Category Archives: Horse Care/Protection

Mustangs’ Insides Viciously Ripped Out: Stop the BLM!

The Bureau of Land Management is once again callously planning to permanently sterilize wild horse mares using a gruesome procedure so deadly and inhumane that many veterinarians refuse to perform it. Don’t let the BLM rip out the ovaries of wild mares!

The proposed surgery, called ovariectomy via colpotomy, is controversial even for domestic mares who are used to human handling and given normal surgical protections such as sterile conditions, anesthesia, and complete long-term aftercare. The situation at the Burns Corral in Oregon, where the deadly experiments are slated to take place, is not conducive to any of those conditions which makes the already risky procedure all the more dangerous and life-threatening.

This is the third time that the Bureau has tried to perform this barbaric experiment on defenseless wild horse mares, under the guise of a “study.” After two major universities dropped out, lawsuits were filed, and massive public outcry occurred, the first two attempts were abandoned by the Bureau. Many thousands of In Defense of Animals supporters wrote to both of the universities initially involved, and also to the BLM in protest of this vile procedure from its past attempts.

Take action on this issue.

In Defense of Animals
3010 Kerner, San Rafael, CA 94901
Tel. (415) 448-0048 Fax (415) 454-1031
idainfo@idausa.org

Racing to Extinction: New Management Plan Will Devastate Our Wild Herds

For the past couple of weeks, we have been in contact with the ASPCA and HSUS, the main drivers behind a new management proposal for America’s wild horses and burros. We learned of their concerns for our wild herds in response to growing impatience on the part of lawmakers. We have also listened to the comments of other wild horse advocates and all of you wild horse lovers.

We share your deep concern, especially if this plan moves forward.

In its current form, this “management” plan lacks the safeguards and oversight that would keep our wild herds safe from inappropriate, unscientific, and cruel management practices. We have tried to work with the organizations supporting this plan, asking them to add language which mandates that funds be allocated for humane, reversible fertility control and provide for meaningful accountability on the part of BLM.

Sadly, we understand that the proposal will soon be put forward to Congress as-is. This does not end our efforts. We will continue to fight for the protection of America’s wild horses and burros. We are actively working on alternative solutions to this disastrous proposal and we will see the fight through.

We want to thank you all for your support of our mission and our work, and for loving our wild herds as much as we do. Transparency is at the core of meaningful communication and that is why we’d like to explain our concerns about this proposed plan, so you can decide for yourself whether or not it seems right to you.

Our wild horses will need your voice in the coming months, and being informed is the first step in taking effective action. I have learned in my 25 years of advocacy that one passionate voice can make a difference, but an army of informed, passionate voices can create lasting change.

Thank you for standing with us and with our wild ones.

We know that we can count on you to lend your voice, as needed, to champion our wild families, who cannot speak for themselves.

We encourage you to call your representatives and senators and urge them not to support this proposal as-is.

Click here to find your elected officials.

Ginger Kathrens
Founder and Executive Director
The Cloud Foundation
107 South 7th St
Colorado Springs, CO 80905
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Positive Tests of Cannabinoids (CBD) Will Result in GR4 Violations as of Sept. 1, 2019

Tasked with protecting the welfare of equine athletes and ensuring the balance of competition, the US Equestrian Federation (USEF) Equine Drugs and Medications Program consistently monitors new products and product claims. From time to time, new products appear on the equine supplement market claiming to enhance a horse’s performance. Over the last several years, cannabinoids have gained increased attention and have become nearly mainstream.

In 2018 Congress passed the Agriculture Improvement Act, also known as the “Farm Bill”, which defines “hemp” as both the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any derivatives of cannabis with less than 0.3% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). With the enactment of this bill, “hemp” is no longer considered a controlled substance under federal law, but THC remains a Schedule I drug with the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). The passage of the Farm Bill has created some potential confusion with respect to the use of these substances with competition horses.

