Category Archives: Horse Care/Protection

Multiple Graded-Stakes Winner Eye of the Tiger to Old Friends

GEORGETOWN, KY – JULY 5, 2018 – Grade 2 winner Eye of the Tiger has been pensioned to Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement Center in Georgetown, KY.

Michael Blowen, founder and president of Old Friends, made the announcement.

Fifth in the 2003 Kentucky Derby behind winner Funny Cide, and winner of both the Affirmed and Washington Park Handicaps, Eye of the Tiger was retired from racing in 2006 with five wins from 19 starts and earnings of $535,679 for breeder/owner John D. Gunther.

He has stood at Gunther’s Glennwood Farm near Versailles, KY — which also bred newly minted Triple Crown winner Justify — since then, but was pensioned from stud duty in 2016. The now 18-year-old stallion arrived at Old Friends on June 27.

“Eye of the Tiger he has been a long-time member of our horse family,” said Glennwood’s Tanya Gunther. “He deserves the serenity that this home will provide him, which was a challenge to do at our small farm with the constant hustle and bustle of mares, foals, and yearlings.

“To know he will join the company of Classic horses such as War Emblem, Silver Charm, and Touch Gold makes me very pleased,” Gunther added. “Imagine the stories they will share. A big thank you to Old Friends, and we look forward to visiting him very soon.”

“We’re so very thrilled to welcome Eye of the Tiger,” said Old Friends’s Blowen. “We can’t thank the Gunthers enough for trusting us with his care. This is a beautiful stallion with a great story to tell, and I’m sure he will be a big fan favorite.”

Old Friends offers guided walking tours of the farm daily at 10 am, 1 pm and 3 pm. Fans can visit with Eye of the Tiger and other well-known champions of the turf, including Kentucky Derby/Preakness winners Silver Charm and War Emblem.

For information and reservations, please call (502) 863-1775 or visit the website at www.oldfriendsequine.org.

MEDIA CONTACT: Cynthia Grisolia, (347) 423-7322, cindy@oldfriendsequine.org; Michael Blowen (502) 863-1775, michael@oldfriendsequine.org

What Causes Racehorse Lungs to Bleed?

Photo: Gun Runner. Keith Luke @lukephotography.

Ever heard of a horse that collapsed after a thirty-minute race? Exercise induced pulmonary hemorrhage could be one of the reasons behind such a tragedy. EIPH is common in most racehorses and those used in equine sports like barrel racing or polo. The term EIPH is a term for an equine who experiences blood moving into the lungs and airways during an extended period of exertion like racing.

Types of Exercise Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage

EIPH is divided into two categories, mainly bleeding from the nose and bleeding from the lungs. The bleeding from the nose involves blood vessels in the nasal airways. Approximately 5% of horses experience this type of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage.  Bleeding from the lungs occurs when blood flows from the capillaries in the lungs. You might notice blood coming from the nostrils when your horse has this type of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage. Estimates indicate that bleeding from the lungs affects over 70% of racehorses.

Causes of Exercise Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage in Horses

Although there is no definitive cause for pulmonary hemorrhage condition, experts believe that specific processes inside the lungs could be the reason for the bleeding. For the horse to get maximum strength and endurance for a race, it requires an increase in blood volume and in the pumping function of the heart. The increased pumping creates pressure within the blood vessels, which in turn raises the horse’s blood pressure. There’s an assumption that the extra pressure could cause the capillaries to burst, allowing hemorrhages to get into the air sacs, which gets into the airways, and further into nasal passages. All these responses are due to the circularity response of the stress exerted during extreme exercise.

Treatment of Exercise Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage in Horses

Reducing the recurrent episodes is the best way to treat exercise-induced hemorrhage in horses. The more times the bleeding occurs, the higher the chances of scarring which could interfere with the horse’s productivity and performance. A qualified vet may give Lasix, which is a diuretic used before a race, which helps to lower the blood pressure. You might need to allow plenty of rest for your horse and avoid keeping the horse in a stall for many days.

