Category Archives: Competitions

Five Things to Know about the Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event

Phillip Dutton and Mr. Medicott were the 2017 USEF CCI4* Eventing National Champions. Shannon Brinkman Photo.

Get up to speed for the Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event and the Land Rover/USEF CCI4* Eventing National Championship on April 26-29

The Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event (LRK3DE), which also hosts the Land Rover/USEF CCI4* Eventing National Championship, kicks off this week. This iconic American sporting event, which takes place April 26-29, annually draws top international horses and riders to the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, Ky. for world-class eventing competition. We’ll be streaming all three phases — dressage, cross-country, and show jumping — live on USEF Network, so be sure to check out the broadcast schedule and tune in for all the action.

Here are five things to know about the Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event as you head into the event.

  1. Land Rover is the new title sponsor.

Land Rover served as the Kentucky Three-Day Event’s longtime Official Vehicle and was Presenting Sponsor for five years before increasing its support by signing a four-year agreement last October to become Title Sponsor. Land Rover also continued its support of US Equestrian, extending its deal with the federation through 2020. Land Rover’s participation also includes the “Ultimate Stable experience,” including a range of top equestrian apparel and equipment, as well as live farrier displays, open in the sponsor village to all attendees. Land Rover also brings back its popular “Land Rover Tailgate Challenge,” in which Land Rover owners compete for an exclusive prize for the most creative and best-catered tailgate party. And ticket-holders can also test-drive the newest Land Rover models on a specially designed off-road demonstration course during LRK3DE.

  1. The event will also crown the 2018 Land Rover/USEF CCI4* Eventing National Champion.

The highest-placed U.S. rider will be named the year’s Land Rover/USEF CCI4* Eventing National Champion. US Equestrian President Murray Kessler will present the rider with the Roger Haller Trophy bronze for the first time this year. The trophy is given in memory of Haller, an internationally respected eventing official. Friends and family of Haller came together to commission the bronze trophy, which is designed by 1987 Kentucky Three-Day Event winner and 1996 Olympic individual bronze medalist Kerry Millikin. The national champion also receives a silver picture frame and a champion cooler.

  1. LRK3DE is one of only six CCI4* events in the world.

LRK3DE, which offers $400,000 in prize money, is also the only CCI4* event in the Western Hemisphere.

  1. Several past national champions are returning to the 2018 LRK3DE.

Buck Davidson, Phillip Dutton, Lauren Kieffer, and Kim Severson are all multiple-time national champions and have talented mounts who could help them add a title to their resumes again this year. Dutton, who has captured the title five times so far, will try for back-to-back titles this year after earning it last year with Mr. Medicott.

  1. USEF Network will be covering all three phases of the event — and the new Kentucky CSI3* Invitational Grand Prix.

Check out USEF Network for broadcast schedule updates, live stream, and links as we cover dressage on April 26-27, cross-country on April 28, and show jumping on April 29. We’ll also be streaming the weekend’s new grand prix events: the Kentucky CSI3* Invitational Grand Prix $35,000 Welcome Speed Cup 1.45m on Friday, April 27, at 6 p.m. ET and the $225,000 Kentucky CSI3* Invitational Grand Prix 1.60m on Saturday, April 28, at 4:30 p.m. ET.

by Glenye Cain Oakford
© 2018 United States Equestrian Federation

Second Day of Official Test Event Features Team, Freestyle and Marathon Competition

Rebecca Hart and Fortune. ©Sue Stickle Photography & ©TIEC.

TRYON, NC, USA – April 21, 2018 – Day two of FEI CPEDI 3* competition at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon 2018 (WEG) Test Event for Para-Dressage, Dressage, and Driving hosted at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC), saw Rebecca Hart (USA) easily best the FEI CPEDI 3* Grade III Team Test to Music, scoring a 71.569% to take home top honors aboard Rowan O’Riley’s Fortune. Lauren Barwick (CAN) achieved second place in the Grade III test aboard her own Engelbrecht, a 2009 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Vivaldi x Rimini 41), while Eleanor Brimmer (USA) and her own Argentinia, a 2002 Hanoverian mare (Acorado I x Frappant) claimed third with a score of 65.539%.

The 2010 Oldenburg gelding (Fidertanz 2 x Don Romantic) is a new mount for Hart and he is new to the world of Para-Dressage too. After only being partnered for a month seemed to be no hindrance for the pair’s performance, as they rode to a comfortable lead in the Team Test – as did Team USA. Hart explained that the duo was a perfect match even from the first ride thanks in part to the gelding’s easy-going, friendly disposition.

“He is just awesome. He’s the happiest soul I’ve ever met. He’s a total lap dog with just kind of an in-your-pocket personality, and a joy to be around. He’s quite green when it comes to showing and he just took all of this in stride,” she said of the exciting atmosphere at TIEC. “I didn’t quite know what his reaction to all this would be, and he was like, ‘It’s cool, it’s 30 degrees and wind is blowing – we’re fine!’ He was so great today.”

Their quick transition into competition did not show in their test, and Hart explained that it’s hard to believe her young mount is still adjusting to Para-Dressage. She commented, “There’s always that learning curve with a new Para-Dressage horse. Even from the very first ride that I sat on him, I was able to get on and he said ‘Yep, this is fine, I can do that for you. Your legs don’t work? No problem. I’m not 100 percent sure what you mean, but I’ll try for you,'” she said of the gelding’s initial response to her. “That first ride is really what drew me to him since we weren’t really looking for a second horse, but he just fell in our laps. He did all that I asked – I usually do start and stop [on a first ride]. He did all the laterals right from the beginning and he was like, ‘Yep, I’ve got you.'”

Both of Hart’s current mounts are new and both are possible contenders for WEG, depending on the selectors’ decision, said Hart. “I’ve only had El Corona Texel for six months now and Moolah we’ve had for one month. My main goal with them is they have the same job, just different sandboxes, and wherever we go they come out and work on consistency and fluidity of the tests, and just gaining exposure for them in a lot of different situations. If we’re so blessed as to look like we’re having both make the team, we would have them [the selectors] pick who they think would be most beneficial. It would really come down to the selectors in that case.”

