Category Archives: Community/Charity

Savonna Adell Joins Forces with JustWorld International as Newest Ambassador

Savonna Adell and Sportin Around. Photo by: SportFot.

Wellington, Fla. – April 12, 2018 – Up-and-coming junior rider Savonna Adell is passionate about equestrian sport, and now she is excited to be giving back to the sport and the community by joining JustWorld International as their newest ambassador. JustWorld International is dedicated to breaking the cycle of poverty by funding local partners around the world helping children thrive. JustWorld’s involvement in the equestrian community provides unique resources for fundraising and a unique network for raising awareness.

“I am very excited to join the team of ambassadors at JustWorld International,” expressed Adell. “I understand the importance of giving back to the community and I am happy to be helping other children around the world. I am looking forward to volunteering at events and representing JustWorld at horse shows around the country.”

As an ambassador, Adell will act as a spokesperson for JustWorld in her local community, among friends, and at horse shows. She has also pledged to make an annual donation to benefit JustWorld, in addition to volunteering time to JustWorld events. JustWorld ambassadors can also choose to host fundraising efforts such as bake sales and Horseless Horse Shows. All proceeds from an ambassador’s event will go directly to a JustWorld project.

JustWorld International was founded in 2003 by equestrian, Jessica Newman. “I started to realize that there was a lot more out there and that I was living in a very privileged circle,” said Newman. “I’d done everything I wanted in the sport as a competitor and it was time to dedicate my life to doing something for others.”

For the past fifteen years, hundreds of Rider Ambassadors and supporters, including juniors, amateurs, and professionals from around the world, have changed thousands of children’s lives by helping with fundraising efforts and spreading awareness.

Adell is a 12-year-old junior athlete who is quickly climbing the ranks in equestrian sport, having recently been named Reserve Circuit Champion in the Large Children’s Pony Hunter division with Spellbound, after winning the championship honors during World Champion Hunter Rider week at the Winter Equestrian Festival. A Bloomfield Hills, Michigan native, Adell shows under the tutelage of trainers Gary and Kelsey Duffy of Little Brook Farms, based in Wellington, Florida.

www.justworldinternational.org

Contact: Rebecca Walton
phone 561.753.3389 fax 561.753.3386
rjw@phelpsmediagroup.com
PhelpsMediaGroup.com

Equestrian Aid Foundation Helps Eventer Kim Meier Cope after Life-Altering Injury

Kim Meier with Bart (top) and Test Run. Photos courtesy of Kim Meier.

Wellington, Fla. – Apr. 9, 2018 – Kim Meier reached the pinnacle of eventing before tragedy struck. In 2007 she was paralyzed from the shoulders down in a freak accident. For Kim and horse people like her facing catastrophic injury and illness, life becomes a struggle.

Kim carved her career in classic eventer fashion, riding homebreds and doing all the work herself. She developed her work ethic at the summer camp her family owned, fell in love with the horses and was determined to be an eventer. Largely self-taught, she also worked with Denny Emerson, Ralph Hill and Donnan Sharp.

Test Run or “Merle” was her ticket to the big time. She had bred his sire and his sire’s dam. In 2002, Kim and the gray Thoroughbred finished Bromont. Then in 2003, they competed at Foxhall Three Day Event, their first three star, then Fair Hill. At the Rolex (now the Land Rover Kentucky Three Day Event) Four Star Event in 2004, they had a top-10 finish out of 72 starters. They competed at Burghley and finished. She was 45 and looking forward to great things.

In 2005, Merle was sidelined due to an injury. Then, Kim’s barn endured a frightening and emotional experience with the EHV-1 virus. Merle got through it and they got back to work.

“I did three Intermediates that year in the summer and fall, planning my big comeback at Rolex in 2007,” Kim said in an article she wrote for Eventing Nation. “We did one Intermediate, and that next Tuesday I was doing a jumping school when IT happened. On the way to a vertical, he stepped on his bell boot and went down on his knees. I slid down his neck and caught the rail on the base of my head.”

As a result of her fall, Kim suffers from paralysis from the C5 vertebra down. Despite extensive rehabilitative therapies, Kim’s doctors said she could never ride, stand or walk again and would forever be wheelchair bound.

“It’s great how the Equestrian Aid Foundation jumped right in to help from the very beginning right after I got hurt,” Kim said.

The Foundation provided financial assistance to help Kim with basic living expenses. Her daughter and friends help her with daily activities and make certain she has the care she needs.