USEF Equine Drugs and Medications Rules prohibit cannabidiols (CBD) and their metabolites. While hemp does not contain more than 0.3% THC, it does contain CBD. CBD, both natural and synthetic forms, are likely to affect the performance of a horse due to its reported anxiolytic effects. This substance is no different than legitimate therapeutics that effect mentation and behavior in horses. It is for these reasons that USEF prohibits CBD and all related cannabinoids. Horses competing under USEF rules who test positive for natural cannabinoids, synthetic cannabinoids, and other cannabimimetics will be considered in violation of GR4 beginning September 1, 2019.

It is important to note that analytical methods are being implemented to detect CBD and similar cannabinoids. Both USEF and FEI list natural cannabinoids, synthetic cannabinoids, and other cannabimimetics as prohibited substances. Caution is important when using these products as their composition widely varies and may not be representative of their label claims as there is no regulatory oversight from the FDA, nor guarantee of their safety in horses.

As published literature does not exist noting detection times of these substances in the horse, and because products can widely vary in their compositions and concentrations, detections prior to September 1 will receive warnings. They will be considered to be in “Prior” violation if there are additional detections of cannabinoids following September 1. GR411 Conditions for Therapeutic Administrations of Prohibited Substances does not apply for cannabinoids and medication report forms do not apply.

With regards to human use, any athlete who is subject to testing under the World Anti-Doping Code can refer to the regulations for human use of cannabinoids here.

by US Equestrian Communications Department

Chilean Champ Santona Euthanized at 25

Santona at Old Friends (Photo: Laura Battles)

GEORGETOWN, KY – MAY 7, 2019 – Chilean champion Santona has died. The 25-year-old mare was euthanized at Park Equine Hospital at Woodford on May 5th due to complications from colic.

Santona had been pensioned at Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement Farm in Georgetown, KY, since 2011. Michael Blowen, founder and President of Old Friends, made the announcement of her passing.

Bred in Chile by Haras Santa Isabel, Santona (Winning – Syracuse, by Sharp-Eyed Quillo) won the Grade 1 Las Oaks at Club Hipico De Santiago in 1997. That year she was named Champion grass mare in Chile, and was then brought to the United States in 1998 by owner-breeder Earle I. Mack.

Campaigned by Mack and trainer Jimmy Jerkins for four starts in New York, Santona never regained her top race form and was retired to the breeding shed.

Her colt by Grand Slam, Grand Hombre, won the Pennsylvania Derby in 2003 and earned over $900,000.

“Mr. Mack adored Santona, and Old Friends was honored to care for her for these last years,” said Blowen. “She was extremely intelligent and very competitive.  She will be missed by all of her mare friends and human caretakers.”

For more information, please call (502) 863-1775 or visit the website at www.oldfriendsequine.org.

MEDIA CONTACT: Cynthia Grisolia, (347) 423-7322, cindy@oldfriendsequine.org; Michael Blowen (502) 863-1775, michael@oldfriendsequine.org

Misguided Management Plan Threatens Beloved Wild Herds

Since the recent announcement of a new management proposal for America’s wild horses and burros, The Cloud Foundation has been working hard behind the scenes to craft a measured, science-based response. We know that you rely on us for accurate, actionable information rather than reactionary rhetoric, and thoughtful commentary takes time.

TCF supports the Unified Statement, which outlines a humane, cost-effective plan for on-the-range management and is signed by over 100 wild horse and animal advocacy groups. It is our opinion that the proposal supported by ASPCA, HSUS, the National Cattleman’s Beef Association, et al. presents a danger to our wild herds in its current form. This proposal does not provide for any meaningful accountability on the part of the BLM to follow through on its responsibilities and we can find no scientific backing for its claims.

We agree that change is needed. Our western rangelands are suffering from the effects of climate change and overuse by multiple interests, including energy development and livestock grazing. We are at a tipping point and a new path forward needs to be blazed.

This is an opportunity to alter the course of a broken system and affect meaningful change for the betterment of all. We need to look at not just what is convenient for the BLM or the private interests, but also consider what is right for the land, for our wild horses and burros, and for the American people who love them.