Roxanne Trunnell (USA) once again took top honors in Grade I, executing a strong test aboard Dolton, a 2012 Hanoverian gelding (Danone I x Londonderry) owned by Kate Shoemaker, to earn a 74.345%. Grade II also saw a return champion in Sharon Buffitt aboard her own Elektra II, a 2005 Oldenburg mare (Radjah Z x Rastar), this time receiving a score of 65.758%. In Grade IV, Angela Peavy (USA) rose to the occasion and rode to a 71.875% aboard Rebecca Reno’s Royal Dark Chocolate, a 2008 Oldenburg mare (Royal Doruto x Don Larino), while Katie Jackson (USA) and her own Diesel, a 2003 Oldenburg gelding (De Niro x Welt Hit II), once again dominated Grade V competition, earning a score of 68.760%.

In the Team competition, the USA took the title with winning members Katie Jackson, Rebecca Hart, Kate Shoemaker, and Roxanne Trunnell, placing ahead of Team Canada in second.

FEI CDI 3* Grand Prix Freestyle Awards Blue Ribbon to USA’s Karen Lipp

After coming off of a successful winter circuit consisting of several top ten CDI placings, Karen Lipp (USA) rode Kathleen Oldford’s Whitney to the win in the FEI CDI 3* Grand Prix Freestyle presented by Adequan® during Saturday’s FEI World Equestrian Games™ Dressage Test Event. Second place was clinched by Geena S. Martin aboard Caroline Roffman’s Bon Chance, a 2005 Hanoverian gelding (Belissimo M x Weltmeyer), scoring a 66.675%, while Abraham Pugh guided Elfenperfekt, a 2006 Trakehner stallion (Peron x Zauberklang) owned by Alice Drayer, received a score of 66.615% and third place.

The partnership between Lipp and the 2005 Hanoverian mare (Whitestar x Grand Cru) has been blossoming for some time, but the pair did not contest the international ring until last fall. “We actually purchased her as a four-year-old and I competed her up through the Young Horse Program, which she did quite well in as a four, five and six-year-old,” said Lipp. “For a period her owner was going to ride her, then decided it wasn’t the right match for her, and instead of selling her she said, ‘you do well together, so go on together.’ So now I’m back riding her, and I showed her in a few CDIs, and then unfortunately when I got home she got injured, so she had a period of time off, but thank God she’s back.”

“I would like to thank Kathleen Oldford, the owner of the horse, for giving me the opportunity to ride her. It’s been a really great journey for many years and I feel really lucky and fortunate to have somebody who owns a nice horse and lets me ride it. It’s kind of a rarity.”

The Atlanta, GA, resident was grateful for the short trip up to Tryon, and credits the venue for its hospitality and welcoming feel for competitors. She elaborated, “It’s the nicest venue. I told some of my friends when I first came up here that it is like Disney World for horses and it’s really amazing. It’s amazing and we’re so fortunate to have it. What I love about it too, is that you can come and keep your horses and stay, and never get in your car and never go anywhere. There are great restaurants and it’s just really great. I love that the local community that come hang out and watch – that’s kind of exciting, too.”

After capturing fifth place in the FEI CDI 3* Grand Prix presented by Adequan® on Friday, Lipp and Whitney’s efforts for the Freestyle were rewarded with a 69.765% from the judging panel and after climbing the ladder to first, Lipp is using the win as a motivator for the future. “I’m just going to keep on working at it and getting better,” she explained. “She’s a hot, fiery horse, so the big thing is getting relaxation. Yesterday I had it a little bit better and today was a little bit harder, but it’s an electric place. She tries really, hard, but she’s just a little bit of a nervous horse, so it’s keeping that balance with her.”

“I think what she’s really good at is the power stuff,” continued Lipp, who rode to an upbeat musical freestyle designed by Canadian Karen Robinson. “The extensions, the passage – I think when I come in she gets a little bit taken back, so at the beginning I felt a little stuck, but as the test went on it got better and better. She has really good changes and I made a mistake tonight that was me. Overall, I think she likes the music and likes the atmosphere, so in that way it’s fun.”

FEI CAI 2* Driving Competition Tests New White Oak Course for Marathon Phase

Twenty-three entries across five divisions were the inaugural challengers of the Richard Nicoll (USA)-designed track at the White Oak course during the day’s Marathon phase, with four in-hand competition pitting nine entries against the clock through the brand new obstacles.

Chester Weber (USA) guided his team of Amadeus, Asjemenou, Reno, and Ultra to the finish with a score of 109.08, landing in the first-place position heading into the Cones phase on a total of 150.20 penalties. Misdee Wrigley-Miller (USA) and team of Bravour 54, Beau, Bolino D, and Calipso 85 hold the second place position after their quick Marathon run, scoring 122.06 to finish with a 162.05 before Cones, while James Fairclough (USA) sits just behind in third after finishing fast and clean on a score of 109.87 for a total of 163.26, guiding Bento V, Citens, Dapper and Zenden.

“I was really pleased with the course today,” Weber said of the newly constructed layout. “I think Richard Nicoll and the entire team at Tryon here have done a fantastic job. To drive on a track that was formerly a golf course is about like it sounds – it was fantastic. The ground was really nice and consistent and I think the course designer asked quite a few questions. It looks like of the seven obstacles today, we’ll see four or five of them at WEG, and those ones are really the caliber of obstacle necessary and fitting for WEG. I think they used some portable obstacles as they work toward September to fill in some gaps, and I think that was appropriate for today.”

Two of his four horses were just on the national championship team at Live Oak International a month ago, Weber said, so he knew they would go together very well, but this particular combination had never run Marathon together. He added in Reno for Gouveneur, his Dressage right lead, and explained the strategy behind this change:

“The right side I knew really well and then the left wheel horse, I’ve done quite a few shows with and I was really pleased with him today. He’s sort of been in my B group, but he’s looking like he’s trying to come back to Tryon in September. The left lead horse is a really wonderful horse, Ultra, that has lots of experience at championships and things like that. He was an absolute pro out there today. I put in a really nice horse, Reno, who’s sort of my Cross-Country leader that I plan to drive here in September because I wanted to see what he’s like on this track and learn a little bit about him. I took out a seven-year-old horse named Gouveneur that we’re producing kind of behind this group for a career hopefully after Tryon, but to be honest he was steady as a rock and we may even use him tomorrow in the Cones to give him a little more experience.”

Weber reflected on how he’s planning to attack the Cones phase. “I guess my plan always is to drive double clear – clear without any faults and also without any time faults – so that’s kind of my plan. I’ve seen the course a little bit from the side looking on, which is sometimes a little bit deceiving, but Richard Nicoll usually builds a course that has an element of flow, which works well with my style of driving. I like sort of one high tempo instead of a lot of speed changes and things like that. Some drivers really go forward and come back, forward and come back, but I like to maintain one even flowing speed throughout the whole course.”