Though it’s been a long, tough road, Kim remains resilient and has the courageous spirit to stay as active as possible. She works judging unrated horse shows when she can, gives some lessons and does the occasional clinic.

Your donation to Equestrian Aid Foundation provides much-needed support for horse people like Kim facing catastrophic injury and illness.

For more information, please visit EquestrianAidFoundation.org.

IHSA National All-Academic Award Recipients Named

National Qualifiers Announced for Teresa L. McDonald Challenge

Fairfield, Conn. – April 5, 2018 – The IHSA announced the list of nearly 800 recipients for their National All-Academic Award. The National All-Academic Award recognizes academic achievement for an IHSA undergraduate or alumni member based on their fall 2017 semester grades. All the recipients competed in at least one IHSA competition during the academic year.

Students who achieved a grade point average of 3.8 or higher received First Team honors and students who earned a grade point average of 3.5 or higher received Second Team honors.

Click here for a list of recipients.

The IHSA announced the 16 national qualifiers for the Teresa L. McDonald IHSA Scholarship Challenge. These students achieved the highest scores from their zones on the online test. They will compete in a practicum phase at the 2018 IHSA National Championship Show in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, May 3-6.

Teresa L. McDonald IHSA Scholarship Challenge is sponsored by EQUUS. The challenge is a free online test covering non-discipline-specific, general horsemanship topics and is open to all IHSA undergraduate members. The timed test consists of 50 questions from the United States Hunter Jumper Association (USHJA) Study Guide.

The test was available online for two weeks on the IHSA website. The participants with the top-two scores from each Zone are invited to compete in a practicum phase at the 2018 IHSA Nationals in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The top-10 scorers win scholarships.

Teresa L. McDonald taught at Virginia Tech and was an active IHSA board member for many years. McDonald was a founder of the Intercollegiate Dressage Association. She was known for her sense of diplomacy and nicknamed “Madeline Albright.”

Click here for a list of qualifiers.

The IHSA was founded in 1967 by Robert Cacchione while he attended Fairleigh Dickinson University in Teaneck, New Jersey. The organization was established so that any full-time college student could participate in equestrian competition regardless of economic status, gender or riding level and offers Hunter Seat and Western competition at eight levels from Walk-Trot through Open divisions for both male and female college athletes. The IHSA emphasizes learning and sportsmanship and fosters teamwork. The organization has grown to include 400 member teams and 10,000 members encompassing 39 Regions, 8 Zones and 45 states and Canada. College or university teams, individuals, alumni and coaches may become members.

For more information, go to IHSAinc.com or contact media@IHSAinc.com.

Hailey Johns Named as Official Junior Ambassador for Leo Conroy Maclay Grant

Hailey Johns competing in the 2017 ASPCA Maclay Equitation Finals. PC: Shawn McMillan Photography.

Lexington, KY – March 21, 2018 – The National Horse Show is pleased to announce 17-year-old Hailey Johns as the new Junior Ambassador for the Leo Conroy Maclay Grant (LCMG). Johns was a recipient of the important grant in 2017 and used it to compete at the National Horse Show in the ASPCA Maclay Equitation Championship.

Johns, who currently trains with Katie Kappler of Katie Kappler LLC, has been an avid equestrian since she was four years old. After a brief introductory phase at a western facility, Johns was introduced to the hunter and jumper disciplines. She competed in the pony divisions and junior hunter classes before making the transition to the equitation ring at age 12.

“I’d wanted to compete in the Maclay Finals for so long and I was so excited to have qualified but the first thing that I asked myself was ‘how am I going to make this possible?’” remarked Johns. “My parents had already completely expended our budget to get me to the regionals so I felt like I needed to cover as much of the expenses as possible.”

That’s when Johns says she and Kappler saw a poster advertising the grant at the regionals facility. “I researched it and I knew that was the best route to go. It seemed like an exceptional opportunity and perfect for me so I applied as soon as I could,” said Johns.

The Leo Conroy Maclay Grant was established in 2015 after the passing of rider and trainer, Leo Conroy. Conroy was an avid supporter of the National Horse Show and especially of the ASPCA Maclay Finals. He spent many years as the co-manager of the National Horse Show and acted as Chairman of the National Horse Show Equitation Committee. To commemorate his dedication and love for the show, the grant is awarded to up to 5 Maclay competitors and 3 Hamel Foundation NHS 3’3″ Equitation Championship competitors each year that demonstrate a need for financial support to participate in their divisions.

