Category Archives: *Featured/Spotlights

Special features, spotlights, headlines

Eventing Gold for Great Britain and Germany’s Ingrid Klimke at Strzegom

Photo: The victorious British team at the FEI European Eventing Championships at Strzegom in Poland: Nicola Wilson (also individual bronze), Ros Canter, Oliver Townend and Kristina Cook (FEI/Jon Stroud)

A jubilant British team was celebrating after jumping three superb clear rounds in the final phase to hold onto their overnight lead and clinch the longed-for team title at the FEI European Eventing Championships in Strzegom (POL).

“We are very excited to be back on top. We’ve got some amazing riders and horses and we’ve worked hard for this.” — Kristina Cook, British gold medal team member

Ingrid Klimke, who has been such a key member of the German team for 17 years, also delivered a jumping perfect round under pressure on Horseware Hale Bob to win her first individual title and lead Germany to team silver.

Triple European champion Michael Jung’s winning run finally ended and the German sportingly settled for individual silver with a clear round on fischerRocana.

“You just have to keep going and after 20 years it will happen! I always want to be a team player, but this was my dream” — Ingrid Klimke (GER), new European champion

Sweden held onto team bronze, but Sara Algotsson Ostholt had a less than happy jumping round on Reality 39 and dropped from third to ninth.

Britain’s Nicola Wilson went clear on Bulana to take bronze, her first individual medal, while Cook and Canter lined up behind her in fourth and fifth. Oliver Townend, who was the discard score, did not present Cooley SRS at the final horse inspection.

Ten teams and 56 riders completed the competition, although there was disappointment when host nation Poland’s best rider, Pawel Spisak, was denied a fairy-tale finish after Banderas did not pass the final horse inspection.

www.strzegom2017.pl

By Kate Green

FEI Press contact:

Leanne Williams
Manager Press Relations
leanne.williams@fei.org
+41 79 314 24 38

Great Britain Bounces Back at Eventing Championships to Take Lead after Cross Country

Photo: Ingrid Klimke with Horseware Hale Bob. (FEI/Jon Stroud)

Great Britain has swept into the lead after cross country at the FEI European Eventing Championships in Strzegom (POL) with three brilliant clear rounds from team rookie Ros Canter on Allstar B, Kristina Cook (Billy the Red) and anchorman Nicola Wilson (Bulana).

“Bulana is so honest and good on a line. She was in a rhythm from start to finish. It’s very exciting! We had a group team hug and a jump around!” — British team member Nicola Wilson (GBR), lying 4th individually

But Britain has only two fences in hand over the defending champions, Germany, who is known for their skill in the final jumping phase. German duo Ingrid Klimke (Horseware Hale Bob) and triple European champion Michael Jung (fischerRocana FST) completed flawless rounds and are in individual gold and silver medal positions.

Germany slipped behind Britain when pathfinder Julia Krajewski, riding Samourai du Thot, picked up 20 penalties for a runout at fence 8 and dressage leader Bettina Hoy (Seigneur Medicott) ran out at the influential double of angled brushes at fence 4 and was then eliminated for a fall at the 10th.

“I felt under pressure for sure, but Bobby was in such good form that I was nearly laughing and really had to concentrate. We had such fun out there!” — Ingrid Klimke (GER), individual overnight leader

Sweden was the only nation to achieve four clear rounds and is in bronze medal position, with Sara Algotsson Ostholt and Reality 39 in individual third place.

Ten nations completed as teams, with the hosts, Poland, in sixth place behind Italy and Belgium. The French, who were second after dressage, finished with only two riders after Gwendolen Fer had a fall with Traumprinz and Thomas Carlile, lying in sixth place, was eliminated for three refusals with the stallion Upsilon.

Britain’s day started shakily when pathfinder Oliver Townend had two runouts on the inexperienced Cooley SRS, but he still completed with only 1.2 time penalties, which was one of the fastest times of the day. There were 63 completions, 35 clear rounds and four inside the optimum time of 10 minutes.