It’s his first time in Tryon and his first peek at what the WEG will hold, and Weber had glowing reviews to share about the venue. “Without a doubt, the facility is bar none one of the nicest facilities I’ve been to in the world,” he began. “There’s certainly a lot of construction going on. The civil engineer and the building team here are going full speed, it seems like 24 hours a day, and I’m really impressed. But what’s completed already is really nice and super high quality, so I’m really looking forward to September and I feel like a prideful American.”

As for Weber’s plans looking at the next few months before the arrival of WEG in September, he commented on the next stop on their competition tour. “Our next event is at Royal Windsor – that’s the first weekend in May, at Windsor Castle, just outside of London, and after that we’ll likely be in Saumur, then Aachen, and then Beekbergen, and then after Beekbergen the horses will come home to Florida and acclimate a little bit to the heat and humidity, which we could have here in Tryon. We’ll do some acclimation, make sure we’re all polished up, and then we’ll come up here and hopefully we get something done!”

For more information, visit www.Tryon2018.com and www.fei.org/tryon-2018.

Stellar International Line-Up at CHI Royal Windsor Horse Show

Royal Windsor Horse Show will welcome the world’s best riders to the private grounds of Windsor Castle from 9-13 May 2018, with a line-up fitting to celebrate the Show’s 75th anniversary year. With international competitions taking place across four FEI equestrian disciplines, including CSI5* Show Jumping, CDI4* Dressage and CAIO4* Driving, as well as CEI2* Endurance, the calibre of entries is better than ever before.

International CSI5* Show Jumping

Six of the world’s top 10 Show Jumpers will be taking to the Castle Arena, headed by World No. 1 Kent Farrington (USA), who will be hoping to make a successful return from injury to reclaim his title in the prestigious Rolex Grand Prix. The class, the pinnacle event of the Show, will take place on Sunday 13 May, with a top-class line-up contending for the coveted Rolex Grand Prix and unprecedented prize fund of €300,000.

Reigning European Champion and individual silver medallist at the 2016 Olympics, Peder Fredricson (SWE) and Rio Olympic team gold medallist Kevin Staut (FRA), currently ranked third and fourth in the world respectively, will be hot on Farrington’s heels, seeking to usurp him from pole position in the Rolex Grand Prix, a position he has taken two years consecutively. Top Italian duo, Lorenzo de Luca and Alberto Zorzi along with fellow top-10 rider Steve Guerdat (SUI), individual gold medallist at London 2012, will be adding to the stiff competition.

A strong British contingent, led by crowd favourites Scott Brash and Ben Maher, will be looking to mount a formidable home challenge across the three days of CSI5* competition, including action taking place during a Saturday evening performance.  Father and son combination, John and Robert Whitaker, William Funnell and the notoriously fast Guy Williams will all be sure to set the Castle Arena alight, looking for a home victory.

Britain’s leading lady rider Laura Renwick will be heading the female challengers, along with USA representatives, Laura Kraut, another Olympic gold medallist within the stellar line-up, and Lauren Hough, plus British young rider Emily Moffitt.

Representing Ireland will be Bertram Allen, Denis Lynch and Cian O’Connor, all of whom were part of the European gold medal winning team last summer. Adding further international flair to the competition will be former individual Olympic champions, Canada’s Eric Lamaze and Brazil’s Rodrigo Pessoa, and former World No. 1 Daniel Deusser (GER), fresh from Grand Prix victory at the FEI World Cup Final in Paris last weekend.

International CDI4* Dressage

Reinforcing the international prestige of the Show will be the CDI4* Dressage, with The Al Shira’aa Grand Prix and The Al Shira’aa Grand Prix Freestyle to Music set to take centre stage on the evenings of Thursday 10 and Friday 11 May respectively. Home favourite Carl Hester has dominated Dressage at Royal Windsor in recent years, with victory aboard his Rio Olympic companion Nip Tuck in 2015 and returning to dominate both the Freestyle and Grand Prix with the British-bred Barolo in 2017. Hester will be returning in 2018 with Hawtins Delicato, with whom he recently made his National Grand Prix debut, scoring 76.8%, and the horse with which he is hoping to compete at the FEI World Equestrian Games (WEG) later in the year.

Triple Olympic gold medallist, Charlotte Dujardin is sure to pose a serious challenge to Hester’s previous dominance, riding her new Grand Prix partner Mount St John Freestyle, who made an impressive Grand Prix debut last month, scoring 81%. The nine-year-old Hanoverian mare, hailed as Dujardin’s next superstar and nick-named “Mrs Valegro”, is also being aimed at WEG, with Windsor providing an excellent platform to showcase her ability in front of international judges, including Susan Hoevenaars, who will also be judging at WEG itself.

Four-time British Olympian, Richard Davison (GBR), will also be looking to steal Hester’s crown with homebred gelding Bubblingh, out of his former international ride Ballaseyr Royale, who together took the Grand Prix and Freestyle in Roosendaal at the end of last year, as will compatriot Hayley Watson-Greaves (GBR) with Rubins Nite and former British team member Gareth Hughes aboard Don Carissimo.

A strong international contingent will be seeking to dampen British spirits, including Tosca Visser Van Der Meulen and Thamar Zweistra from the Netherlands and Germany’s Juliette Piotrowski, a former Young Rider European team gold and individual silver medal winner. From Japan, Akane Kuroki will be riding her Olympic ride Toots, with young rider Caroline Chew (SGP), silver medal winner at the South East Asian Games, returning aboard Tribiani. Ireland’s Kate Dwyer will be making a spectacular come back from a broken back, which put her out of action for the winter season, aboard the twelve-year-old Snowdon Faberge.

International CAI3*/CAIO4* Driving

The 2018 CAIO Land Rover International Driving Grand Prix, a FEI World Cup qualifier, will play host to a magnificent line-up in each of the three categories; horse and pony four-in-hands and horse pairs.

The 30 horse four-in-hand competitors represent 12 countries including five from the home nation. Among them will be reigning indoor and outdoor World Champion, Boyd Exell from Australia, who earlier this year claimed the FEI World Cup championship for the seventh time, looking for a ninth Royal Windsor win.

Giving him no quarter will be two top competitors from the nation that has dominated gold medal position at the World horse four-in-hand championships over the last decade, the Netherlands’ Ijsbrand Chardon and Koos de Ronde, the latter also being the current FEI World Cup bronze medallist. Chardon’s son, Bram, a previous world pony four-in-hand champion as well as pony four-in-hand winner at Windsor, will make his Royal Windsor debut in horse four-in-hand and will be one to watch. The USA’s Chester Weber will also be back attempting to reclaim his 2014 and 2015 Royal Windsor titles.