The ASPCA Maclay Final championship is considered one of the most prestigious equitation events in the country and hosts many young athletes from across the country.

All riders must qualify through regional competitions in order to compete at the Maclay finals. Those seeking assistance through the LCMG to support their journey are asked to detail an essay on the importance of the show to them and why they are a good choice as a recipient of the grant. The grant accommodates recipients by covering expenses associated with entry fees and stabling as well as a $1,000 stipend to cover additional show-related costs required to compete in the Maclay Final or Hamel Foundation NHS 3’3″ Equitation Championship.

“We are thrilled to have Hailey Johns represent the Leo Conroy Maclay Grant this year,” said Jennifer Burger, President of the National Horse Show. “Hailey is the perfect representation of the type of young person that we strive to help through the LCMG and we are looking forward to utilizing her to get the word out for the 2018 edition of the National Horse Show.”

To learn more about the Leo Conroy Maclay Grant, click here.

To learn more about the National Horse Show, click here.

Luminary Award Presented to Stephanie Riggio Bulger for Service to Equestrian Aid Foundation

Photo by EQ Media.

Wellington, Fla. – March 12, 2018 – Equestrian Aid Foundation founders, board members, staff and friends honored Stephanie Riggio Bulger with their Luminary Award for her invaluable service to the organization. Founders Robert Dover, chef d’Equipe of the U.S. Dressage team, and Robert Ross hosted a private party Sunday, Feb. 4, at their home in Wellington’s Palm Beach Polo and Country Club. Dover, Ross and fellow founder R. Scot Evans paid tribute to Bulger.

“Stephanie infused the Equestrian Aid Foundation with her energy and clear vision for our mission,” Ross said.

“Her focus is helping us navigate new paths to define our future. We are grateful for the legacy Stephanie bestowed upon us all,” said Monique Keitz, Equestrian Aid Foundation board vice president.

Ross and Evans introduced Bulger to the Equestrian Aid Foundation nearly a decade ago. The organization provides financial support for horse people facing catastrophic illness or injury. She served as a member of the board of directors for eight years, four years as the president of the foundation.

“I was so surprised!” Bulger said about her award. “When Robert got the mic and asked for Stephanie to come up, my initial thought was that there was a new grant recipient named Stephanie who was going to speak. I had no idea I was about to be recognized and honored.”

Bulger says that she is especially proud of several projects that she tackled during her leadership. The last major project she led was producing the recipient resource guide, a succinct handbook that details where and how injured or ill horse people can find additional help. It provides helpful links, phone numbers, an explanation of various government programs and benefits and more.

“I am so happy with how the recipient resource guide turned out,” Bulger said. “I am also thrilled with the Show You Care horse show program that we launched last year.”

Bulger said that the Equestrian Aid Foundation gave her an outlet to give back to the community.

“Horses and the people I have met have formed the most significant and meaningful relationships in my life,” Bulger said. “I don’t know where I would be if it weren’t for my horses and horse friends. Working with the Equestrian Aid Foundation was my way of saying thanks.”

With the changing times and challenges facing nonprofit organizations, Bulger says she hopes the Equestrian Aid Foundation continues to look forward to help horse people in crisis.

“There is so much more work to be done and more people who need help,” she said. “We have been told time and time again that the Equestrian Aid Foundation saves lives. It is a vital part of the greater equestrian community and I know that it will continue to have an impact.”

For more information, please visit EquestrianAidFoundation.org.

The Challenge of the Americas Going Global March 9

Photo courtesy of Susan J. Stickle.

The Challenge of the Americas (COTA) is busting down borders! Not only is COTA returning after a year’s hiatus to help find a cure for breast cancer; it’s so big, it’s going global.

COTA’s signature six-rider Grand Prix Quadrille Team Challenge will be held live on March 9 at the world-renowned Global Dressage Festival (GDF) show grounds in Wellington, Florida, and for the first time, it’s also being live-streamed via Chronicle TV.

To add more excitement, the competition will break down borders as one of the teams joins the four teams riding live to compete via video from Holland.

