Category Archives: Community/Charity

Ranching Evolution

A little history and a look at the current offerings in AQHA ranch-horse competition.

No bling. No fancy clothes. Those were the tenets of the first AQHA Versatility Ranch Horse classes that debuted 16 years ago.

Exhibitors were looking for something different from the usual AQHA show classes. So a task force comprised of ranchers, exhibitors, judges and representatives from other ranch horse organizations developed the five-class VRH shows, and at each VRH show, exhibitors competed in ranch riding, ranch trail, ranch cutting, working ranch horse and ranch conformation.

The classes harkened back to a day when an American Quarter Horse would show in halter in the morning and do all of the other classes – cutting, western pleasure, etc. – through the rest of the day. Since then, AQHA has added a hugely popular standalone ranch riding class, as well as AQHA Ranching Heritage Challenges that are open to all AQHA Ranching Heritage-bred horses.

Versatility Ranch Horse

AQHA Versatility Ranch Horse events debuted in 2002. The five-class VRH shows required exhibitors to compete in five classes: ranch riding, ranch trail, ranch cutting, working ranch horse and ranch conformation.

To read more about ranch classes, go to AQHA Daily.

By Becky Newell and Larri Jo Starkey

American Quarter Horse Association
1600 Quarter Horse Drive
Amarillo, TX 79104

Belmont Happenings

June 9… Ron Turcotte and a Big Red horse at Belmont Park… a Triple Crown on the line… It’s 45 years later and here we go again! Meet Secretariat’s Hall of Fame jockey during the 150th Belmont Stakes festivities and watch Justify continue his own quest for racing’s pinnacle prize.

Beginning Friday, June 8 at 11:00 am and continuing on Saturday, June 9 at 10:00 am, Ron will be available to meet fans and sign autographs at the Secretariat wall mural booth adjacent to the grandstand colonnade entrance. On Belmont Stakes Day, Ron will be joined by additional racing celebrities including fellow Triple Crown riders Jean Cruguet and Victor Espinoza. Other special guests scheduled to appear throughout the day are Hall of Fame rider Julie Krone and journalist/photographer/handicapper Steve Haskin. Stop by and say hello to these legendary racing luminaries. Click Here for Event Schedule.

Secretariat.com
P.O. Box 4865
Louisville, Kentucky 40204
United States

Inside the Rolex Grand Slam: Exclusive Interview with Kent Farrington

Kent Farrington riding Voyeur at the CHI Geneva 2017 (Photo: Kit Houghton)

Can you talk us through your incredible recovery process?

“I am a really active person, so I didn’t want to rest for too long. After the surgery I was walking around the hospital on crutches when everyone else was asleep – I think it was only 10 or 11 hours after my operation, but I felt I needed to move.

Once I was out of hospital I had a week of resting at home to recover. It was exhausting as I was unable to sleep properly and would often wake up in the night because of the medication and the pain, but I wanted to start my rehab as soon as possible so I could get back to my sport. In my mind I was in a hurry to recover and I didn’t want to sit back and wait for that to happen. I think that recovery is down to healing physically but also focusing mentally and that’s what I was determined to do. I started training every other day, doing simple exercises at home, e.g. lying on the couch bending and straightening my leg in sets. I would repeat this every other hour, just doing these sets all day to build my strength.

As I got stronger, I frequently got x-rays to evaluate the progress. If you overtrain you can build too much bone and that can have a real negative impact on your healing and can result in you stopping your training altogether which would have been a disaster for me – it’s all about the right balance.

I also had another problem: when I fell the bone came out of my skin, I had a big wound and a high risk of infection. I had doctors working on that too and was sending photos to the doctors every day to monitor it.

As process went on and the rehab developed, I did a lot of weight resistance on my leg – grueling exercises, elliptical machine routines, bounce exercises and putting my own body weight on one leg and teaching myself to walk again really. I started training 2-3 times a day, repeating all the same exercises. I also bought a rowing machine, so I could train at home in between sessions with my physical trainer.

I did training sessions at 5.30am or 9.30pm as I wanted to be on my own. I work better on my own as I like to do my own thing and focus on getting stronger.  I was really grateful that my trainer would come in early or stay late just to focus on me.

