the FEI Pair Horse-USEF National Championships sponsored by Hillcroft Farm are Casey Zubek of Manhattan, IL and Steve Wilson of Louisville, KY. Zubek and Wilson’s one-point margin of difference between first (46.78) and second (47.72), respectively, put spectators on the edge of their seats while Canadian entry, Rae Fischer, kept the international pressure on the American whips with a strong 57.46 score for third.

No close margins were to be found in the FEI Single Horse division as Suzy Stafford of Wilmington, DE and her Morgan, PVF Peace of Mind, set a definitive lead of 47.49. The pair’s closest contender, Kent Brownridge of Roxbury, CT and his Hackney, Halstead’s Shale, scored 64.06, seating them reserve ahead of Canadian contenders Catherine Lavasseur (65.73) and Carole Precious (68.22), respectively.

Aiken, SC drivers Amy Cross and Jennifer Matheson claimed early dominance in the FEI Pair Pony USEF National Championships sponsored by Hillcroft Farm — until Katie Whaley of Paris, KY and her Welsh pair split the Southern duo’s claim on the top spots. Whaley’s 52.61 was enough to move ahead of Matheson’s 56.58, while Cross and her Welsh Cob held on to their win (42.82) as the first of Yellowframe’s combined driving phases concluded.

Tracey Morgan and Fuego 88 claim the FEI Single Pony win in dressage with a score of 43.84.
Tracey Morgan and Fuego 88 claim the FEI Single Pony win in dressage with a score of 43.84.

The FEI Single Pony win in dressage went to Tracey Morgan of Belleville, MD (43.84), whose German Riding Pony helped set an 11-point edge ahead of Baptistown, NJ entry Mary Mott-Kocsis. While composing but a single entry to the FEI Four-in-Hand Pony class, Heather Schneider and her grey Welsh stallion were big in personality as they won smiles from spectators for his exuberant ‘neigh’ to the judges before their final 58.40 winning score.

Drawing first-time competitors from across the United States to the ‘horse capital of America’ and the Live Oak International was the final class of opening day, the Intermediate Single Pony sponsored by Wayne Humphreys. The Oro Valley, AZ entry of Doris Leacy and her German Riding Pony cross, Katydid Baroness, set a winning standard with a 47.94 test — and other up and coming talent showed throughout the class. Reserve went to first-time Live Oak International competitor, Allyn Carman of Grass Valley, CA (48.64) and Hackney cross, Bud Lite. Third place also went to a debut driver, Deborah Lawrence of Shelbyville, KY and her aged crossbred, Lodestar.

The more than 30 horse-and-driver combinations that performed for opening day of the 23rd edition of Live Oak International in their elegant turnouts will be matched by continued classes on Friday for Yellowframe Farm Intermediate Driven Dressage. Friday will include the return of Intermediate Pair Horse titleholder and former pro football star, Max Montoya, and Ocala hometown favorites Ellen Epstein, Cathy Franks, and Boots Wright.

Friday also marks the start of the second exciting chapter of the Live Oak International program — show jumping — with the $5,000 Pasmore Stables 1.35m Power & Speed at 2:00 pm and $10,000 Waldron Wealth Management 1.40m Welcome Stake at 4:00 pm.

This year’s CSI2* – W/CAI2* Live Oak International is a World Cup qualifier and has attracted some of the world’s top show jumping riders vying for victory under the live oaks, including recent Furusiyya FEI Nations Cup CSIO5* Hickstead U.S. squadmate, Margie Engle; 2008 Beijing Olympics U.S. team rider Laura Kraut; and four-time USEF Equestrian of the Year and first woman to win Hickstead’s King George Gold Cup, Beezie Madden.

Outside the show ring, the Live Oak International is a true family affair, with plenty of children’s activities to delight throughout the weekend, including Kids’ Horseless Jumping Competitions on Saturday and Sunday, and perennial closing day favorite — the Sleepy P Ranch Leadline Class at 1:30 pm before the concluding $34,000 SCI2* Hollow Creek Farm Winning Round at 2:00 pm.

For complete results and scheduling, visit www.liveoakinternational.com.

For more information contact:
Damian Guthrie
Live Oak International
www.liveoakinternational.com
info@liveoakinternational.com
786-303-2681
Press Office
Johnny Robb
561-290-9668

Ray Ainsworth Receives Rave Reviews at Illinois Clinic and Buck Creek St. Jude Trail Ride

Ray working a horse at the Blain’s Farm and Fleet Grand Opening.

Morton, IL – October 14, 2014 – When Cathy Roe took her elderly mother to watch Ray Ainsworth, she planned to only stay for one day of the multi-day clinic, but by the end of the day at the Blain’s Farm and Fleet Grand Opening, Roe knew she would be coming back for more.

“I’ve seen horse trainers before and whatever they want to call themselves – horse teachers, horse whisperers. Most of them don’t overly impress me,” Roe said. “I watch what they do. That’s fine and neat, but maybe it’s not something I would do or doesn’t apply to my situation or me. When I first watched Ray, he impressed me. When I first got there the first day I was hooked. I came back Friday and Saturday.”

Roe is not alone in being impressed by Ainsworth. Known as THE MAN HORSES TALK TO, Ainsworth teaches horses in a way that makes him one of the world’s most unique horsemen. He has started as many as 10,000 horses, and he now travels the country giving clinics and helping others to start their animals or address behavioral concerns.

It was at one of Ainsworth’s most recent clinic stops that Roe came to see him and ended up bringing with her a Quarter Horse/Paint named K.C.