Six Dutch Grand Prix riders, Maria Anna Digman, Miranda Hoezen, Sylvia van den Broek, Michelle Westerdijk, Renee Zoomers, and Walda Zwart, are thrilled to join in the first international Challenge of the Americas to help end to breast cancer. Their freestyle will be pre-recorded and they’ll join Wellington-based Team Back on Track, Team MatchNRide, Team Purina, and Team Winged Foot via the big screen in the GDF International Arena.

Team Back on Track riders include Allison Kavey, Jim Koford, Nicole Levy, Sallie Spenard, Betsy Van Dyke, and Noel Williams. Cynthia “Tigger” Montague serves as choreographer and coach for the all-American team.

Team MatchNRide, whose riders hail from Canada, includes Patrick Battison, Jaimey Irwin, Tina Irwin, Harper Mackenzie, Evi Strasser, and Tanya Strasser. They are under the direction of choreographer Eva Pracht and musical creator Karen Robinson.

Team Purina, under the watchful eyes of choreographer Terry Ciotti Gallo and coach Bill Warren, is comprised of Americans Charlotte Bredahl, Pam Goodrich, Kim Herslow, Kasey Perry Glass, Betsy Steiner, and George Williams.

Team Winged Foot, an international team made up of Marco Bernal, Raul Corchuelo,

Susanne Hamilton, Bridget Hay, Yvonne Losos de Muñiz, and Ilse Schwarz, is under the direction of choreographer and coach Ruth Hogan Poulsen.

Other global touches include a Grand Prix freestyle performance by top Swedish rider Tinne Vilhelmson-Silfvén aboard Paridon Magi, a pas de deux by U.S. riders Heather Blitz and Catherine Haddad Staller, and a quadrille showcasing the beauty and elegance of the PRE horse.

“It’s time we went global,” said COTA founder Mary Ross. “Breast cancer knows no boundaries and to help end breast cancer, we need to raise more donations ear-marked for breast cancer research. The best way for us to do this is to reach out to equestrians in other locations for their support.”

Funds from ticket sales, sponsorships and donations will go to The Breast Cancer Research Foundation through their partner Play for P.I.N.K. The mission of The Breast Cancer Research Foundation is to prevent and cure breast cancer by advancing the world’s most promising research.

“We are extremely proud of our partnership with the Challenge of the Americas and indebted to everyone involved in wanting to see the end of breast cancer,” said Stephanie Hamburger, Executive Director of Play for P.I.N.K., a volunteer organization dedicated to raising funds for the Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF). “The Challenge of the Americas’ support is critical to the research-funding capability of BCRF. The money raised will impact the lives of countless individuals and families affected by the disease.”

Join us Friday, March 9 at the Global Dressage Festival show grounds, or via live-stream on Chronicle TV. VIP tickets for the Challenge Gala are available at challengeoftheamericas.com. General admission tickets available at the door for $20.

Discover Dressage Joins COTA to Advance Dressage While Fighting Breast Cancer

Team members include Kerrigan Gluch, Sarah Roda, Elena Schiefele and Sophia Schults. Photo by Lily Forado.

When Challenge of the Americas (COTA) organizer Mary Ross approached Kim Van Kampen, the founder of Discover Dressage, to join in COTA’s fight against breast cancer, Van Kampen thought it was a great idea.

The March 9 Challenge of the Americas features teams of top international dressage riders competing in Grand Prix freestyle quadrilles to benefit breast cancer research, and Discover Dressage is a non-profit organization with the mission to inspire American youth to discover the sport of dressage and support healthy competition.

“When Mary talked to me about ideas for the Challenge, I told her I had a quadrille ready to go,” said Van Kampen, owner of Hampton Green Farm, known for the breeding and promotion of the PRE horse. “For USPRE week, held recently in Wellington, Florida, the girls put together a quadrille on four great geldings and had a lot of fun. I thought adding them to the exhibition line-up before the competition would be an excellent way to support the Challenge. Our all-female musical quadrille made up of talented young women will help create awareness among young people about breast cancer.”

The team of Kerrigan Gluch, Sarah Roda, Elena Schiefele and Sophia Schults will ride their own PRE horses or those owned by Hampton Green Farm. They are coached by Maria Lithander.

“It’s very different to ride as a team and it presents unique challenges, but it’s also really fun and rewarding,” Elena Schiefele said. “Since one in eight women develops breast cancer, I think breast cancer research is important not only to those whose lives will be saved, but also to their families and everyone else affected by it.”