“Oliver did a great job because he never gave up and the team was fantastic. It’s where preparation meets opportunity. I get a lot of teasing from my German friends, but I am thrilled to be working with the British team again.” — Christopher Bartle, former German trainer, now training Team GB

Follow live scoring on www.strzegom2017.pl.

By Kate Green

FEI Press contact:

Leanne Williams
Manager Press Relations
leanne.williams@fei.org
+41 79 314 24 38

19 European Nations Line Up at Eventing Championships in Strzegom

Michael Jung will be bidding for a record fourth individual title at the 2017 FEI European Eventing Championships (FEI/Jon Stroud)

Can anyone break Germany’s firm grip on the FEI European Eventing Championships? That is the question as riders, horses, owners, grooms and trainers from 19 countries, plus a host of volunteers, have been welcomed to the first senior Eventing championships to be held at the Stragona Equestrian Center in Strzegom (POL) from August 17-20 and the first one in Eastern Europe since Bialy Bor (POL) in 1986.

The German team is bidding for a fourth successive European team gold medal and world number one Michael Jung, whose extraordinary winning run began in Luhmühlen (GER) in 2011 with the great La Biosthetique Sam, will again be one of the favourites to take the title and, in the process, make Eventing history.

The Jung story continued to Malmö (SWE) in 2013, where he triumphed on Halunke, and then in 2015 he produced an unforgettable display of horsemanship on fischerTakinou, galloping through torrential rain at Blair Castle (GBR) in the Scottish Highlands to equal Ginny Eliot’s (GBR) record of three successive titles on three different horses and receive team and individual gold medals from HRH Queen Elizabeth ll.

Now he will be trying to make history on Polish soil, and few would bet against him making it four in a row with fischerRocana FST, known as ‘Roxy’. The brilliant little mare is a dual winner of Kentucky CCI4* and won world team gold and individual silver medals at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ in Normandy (FRA) in 2014.

A mighty German squad includes three-time Olympic gold medallist Ingrid Klimke (Horseware Hale Bob), and recent Luhmühlen winners Julia Krajewski (Samourai Du Thot).

Joy of the sport

However, nothing is ever predictable in Eventing – that is the joy of the sport – and the name that has been on everyone’s lips this summer is Frenchman Thomas Carlile on the beautiful grey stallion Upsilon, a horse that is hugely talented in all three phases.

Last year at the Rio Olympic Games, the French beat the Germans to team gold and they come to Strzegom on a wave of confidence. They may be missing the Olympic silver medallist Astier Nicolas, who is injured, but France fields riders of the calibre of Maxime Livio, currently ranked fifth in the world, and 2015 individual bronze medallist Thibaut Vallette. Remarkably, France, so often the silver medallists, have never won the European team title, but they must surely feel the tide is about to turn.

Great Britain have dominated the European Championships for many years with an unbroken winning run of eight titles from 1995 to 2009, and will be equally determined to regain their place at the top of the leaderboard, as will their new team trainer Christopher Bartle who helped Germany to three Olympic golds and multiple championship medals.

The British squad is headed by Kristina Cook (Billy the Red), for whom it is an eighth European appearance. She is the only mother to have taken the European title, which she did convincingly in 2009 on Miners Frolic in Fontainebleau (FRA).

The strong British line-up includes Luhmühlen runner-up Nicola Wilson on the exciting black mare Bulana – Wilson is the highest ranked rider here at world number four after Jung – plus newly crowned national champion Gemma Tattersall (Quicklook V) and Oliver Townend (Cooley SRS), who is ranked eighth in the world.

Look out also for Belgium’s leading lady Karin Donckers, the world number 10, for whom it is a seventh European Championship, Belarusian Olympic rider Alena Tseliapushkina on Passat, Swiss brothers Ben and Felix Vogg, Swedish sisters Sara and Linda Algotsson and leading Irish couple Michael and Patricia Ryan.

There will be teams from Spain, Italy, Russia, and, for the first time in decades, Norway, coached by the great Finnish rider Piia Pantsu-Jonsson, world bronze medallist in 2002.