That was my routine: eat, sleep and train.

As you go on, and you are motivated to get better, you learn to cope with it all. I am motivated on my own, so I didn’t need to extra help for that. Getting back to the sport, my amazing horses and my big team of riders and owners motivated me and made excited to get healthy again.”

Can you tell us about the team of people who helped with your recovery process?

“Firstly, I had a fantastic doctor, Dr Nicholas Sama. He is a pro at this job and really took an interest above and beyond what a normal doctor should. I was going to his office a minimum of once week and they took it on as a cause to get me back to my sport as quickly as possible with a full recovery physically.

Ed Smith from Athletes Advantage in Wellington, Florida – a training a rehabilitation centre – was another very influential person. I was going there before and after normal business hours and he was there for me, to train me through everything. These aren’t things those guys have to do, and I am so grateful for all of that support. Top of their field.

I have a really strong team at home. Claudio Baroni is a fantastic rider and helps me to exercise the horses and we made a plan together just two days after the operation. We made a calendar of what all my horses were going to do while I was recovering, and it was great to know they would be in safe hands.  When you do things like that — putting your mind in the focus of planning for the future — it pushes me to do everything in my power to be as good as I can and as quick as I can in my recovery.”

The film you posted on Instagram has had a lot of interest; can you talk us through it?

“I think that is one of the things about social media today – people are very interested in what other people are doing. People kept asking me how I was, could I work and kept questioning if I would ever be able to ride again – so thought I would post that video up and would answers everyone’s questions and show everyone that I was on a good road to recovery.”

How did it feel to be back in the saddle?

“The first couple of times I was a little apprehensive – I thought ‘am I going to remember how to ride’ etc. I had a lot of pain the first time, I couldn’t ride in the stirrups, but I had to control my mind set and tell myself it was going to better. I had to accept I could only make baby steps and each day it would get a little bit better and a little bit better.”

When I first jumped a course for the first time it felt good; it felt okay to ride and jump and it felt exciting. I was like a little kid at Christmas; it’s weird because when you do something your whole life you take for granted how fun something is; for me be back in the saddle and riding made me feel alive again.”

Royal Windsor Horse Show was your first show back; how was the experience this year?

“I love Royal Windsor Horse Show; it is one of the most unique competitions and to be in the Castle Grounds is so special, so I really wanted to be able to compete there. I didn’t want to push myself too much in the first class, so I went at a medium speed and came third which I was really pleased with.

I told myself if I could ride, I could compete and if I was going to compete I wanted to do it properly and at a 5* show, so Windsor seemed the appropriate one to aim for. “

What advice would you have for anyone who was experiencing a similar injury to yours?

“The first thing is acceptance of what your injury is, understand that you’re hurt and you won’t be better in a day or a week. I wanted to educate myself on my injury, so I worked out what I could do, what I could expect and how to be realistic.

I looked up other athletes who had similar injuries to see what they did to recover. One particular sports star stuck with me, a basketball player called Paul George. He suffered a horrific break very similar to mine and people thought he would never play again. He recovered and came back to be one the of the best players in the NBA, so I thought if he can do it, so I can I. That was really good for my moral and motivation.”

Now you are back from injury, what are your main focuses this year – are you eyeing up the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping?

“For sure my eye is on all the big Rolex competitions and of course the Rolex Grand Slam. I was so disappointed to miss The Dutch Masters, but I will focus on getting back on track and aim for that ultimate prize. I am excited for Aachen in July; it is one of the best competitions in the world and I am looking forward to competing against the world’s best riders.”

Which horses do you have high hopes for this year?

“I am lucky to have so many great horses, but I have particular high hopes for Creedance, Voyeur, Gazelle, and Uceko. I also have some up-and-coming young ones. I don’t think they will be ready for Grand Prix level this year but definitely high hopes for the future.”

Which horses do you plan to bring to CHIO Aachen in July?

“I am not 100% sure yet by in my ideal world I would bring Voyeur, Gazelle, and Uceko.”