Team member Sophia Schults agreed. “Having the opportunity to participate in such an amazing event is unreal and being able to help support such a great cause is a huge honor. The support that both the sport of dressage as well as breast cancer research gains from this event makes a huge difference and I feel very lucky to be a part of both causes.”

Rider Kerrigan Gluch said they had fun creating an entertaining routine and she’s excited to perform it for a worthy cause. “This is my first time being involved with something like the Challenge, so I am very eager to see how it goes. This sport is mostly geared towards competition, so I think it’s great to associate it with breast cancer research. I think good riding, entertaining music, great people – all for a good cause, makes for an awesome night.”

Challenge of the Americas:
challengeoftheamericas.com
facebook.com/ChallengeoftheAmericas

Equestrian Aid Foundation Helps Farrier Get Back on Track after Serious Injury

Trevor Lent and Blue. Photo courtesy of Trevor Lent.

Wellington, Fla. – Feb. 22, 2018 – Trevor Lent made his living as a farrier until the day he was kicked so badly that both his kneecap and femur shattered. After an initial unsuccessful surgery, his doctor performed a total knee replacement that left him temporarily non-weight bearing and permanently unable to return to his livelihood of shoeing horses.

Without income from his work, the once self-reliant cowboy’s life fell apart. He lost his house and his marriage. For a period of time, a truck and stock trailer served as home to Trevor, his horse and his dog.

Then, a friend told him about Equestrian Aid Foundation and how the organization helps horse people facing financial catastrophe from illness or injury. Trevor asked – and Equestrian Aid said yes.

“The Equestrian Aid Foundation was a tremendous help to me during a tumultuous time,” he said.

After several years of hard work at odd jobs and with the support of Equestrian Aid Foundation and his friends, Trevor purchased a small tract of land at the foot of the Datril Mountains in New Mexico. Slowly but steadily, he built a barn for his horse and a shop. Trevor now works repairing tack and leather goods, and he creates custom tack for pack horses and mules. Eventually, he built a small home. Today Trevor lives there with his wife Tova, whom he met on horseback.

“I like living here,” Trevor said. “It’s big country and it’s beautiful. There’s not a lot of people and the people here are survivors. They have to be.”

Trevor will never be sound again but he, too, is a survivor. Despite the devastating physical, emotional and financial aftermath of his accident, he has rebuilt his life.

For more information, please visit EquestrianAidFoundation.org.

“Hats Off to the Horses: The Road to the Derby” Online Auction Launches with the Awesome Gem

Proceeds from this fashion sale to benefit Old Friends Thoroughbred Retirement Facility

GEORGETOWN, KY – JANUARY 5, 2018 – The online fashion auction “Hats Off to the Horses: The Road to the Derby” kicked off this week with another beautiful handcrafted Derby chapeau going on the virtual block to raise money for Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement Facility in Georgetown, KY.

This is the ninth year that Old Friends has joined with acclaimed milliner Sally Faith Steinmann of the Massachusetts-based Maggie Mae Designs® to auction off exclusive Derby hats online, each inspired by one of the non-profit organization’s retired racehorses. The fashion fundraiser has raised over $32,000 to date.

This new hat was inspired by Old Friends retiree Awesome Gem. The now 15-year-old gelding, once campaigned by West Point Thoroughbreds, is a multiple graded-stakes winner and counts among his victories the 2010 GR 1 Hollywood Gold Cup.

For this launch, the beautiful chapeau was modeled by Krystal Court accompanied by her husband, leading jockey Jon Court, and their daughter, Aubrey.

Bidding on “The Awesome Gem” can be done between January 1st, 2018 and January 11, 2018 by visiting the Old Friends website at www.oldfriendsequine.org and following the link, or by CLICKING HERE and follow the “click to bid” button.

This new design showcases Awesome Gem’s chestnut coat along with his familiar West Point Thoroughbreds black-and-yellow racing silks.

The hat’s wide, 20-inch, flat-brim design was created out of deep yellow dupioni silk with a black lace overlay and a black taffeta edge. Adornments include a single yellow rose, fashioned out of swirling layers of deep yellow dupioni silk and soft lemon organza, which pays homage to the horse’s Gold Cup win, and a large shimmering button, made of chocolate, crystal, and platinum beads, which adds a final finishing touch.

As always, Steinmann included a physical remembrance of the horse, with strands of Awesome Gem’s tail hair woven into the trim.

Special thanks to EquiSport Photo for the images and video and to the Bella Rose Boutique of Lexington, KY for supplying the beautiful ensembles.