“K.C. didn’t buck, kick or bite – nothing drastic – but if you wanted to go riding, you had to stick with someone else,” Roe explained. “You couldn’t ride off by yourself. If you did, he would freeze. As long as it could see the other horses, you could ride it, but the minute those horses were gone, it would go into a panic. He was very attached. It was my daughter’s horse basically, but she couldn’t ride it because it would freeze. I was sharing this with all with Ray, and he said to bring him over. So I brought him and another horse over to the grand opening at Blain’s Farm and Fleet.”

Roe continued, “I told him in all honesty that we were going to sell this horse because my daughter wouldn’t mess with it because the horse scared her. Now, my daughter is interested in the horse again because she can’t believe the difference.”

Out of the saddle, Roe’s daughter had a difficult time leading K.C. across grass, as he would always pull his head down to the grass and refuse to move. After working with Ainsworth, the problem is a thing of the past, and the ground work that Roe picked up from Ainsworth is something that she and her daughter plan to continue to utilize with their horses.

“It would always jerk its head down and eat the grass. It was always a major issue. You take a 1,000 pound animal and a 100 pound little girl. It turns its head, and it’s going to pull her,” Roe said. “[After working with Ray] the horse never tried once to eat grass. It paid attention to her. I was really amazed. Some people said the horses there had been worked with before. I said, ‘You can tell the story however you want, but this was my horse. I know for a fact Ray never saw that horse before a day in his life.’

“I went out and bought eight of the videos, and I did all the things that he told me to do with this horse and my daughter also has been working with the horse,” Roe continued. “Ray really impressed me, and I have nothing bad to say about that man, absolutely nothing.”

Ray worked horses for charity at the 16th Annual Buck Creek St. Jude Trail Ride
Ray worked horses for charity at the 16th Annual Buck Creek St. Jude Trail Ride

Following his time in Illinois, Ainsworth headed to Alamo, Tennessee for the 16th Annual Buck Creek St. Jude Trail Ride. The trail ride raises funds each year for the St. Jude Children’s Hospital, and this year, for a minimum $25 donation to the hospital, riders could have Ainsworth work with their horse(s).

It was at the trail ride that Ainsworth met Tina Evan’s mount, Dakota.

“Last year, Dakota got tied up to a hitching post, and I was bringing my saddle out and dropped it out my arms. That spooked him, and unfortunately, the hitching post was not secure,” Evans said, sharing the story behind the 10-year-old horses concerns. “He took off down the road with a piece of hitching post attached to the rope. He beat the heck out of his legs. So he’s always been very head shy when it comes to being tied up and having anything like the saddle brought out.”

After their time with Ainsworth, Evans immediately saw a difference in Dakota’s behavior and plans to continue to practice what she learned from Ainsworth.

“When I saddled up to ride him on Saturday after Ray had worked with him, I brought that saddle right around the side of the trailer which normally he would have spooked, but he just looked at me as if to say, ‘Oh, okay, no problem,'” Evans said.

“Ray’s a very personable man. I like his gentle approach. He’s very informative and explained every step of what he was doing, which I think is great. When you’re training people you need to explain why you’re doing it, not just do it,” Evans concluded.

To come see Ainsworth first hand, find out where he will be visiting throughout the year here. Ainsworth’s next clinic will be held at Blain’s Farm and Fleet Grand Opening in Dubuque, Iowa Oct. 23-25.

To learn more about Ainsworth, visit www.rayainsworth.com.

Emily Riden for Phelps Media Group, Inc. International

MEDIA CONTACT:
Phelps Media Group, Inc.
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Wellington, FL 33414
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Horse & Country TV to Air Farming Sunday Offering Insight into Today’s Modern British Farms

3 May 2013 – On Sunday 5 May at 5.00pm and 9.00pm Horse & Country TV (Sky Channel 280) will broadcast the magazine show, Farming Sunday, which looks at the technologies and techniques adopted by British farmers that are currently employed on the land to produce our food.

Since the eruption of the horsemeat scandal, the provenance of our food and how it’s produced has never been more topical; however, there is little information about how farmers really operate and what modern farms actually do.

Farming Sunday covers the main agricultural sectors, from wheat production through to dairy and livestock farming. The programme gives a true insight into what is currently happening in farming, which is enabling British farmers to be some of the most productive and welfare-sensitive in the world.

Head of Programming for Horse & Country TV, Jonathan Rippon, said, “This new series of Farming Sunday offers today’s farmer a wealth of knowledge concerning a vast array of topics.”

Rippon continues, “From veterinary advice from industry experts, to independent reviews of machinery, to economics and sustainability, Farming Sunday is a must-watch for those involved in every aspect of British farming.”

Farming Sunday will air on the Channel on Sunday 5 May at 5.00pm and 9.00pm, and a new episode will play out in those slots each week.

Horse & Country TV offers a rich, mixed schedule of programming for fans of equestrian sports and country living.  The channel covers all equestrian disciplines including showjumping, dressage and evening, and other topics such as natural horsemanship, lifestyle, travel, food and documentaries.

About Horse & Country TV

Horse & Country TV lives on-air on cable and satellite and online at www.horseandcountry.tv and www.horseandcountrytv.nl. The Channel broadcasts exclusive sports event coverage, news, documentary and personality-led programming to the passionate audience for horse sports and country living. At the UK’s Broadcast Digital Awards H&C won “Best Specialist Channel” in 2011 and was shortlisted in two categories this year. Online H&C publishes blogs and commentary provided by a range of experts and personalities, an extensive range of equestrian video, a calendar of events, as well as programme support material for all of the Channel’s featured shows. H&C’s role as a community hub for the horse and countryside loving community is reflected in the Channel’s 500,000+ viewers each month, 80,000+ Facebook fans and 10,000+ followers on Twitter.

For further media information, please contact:
Tim Welland
Revolution Sports + Entertainment
E: tim@revolutionsports.co.uk
T: +44 (0)207 592 1207