Let’s not forget – these are not “the BLM’s wild horses.” These are America’s wild horses. They belong to each citizen of the United States, and they are beloved symbols of freedom. Americans do not want to see or pay for their wild mustangs to be rounded up by the tens of thousands and incarcerated for the rest of their natural lives.

Collaboration between groups of stakeholders is needed, and compromise will likely be required – but it should happen across the board. If everyone comes to the table willing to talk with an open mind we can come up with a solution and plan for the future that will truly serve our nation, its ecosystems, natural resources, and wildlife.

Sadly, no wild horse advocate groups with nothing to gain from this proposal were included in its formative stages. Our wild horses and burros deserve a seat at the table, and not one group with knowledge of the complexities of the on-range management issue was invited to speak for them as this plan was being drafted. That fact speaks for itself.

The Cloud Foundation always has been and will continue to be a thoughtful, passionate voice for safe, humane, cost-effective on-the-range management of our wild horses and burros. We are very willing to lend our 25 years of experience to a rational and open-minded discussion in order to build a logistically and fiscally sustainable strategy for management of these incredible animals.

We are fighting for the lives and future of our wild herds right now. There are some government and private interests that would wash their hands of them, given the chance. We know that we can count on you to lend your voice, as needed, to champion our wild families, who cannot speak for themselves.

Thank you for all you’ve done and will continue to do for these majestic animals.

Ginger Kathrens
Executive Director
The Cloud Foundation
107 South 7th St
Colorado Springs, CO 80905
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Push the PAST Act to the House Floor

Bill Gains 219 Sponsors

Since being introduced in January, the bipartisan “Sen. Joseph Tydings Memorial Prevent All Soring Tactics (PAST) Act” (H.R. 693) has gained 219 cosponsors, which is more than half of the members of the House of Representatives.  Under new House rules, any legislation gaining 290 or more co-sponsors will receive an automatic vote on the floor.  As soon as H.R. 693 gains 71 more supporters – a target the horse industry can reach with your continued advocacy – House leadership will schedule the bill for a vote on the floor, where it’s assured quick passage.

H.R. 693 will strengthen the Horse Protection Act and finally end the soring of Tennessee Walking Horses, Spotted Saddle Horses, and Racking Horses. The American Horse Council, along with most major national horse show organizations and state and local organizations, supports the PAST Act.  To send a letter to your representative urging him or her to sign on as a co-sponsor, please click here and follow the prompts.  For more information related to H.R. 693 and how to move the bill forward, please contact AHC’s Bryan Brendle at 202-296-4031.

American Horse Council Mailing Address:
1616 H Street NW, 7th Floor
Washington, DC 20006

Casares Portraits Immortalize Equine Rescue Efforts

Wellington, FL (April 17, 2019) – From kill pen to pony stardom: Coconut the rescue pony takes center stage in another spectacular photo shoot by Ramon Casares of Casares Fine Art Photography. Designed to immortalize the incredible journey of this equine and her rescuers, Casares’ trademark chiaroscuro shoot with Coconut combined dramatic stage lighting and his eye for artistic photography to create a stunning portrait and to transcend the connection between man and horse. Coconut, who is now in training to be a child’s polo pony, has also learned a few tricks along the rescue journey, including how to bow. As a fitting expression of her gratitude to her rescuers, Casares captured this pony’s bow in his typical fashion: with art and illumination.

The coming 4-year-old mare was rescued from a kill pen in 2017 by Pamela Flanagan and Rob Journayvaz. Both are polo players and enthusiasts, and sent the then feral Coconut to their close friend and trainer Jillian DeGeorge, who they give the most credit for turning Coco into the sweet and playful pony she is today. Recently started under saddle, Coconut’s training has focused on the polo basics, so that she may transfer that knowledge to her young riders. Flanagan, who is also an attorney, has made rescuing equines a passion to compliment her love for polo. Over the past year, Coconut has evolved from sensitive and skittish to trusting and brave, which is emphasized in her brilliant portraits. Casares’ stunning images, photographed so that she is the only source of light and detail, shine as bright as this little pony’s future.