For additional information, contact the Old Friends office at (502) 863-1775.

Maggie Mae Designs® Custom Millinery offers magnificent hats for all occasions – from glamorous racing events such as the Kentucky Derby and the Royal Ascot to stunning bridal wear and handsome cocktail fashions. Every hat is carefully handcrafted by milliner Sally Faith Steinmann from her home base in South Harwich, MA. Salons of her fashions can been seen on her website at www.maggiemaedesigns.com.

Old Friends is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization that cares for 175 retired racehorses. Its Dream Chase Farm, located in Georgetown, KY, is open to tourists daily by appointment. Old Friends also has a satellite facility in Greenfield Center, New York, Old Friends at Cabin Creek: The Bobby Frankel Division, which is also open to visitors. For more information on tours or to make a donation, contact the main farm at (502) 863-1775 or see their website at www.oldfriendsequine.org.

Tim Jones Takes the Helm as New Executive Director of Jacksonville Equestrian Center

Jacksonville, FL (January 3, 2018) — The Jacksonville Equestrian Center grounds first got its start as a former U.S. Naval base. When the Navy closed down the base, they donated 2,000 acres of forestland to the city of Jacksonville, earmarked for a regional recreational park. The city then created an 80-acre, world-class equestrian center on the property, capable of hosting many kinds of events and often has multiple events simultaneously.

The task of running the versatile, multi-faceted facility in Jacksonville, Florida is now in the capable hands of Tim Jones. Although Jones spent the last several years in Kentucky horse country, he is happy to now call the warmth and balmy beauty of the sunshine state of Florida home.

Jones graduated from the University of Kentucky in 1987 with a Bachelor of Science degree in agriculture (agronomy/animal science). “I grew up on a farm in far western Kentucky,” he drawled softly. “But I really did not become involved with horses until I attended The University of Kentucky where I began working part-time on a local Thoroughbred farm to help pay for college.” After starting off hot-walking racehorses, an enthusiastic Jones began to learn the horse business from the ground up. He went on to become a groom, and then an exercise rider.

After a short stint as an assistant farm manager in Ohio, Jones moved back to the Lexington area as the event-coordinator of the legendary Kentucky Horse Park. “Although my position at the park wasn’t hands-on with horses any longer, I was heavily involved with the Mounted Police unit there and was fortunate to ride with them on several occasions, including a musical ride and many public relations functions.” It was at the Kentucky Horse Park that Jones learned about the horse show industry. “I loved the job, and I grew with the department during the next 17 years. We added rings and barns, and it was a really good time to be there.”

Next up for Jones was a seven-year stint as the director of Western Kentucky University’s Agricultural Expo Center in Bowling Green, where he was in charge of the operation of a climate-controlled 2,000-seat indoor arena, an outdoor arena and event stabling. “The Expo Center hosts a number of equestrian and livestock events annually,” Jones explained, “as well as providing classroom and support to the Agriculture Department of the University.” Bowling Green was a much smaller facility, and he says he “missed the larger events at a place like the Kentucky Horse Park.”

“So that’s what brought me to the Jacksonville Equestrian Center,” explained Jones. “More than anything, I like diversity and the variety of lots of different events. Horse shows have similar aspects but there are differences. A barrel racing competition is different from a dressage show, which is different from a hunter/jumper show, which is decidedly different from dog agility. Every day is different.” Then he happily added, “I’m definitely excited about not having to put my snow-and-ice-removal skills to the test!”

Jones’ vast experience will serve him well as he heads up the exciting new phase of construction at the Jacksonville Equestrian Center. Ground breaking will commence next month for an additional covered arena and cattle cover to complement the 5000-seat indoor coliseum, stadium jumping field, four permanent barns, and seven outdoor arenas The Jacksonville Equestrian Center staff has already developed a reputation for hosting family-friendly exciting events all year round, with most events open to the public. The facility is a favorite destination not only for horse lovers and competitors, but also for recreational events that take advantage of miles of hiking and riding trails, a picnic pavilion and even an Olympic-sized indoor swimming pool center abutting the equestrian facility.

For more information about the facility and to find out about upcoming events, visit www.jaxequestriancenter.com or Tim Jones at (904) 255-4225.

Jacksonville Equestrian Center
Tim Jones 904-255-4225
timjones@coj.net
13611 Normandy Blvd.
Jacksonville, FL 32221