Category Archives: Horse Care/Protection

Old Friends Welcomes Five-Time Grade 1 Winner Einstein

Einstein arrives at Old Friends (Photo: Carole Oates)

GEORGETOWN, KY – MARCH 11, 2019 – Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement farm based in Georgetown, KY, has welcomed new retiree Einstein. The Brazilian bred son of 1986 Horse of the Year and Kentucky Derby winner Spend a Buck has been pensioned by The Stonach Group’s Adena Springs to the non-profit organization.

Trained by Helen Pitts, Einstein (Spend a Buck–Gay Charm, by Ghadeer) captured the 2009 Santa Anita Handicap (gr. I) and four grade I stakes on turf, including back-to-back triumphs in the Woodford Reserve Turf Classic (gr. IT) at Churchill Downs.

Other wins include the 2008 Clark Handicap (gr. II), also at Churchill, and the Mervin H. Muniz Jr. Memorial Handicap (gr. IIT) at Fair Grounds.

In all, Einstein made 30 starts, winning 11 races. He won or placed in 13 stakes, all of which were graded, and his career earnings totaled $2,703,324.

Einstein retired from racing in 2010 to stand at Adena Springs near Paris, KY. He later stood at Adena Springs North in Ontario, Canada and at Magali Farms near Santa Ynez, CA. His top runners include grade III winner Rankhasprivileges and multiple-stakes-placed E Equalsmcsquared.

In 2015, Adena Springs also donated Breeders’ Cup Classic winner Alphabet Soup and Belmont Stakes winner Touch Gold to Old Friends.

“We’re extremely grateful to The Stronach Group for allowing us to care for Einstein, and for supporting him with a significant annual contribution,” said Old Friends President and founder Michael Blowen. “Einstein has a lot of fans and I’m sure they’ll be flocking to visit him.

“The great son of Spend a Buck didn’t peak until his six and seven-year-old campaigns,” Blowen continued, “and, as fate would have it, he defeated many of our other Old Friends retirees, including Arson Squad, Commentator, Rail Trip, and Cosmonaut.”

“Einstein was one of the most honest and consistent race horses of modern times,” said Donald Wells, Farm Manager at Adena Springs. “He came very close to being the first horse to win grade 1 races on the turf (Woodford Reserve), synthetic (Santa Anita Handicap), and dirt when he was a troubled third in the Stephen Foster in 2009.

“It has been a privilege to care for such a tough and honest horse,” Wells added. “We know he will be well taken care of at Old Friends, and we look forward to his fan base getting to know and love him the way we have.”

For more information, please call (502) 863-1775 or visit the website at www.oldfriendsequine.org.

MEDIA CONTACT: Cynthia Grisolia, (347) 423-7322, cindy@oldfriendsequine.org; Michael Blowen (502) 863-1775, michael@oldfriendsequine.org

Cloud Foundation Director Ginger Kathrens to Apply as Humane Advisor to BLM

For the past three years, TCF Founder and Executive Director, Ginger Kathrens, has served a critical role as humane advisor to the agency tasked with managing our wild horses and burros on our public lands. As her first term comes to a close, we are thrilled to announce that she will reapply for a second term of service.

The BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board is stocked with people from all sides of the “issue”, many who are not friendly to these magnificent animals. It’s crucial to the humane management of our wild herds to have an advocate with Ginger’s breadth of knowledge and compassion in the body of advisors.

We know that you care as much about the freedom and well-being of our wild horses as we do, and so we ask you to take action now and support Ginger’s reinstatement as Humane Advisor.

Read the full nomination details.

How can you help?

It doesn’t take much time at all. Here are the simple details:

1) Write a short letter in support of Ginger Kathrens’s renomination to the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board. Some points to make:

  • 25 years spent documenting wild horses
  • Her award-winning series of Cloud films reintroduced America to their wild horses
  • Tireless advocate for the preservation of wild horses and our public lands
  • Thought leader in the horse advocacy community, her voice and opinion are widely respected
  • Committed to working with the BLM to find humane management solutions

2) Mail your letter to the address below before April 1, 2019.

Division of Wild Horses and Burros, US Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management
1849 C Street NW, Room 2134 LM
Attn: Dorothea Boothe, WO-260
Washington, DC 20240

The Cloud Foundation would not be here without your generous support. Our mission and to preserve and protect all of America’s wild horses and burros, and the land which was dedicated to them, would not be possible without your contributions.