© 2018 Rolex – Rolex Grand Slam

Equestrian Aid Foundation Helps Breeder with Necessities after Catastrophic Accident

Photo courtesy of the Wight family.

Committed to a life of serving others, Loren and Nancy Wight once suspended their Egyptian Arabian breeding operation and moved to Honduras for a year, where Loren helped local communities as an ophthalmic technologist. Now, he is learning to be on the receiving end of help.

In an unsuspecting moment on the family’s Idaho ranch, life changed forever. Loren was teaching a new employee how to operate their tractor when it lurched forward and knocked him down. He was trapped under the tractor’s giant rear wheel, and the only way to get him out was to back over him again.

Loren suffered a catastrophic crush injury to his lower legs, and in the resultant fall, he also sustained a traumatic brain injury. Even after numerous surgeries and rehabilitative therapies, the fate of his lower right leg remains uncertain and may require amputation. The blow to his head left Loren legally blind and impaired his memory, effectively ending both his livelihood as an ophthalmic technologist and a horse breeder.

It’s been a daily struggle since Loren’s accident. Nancy and his daughter work tirelessly to fill his shoes financially and as a farm worker — caring for the horses and other animals, overseeing the breeding operation, and milking the dairy goats. Loren assists where and when he can. Ever resourceful, the family supplements their income by selling eggs, hand-knit mittens, and soaps and lotions made from goat’s milk.

Amidst the day-to-day bustle of farm life, Loren’s health struggles loom in the background. Once self-sufficient and able to provide for his family, Loren relies for the time being on funds from the Equestrian Aid Foundation to keep food on the table and the house warm. Thanks to our donors, however, these necessities are in place.

“I don’t know how, but I vow to give back to the Equestrian Aid Foundation once we get through this tough time,” Loren says. In the meantime, he is grateful for the compassion of the equestrian community as he and his family work toward a brighter future.

For more information, please visit EquestrianAidFoundation.org.

Every Day at the Barn Is Mother’s Day

Faye with the Welsh Pony M.E. Don’t Come Back Jack and Eloise with the Andalusian Robusto AF. Photo credit: Gina Falcone/Courtesy of Carlyn Nuyda-Calloway.

In families where parents and children both ride, that experience can be especially fulfilling. That’s what California-based fashion designer and Meditation Studio owner Carlyn Nuyda-Calloway and her daughters, Eloise and Faye, have found. The three are the latest in a line of female equestrians in their family who have shared the connection with horses down the generations, from the East Coast of America to the Philippines and now in Southern California.

“For me, it creates such a strong bond with them. I get to share their joy, and they get to share mine,” Carlyn said of equestrian life with her daughters. “It’s also about teamwork. Sometimes we disagree, but, because there’s a horse involved, we have to agree to disagree. We have to come to a point where we’re all in this together. We are able to finish each other’s sentences beyond the barn partly because we spend so much time together in the barn. It’s made us so much closer as a family. Although my husband is allergic to horses, he does come to the shows and he does his part, too. But the whole thing has definitely created a synergy between me and my girls.

“And it’s just so much fun!”

“Whenever I’m at the barn, and especially when I’m riding, it reminds me that equestrianism is the only sport where your equipment can decide not to cooperate,” said Eloise, 14. “And you can’t really get mad at them when they go against what you want, because it doesn’t really help. I think it teaches us all to sit back and go with the flow. It teaches us to look at the bright side of things and be satisfied with what we have and work through it, patiently.

“It’s definitely strengthened our relationship,” she added. “Being there forces us to ask each other for help. You know, I wouldn’t always want to ask my little sister for help outside the barn, because that’s the way siblings are with each other. But being at the barn, we’re all equal and friends.”

Faye, 11, explained it succinctly. “At the barn, everything is happier!” she said. “We get along much better and can relate to things much better — not saying that we don’t do that at home, but it just feels so free at the barn.”

Carlyn’s mother, Rocio Nuyda, now retired, also frequently accompanies her daughter and granddaughter to the Los Angeles Equestrian Center, where Eloise and Faye ride. In fact, the love of horses has been passed down through several generations of women on Carlyn’s father’s side of the family.