GB’s horse four-in-hand challenge will be in the experienced and capable hands of the Basset sisters, Karen and Pippa, as well as Wilf Bowman-Ripley, Dick Lane and Daniel Naprous, whose performance indoors at the London International Horse Show at Olympia has thrilled the home crowd in recent years.

The horse pairs, a CAI3*, will field 18 competitors from 11 nations, including last year’s winner, Lars Schwitte (GER). He will find himself with stiff competition from the current world bronze horse pairs medallist Beat Schenk (SUI) as well as the experienced Barry Capstick (IRL). The challenge from the home nation will come from successful horse pairs driver David Matthews, as well as barrister Chris Smith, current chairman of British Carriagedriving.

Competition in the 9-strong pony four-in-hand, also a CAI3*, will be as strong as it is in the other two categories with last year’s winner, Tinne Bax from Belgium out to retain her 2017 Royal Windsor title. The Netherlands’ Jan de Boer, the current world silver medallist and six-time Royal Windsor winner, will provide tough opposition, with Britain’s Sara Howe, Roger Campbell and Joanna Broadbent all determined to uphold the Union Jack.

Show Director, Simon Brooks-Ward, said, “The calibre of entries at this year’s Show is second to none, demonstrating the ever-increasing international prestige of the event and cementing its status amongst the best shows in the world. We’re honoured to welcome some of the world’s finest horses and riders and are looking forward to watching the world-class action unfold.”

To find out more about Royal Windsor Horse Show, or to book tickets, visit www.rwhs.co.uk. Tickets can also be purchased by calling the box office on 0844 581 4960 from the UK and +44 (0)121 7966290 internationally. Windsor residents should call the Windsor Information Centre on 01753 743589.

For more information, please contact:
Gayle Telford gayle@revolutionsports.co.uk +44(0)7717 776928

Hamilton and Makari Design Defend Their Title at Southern Pines CDE

Photo: Nifty Hamilton and Makari Design (Picsofyou.com)

Raeford, N.C. – The USEF Advanced Single Horse Combined Driving National Championship came to a conclusion on Sunday with the cones phase at the Southern Pines Combined Driving Event (CDE). The athlete-and-horse combinations had to face Barry Hunter’s tough cones course to determine the ultimate winner. Jennifer “Nifty” Hamilton and Makari Design kept their cool in the final phase to win back-to-back national champion titles.

USEF Advanced Single Horse Combined Driving National Championship

Hamilton (Alva, Fla.) and Makari Design began the national championship by winning the dressage and marathon phases with scores of 48.09 penalties and 81.92 penalties, respectively. They drove a great cones round to add 2.96 time penalties to their score and win the final phase. Hamilton and the 10-year-old KWPN gelding she owns with Milton Hamilton claimed their second national champion title after finishing on an overall score of 132.97 penalties.

“The cones course drove very well, but it was pretty technical and tough to make the time on,” Hamilton explained. “It was great because it is the kind of course that will make you better.”

Commenting on how Makari Design performed throughout the competition, Hamilton said, “He is definitely more connected than he has ever been, which allows me to ask for more. With more work and work on getting him stronger, he is going to be even better in a few years.”

Jacob Arnold (Snow Camp, N.C.) and Uminco earned the reserve national champion title due to their strong performances. They were in third place after Friday’s dressage phase with a score of 52.89 penalties and then moved up to second place after tallying 82.53 penalties in Saturday’s marathon phase. Arnold piloted Leslie Berndl’s 17-year-old Royal Dutch Warmblood gelding around the cones course to have one ball down for 3.00 penalties. In their first year competing together, Arnold and Uminco garnered an impressive finish on an overall score of 138.42 penalties.

Barbara Chapman (Metamora, Mich.) and Meara Beval were third in the national championship with an overall score of 149.25 penalties.  Chapman and her 14-year-old American Warmblood mare scored 53.96 penalties in the dressage phase to sit in fourth before rising to third place following the marathon phase that added 88.34 penalties to their score. They closed out the national championship with two balls down and time penalties for 6.95 penalties in the cones phase.

Find more information on the Southern Pines CDE.

From the US Equestrian Communications Department

Hamilton and Makari Design Maintain Their Lead at Southern Pines CDE

Photo: Nifty Hamilton and Makari Design (Picsofyou.com)

Raeford, N.C. – The USEF Advanced Single Horse Combined Driving National Championship continued on Saturday with the marathon phase at the Southern Pines Combined Driving Event (CDE). The athlete-and-horse combinations headed out on the Carolina Horse Park’s grounds to tackle Barry Hunter’s marathon track. Jennifer “Nifty” Hamilton and Makari Design held onto their lead to stay atop the overall leaderboard heading into the final phase on Sunday.

USEF Advanced Single Horse Combined Driving National Championship

Defending national champions Hamilton (Alva, Fla.) and Makari Design continued their quest for back-to-back titles by blazing around the marathon course. The duo won the marathon phase with a score of 81.92 penalties, having the fastest times in two of the seven obstacles. Hamilton and the 10-year-old KWPN gelding she owns with Milton Hamilton head into the cones phase with an overall score of 130.01 penalties.

“[Makari Design] was perfect,” Hamilton said. “It was a wonderful course; Barry Hunter is a great course designer. The course drove very smooth, but there were two water hazards, so it was a tough course.”

Hamilton also had high praise for the combinations in the national championship. “It is a great field of competitors. Today was a good effort on everyone’s part. We all work together studying courses and sharing routes; it is a great group to be a part of.”

Jacob Arnold (Snow Camp, N.C.) and Uminco moved up from third place to second place overall on the strength of a strong marathon round. Arnold piloted Leslie Berndl’s 17-year-old Royal Dutch Warmblood gelding to the fastest times in four obstacles and finished the phase with 82.53 penalties. The combination heads into Sunday on an overall score of 135.42 penalties.

Barbara Chapman (Metamora, Mich.) and Meara Beval climbed from fourth place on the leaderboard to third following Saturday’ phase. With her 14-year-old American Warmblood mare, Chapman finished the marathon course with 88.34 penalties. She and Meara Beval sit on an overall score of 142.30 penalties.

Find more information on the Southern Pines CDE.