The Cloud Foundation
107 South 7th St
Colorado Springs, CO 80905
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Horses Helping Horses Does It Again

ARREDONDO DRESSAGE SOCIETY
Presents the 10th Annual Horses Helping Horses

A day to benefit the HORSE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA
Saturday, March 16, 2019
Canterbury Equestrian Showplace, Newberry, Florida
In the Covered Arena

Join us and some of the regions most talented dressage instructors as they donate their time and skills to perform a benefit clinic for Horse Protection (HPAF). The Arredondo Dressage Society Website lists the clinicians, ride times, and instructions for bidding on the clinics (arredondodressage.org).

The day is a day all about horses, and a day to raise awareness about equine rescues and sanctuaries and the lifesaving work they do year-round to care for the at-risk horses in their communities who have often been abused or neglected. Horses are majestic, loving animals, and we hope our local and loyal supporters will come out so that we can continue our lifesaving efforts for years to come.

To support this cause, Arredondo Dressage Society will sponsor events throughout the day. The clinics offer riders and spectators a chance to see actual dressage training and work. In addition, there will be lunchtime demos including vaulting, reining, and dressage. There will also be a used tack sale and raffles throughout the day.

Arredondo has an online auction on its website which will be finalized at the 5:00 Wine and Cheese Reception, with a live auction and bidding. Horse Protection staff will showcase some of the rescued animals and they will be on hand to answer questions and to educate the public about the work being done on behalf of the equines of Florida.

Come for a fun day and support this most worthy cause!

HORSE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA
Horse Protection Association of Florida (HPAF) is located on 140 acres in Micanopy where herds of upwards of 60 rescued horses are cared for. These horses have been abused, abandoned, or neglected and have been seized, surrendered, or otherwise rescued by Morgan Silver and her team. The horses usually arrive at HPAF in an emancipated condition and they are typically weak and scared. Some have never known a kind human touch, but under the loving care of Morgan and the women and men who work at the farm, the horses are given the care they need. They receive veterinary care, farriers work on their feet, their diets are customized for their needs, and each horse is handled and worked with until they recognize that these humans are there to help.

Each horse has its own stall and is trained to walk into its stall each morning and night for feeding. Each horse is Parelli trained with a rope halter and rope so that they are used to handling and develop ground manners. Each horse is groomed on a daily basis before being turned out to pasture.

The HPAF website (hpaf.org) shows some of the work being done at the farm, and shows the horses that are ready for adoption. Once a horse is sound and properly trained, it will be ready to be adopted. Of course, there are some that will remain at HPAF as their forever home. Right now, there are 4 distinct herd groupings. The mares with an occasional senior or quiet gelding are kept in one barn and pasture. The geldings have another barn and pasture. There is also a senior barn and pasture, and finally, there is the mums and babies barn. We have 4 new babies this year, and just recently, the mums have been taken to a new farm and the babies have been weaned. After a few days of protesting, the babies have all settled down and happily romp around in their own pasture.

Contact:
Heather Stalker, stalkhj@peds.ufl.edu, (352) 231-0670

FEI Issues Guidelines on Equine Influenza Outbreak

Lausanne (SUI), 8 February 2019 – The FEI has issued guidelines to the equestrian community to protect horses from and prevent transmission of equine influenza, following confirmed outbreaks of the virus in Belgium, France, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Nigeria, United Kingdom, and the United States of America since the beginning of the year.

Equine influenza is a highly contagious virus which causes respiratory disease in horses. The virus is endemic to most countries in the world and outbreaks can have a severe impact on the equine industry, potentially resulting in restrictions on horse movement and cancelled events.

“Vaccinating horses against equine influenza is key to combating the spread of equine influenza,” FEI Veterinary Director Göran Åkerström said. “It is important that all horses are vaccinated, regardless of whether or not they compete or come into contact with other horses, but there are also biosecurity measures that should be put in place, including best hygiene practices.”

All FEI horses must have an up-to-date vaccination history in their passports and checks are carried out on entry to all FEI events.

The air-borne virus can spread up to two kilometres, depending on the environmental conditions, and can be easily transmitted between horses that are in close contact, such as attending events, group training and hunting, or between vaccinated and unvaccinated horses in the home yard.

Any horse that displays any signs of illness should not leave their home yard. This also applies to any horse that has been in contact with a horse or horses that have equine influenza.