While there isn’t a single treatment for exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage, it’s a condition that can be managed. Speak to an experienced vet to find out what other measures could help reduce these recurrences.

What are the Symptoms of EIPH in Horses?

Your horse may exhibit certain symptoms if he has exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage. The symptoms may be auditory and visual. Some of the symptoms to watch out for include weird choking sounds after exercising for long periods, mucous tinged with blood, abnormal breathing noises like whistling or roaring, the flow of blood from one or both nostrils, and recurrent swallowing within 30 minutes after finishing a race. You’ll also notice how uneasy and distressed the horse looks.  Also, you might notice some other things that could indicate the presence of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage. You’ll notice that the horse may fall back and may not be able to sustain higher speeds like before. Furthermore, you may notice a hesitation to engage in regular activities. During this time, the horse will display extreme exertion, and you may notice unusual stride rhythms.

Tap into a Healthier Horse Foot with D.E. Hoof Taps

D.E. Hoof Taps were inserted into wall separations in this hoof after the shoe had been hot fit to the foot. The farrier will now nail the shoe on over the taps. (Ernest Woodward/Southern California Equine Podiatry Center photo)

New easy-to-use inserts improve hoof wall health, growth, and attachment

CHESTER, NEW YORK (June 14, 2018): Hoof trimmers and farriers have a new option for equine foot problems like white line disease, wall separations, excessive wear, uneven growth and cracks. If ignored, wall problems can affect a horse’s performance, accelerate lameness or lead to expensive hoof repair procedures.

Preventing and treating hoof wall problems has been a challenge to professionals and owners alike. The D.E. HOOF TAP is practically invisible once installed but the hoof responds with tighter new wall growth and a healthier white line.

Zinc-coated D.E. HOOF TAPS insert into the hoof wall and are lightly hammer-tapped until flush with the wall’s bearing surface; they may be covered by a shoe or boot or left exposed on an unshod hoof. When the trimmer or farrier returns, the tap is removed with a standard farrier’s nail puller tool, and results are evaluated.

D.E. HOOF TAPS are a patented invention of New York farrier Doug Ehrmann, who experimented with an anti-bacterial zinc-coated insert to help grow out hoof defects from within; he was encouraged when he saw improved growth.

D.E. HOOF TAPS do not impede natural foot flexion and expansion in a barefoot horse. Under a shoe, they are a non-chemical asset to encourage healthy growth. Taps are also an alternative to shoes on hind feet for some horses, and are useful in horses transitioning to barefoot, when appropriate. Some horses wear only one tap at a time; others wear several. Any kind of shoe can be used with hoof taps.

Hoof taps are manufactured in England and were tested in the farrier school at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine in New York, where instructor Steve Kraus, CJF described D.E. HOOF TAPS as “a less costly way to keep barefoot hooves from falling apart, or to help grow out cracks.”

Hoof Taps are in use by New Jersey equine veterinarians Brendan Furlong, longtime Team Veterinarian for the Land Rover U.S. Eventing Team, and Wendy Leich, USET veterinarian at four Olympic Games; they were early adopters of D.E. HOOF TAPS for their own sport horses. One of their young otherwise-barefoot dressage horses scored 80% in Wellington, Florida this winter wearing taps. This spring, they opted to install taps in their horses’ feet in lieu of shoes.

Sold in containers of 25, each steel tap has an anti-bacterial zinc coating and three shallow anchors that hold the tap in the wall just outside the white line.

Please consult your hoof care professional to decide if D.E. Hoof Taps are appropriate for your horse. Order Hoof Taps from major farrier and tack distributors, including Jacks Inc., equinepodiatry.com, or check the DE Hoof Taps Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/hoofprofessional.

Contact Doug Ehrmann directly: dehrmann.soundequine@gmail.com, or call +1 (845) 469-2553. Distributor, retail and international inquiries are welcome.