The action begins 17 August when the dressage test starts at 10:00 CEST in front of ground jury Ernst Topp (GER, president), Sue Baxter (GBR) and Slawomir Pietrzak (POL). The Technical Delegate is Gillian Kyle from Ireland and great anticipation surrounds Saturday’s action on the cross country track designed by the German maestro Rűdiger Schwarz, who produced such brilliant sport for the 2006 FEI World Equestrian Games™ in Aachen (GER).

History is waiting to be made – but who will be making it?

Follow the action on www.fei.tv.

By Kate Green

FEI Media Contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Press Relations
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 787 506 142

Leanne Williams
Manager Press Relations
leanne.williams@fei.org
+41 79 314 24 38

US Dressage Team Wins Bronze in FEI Nations Cup CDIO3* Hickstead

Spidge Event Photography.

US Finishes Second in FEI Nations Cup Dressage Series

Hickstead, England – The Dutta Corp. U.S. Dressage Team clinched the bronze medal after having solid performances at the FEI Nations Cup CDIO3* Hickstead. Chef d’Equipe Robert Dover guided the U.S. team of Katherine Bateson-Chandler, Susan Dutta, Chase Hickok, and Charlotte Jorst to deliver quality tests throughout the three days of competition. The U.S. team earned bronze with a score of 421.920, finishing behind gold medal-winning France with a score of 424.811 and silver medal-winning the Netherlands with a score of 424.053. In addition, the FEI Nations Cup Dressage Series came to a close at Hickstead, with the U.S. finishing second behind Sweden and ahead of Denmark.

“I was very proud once again of our U.S. Nations Cup athletes here in Hickstead. Under extremely difficult weather conditions, our riders rode with class and did their very best,” said Dover. “Our goal this year was not to simply do well, which we did by winning in Rotterdam and placing second in Aachen, along with other results in the series, but to show off both our fabulous veterans as well as fresh, new human and equine faces. We are all very proud of our second-place finish in the series, the only nation to have supported every competition in it!”

The competition began on Friday with all team members performing the CDIO3* Grand Prix Test. Hickok (Wellington, Fla.) and Hyperion Farm, Inc.’s Sagacious HF were the top U.S. finishers in second place with a score of 71.640%. Jorst (Reno, Nev.) and Kastel Denmark’s Kastel’s Nintendo were not far behind in fourth place with a score of 70.880%. Bateson-Chandler (Wellington, Fla.) and Jane Clark’s Alcazar had a nice test to score 69.320% to finish in 15th place, while Dutta (Wellington, Fla.) and Tim Dutta Inc.’s Currency DC received a score of 63.640% to finish in 26th place.

On Saturday, two U.S. combinations competed in the CDIO3* Grand Prix Special with both of their scores counting towards the team score. Hickok and the 1999 Dutch Warmblood gelding had another stellar performance to finish third with a score of 70.843%. Bateson-Chandler and the 2005 Dutch Warmblood gelding delivered a great test to finish eighth with a score of 69.412%.

The Nations Cup came to its conclusion on Sunday with the CDIO3* Grand Prix Freestyle. The remaining two U.S. combinations competed, and the best score counted for the team score. Jorst and the 2003 Dutch Warmblood stallion put forth a good effort to score 69.825% to finish seventh. Dutta and the 2000 Oldenburg gelding performed their first freestyle of the year and received a score of 66.625% to finish in 12th place.

View the complete results.

By Kathleen Landwehr, US Equestrian Communications Department

What Are the Main Betting Terms in Horse Racing You Need to Know?

Horse racing is an exhilarating sport to watch, with powerful animals and talented jockeys either sprinting on the Flat or risking life and limb over obstacles.

It is even better when you have money on a horse and so it is essential to know the main betting terms involved in racing.

There are many ways to place a wager, with bets to win or ‘on the nose’ popular but it is also possible to back a horse ‘each way’.

You will need to outlay double your stake as you are backing it to either win or be placed (usually the first three or four home in a race).

If the horse wins then you will be paid out for the win and the place (a quarter or fifth of the winning amount) while a placed horse will see you receive just the latter.