Coconut’s shoot with Casares follows in a long line of rescued wildlife and sport horse portraits that have defined Casares’ work. Building on influences from his background as a native of Argentina and career as an exotic animal caregiver at the country’s largest zoo, Casares expanded his photographic talents to include all species of creature, from human and equine to possum and crocodile. He has photographed animals from nearly every phylum, class, and order in the animal kingdom. With Casares Fine Art Photography appearing across the globe and garnering international acclaim, his images have captured the imagination of audiences at major media outlets and international art shows.

But despite his passion for the horses and traditional commissioned work, Casares’ portrait style images of nature’s rarest and most common species are the artist’s true accomplishment and calling card, along with his trademark style devoid of background distractions and illuminated to detail each whisker, feather, or scale. Casares captures an essence with each image that underscores his own passion and vision as a photographer and conservationist. As a former keeper for the Buenos Aires Zoo, Casares was witness to the beauty, ferocity, and fragility of the animal kingdom firsthand. During the evolution of his photographic career, he began to visit wildlife rescues to document the plight of their patients. Realizing his images could generate support and awareness for those injured and recuperating commonplace species, as well as those who are in danger of extinction, Casares embarked on a mission to unite his talent for photography with his passion for conservation. BROKEN was the result.

Combining Casares’ distinctive artistic style and the plight of rescued animals, BROKEN is the final product of 3 years’ worth of photography, the resilience of each animal, and the selfless efforts of their rescuers. In the oversized fine art book, the saga of each animal is told beside their stunning and emotionally evocative images with the goal of bringing awareness to their struggle and rehabilitation. An ever-growing endeavor, Casares intends to expand the Broken: Rescued Wildlife Fine Art Project to multiple countries and continents to maximize awareness and resources for endangered wildlife.

For more information on Casares Fine Art Photography or BROKEN, visit www.RamonCasares.net.

Media contact:
PR and Marketing
Holly Johnson
Equinium Sports Marketing, LLC
www.equinium.com
holly@equinium.com
+1 954 205 7992

Defend the Onaqui Wild Horse Herd from Devastation

The world-renowned Onaqui wild horse herd just outside of Salt Lake City, Utah is in grave danger. The Bureau of Land Management has plans to forcibly remove over 300 of the beloved wild horses and possibly risk their lives with eventual sale for slaughter. A successful rally by advocates has opened negotiations with the Bureau, but we urgently need you NOW to keep the pressure on to prevent the devastation of this beautiful herd.

The Onaqui mustangs are among the most famous and most photographed wild horses in the world, visited by tourists far and wide. The Bureau of Land Management’s cruel plans would sever family bonds en masse, ripping 80% of this herd from their lands and their companions.

Animal activists from across the country gathered in Utah to speak up for the horses on Friday, April 5.

Advocates met with Utah Bureau of Land Management officials after the rally and made some progress in protecting these wild horses. Although more meetings between the advocates and the BLM are scheduled in the next few weeks, the mustangs’ safety is far from secure. Without your urgent help, their future is bleak. It is crucial that we keep up the pressure to let the Bureau know we will not let up in our efforts to protect this herd.

  1. Call the Utah Bureau of Land Management (BLM) office Wild Horse & Burro department (801) 539-4001 ext. 4050.

You may wish to say:

I am calling to urge you to cancel all plans for a BLM roundup of the Onaqui wild horse herd and work with wild horse advocacy groups to expand the existing PZP fertility control program instead. This will save taxpayers millions of dollars and allow these beloved horses to stay free with their families and be photographed and enjoyed by eco-tourists from around the country and the world.

  1. Send our email (with your personal touch) to the BLM’s Utah Office.

In Defense of Animals
3010 Kerner, San Rafael, CA 94901
Tel. (415) 448-0048 Fax (415) 454-1031
idainfo@idausa.org

“Hats Off to the Horses: The Road to Derby” 2019 Concludes with Final Chapeau of the Season

Dagmar Galleithner-Steiner, Nicanor, Joe Steiner, and son Jonah model the newest “Hats Off to the Derby” chapeau (Photo: Barbara D. Livingston)

New Hat Honors Old Friends Retiree Nicanor

For the 10th consecutive year, Maggie Mae Designs® and Old Friends are teaming up for an unparalleled online shopping experience. “Hats Off to the Horses: The Road to the Derby” is a unique Derby-hat fundraiser featuring one-of-a-kind couture Derby hats created by MAGGIE MAE DESIGNS® to benefit Old Friends.