From the US Equestrian Communications Department

I Just Know Can Spring Grand National Surprise

Photo: “Aintree Grandstand” by Paul (CC BY-SA 2.0).

The world’s most famous horse race, the Grand National, is coming up this weekend, and the race looks to be as competitive as ever. This is one of the biggest sporting events in the world and many people look forward to the race, ensuring they have a prime viewing spot to watch the action unfold whether they are at the track, out with friends or at home. Those who watch horse racing on a daily basis will be looking forward to the Grand National, as will those who tune into racing once each year to have a punt on the horses.

The latest Grand National 2018 odds show that the race is going to be extremely competitive, as it always is, and the favorite for the race is still not known. We usually see a late market move on the day, which can determine who will be sent off the favorite, and we look like having that again this year. Right now, the race for favoritism looks to be between three Irish horses, Total Recall (10/1), Tiger Roll (11/1) and Anibale Fly (10/1), and the English challenger Blaklion (12/1).

Further down the betting list, you will find a very interesting contender in I Just Know (22/1) for the Sue Smith yard. He won’t be one of the most popular Grand National betting tips that you see but he looks to have a great chance of running a big race at big odds. He won the North Yorkshire National in January, showing his liking for a grueling test of stamina like the one that will take place on Saturday. He had a nice prep run for this race over hurdles, and that should have put him spot on for the feature race on Saturday.

The latest weather forecast shows that Saturday should be a dry day at Aintree, something which should leave the ground on the soft side. That will suit I Just Know and this can help him run a very big race and certainly outrun his odds. The Grand National is often full of unlucky horses but I Just Know likes to make the running so he should be at the front and away from any potential trouble that will happen in behind him.

Sue Smith knows what it takes to win a Grand National and she has had a similar success in the past with outsider Auroras Encore winning the 2013 race. She will be hungry for another victory in the race and will be doing all she can to ensure that preparations go as smoothly as possible for I Just Know.

40 runners will go to the post on Saturday for the biggest horse race of the year and excitement surrounding the event is really building. The race looks to be as competitive as ever and many horses will go into the race with a chance of winning. At big odds, I Just Know from the Sue Smith yard can run a huge race and upset some of the bigger names by taking the 2018 Grand National.

Veteran and New Faces Comprise US Show Jumping Contingent at FEI World Cup Jumping Final

McLain Ward and HH Azur. Photo by Shannon Brinkman.

McLain Ward looking to complete back-to-back wins

Paris, France – Ten of the nation’s top U.S. show jumpers will compete for the 2018 Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Final in Paris, France, April 11-15, at the AccorHotels Arena. The U.S. contingent will face stiff competition from the likes of Sweden’s Henrik von Eckermann, Frenchman Kevin Staut, and other top Europeans coming off an indoor season. Thirty-eight athletes will seek the illustrious title, as a string of veterans and newcomers compete for the United States.

Meet the Athletes

Longines FEI World Cup, North American East Coast Sub-League

Among the veterans, McLain Ward (Brewster, N.Y.), the reigning Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Final champion, will ride HH Azur, Double H Farm and François Mathy’s 12-year-old Belgian Warmblood mare. The four-time Olympian and three-time FEI World Equestrian Games™ competitor will look to defend his title on the bold, bay mare that carried him in 2017.

“Any of the 37 best riders in this final are able to win the title. The bottom line for me will be focusing on my job and our performance,” said Ward. “But with HH Azur, my main concern will be to ride her as best as possible and if I succeed, I will have a good chance of winning.”

The combination most recently placed third in the $384,000 Rolex Grand Prix CSI5* and won the $132,000 Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF) Challenge Cup Round V CSI5* during week five of WEF. Ward and HH Azur anchored the U.S. Show Jumping Team to a silver-medal finish at the 2017 Longines FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ Final in Barcelona, Spain, last September.

Alison Robitaille (Upperville, Va.) will ride Ace, a 13-year-old KWPN gelding owned by Bertram and Diana Firestone, in her fifth FEI World Cup Jumping Final appearance. Most recently, the duo were top-five in the $265,000 Longines Grand Prix CSI5* during week five of the 2018 HITS Ocala Winter Festival. They also were top-five in the $130,000 Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Washington CSI4*-W for the President’s Cup at the 2017 Washington International Horse Show, and were members of the 2017 silver-medal winning U.S. Show Jumping Team at FEI Jumping Nations Cup Mexico. Robitaille served as part of the U.S. team at the 1998 FEI World Equestrian Games Rome.

Devin Ryan (Long Valley, N.J.) and Eddie Blue will make their Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Final debut. Ryan and the nine-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding owned by LL Show Jumpers, LLC, recently placed second in the $35,000 Longines FEI World Ranking Class CSI3*-W at the 2018 Live Oak International. They also served as the reserve combination for the NetJets® U.S. Show Jumping Team at the Longines FEI Jumping Nations Cup USA in February. They placed second in the $265,000 Longines Grand Prix CSI5* during week five of the 2018 HITS Ocala Winter Festival.

Elizabeth “Beezie” Madden (Cazenovia, N.Y.), a two-time Olympic gold medalist and three-time FEI World Equestrian Games competitor, won the FEI World Cup Jumping Final in 2013 in Göteborg, Sweden, with Simon. For the 2018 final, Madden will ride Abigail Wexner’s 12-year-old Dutch Warmblood stallion Breitling LS. They arrive at the Final with wins at the $205,000 CaptiveOne Advisors Grand Prix CSI4* and the $205,000 CSIO4* Lugano Diamonds Grand Prix during week 11 and week eight of WEF, respectively. Madden and Breitling LS placed second in the $100,000 Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Thermal CSI3*-W at the 2018 HITS Coachella Desert Circuit. Madden contributed to the silver-medal finish of the U.S. Show Jumping Team at the Longines FEI Nations Cup Final in Barcelona, Spain last September, with Darry Lou.

Kristen Vanderveen (Wellington, Fla.) appears in her first Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Final aboard Bull Run’s Faustino de Tili, a 13-year-old Belgian Warmblood stallion owned by Bull Run Jumpers Five LLC. The North American Junior and Young Rider Championship alum earned her spot in the Final after winning the $100,000 Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Ocala Grand Prix at the 2018 Live Oak International. She and Bull Run’s Faustino de Tili also placed in the top 10 in the $216,000 Longines FEI World Cup Jumping New York CSI4*-W at the 2017 American Gold Cup.