The favourite, or ‘jolly’, is the horse the bookies expect to win and will have the shortest odds while the ‘outsider’ will have long odds but it much less likely to land the spoils.

Watch out for a horse that is ‘on the drift’ with its odds lengthening, as there is little money being placed on it and the bookmakers feel confident it will not win.

When a market has just opened up on an upcoming race, it is common to see a ‘bar’ price, which refers to the odds of those runners not quoted with a price during early betting shows.

An ‘accumulator’ is a multiple bet when you place money on the outcome of two or more races, with two selections termed a ‘two-fold’, etc.

The winnings from the first race roll over to the next, and so on, meaning a successful accumulator can be very profitable, although it is tough to pick just one winner, let alone two or more.

Prior to race meetings there will be tips from the racing experts and a NAP of the day is the selection that racing correspondents feel is their strongest of the day.

Check out this NAP of the day if you fancy a flutter, while a horse termed a ‘banker’ is one that is expected to win.

A horse that goes off at ‘even money’ means that you will get back the value of your stake plus of course the stake should your selection win, while one that is ‘odds-on’ is fancied to do well and the pay-out will be less that the initial outlay, plus your stake.

You might sometimes hear a favourite referred to as a ‘Bismarck’ and this is a horse that bookmakers expect to lose or be ‘sunk’ and they are happy to accept bets for.

It is important to check out the ‘form’ of a horse before deciding which one to bet on, while the ‘going’ – the condition of the racing surface – should also play a part in your selection as some horses favour quick, dry ground and others enjoy the mud.

Finally, if you are lucky enough to land a winner, you will be keen to learn the SP (starting price) as this is the one that will determine how big your return will be.

A Thrilling Jump Off Saw Gregory Wathelet Claim Victory in Rolex Grand Prix at CHIO Aachen

23 July 2017, Aachen, Germany – The first equestrian Major of the year has been won by Belgium’s Gregory Wathelet riding Coree, thrilling the 40,000 capacity crowds in the main arena at CHIO Aachen in a dramatic jump off. Portugal’s Luciana Diniz riding Fit for Fun 13 was second and The Netherlands’ Marc Houtzager riding Sterrehof’s Calimero took third place.

A cool, overcast day welcomed the 40 horse and rider combinations who had qualified for the Rolex Grand Prix on Sunday 23 July, the finale and highlight of the nine-day World Equestrian Festival in West Germany. As one of the four Majors which make up the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, every rider had travelled here with one aim: to win in one of the sport’s greatest outdoor arenas.

The Rolex Grand Prix course, designed by the notoriously demanding Frank Rothenberger asked these world class pairings continuous questions over the first round, with 16 jumping efforts to tackle. Rolex Testimonee Scott Brash was third to go and despite a seemingly faultless start, the penultimate triple combination saw Brash take an unlucky four faults.

Testament to the difficulty of the course, only seven clear rounds were produced within the time, including a foot perfect round from Canadian Olympic 2016 bronze medallist and Rolex Testimonee, Eric Lamaze. Two seconds faster than the rest of the field; he had set the bar high for the second round.

18 riders progressed through to round two, with Scott Brash and Eric Lamaze joined by fellow Rolex Testimonees Kent Farrington and Meredith Michaels-Beerbaum, both of whom carried four faults from the first round.

The course was altered for the second stage of the competition: a revised track of 15 jumping efforts tested each horse and rider combination, requiring utmost accuracy and precision to leave the poles standing. Clear rounds were easier to come by and after Luciana Diniz of Portugal followed Marc Houtzager by posting the second double clear, the crowd knew it was going to be treated to a jump-off. Gregory Wathelet of Belgium and Laura Kraut of the USA followed suit, taking the final round to four competitors. Despite recording the fastest first round ride, Rolex Testimonee Eric Lamaze had an unlucky four faults, taking him out of contention of winning the Rolex Grand Prix.