“This year we are seeing a return of the Clade 1 virus in infected horses. Vaccinated horses have suffered only mild clinical signs of the disease and recovered quickly, but unvaccinated horses have been much more severely affected,” FEI Veterinary Advisor Caterina Termine said. “The key message is: get your horse vaccinated, monitor horse health extremely closely, and call your veterinarian if you have any concerns.”

The FEI’s comprehensive question and answer document on equine influenza is available here. Please visit FEI Campus for a course on Equine Influenza: A Horse Owners Guide.

FEI contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Communications
grania.willis@fei.org
+ 41 78 750 61 41

Vanessa Martin Randin
Senior Manager, Media Relations & Communications
Vanessa.Randin@fei.org
+ 41 78 750 61 73

Hats Off to the Horses: Bint Marscay

Honoring the life of our sweet BINT MARSCAY. Another gorgeous couture creation from Sally at MAGGIE MAE DESIGNS®. All proceeds benefit Old Friends. Special thanks to jockey Chris Landeros, his wife Shelby, and son Beckham for modeling. As always, thanks to chief photographer for Daily Racing Form and 6-time Eclipse Award winner, Barbara D. Livingston, for her stunning images. Auction ends Feb 11 at 8pm EST. These hats have raised over $35k for Old Friends!  Click to bid.

Click for more about this hat.

Click to learn about Bint Marscay.

Click to learn about the annual hat program.

For more information: (502) 863-1775; www.oldfriendsequine.org

Unparalleled Support: The Role of Veterinary Technicians at Palm Beach Equine Clinic

Yessica Arrua assisting with an electroacupuncture treatment. Photo by Jump Media.

Wellington, FL – Palm Beach Equine Clinic (PBEC), based in Wellington, FL, is home to world-renowned surgeons, board-certified specialists, and state-of-the-art diagnostic technology. In addition, PBEC is home to 30 veterinary technicians who provide support to the veterinarians they work alongside.

PBEC takes pride in the diligence of the technicians who work in collaboration with the veterinarians to maintain the daily functionality of the clinic. The typical responsibilities of an equine veterinary technician include:

  • Manage veterinarians’ schedules
  • Stock veterinarians’ mobile unit with supplies, equipment, and medications
  • Accompany veterinarians on barn calls and emergency response
  • Consult on cases with veterinarian
  • Care for and monitor horses admitted to the on-site clinic hospital
  • Plan patient care and follow-up
  • Oversee billing and invoices

According to Dr. Marilyn Connor, veterinary technicians are the right hands of the doctors they work with. PBEC employs 30 technicians and the hands-on experience they have access to gives them invaluable opportunities to learn.

“One thing that is special about PBEC is that we have a full staff of technicians day and night,” said Dr. Connor, who first joined PBEC as an intern and now works as a full-time veterinarian. “They are the ones feeding and caring for horses, administering medications that do not require a doctor, and assisting veterinarians on cases. During the peak of season, there are roughly 40 doctors with very diverse caseloads for technicians to learn and gain experience from.”

Yessica Arrua is one PBEC technician who has become an accomplice for veterinarian Dr. Natalia Novoa and the clinic in general. Arrua, 22, was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina but now calls Florida home and is a pivotal part of the PBEC team.

Five questions for PBEC veterinary technician, Yessica Arrua:

  1. How did you first get involved with horses?

I have been around horses since I was three years old. Both my parents have been working with horses since before I can remember. My dad works with polo ponies and my mom with dressage horses. They both traveled to Florida to pursue work with horses here and that is how I came to be a resident of Wellington and a team member with Palm Beach Equine Clinic.

  1. What are your day-to-day responsibilities at PBEC?

I work with Dr. Natalia Novoa, who focuses on both traditional veterinary medicine and alternative therapies like chiropractic adjustments and acupuncture. My day-to-day responsibilities include making sure our truck is stocked with the equipment and medications that we may need. I also look after all the invoices in our system on a monthly basis. Overall, my role is to ensure Natalia has everything she needs and is prepared for our farm call visits.

  1. What do you enjoy most about working with equine veterinarians and the horses they treat?

Other than being around horses every day, which is the best part of my job, I really enjoy being able to experience all the different types of cases that come through Palm Beach Equine Clinic. Especially during the winter season, we see so many interesting cases from emergencies to routine exams.

  1. Do you have a favorite case?

My favorite cases to work on are the ones where horses have anhidrosis, which we see often in the Florida heat.