Sarah Scheiring (Chester, N.J.) will ride Cheval Equestrian LLC and Molly Ben-Menachem’s 10-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding Dontez. The pair comes off of an impressive season with several strong finishes. Those include top-five finishes in the Longines FEI World Cup Qualifier and the Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Guadalajara at the 2018 Triple Copa Scappino CSI4*-W presented by Audi, as well as a third-place finish in the $130,000 Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Calgary presented by Pure North at 2017 Royal West CSI3*-W. This will be the combination’s first Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Final.

Andrew “Andy” Kocher (Howell, N.J.) will make his Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Final debut with Navalo de Poheton. Kocher and the 17-year-old Selle Français gelding owned by MKO Equestrian LLC won the $100,000 Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Del Mar at the 2017 Del Mar International World Cup Week.

Charlie Jacobs (Boston, Mass.) returns for his fourth Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Final. He and Cassinja S, the 12-year-old Zweibrücker mare owned by CMJ Sporthorse LLC placed in the top 10 in the $100,000 Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Ocala CSI3*-W at the 2018 Live Oak International, as well as in the $130,000 Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Washington CSI4*-W for the President’s Cup at the 2017 Washington International Horse Show. The combination also contributed to the gold-medal win of the U.S. Show Jumping Team in the 2017 BMO Nations’ Cup at Spruce Meadows.

Longines FEI World Cup, North American West Coast Sub-League

Richard Spooner (Agua Dulce, Calif.) will ride in his 15th  FEI World Cup Jumping Final on either Chatinus, a 10-year-old Hanoverian gelding that he owns with Tracy Katayama, or Arthos R, a 13-year-old Dutch Warmblood stallion owned by CNS Logistics, Inc. Spooner and Arthos R most recently won the $40,200 Desert Classic CSI3*-W during week four of the 2018 HITS Coachella Desert Circuit, as well as the $50,000 Las Vegas National Winning Round Jumper Classic at the 2017 Las Vegas National Horse Show. On Chatinus, Spooner claimed the $100,000 Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Las Vegas CSI4*-W presented by Interactive Mortgage at the 2017 Las Vegas National Horse Show to qualify for the Final.

Jamie Barge (Malibu, Calif.) and Luebbo return to the Final for their second consecutive year. She and the 13-year-old Oldenburg Springpferd gelding owned by Kylie Co. placed in the top 10 in the $100,000 Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Ocala Grand Prix CSI3*-W at the 2018 Live Oak International and the $100,000 Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Thermal CSI3*-W at the 2018 HITS Desert Circuit, respectively.

Competition Information

The Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Final gets underway Thursday evening with the Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Final I (Jumping Speed Class).

Watch it live on FEI TV beginning at 2:30 p.m. EST.

View more information about the 2018 Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Final.

From the US Equestrian Communications Department

Powerhouse Teams Finish at the Top at IHSA Zone Finals

Savannah College of Art & Design earned the Zone 5 championship and the trip to Harrisburg for the Nationals. Photo courtesy of SCAD.

Entries Set for 2018 National Championship

Fairfield, Conn. – April 10, 2018 – The Intercollegiate Horse Shows Association (IHSA) held eight Zone Finals, sponsored by the United States Hunter Jumper Association (USHJA), April 7-8. The eight Zone hunter seat competitions produced across the country were qualifying events for the 2018 IHSA National Championship to be showcased at the Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, May 3-6.

From each Zone Finals, the top two teams and the top two individual riders from each division all qualified to compete at the highlight of the IHSA season. The National Championship crowns the team, individual and alumni champions in both hunter seat and Western. The event also features the coveted USEF/Cacchione Cup and the AQHA Western High Point Rider national final.

THREE-TIME IHSA NATIONAL CHAMPIONS SCAD WINS ZONE 5
Zone 5 Finals were hosted by the College of Charleston in Charleston, South Carolina. Savannah College of Art & Design (SCAD) managed to dominate the season despite fielding a roster with a majority of new riders. SCAD came away with the championship of Zone 5. Hometown host team, the 28-time Region 9 champions, the College of Charleston, earned the reserve championship. SCAD will attempt to earn their fourth team championship at Nationals.

“It is a huge team effort and I am so grateful to the staff, the facility and the horses,” said Ashley Henry, head coach of the SCAD Equestrian Team. We had our big team meeting at 5:30 a.m. and I told them, ‘Yes, SCAD Equestrian has a legacy, but every year, it’s a whole new dance. It’s like the first time all over again.’ We’ve always approached it that way.”

Henry said that the team will go back to the basics to prepare for Nationals. They will go on the lunge, train over single jumps and serpentine loops. They will practice on landing the lead.

“It’s the fundamentals of riding that are going to help in the ring when you’re given a challenge,” she said. “We still have a long road ahead, even though we’re Pennsylvania-bound. The game only gets harder now.”

CENTENARY UNIVERSITY TOPS ZONE 3
Centenary University aced their Zone Finals hosted at their equestrian center. The 2017 National reserve team champions led by coaches Michael Dowling and Heather Clark are consistently at the top of the IHSA results. They have many Cacchione Cup wins to their credit, including Katherine Steiner in 2017. Penn State University’s Equestrian team added to their impressive list of achievements and earned the reserve championship.

Dowling credits the success of the Centenary team to the strength of their program, the support of nine full-time faculty members and the depth and diversity of their horses. Training the team, Clark focuses on fine tuning position and Dowling focuses on effectiveness and the horse’s way of going. Their teaching styles complement each other and play a key role in the team’s success.

“If the rider is more comfortable riding warmbloods, we put them on a hotter type of horse so they can figure that out,” Dowling said. “When we have a rider that’s a little better on a Thoroughbred-type horse, then we try to get them more comfortable riding a big warmblood. We constantly try to change it up.”

Leading up to Nationals they will focus on where they were weak at Zones and do a lot of strengthening and work without stirrups.

“I’m really excited about the group of students that we have this year,” he said. “Every year we become more determined to put on a better show. Harrisburg is about as close to home as we get so we have a lot of volunteers coming. It’s going to be a fun event.”

ST ANDREWS NABS ZONE 4
The St. Andrews University hunter seat team, led by coach Robin Brooks, rose to the occasion earning 39 points to win the Zone championship and punched their ticket to Harrisburg. Also Harrisburg-bound, reserve champions Virginia Tech University earned 36 points.

“We have a group of seniors that have been great team leaders this year,” Brooks said. “They have been hungry for it all year.”

Brooks said that the strategy for competing at Nationals is lots of practice. She wants them to be as strong as possible, while keeping their confidence high and setting them up for success.

“They are losing their stirrups as of this morning,” she said.