First to go in the jump off was Marc Houtzager, posting a clear round with a time of 53.66 seconds, but this was quickly beaten as Luciana Diniz raced around the course in 47.40 seconds. With two riders left to go, a hushed silence descended over the crowd as Wathelet entered the arena aboard his mare Coree. The pair turned up the pressure and took another second off the fastest recorded time, finishing on 46.60. The cheering crowd once again quietened as the last rider to go, Laura Kraut, entered the arena. Unfortunately, luck is not always on your side in this sport and Kraut knocked the last rail, dropping her into fourth place, giving Wathelet the title spot.

Speaking about his first Rolex Grand Prix win at CHIO Aachen, Wathelet remarked, “Rolex has the best Shows to form the Rolex Grand Slam with Aachen, Calgary, Geneva and Den Bosch and every rider wants to win. For me it is a dream come to true to win the Rolex Grand Prix at Aachen and have my name on the wall and Calgary would be the same, so I hope to get a good result there also.”

Show Director Frank Kemperman spoke after the Rolex Grand Prix: “First of all I would like to congratulate the winners; you presented some fantastic sport today; a special thank you to your horses. A big thank you to Rolex because without Rolex it would not be possible to have this Grand Prix today. This is the start of a new Rolex Grand Slam for Gregory; our friends in Calgary and Geneva are waiting for you.”

Along with the prestigious Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping trophy, Wathelet also received an engraved Oyster Perpetual Datejust II. All eyes will now be looking ahead to the next equestrian Major at the CSIO Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ in September, where Wathelet will be attempting to continue his reign as the live contender of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping.

MEDIA CONTACTS:

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Virginie Chevailler
virginie.chevailler@rolex.com
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US Dressage Team Wins Silver at FEI Nations Cup CDIO5* Aachen

Shannon Brinkman Photo (Left to right: Olivia LaGoy-Weltz, Kasey Perry-Glass, Laura Graves, and Adrienne Lyle)

Graves and Verdades Win Grand Prix Special

Aachen, Germany – The Dutta Corp. U.S. Dressage Team won the silver medal at the FEI Nations Cup at the World Equestrian Festival CHIO Aachen in Aachen, Germany on Saturday with a final score of 450.392. Rio Olympic team bronze medalist Laura Graves and Verdades were foot perfect as they bested the field of competitors, unseating Germany’s Isabell Werth in the Grand Prix Special to win with a final a score of 81.824%.

“These incredible young ladies are just super athletes along with super wonderful horses, some of which are brand new to arenas such as this,” said Chef d’Equipe Robert Dover. “I was over-wrought with emotion about them landing in second place halfway through this Nations Cup. On the one hand, a part of me expects that; I expect excellence. Still, it is an extra thrill to have this youthful look of new faces coming along with our seasoned veterans. I’m very happy and very excited about this group.”

Maintaining their silver status from Thursday’s Grand Prix, the U.S. had little to no room for error as they entered the arena. The 2016 Olympic duo of Graves (Geneva, Fla.) and Verdades, Graves’ and Curt Maes’ 2002 Dutch Warmblood gelding, kept the momentum going fresh off their Grand Prix test, where they placed second with a 79.514%. They were determined to keep the team on the podium by producing a showstopping performance in the Grand Prix Special.

“Today was just our day. My horse gave me a great birthday present,” said Graves. “It was actually the first time this year that we have shown in the [Grand Prix] Special. I could not be more pleased with him. Aachen brings out the top riders, and that’s what keeps me motivated.”

Graves is the fifth U.S. dressage rider to win at Aachen, behind Patricia Galvin and Jessica Ransehousen (1960), Robert Dover (1987 CHIO Freestyle) and Steffen Peters (2009).

“A win in Aachen is tantamount to a win at the Olympics,” said Dover. “She was against the very best rider from the Olympic Games, the very best rider from the World Cup and when you beat that rider and horse, it’s just everything. When you go into the stadium and have our national anthem played and our flag go up, it is something she will never forget in her life. Nothing can make me more proud or happier for her.”

London Olympic veteran Adrienne Lyle (Ketchum, Idaho) aboard Salvino, the 2007 Hanoverian stallion owned by Salvino Partners, LLC, entered the ring confident and composed, demonstrating brilliant movements to finish on a final score of 71.814% and 73.608% in the Grand Prix and Grand Prix Special, respectively.