(What is Anhidrosis? According to the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP), anhidrosis is a compromised ability to sweat in the face of exercise or high ambient temperatures. This is a potentially dangerous condition for horses, especially working horses, because they thermoregulate (maintain a consistent body temperature) primarily through sweating.)

There is no universal or proven treatment for anhidrosis, but people often try salts, electrolytes, thyroid supplements, and even beer. But Dr. Novoa has been able to help these horses with acupuncture. We had one case where the horse didn’t respond to any traditional treatments, but started sweating right away during our first acupuncture treatment.

  1. What can we find you doing when you aren’t working at PBEC?

You will find me at the beach, reading, and spending time with my family!

To find out more, please visit www.equineclinic.com or call 561-793-1599.

Contact: Lindsay Brock
lindsay@jumpmediallc.com

EquiJet Addresses USDA Miami Animal Import Center Closing

Miami, Fla. – Jan. 24, 2018 – During this especially busy travel season for horses, EquiJet wants to make sure loyal clients and friends stay up to date on current happenings. As was reported earlier this week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has closed the Miami Animal Import Center (MAIC) to new arrivals as of January 19, 2019 due to a series of horses falling sick, with three animals unfortunately dying. The MAIC quarantine stalls will be closed to new import arrivals through March 31, 2019, affecting many competitors involved in South Florida equestrian competitions such as the Winter Equestrian Festival, the HITS Ocala Winter Circuit and the Adequan Global Dressage Festival, among others. For anyone affected by this issue, please reach out to us if you have questions or need assistance making or changing your travel plans for your horses.

As of the news breaking, no horses shipped by EquiJet were affected or in danger of becoming ill. The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Agency (APHIS) is investigating to determine the specific cause of illness, but salmonella is suspected, and the facility is stepping up biosecurity and taking added precautions to prevent any further disease spread.

The EquiJet team is working closely with other quarantine centers and trusted airports and airlines to continue to provide you the outstanding service our clients have come to expect. While this development is a setback for many equine travelers and their owners, we thank you for your patience while the USDA works to decontaminate the facility in Miami and ensure that it is up to code.

To request a quote or for more information, please visit EquiJet.com.

Media Contact: Lenore Phillips
561-753-3389 | lrb@phelpsmediagroup.com

PBEC Case Study: Ethmoid Hematoma

Dr. Michael Myrhe and Dr. Weston Davis performing the Ethmoid Hematoma procedure. Photo courtesy of PBEC.

A horse was recently admitted to Palm Beach Equine Clinic (PBEC), based in Wellington, FL, with symptoms that included bleeding from the nostril. The patient’s referring veterinarian had diagnosed the horse with an ethmoid hematoma, which in layman’s terms is essentially a mass that fills with blood in the nose or sinus cavity.

The patient was placed under the care of PBEC’s board-certified surgeon Dr. Weston Davis and Dr. Michael Myhre. They performed an airway endoscopy to locate and evaluate the hematoma that the referring veterinarian had identified. After confirming the diagnosis, Dr. Davis and Dr. Myhre were eager to ensure that it was the one and only hematoma they were battling.

PBEC is one of an elite group of equine veterinary clinics to have a computed tomography (CT) machine in their arsenal of diagnostic imaging equipment. A CT gives veterinarians a unique look at the head, neck, and spine of a horse that they would never be able to accomplish with other imaging modalities. After a CT of the patient’s sinuses, more masses were indeed identified.

“This was a fairly typical presentation of an ethmoid hematoma, but there were certainly more masses than normal,” said Dr. Myhre. “It’s for this reason that the CT was very useful. If we were not able to obtain the scans that we did, we may have missed the masses that were located deeper in the sinus.”

Click here to watch the CT scan that spotted the additional masses in progress.

The cause of an ethmoid hematoma is unknown, but the mass resembles a tumor in appearance and development without being neoplastic. Horses with extensive masses may have reduced airflow and an expanding hematoma can cause pressure necrosis of the surrounding bones, but rarely causes facial distortion. Treatments of the condition can range from conservative management to surgery. The conservative treatment route includes the injection of formalin – a mixture of formaldehyde gas and water – into the mass using a guarded endoscopic needle. Once injected, the mass typically regresses rapidly, but recurrence is common. For some cases, surgical excision is achieved via a frontonasal bone flap procedure.