Additional helpful statements from well-known professionals who have used D.E. Hoof Taps:

Farrier Ernest Woodward of the Southern California Equine Podiatry Center in Rancho Santa Fe works on hoof problems in upper level sport horses and has documented practical and innovative uses for hoof taps, including stimulating wall growth for toe cracks on slow-growing hooves. “I’ve been using them on barefoot dressage horses here in Southern California,” Woodward said. “One horse in particular was wearing his toes off at a barn that is all pavers and asphalt; it had been serious for six months because wear was exceeding growth. The shoes were taken off by the vet’s orders and the Hoof Taps went in. Then the client called after a few weeks to report that the horse was showing so much growth it needed to be trimmed ahead of schedule!”

Florida farrier Curtis Burns works on hoof problems in high-profile sport horses, often using his Polyflex glue-on shoes. Burns reported positive results in his trial use of hoof taps in two show horses that suffered from heel separations. He reported, “When there’s a wall cavity at the heel, I can’t glue without filler under the shoe. For these horses, I added a tap. It was packed with Keratex and copper sulfate as I normally would do under the shoes. I came back to find the separation under the shoe hard and dry. They look promising; the rest of the box of Hoof Taps will be used!”

K. C. LaPierre, barefoot hoof care educator and alternative hoof protection innovator, recently added D.E. Hoof Taps to the curriculum of his courses in the US and Europe. “Hoof Taps show great promise in rehabilitation podiatry,” La Pierre said. Among his uses for hoof taps is with his Perfect Wear casting tape for repair cases and taps alone in hooves with asymmetric growth.

 

Getting Your Horse Loaded in the Trailer

Preparation is key for older horses who are having problems at the trailer. Sometimes, it’s that they were never halter started correctly and don’t really know how to lead.

“When I put some pressure on the lead rope, they need to come right off it,” says Brent Graef, a horsemanship clinician from Canyon, Texas. In his young-horse class, the definition of “enough pressure” is no more than what it would take to pull the wings off a butterfly; the horses – whether they’re youngsters or older horses – should be light on the lead rope.

So that’s Brent’s first checkpoint when he’s working with a problem-trailer-loading horse. If the horse doesn’t know how to follow a soft feel, then more ground work is needed until he leads up nicely. If the horse can lead correctly, though, Brent moves on to his next step: influencing the horse’s feet.

“I try to get in time with his feet,” Brent says. He asks the horse to lead at his elbow, so he can see the front feet. Then, as the right front foot is just about to leave the ground, Brent lifts up slightly on the lead rope, asking that foot to shorten its stride.

He does the same thing just as the left front foot is about to leave the ground. On the next two strides, Brent will ask the horse to return to his regular stride. Then he’ll ask the horse to lengthen his strides, timing the requests just as each front foot is lifting off the ground.

Learn more about loading your horses in the trailer.

By Holly Clanahan for America’s Horse

American Quarter Horse Association
1600 Quarter Horse Drive
Amarillo, TX 79104

Winston, Kentucky Derby Museum Ambassador and Old Friends Retiree, Dies at 24

Photo: Mary Greene.

GEORGETOWN, KY – MAY 2, 2018 – Winston, the miniature horse that long resided at the Kentucky Derby Museum in Louisville, has died.

In February of 2018, Winston announced his retirement from the museum and promptly joined Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement facility based in Georgetown, KY., where he would continue to greet visitors and fans.

Michael Blowen, founder and president of Old Friends, made the sad announcement of Winston’s unexpected passing.

According to Dr. Bryan Waldridge of Park Equine Hospital in Woodford County, where the mini horse was sent after exhibiting symptoms, Winston’s sudden death was caused by an infection in his abdominal cavity.

Winston would have turned 25 on May 4.

Winston took up residence at the Kentucky Derby Museum, located at Louisville’s Churchill Downs racecourse, as a two-year-old in the fall of 1995. He was donated to the Museum by Norma Aubrey of Posh Petites, Paints & Appaloosa Miniature Horses in Shelbyville, and he spent his tenure at the museum as a companion to more than 30 visiting Thoroughbreds, including Derby contenders Perfect Drift, Phantom on Tour, and Twinspired, as well as Kentucky Derby winner, Mine That Bird.