ZONE 6 GOES TO UNIVERSITY OF FINDLAY
Two Zone 6 universities well-known for their top-notch programs progressed to the Nationals team competition roster. Guided by coach Alexandra Kemp-Thompson, the University of Findlay hunter seat team prevailed at the Zone 6 Finals. Otterbein University earned the reserve championship, and the two will face the 14 teams all vying for the national championship.

“I was very pleased with my team’s performance at Zone Finals,” Kemp Thompson said. “It had been six years since we had been at Otterbein. All the students took on the challenge of riding completely new horses. I’m very proud of how my students handled themselves both inside and outside the ring all season given the circumstances they had to overcome.”

For Findlay, the 2018 season in their Region was unusual. Their last two home shows of the year were canceled and entries at Findlay’s final away show were cut in half.

“My priorities are rider physical fitness and mental self-confidence,” she said. “We have 150 horses in our barn, so I know I can count on my students to ride whatever is thrown their way at Nationals. There will be no stirrup work and work on endurance. I’m very excited to see this team step up. It should be fun!”

STANFORD TAKES ZONE 8
The Stanford University Equestrian team topped the Zone 8 Finals. Led by head coach Vanessa Bartsch, the Stanford team was the third-place finisher at Nationals in 2017. Colorado State University earned the Zone 8 reserve position and will also make the cross-country trip to Harrisburg.

“There has been an exponential increase in the quality of riding from all of the schools in our Zone,” Bartsch said. “It continues to push us to be better, train harder and find nicer horses to bring in. The overall quality of the teams and riders that we were competing against was exceptional. It made it competitive and fun. As a coach, it promotes our whole area to be the best that we can be.”

Stanford has a young roster this year and Bartsch explained that two seniors, Caroline Soane and Celia Lang-Ree, have stepped up to lead the less experienced members of the team. This year will mark the two seniors’ fourth National Championship.

To prepare for Nationals, Bartsch has a diverse pool of coaching talent to call on at the Stanford Red Barn including Guy Thomas and Willow Tree Farm and Cindy Brooks at Northern Run. But Bartsch doesn’t plan on changing up the plan.

“We ride how we ride, we train how we train; we’ll step up and add some practices,” she said. “We’ll continue to do no stirrup and strengthening work, but we’ve been doing that since the start of the year. We’re excited. Harrisburg has been a good venue for us.”

MORE POWERHOUSES HARRISBURG-BOUND
The Mount Holyoke team, led by legendary coach C. J. Law, have been regulars at Nationals and this year is no exception. They won the Zone 1 championship, securing their place in Harrisburg. The Boston University team was named reserve champions.

Coach Cynthia Ford and her Skidmore Thoroughbreds led the Zone 2 field to take the championship. Reserve champions St. Lawrence University will join them at Nationals.

From Zone 7, champions West Texas A & M University and reserve champions Purdue University will join the lineup for the IHSA Nationals team competition, setting the stage for exciting intercollegiate sport.

For more information, go to IHSAinc.com or contact media@IHSAinc.com.

History on the Horizon as 40th Champion Will Be Crowned Next Week in Paris

Photo: It was an American victory, for Katharine Burdsall and The Natural, when the FEI World Cup™ Final was last staged in Paris (FRA) in 1987 where then FEI President, the Princess Royal, presented the trophy. (©Hippophot)

Every sport has its majors, and for the Olympic discipline of Jumping there is nothing to compare with the tension, excitement and prestige of battling for the ultimate prize of the indoor season – the Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping trophy. The destination of this most coveted prize will be decided at the 2018 Final next week at the AccorHotels Arena in Paris (FRA) where 39 horse-and-rider combinations from all around the globe will gather in the quest for honour and glory.

The title is a seal of success and a measure of achievement, and winning it is one of the proudest moments in the career of any athlete who gets to place his or her name amongst the greats who have gone before them. You don’t come out on top by chance. The Final is a test of all that’s best about the horses and riders who have qualified from hard-fought leagues staged all around the globe — their partnership and mutual understanding, their power and speed, their courage, and their tenacity to give their best over three tough days of competition.

As America’s McLain Ward returns to defend the title he won so convincingly on home ground in Omaha (USA) last year, he knows that he and his brilliant mare HH Azur have it all to do once again. Becoming a back-to-back champion is no easy feat, but it has been done before – most notably by legendary combinations like the iconic Canadian duo of Ian Millar and Big Ben who reigned supreme in 1988 and 1989, and Great Britain’s John Whitaker who steered the magical grey, Milton, to victory in 1990 and again in 1991.

Those who have posted three wins are exceptional and, again, some of the biggest names in the sport. Austria’s Hugo Simon put himself into the record books as the very first champion riding Gladstone in 1979, and then returned to do it twice more with ET FRH in 1996 and 1997. Germany’s Meredith Michaels-Beerbaum partnered the great Shutterfly to success in 2005 and again in 2008 and 2009, and compatriot Marcus Ehning claimed three titles with three different horses between 2003 and 2010. Perhaps the most remarkable three-time champion of all is Brazil’s Rodrigo Pessoa, because he succeeded in consecutive seasons between 1998 and 2000 and each time with the same super-stallion, the “King of the Ring” himself, Baloubet du Rouet.

Ehning is on the edge of history, as he goes into next week’s Final as the only rider with the chance of becoming the first four-time champion.

He is one of five former title-holders competing this time around, and each of them arrive in Paris on cracking current form. America’s Beezie Madden brings Breitling LS, Germany’s Daniel Deusser has two qualified horses, the strangely-coloured Cornet 39 and his 2014 winning ride Cornet d’Amour, and Switzerland’s Steve Guerdat, winner in both 2015 and 2016, is also double-handed, with Alamo and the super-speedy Bianca. Ward’s work will be cut out for him to keep these superstars in check, but sometimes surprises are sprung as the story of the closing stages of this fantastic series confirms.

Few expected Bruno Broucqsault and Dileme de Cephe to become the first French partnership to take the title in Milan (ITA) 14 years ago, and a second French victory is long overdue. If there is one man who deserves his date with destiny it is Kevin Staut who has campaigned tirelessly throughout the qualifying series over many long seasons and who brings two great horses, Reveur de Hurtebise HDC and Silver Deux de Virton HDC with him to this year’s finale on his home turf. Could his moment have arrived at last?

To make it happen he will have to see off tremendous challenges from riders like Sweden’s Henrik von Eckermann who finished third last year and who brings the brilliant mare Toveks Mary Lou, and of course Britain’s Michael Whitaker whose hunger for this title is second-to-none after 24 previous attempts and many podium placings.