“I’m ecstatic,” said Dover. “She rode magnificently both days. Today, the marks reflected a super talented horse and a fantastic rider piloting this young horse.”

Relatively new to international competitions, Olivia LaGoy-Weltz (Haymarket, Va.) and Lonoir, LaGoy-Weltz and Mary Anne McPhail’s 2004 Danish Warmblood gelding, competed with poise riding two technically outstanding tests, finishing the Grand Prix with a 71.514% and 72.118% in the Grand Prix Special.

“Olivia is another incredibly gifted rider. She is as tough about wanting perfect and being determined,” said Dover. “Right before she went in I said rack up as many points as you possibly can in the first half of the test because his greenness is in the second half and that’s exactly what she did. That’s what you want in a team rider; it shows another great talent for the future.”

Graves’ Rio Olympic teammate, Kasey Perry-Glass (Wellington, Fla.), and Goerklintgaards Dublet, Diane Perry’s 2003 Warmblood gelding, had an unexpected miscommunication in their first pirouette during Thursday’s Grand Prix, resulting in a score of 68.929% which was the drop score for the team. However, the pair’s performance on Saturday set the tone for the U.S. with a score of 71.608%.

“We wanted Kasey to keep showing the continued evolution of how this horse is coming on,” said Dover. “It [Grand Prix Special] was so amazing and so lovely. The 74-75% is right there. I’m thrilled with her.”

Germany took home top honors with a final collective team score of 471.046, and placed three of their riders in the top ten in the Grand Prix Special. Sweden, who was in fourth after the Grand Prix, surpassed Denmark to round out the top three with a final score of 437.635.

Graves and Verdades placed third with a score of 82.550% in the Grand Prix Freestyle Sunday morning.

From Classic Communications/US Equestrian Communications Department

Caroline Martin and Doug Payne Awarded Jacqueline B. Mars Competition and Training Grants

Caroline Martin and The Apprentice. Photo By: Shannon Brinkman.

Gladstone, N.J. – July 20, 2017 – The United States Equestrian Team (USET) Foundation is pleased to announce that this year’s recipients of the Jacqueline B. Mars Competition and Training Grants are Caroline Martin and Doug Payne. Martin and Payne were recognized and unanimously selected by the US Equestrian eventing selectors due to their impressive records and future in representing the United States in international competition.

As recipients of the Jacqueline B. Mars Competition and Training Grants, Payne (Aiken, South Carolina) will travel to compete in the Blenheim CCI3* in Oxford, England with his and Debi Crowley’s gelding, Vandiver. Martin (Riegelsville, Pennsylvania) will travel to The Netherlands for the Military Boekelo-Enschede CCIO3* in October to compete her two geldings, Pebbly Maximus and The Apprentice.

Payne’s show jumping and dressage has continued to improve throughout his career in addition to maintaining his success in cross-country. Payne took over the ride for Vandiver in 2015 and in 2016, the pair placed fourth in The Fork CIC3* in April and earned a third place finish in the Nutrena USEA American Eventing Championships in August.

“It’s a huge honor and certainly an obligation to do our best and make the most of the opportunity,” noted Payne. “It’s a great opportunity against the best in Europe. The timing works really well and sets us up for 2018, which is the ultimate goal. I have to thank Jacqueline Mars and the USET Foundation for having faith in me and awarding grants like this. The experience gained is very difficult to get by yourself.”

Payne and Vandiver continued to find success in 2017, earning a second place at Pine Top Advanced CIC3* in February and a second place finish in April at The Fork CIC3*. Payne also plans to compete in the Millbrook Horse Trials and the American Eventing Championships before traveling to England.

Martin has been a part of the Emerging Athlete’s program since 2013, and recently received the 2017 Karen Stives Eventing Endowment Fund Grant. Martin had the opportunity to participate in the Karen E. Stives European Emerging Athlete Tour under the tutelage of Leslie Law, furthering her education and gaining competitive experience in Great Britain. Martin finished her two horses, Pebbly Maximus and The Apprentice, in fifth and eighth place, respectively, at the Bramham International CCI3*-U25 in June.