As part of his Derby Museum ambassadorship, Winston had thrown out the first pitch at a Louisville Bats game, helped Churchill Downs pick the Derby winner ahead of the race, supported many charitable organizations around town, and performed more than 10 marriage proposals with his “Will You Marry Me?” blanket.

“We are deeply saddened to learn of Winston’s sudden passing,” said Patrick Armstrong, President and CEO of the Kentucky Derby Museum. “He was such a wonderful ambassador for the Museum, bringing happiness to thousands of visitors for 22 years. He will always be a part of the Museum’s story, and he will always have a special place in our hearts.”

“This has been so devastating to everyone at the farm,” said Old Friends’s Blowen. “We were so proud when the Museum chose Old Friends for Winston when his career there ended, and we were so looking forward to spending many more years with him. He was a joy to be around.

“We’d like to thank Dr. Claire Latimer for her expertise with his Winston’s ongoing eye problems and Dr. Scott Fleming for his podiatry work that helped make the little horse more comfortable in recent weeks,” Blowen added. “And of course Dr. Waldrige and the vets at Park Equine who cared for him in his final days.”

Old Friends is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization that cares for over 175 retired racehorses. Its Dream Chase Farm, located in Georgetown, KY, is open to tourists daily by appointment. Old Friends also has a satellite facility in Greenfield Center, New York, Old Friends at Cabin Creek: The Bobby Frankel Division, which is also open to visitors. For more information on tours or to make a donation, contact the main farm at (502) 863-1775 or see their website at www.oldfriendsequine.org.

MEDIA CONTACT: Cynthia Grisolia, (347) 423-7322, cindy@oldfriendsequine.org; Michael Blowen (502) 863-1775, michael@oldfriendsequine.org

Arredondo Dressage Society to Host Horses Helping Horses Benefit for Horse Protection Assoc. of Fl.

Peter Atkins, one of the clinicians for this year’s Horses Helping Horses Benefit for the Horse Protection Association of Florida. (Photo courtesy of Samantha Clark)

Newberry, Florida (April 9, 2018) – The Arredondo Dressage Society will host the 9th annual Horses Helping Horses benefit on Saturday April 21st at the Canterbury Equestrian Showplace in Newberry, Florida. Several of the region’s most talented dressage instructors will they donate their time and skills to perform a benefit clinic for Horse Protection Association of Florida (HPAF).  The Dressage Society website lists the clinicians, ride times and instructions for bidding on the clinics: www.arredondodressage.org.

The day is a day all about horses, and a day to raise awareness about equine rescues and sanctuaries and the lifesaving work they do year-round to care for the at-risk horses in their communities who have often been abused or neglected.  “Horses are majestic, loving animals, and we encourage our local and loyal supporters will come out so that we can continue our lifesaving efforts for years to come,” explains, Karen Curran the volunteer coordinator for the event.

To support this cause, Arredondo Dressage Society will sponsor events throughout the day.  The clinics offer riders and spectators a chance to see actual dressage training and work. The event will take place rain or shine in the Canterbury Showplace covered arena. In addition, the Arredondo Dressage Society will sponsor bake sales, used tack sale and raffles throughout the day. Equine companies such as Vita Flex, Triple Crown Feed, Omega Alpha, Transformer Equine and others have donated raffles prizes to support the cause.  The clinics offer rider and spectators a chance to see actual dressage training and work.  In addition, Arredondo Dressage Society has an online auction on its website, which will be finalized at the 5:00 pm Wine and Cheese Reception, with a live auction and bidding and a wine tasting sponsored by PRP Wines.

The Horse Protection Association of Florida (HPAF) staff will showcase some of the rescued animals and demonstrate some Parelli work with these horses, and they will be on-hand to answer questions and to educate the public about the work being done on behalf of the equines of Florida.