The statistics show that riders from just nine nations – Austria, Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain, Netherlands, Switzerland and USA – have claimed the trophy down the years and that Germany and the USA have each won it on 10 occasions. The youngest rider ever to reign supreme was 1984 champion Mario Deslauriers from Canada who was just 19 years old at the time, and he partnered the youngest horse ever to come out on top, the 7-year-old Aramis.

A total of 28 different riders have held this unique trophy in their hands, and the one and only time the Final previously took place in Paris, 31 years ago back in 1987, a 28-year-old American called Katharine Burdsall pinned 24-year-old Frenchman, Philippe Rozier, into runner-up spot.

A total of 43 riders from 11 nations lined out that year, this time around it is 39 riders from 19 countries as the sport continues to spread its appeal around the world, and the battle for the Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping trophy will be hotter than ever. It’s the one they all want, and the action gets underway on 11 April.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Jason Berry and Quantos Dominate Jumpers Week II of the Atlanta Spring Classics

Week II of the Atlanta Spring Classic drew to a close with Jason Berry continuing his winning ways in the jumper ring. Aboard Quantos, owned by Lee Cesery, Berry topped the field to win the $15,000 Grand Prix, presented by EMO.

It’s been a banner two weeks for Berry and Quantos in Conyers, Georgia. The duo won both weekly Welcome Jumpers, in addition to the Week II Grand Prix.

“Quantos is giving it his all,” Berry commented. “It certainly makes you excited to get up in the morning when you have a horse with a future like he’s going to have.”

Berry, of Verona, Virginia, was the first horse and rider team to attempt the first round of the grand prix track, set in the Olympic Ring at the Georgia International Horse Park. Only three achieved the clear round required to proceed to the jump-off.

First to attempt the shortened, speedy course was Jorja Rose Jones of Byhalia, Mississippi. She piloted Diane Masters’ Light Show to a double clear performance, setting the pace to beat at a quick 42.721 seconds.

Next up was Canton, Georgia’s Chasen Boggio. In the irons of his own Co Pilot, Boggio navigated the shortened course, leaving all the jumps in their cups. Unfortunately, the duo reached the timers just outside of the 47-second time allowed — their time of 47.076 seconds landed them a single time fault.

Berry and Quantos were next up to catch the pace to beat. The pair laid down a flawless clear round, racing to the timers in 41.422 seconds, snatching top hours and the lion’s share of the prize money.

“I wasn’t sure I could catch her,” said Berry of the pace to beat set by Jones. “But Quantos is a good mix. He’s a long-strided horse, so we can leave the stride out, but he’s also got a turn on him. It was a good course, and you needed a horse who could accomplish both — leave out strides and turn quickly.

“There was a fast gallop to an oxer in the jump-off, followed by a sharp right turn,” Berry continued. “Quantos ran well to the oxer and took direction well on the backside, making a sharp right turn. I think that may be where I caught the time.”

Berry said his team couldn’t be happier with the seven-year-old Quantos and he’s pleased with the support from his team, from his owner Lee Cesery to his grooms, Javier Guerra and Luis Vega.

“Everyone has been at the top of their game,” Berry remarked.

Jones ended the class in second place, and Boggio ranked third.

Jones was back in the ring to pick up fourth prize for her ride aboard Chris Richards’ Uno Z. Fifth place was awarded to Aida Sanchez Long, of Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Darragh Kerins’ Rossco. Berry ranked sixth aboard Andrew Kocher’s Duvelke, while Lexington, Kentucky’s Sarah Meier placed seventh with Punchestown Stable’s F 16.

Boggio was back in the ribbons, ranking eighth with Victoria Press’ Quesada D’Elle. Heather Hooker, of Wellington, Florida, was ninth with Meredith Darst’s Quester de Virton. Tenth place was awarded to Meier, this time with Madison Dehaven’s Chanel. Meredith Bryans, of Newborn, Georgia, with her own Guidam Sid, ranked eleventh, and Roger Seitzmeir, of Thompsons Station, Tennessee, wrapped up the top-twelve with the Jaeckle Centre’s TJC’s Kaizer-A.

Quantos and Jason Berry Reclaim Title in $5,000 Welcome Jumper

Jason Berry kicked off Week II of the Atlanta Spring Classic in the same manner he wrapped up Week I — victorious. This time, it was top prize in the $5,000 Welcome Jumper with Quantos. With Duvelke, Berry took home the second place ribbon as well.

Berry, of Verona, Virginia, piloted Lee Cesery’s Quantos across the opening jumper class. The first contenders to tackle the first round, the duo made short work of the track, leaving all the jumps in their cups and reaching the timers well within the time allowed of 79 seconds. They were the first of four contenders to be invited back into the ring for the jump-off round.

Berry and Quantos set the pace to beat across the shortened course, finishing the competition with a double clear performance, a jump-off time of 40.114 seconds, and the winner’s check in his pocket.

“The jump-off round was great for my horse,” said Berry. “There was a lot of space to gallop and he covers the ground so easily.

“Quantos was imported last fall,” said Berry. Since then, he said they’ve been bringing the seven-year-old along slowly and are pleased with his progress.

“He’s been wonderful. He can be an amateur’s horse, but still has the scope for a grand prix. He’s young and green but you can always leave that stride out — he’s got tons of step and tons of scope.”

Berry and Quantos also claimed top prize in Week I’s Welcome Jumper, along with winning the $15,000 Grand Prix aboard Fazous. Berry said it’s his second time riding at the Atlanta Spring Classic, but said it’s been a good few weeks made better by show management.

“They are professionals,” Berry remarked of the show management. “The staff is doing a great job of making the most of the footing —they are putting the time and effort into maintaining it.”

Berry was runner-up with Andrew Kocher’s Duvelke. The duo achieved the only other double clear performance, but a relatively pokey jump-off time of 47.312 kept them in second position.

Sarah Meier of Lexington, Kentucky rounded off the top-three for her performance with Madison Dehaven’s Chanel. The pair blew the time to beat out of the water, reaching the timers in 38.315 seconds, but a falling rail midway through the jump-off landed the pair the third place ribbon. Meier also ranked fourth for her performance with Punchestown Stables’ F 16.

Thompson Station, Tennessee’s Roger Seitzmeir ranked fifth with the Jaeckle Centre’s TJC’s Kaizer-A, while Berry rounded out the top-six with Fazous.

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