“It’s unreal to receive this grant,” expressed Martin. “It’s the second grant I’ve received this year and it’s a dream come true to have this much support from my country. I’ve always wanted to be a professional rider. I’ve now switched over from the Under 25 group to the young professional and it’s wonderful to go overseas and represent my country. I have two remarkable horses with The Apprentice and Pebbly Maximus and I hope to improve upon my results from earlier this year.”

Martin had the first 3* win of her career this year at Carolina International’s CIC3* in March. At just 22 years old, Martin is one of the country’s up-and-coming stars, and her return to Europe with her two geldings will be a strong stepping stone in her aim towards competing at the Kentucky CCI4* in spring 2018.

For more information on the USET Foundation, visit www.uset.org.

Contact: Rebecca Walton
phone 561.753.3389 fax 561.753.3386
rjw@phelpsmediagroup.com
PhelpsMediaGroup.com

US Eventing Team Wins FEI Nations Cup Eventing Competition at Great Meadow International

Photo Credit: Anna Purdy.

Jennie Brannigan Captures Second Individual Title

The Plains, Va. – The Land Rover U.S. Eventing Team won the FEI Nations Cup™ CICO3* at the Great Meadow International, presented by Adequan, for the second consecutive year. The team of Jennie Brannigan, Lynn Symansky, Phillip Dutton, and Boyd Martin defeated teams from Canada and Great Britain in the only FEI Nations Cup™ Eventing competition outside Europe. Brannigan also captured her second individual title at Great Meadow, having won previously in 2015.

Cross country course designer Mike Etherington-Smith reversed the direction and order of the fences from last year with the intention of generating interest for both the competitors and spectators. The change proved to be challenging for some, though not for the U.S. team. All four riders completed the course without any jumping penalties.

Brannigan had an unforgettable day. The Reddick, Fla. resident went third in the team order and secured the victory for the U.S. incurring only 1.6 time faults on Nina Gardner’s Cambalda. Brannigan came into the final day in fourth place and catapulted to the top spot with a final score of 49.8 penalties.

“The first time I came it was so exciting because it earned me a spot as a traveling alternate for the Pan Am Games, which was quite special to me,” said Brannigan. “It’s such an honor to get to ride for your country and ‘Ping’ has been an incredible horse in a lot of ways and is wonderful to me. I really appreciate him stepping up to the plate.”

By the time second U.S. team rider Lynn Symansky took to the course, two riders were eliminated from the British team and the Canadians had already secured a team score. The Middleburg, Va. resident jumped clear, finishing just above the optimum time on Donner, owned by The Donner Syndicate, LLC. They incurred 1.2 time faults for a three-phase score of 50.1 penalties, which was good enough for second place individually. Symansky was originally the alternate, but was named to the team after Buck Davidson, Jr. withdrew Carl Segal and Sherrie Martin’s Copper Beach.

“It’s such a great cohesive group. Everybody just works together and supports each other. We’re all out here to win and do the best that we can,” said Symansky. “It was awesome. The whole way around I heard people cheering me on, saying, ‘Come on Lynn, you can do it!’ It’s cool to ride at your hometown event. It was an honor.”

U.S. pathfinder Boyd Martin of Cochranville, Pa. was the first rider to complete the course within the optimum time of 6 minutes and 33 seconds, finishing within two seconds at 6:31. Riding Steady Eddie, owned by Denise Lahey, Pierrie Colin, George and Gretchen Wintersteen, the Olympic veteran finished on his dressage score of 58.3 penalties.

“He came through for me; he was the only horse that finished on his dressage score,” said Martin of the New Zealand Thoroughbred. “It was a bit hard to gauge the course because the first rider Justine Dutton (GBR) fell and second rider Jessica Phoenix (CAN) was held on the course, but I zipped around and everything rode really well.”