The following day, Sunday, April 22nd, Arredondo Dressage will sponsor a Schooling Show at the Canterbury Equestrian Showplace.  Interested riders can sign up on its website.

Horse enthusiasts are invited to come for a fun day and support a most worthy cause and the schooling show on Sunday is also open to the public.

For more information, contact Karen Curran, Volunteer Coordinator, at 561-542-4448 or email her at kcurranlaw@aol.com.

www.arredondodressage.org

BLM Wild Horse & Burro Meeting: CANCELLED

The BLM has officially cancelled their National Wild Horse & Burro Advisory Board meeting, scheduled for March 27-28 in Salt Lake City.

The BLM failed to give proper notice in the Federal Register, in direct violation of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA). At their last meeting in Grand Junction, CO, the Advisory Board voted unanimously to meet next in Washington, D.C. Instead, the last-minute meeting was slated for Salt Lake City, Utah, home turf of pro-horse-slaughter Congressman Chris Stewart. The meeting was cancelled after an attorney representing TCF and AWHC sent a letter to BLM charging that the Agency had violated FACA.

Read Our Press Release

Ginger Kathrens
Executive Director
The Cloud Foundation
107 South 7th St
Colorado Springs, CO 80905
www.thecloudfoundation.org

TCF & AWHC Threatening Legal Action over Upcoming BLM Meeting

An attorney representing The Cloud Foundation and the American Wild Horse Campaign sent a formal letter to Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, Acting Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Deputy Director Brian Steed, and Fred Woehl, Chair of the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board, threatening legal action over an illegally scheduled National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board meeting.

The March 27-28 meeting clearly violates the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) requiring 30 days of public notice prior to public meetings.

Read the Press Release & Letter

We are hopeful you will share this information with your networks. As always, we will inform you of any updates regarding this situation. If the meeting does proceed in spite of this obvious violation of FACA, we hope that you will consider attending or tuning in to the livestream. You can learn more about the meeting schedule and attending here.

Ginger Kathrens
Executive Director
The Cloud Foundation
107 South 7th St
Colorado Springs, CO 80905
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Upcoming Wild Horse & Burro Advisory Board Meeting Violates Federal Law

The BLM has announced an upcoming National Wild Horse & Burro Advisory Board meeting, scheduled for March 27-28th. The problem is that this announcement is in clear violation of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) which states meetings must be placed in the Federal Register 30 days in advance. Even if the meeting is regarding an urgent matter, it must be announced 15 days in advance, a deadline the BLM also failed to meet.

Read our press release here.

If the meeting proceeds despite this obvious violation, we hope that you will plan to attend this meeting if possible or tune into the livestream. The meeting will be held in Salt Lake City, UT. You can find out more information about the meeting on the BLM’s website here.

Ginger Kathrens
Executive Director
The Cloud Foundation
107 South 7th St
Colorado Springs, CO 80905
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Decomplexicating Equine Nutrition: The High Fat Diet, by Geoff Tucker DVM

The Safe Fats and Oils

There are two rules of thumb about fats and oils. The first is that the more saturated the fat is, the less inflammatory it is. The second is that the shorter the fatty acid chain is (as in short chain, medium chain and long chain fatty acids), the better it is. Unfortunately, these rules of fats are made for humans. We can only assume and extrapolate for horses. There are some important reasons why there is a lack of good information in feeding horses. One is that there is little independent research on this subject. By independent I mean that there isn’t an agenda or a company behind the research. The second is a little subtler. Let me explain.

Can we really compare the horse of today with one from 1000 or 10,000 years ago? More importantly, if we could find ancient horses untouched by humans and test them for nutrition, how would this compare with your horse living today? If your horse is kept in a stall, competes somewhere every weekend, lives in FL for the winter and 1500 miles away for the summer, is fed grain and carrots or is not fed them – how can all of these variables be considered when determining what to feed a horse that only grazed naturally thousands of years ago?

Click here to read the full article.

Geoff Tucker
www.TheEquinePractice.com