Due to the location and advances nature of the masses in this case, injection was not an option and the CT imaging was used to plan a surgical approach. “After sedation and a local block, we went into the sinus through a flap approach where we took a section of bone, cut it into a flap, and moved it back so we could go into the sinuses through a nice window,” said Dr. Myhre. “We removed a mass four centimeters in diameter as well as several smaller masses two to three centimeters in diameter, then flushed the area and closed.”

According to Dr. Myhre the advantages of a standing procedure included fewer risks from bleeding and fewer risks of recovering from anesthesia.

Post-surgery, the bone flap will require several weeks to heal, but the skin itself healed within one to two weeks, which is when the horse was cleared to return to normal activity.

Jennifer Wood, Jump Media
jennifer@jumpmediallc.com

Hats Off to the Horses: The Road to Derby 2019 Begins

“Hats Off to the Horses: The Road to Derby” 2019 kicks off with a new chapeau honoring an Old Friends retiree.

For the 10th consecutive year, Maggie Mae Designs® and Old Friends are teaming up for an unparalleled online shopping experience. “Hats Off to the Horses: The Road to the Derby” is a unique Derby-hat fundraiser featuring one-of-a-kind couture Derby hats created by MAGGIE MAE DESIGNS® to benefit Old Friends.

This new hat pays tribute to King Congie, a stakes winner who resides at Old Friends at Cabin Creek in Greenfield Center, N.Y., and it uses the yellow and black racing-silk colors of former owners West Point Thoroughbreds.

King Congie’s career ended following an injury in 2012. In 2016 he was rescued from a livestock auction by the Rosemary Farm Sanctuary, and with the help of West Point Thoroughbreds was retired to Old Friends at Cabin Creek.

This lovely hat was created out of black dupioni silk with layers and layers of organza. It’s highlighted by a bold yellow under brim, which adds a vibrant, colorful effect when the wearer’s face is upturned, and it is adorned with a delicate rose sculpted out of alternating layers of yellow silk and chocolate organza.

The “King Congie” chapeau is up for bid from January 2nd through January 12th. All proceeds from the sale go to Old Friends.

To Bid: CLICK HERE.

Special thanks to the Stronach Group’s Acacia Courtney for graciously modeling this month’s selection, and to Connie Bush of Tiger Eye Photography for her stunning images of Acacia and King Congie.

To read more about King Congie, the horse, please CLICK HERE.

For more information: (502) 863-1775; www.oldfriendsequine.org; michael@oldfriendsequine.org

Graded Stakes Winner Silver Ray Dies at 30

Silver Ray at Old Friends (Photo: Laura Battles)

GEORGETOWN, KY – JANUARY 2, 2019 – Silver Ray, a graded-stakes winner who was rescued from potential slaughter in 2013, was euthanized due to chronic orthopedic disease at Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement Center in Georgetown, KY. The stallion was 30 years old.

Bred in Kentucky, Silver Ray (Silver Hawk – Danceland, by Little Current) won six of his 26 starts for owners Jerry and Ann Moss, including the GR3 Hoist the Flag Stakes at Hollywood Park. His career earnings totaled $268,532.

As a stallion, Silver Ray sired 47 foals in 13 lifetime crops with 11 winners. He was eventually sold to a dressage trainer and had some success as a sire of sport horses.

But in the summer of 2013 the stallion was discovered at a livestock auction in Mira Loma, CA by April Smith, who bought him for a mere $30.

After uncovering his identity, Smith contacted Catherine Trope, founder of the Glendale, CA-based Polo Pony Rescue, and Trope helped nurse the ailing ex-racer back to health.

When the Glendale News-Press ran a feature about Silver Ray’s rescue and recovery, it came to the attention of the Mosses, who are best known for campaigning the champion mare Zenyatta.

Longtime supporters of Old Friends, the Mosses worked with founder and President Michael Blowen to secure Silver Ray a spot at the Georgetown, KY farm.

“It has been such an honor to have Silver Ray with us these years,” said Blowen. “He has been an unbelievable fan favorite. He had an incredibly gentle soul, he was wonderful with children, and he just loved getting treats and attention from all of our visitors,” Blowen added.

“Great teamwork brought this wonderful stallion to Old Friends,” said Blowen. “We’re grateful to the people who rescued him and the Mosses for sponsoring his journey home.”

For more information, please call (502) 863-1775 or visit the website at www.oldfriendsequine.org.

MEDIA CONTACT: Cynthia Grisolia, (347) 423-7322, cindy@oldfriendsequine.org; Michael Blowen (502) 863-1775, michael@oldfriendsequine.org