Dutton, of West Grove, Pa., already knew that the U.S. had won the Nations Cup prior to going out, but an individual win was on the line. Riding Kristine and John Norton’s I’m Sew Ready, the six-time Olympic veteran finished outside the optimum time adding 5.6 time faults to his cumulative score of 51.6 penalties and putting him in third place.

“My teammates did it all for me. Jennie came home and I had a minute to go before I went in the box and they said she only had a couple of time faults,” said Dutton. “I thought it was a good run for the horse. He’s not the fastest, but I think I could have done a little better job at the galloping fences. Overall, though, I think it was a good run for him and pleased that he went so well.”

The winning score for the U.S. was 151.5 penalties. Team Canada finished on 168.6 penalties for second place. Because Great Britain failed to have the required three qualifying scores, they were awarded a drop score penalty of 1000 points, and finished third.

Full Results

From Classic Communications and the US Equestrian Communications Department

Tinners Way, Multiple Grade 1 Winner and Son of Secretariat, Dead at 27

Photo: Laura Battles.

GEORGETOWN, KY – JULY 6, 2017 – Tinners Way, multiple grade-one winner and the last colt born of the great Secretariat, has died. The 27-year-old stallion was euthanized July 5th at Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement Farm in Georgetown, KY, where he had been pensioned since 2010.

Michael Blowen, founder and President of Old Friends, made the announcement of his passing this morning. Old Friends resident veterinarian Dr. Bryan Waldridge attributed the cause of death to acute onset of severe neurologic disease. “Tinner had been treated in the past for EPM,” added Waldridge, “and he did have some lingering neurologic effects from a previous infection.”

Bred and owned by Juddmonte Farms, Tinners Way (Secretariat – Devon Diva, The Minstrel) began his career in Europe, where he won three of his seven starts in England and France, including the City of York Stakes and the Milcars Temple Fortune Stakes on the turf as a 3-year-old.

In the U.S. as a 4-year-old, Tinner joined California-based trainer Bobby Frankel’s barn, and under the Hall of Famer’s watchful eye the striking chestnut won the grade one $1 million Pacific Classic in 1995, beating future Hall-of-Famer Best Pal and posting a record-equaling mile and a quarter of 1:59 2/5, a time reminiscent of his sire’s Kentucky Derby run.

Tinners Way had a repeat victory in the ’95 Pacific Classic, where he defeated 1994’s Breeders’ Cup Classic champion Concern, and he earned yet another grade-one win the following year in The Californian.

Throughout his career Tinners Way faced off against numerous Old Friends pensioners, including Awad, Kiri’s Clown, and Alphabet Soup.

Sent to stud in 1997 after 27 starts, seven wins, and career earnings of $1,849,452, Tinners Way stood at Vinery in Kentucky, Harris Farms in California, and finally at Key Ranch in Texas, where he retired in 2010 as the richest racehorse in Texas. He was donated to Old Friends by owners Phil Leckinger and Jerry Hardin.

“Twenty-seven is not a bad number,” said Leckinger by phone from Texas. “I can’t thank Old Friends enough for the care and support he was given. Tinners Way certainly did wonders for us, he did wonders for Juddmonte on the track, and I hope he did wonders for his friends and fans in retirement.”

“We are so saddened by the loss of Tinners Way,” said Old Friends’s Blowen, “but its times like these that you really see how much we can do for these old horses. Tinner, like Wallenda, was a warrior to the end, and when he told us his battle was over, we listened.  He had so many friends from all over the country that visited him often,” added Blowen. “He leaves behind a great legacy and a host of adoring fans.”

Old Friends is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization that cares for more than 170 retired racehorses. Its Dream Chase Farm, located in Georgetown, KY, is open to tourists daily by appointment. Old Friends also has a satellite facility in Greenfield Center, New York, Old Friends at Cabin Creek: The Bobby Frankel Division, which is also open to visitors. For more information on tours or to make a donation, contact the main farm at (502) 863-1775 or see their website at www.oldfriendsequine.org.

MEDIA CONTACT: Cynthia Grisolia, (347) 423-7322, cindy@oldfriendsequine.org; Michael Blowen, (502) 863-1775, michael@oldfriendsequine.org