This new hat pays tribute to Nicanor, a stakes-placed runner who is better known as the full brother of 2006 Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro. Nicanor now resides at Old Friends, and this lovely hat uses the blue, lime, and white racing-silk colors of former owners Roy and Gretchen Jackson’s Lael Stables.

The Kentucky-bred Nicanor (Dynaformer – La Ville Rouge, Carson City) was trained by Michael Matz and ridden by several jockeys, including Barbaro rider Edgar Prado. In his 18 starts he captured 4 wins, including a 15 1/4 lengths victory at Delaware Park.

Nicanor entered stud in 2013 at Shamrock Farm in Woodbine, MD and retired to Old Friends in the spring of 2018.

For this lovely hat, Maggie Mae Designs® milliner Sally Faith Steinmann uses a foundation of white dupioni silk overlaid with three wavy layers of silk organza that is top stitched with chocolate thread. The hat is adorned with a large, two-tone, blue silk organza Marguerite fleur, highlighted by a chocolate rose curl at the center that is nestled in a medley of lime organza and taffeta leaves.

The hat is completed by a white brocade under brim that lends a soft, elegant effect around the wearer’s upturned face. And, as always, a physical remembrance — several strands of the horse’s tail hair — were woven into the trim, creating a truly unique, one-of-a-kind Derby chapeau.

The “Nicanor” chapeau is up for bid from April 1st at 8 pm through April 11th at 8 pm. All proceeds from the sale go to Old Friends.

To Bid: CLICK HERE.

To read more about Nicanor, the horse, please CLICK HERE

For more information: (502) 863-1775; www.oldfriendsequine.org; michael@oldfriendsequine.org

Danthebluegrassman, Grade 3 Winner, Euthanized at 20

Danthebluegrassman at Old Friends (Photo: Laura Battles)

GEORGETOWN, KY – MARCH 20, 2019 – Danthebluegrassman, a 2002 Kentucky Derby contender, was euthanized Monday, March 19, at Park Equine Hospital in Woodford due to an irreparable small intestinal obstruction that was causing chronic colic.

The 20-year-old gelding had been pensioned at Old Friends, the Thoroughbred retirement center in Georgetown, KY, since 2008.

A son of Pioneering, out of the Grey Dawn II mare Stay With Bruce, Danthebluegrassman — named after raconteur Dan Chandler, son of former Kentucky governor A.B. “Happy” Chandler — was campaigned by Hall of Fame trainer Bob Baffert and owner Michael E. Pegram.

As a 2-year-old, the flashy chestnut won the Gold Rush Stakes in wire-to-wire fashion. A year later, he punched his ticket to the Kentucky Derby trail with a win in the Grade 3 Golden Gate Derby and a close 2nd in the Grade 3 El Camino Real Derby.

A long shot nevertheless, on Derby day he was installed at 50-1 morning line odds, but then later scratched after he “tied up” following a routine gallop at Churchill Downs. In June of that year he went on to another victory in the Northern Dancer Stakes at Churchill Downs.

Claimed in in 2005, Dan eventually fell down the ranks and was retired to Old Friends in the spring of 2008 after a career boasting 47 Starts and 8 wins with earnings of $423,794.

“Dan was the man — tough but gentle,” said Old Friends President Michael Blowen. “We were fortunate to know him for more than a decade, and he will be missed by all of us. Special thanks to Dr. Bryan Waldrige and everyone at Park Equine for doing the best for Dan when he needed it most.”

For more information, please call (502) 863-1775 or visit the website at www.oldfriendsequine.org.

MEDIA CONTACT: Cynthia Grisolia, (347) 423-7322, cindy@oldfriendsequine.org; Michael Blowen (502) 863-1775, michael@oldfriendsequine.org