“I’ve always been a horse girl for as long as I can remember,” said Carlyn, who grew up in the Philippines. “My grandmother was an amazing horsewoman, and she was the one who influenced me to really love and embrace that whole world.”

Carlyn came by her love of horses honestly. Her grandmother, Evelyn Rollins Nuyda, brought equestrianism with her when she moved from Washington, D.C. to the Philippines after marriage. “She was an English hunter jumper rider, and she also did steeplechases,” Carlyn said, adding that her grandmother competed for the Philippines in competitions both as an equestrian and as a swimmer. “We never had the opportunity to ride together. I was a young girl when I watched her ride at the Manila Polo Club.”

One day her grandmother told Carlyn, then about five or six, “Someday you’re going to want to ride your own horse.” She handed the girl a belt, as if it were a pair of reins. Holding the ends of the reins — where a bit would go on a real set of reins — Carlyn’s grandmother tugged slightly against Carlyn’s hands. “’That’s what you call contact,’ she said. Then she pulled the belt, and the leather slipped out of my hands. She said, ‘When that happens, you no longer have contact. Now I’ll show you how to hold the reins.’ She put the belt between my three fingers and my pinkie, and then she tugged again, and this time the ‘reins’ didn’t slip. She taught me about contact and also about feel, about give and take. I remember that.”

Throughout much of her childhood, Carlyn’s riding centered around ponies rented for the Christmas holidays. “I would practice that contact my grandmother taught me,” Carlyn said, recalling that her grandmother’s instruction was to use the hands only when necessary, and after applying the seat and leg first.

“In my mind, on those ponies at Christmastime I was a grand prix rider!” Carlyn recalled. “I could be riding the shaggiest pony on an old Western saddle, but I didn’t care — I thought I was a grand prix rider.”

As a young adult, now a resident of Los Angeles, Carlyn began riding lessons as a hunter jumper at the Traditional Equitation School at the Los Angeles Equestrian Center — always mindful of her grandmother’s words on the importance of soft, quiet hands. She later tried some combined training with trainer Linda Bierma, adding beginning dressage to her riding experience, and leased a Hanoverian mare named Schwann. But when she got pregnant with her first child, Eloise, she took a break from the saddle.

Happily, the girls — first Eloise and then Faye — showed signs of loving horses from an early age. “I waited until they were both old enough to start riding with me, and then we started riding together on rented horses. It was my way of getting back to horses and staying all together.”

Eventually, the family fell in love with a Tennessee walking horse named Dixie, who became a horse of a lifetime for Carlyn and her daughters — and found her “forever family,” as Carlyn puts it — after trainer Dana Kanstul allowed Carlyn to adopt the mare.

“The moment I got on Dixie, I felt this rush that overwhelmed me,” Carlyn explained. “It was unlike anything I’ve ever felt in my life, a surge of warm energy. I could feel her talking to me. I fell in love with her. And I knew this was the horse that was going to teach my children to love the whole experience of horses.

“I don’t think they would have become the horsewomen they are without her,” she continued. “She taught them humility and about being gentle and being kind. That was the gift she gave us: to have that reverence for the horse and to understand the privilege of being on their backs. That is not to be taken for granted.”

Eloise and Faye blossomed as young equestrians in their own right, earning blue ribbons or high-point awards in disciplines as varied as saddle seat, Western and English pleasure and equitation, and dressage. Dixie died last October after a long and happy life, but the happy experiences she gave Carlyn and her children have carried on.

Eloise’s focus is now on dressage, in which she has recently been showing at Training Level with her 10-year-old Andalusian, Robusto AF. The family bought “Robbie” from Nancy Latta of Amandalusian Farm.

“The breed is known not only for its long history and beauty, but also for its versatility,” Carlyn said. “They can do dressage, saddle seat, hunt seat, Western — you name it. Our thought was that, since this is her first horse and dressage is very new to her, we’d consider buying a horse who could change his job title in case dressage didn’t turn out to be her cup of tea. He’s absolutely stunning and very kind, and the Andalusian temperament really suits our personalities as a family.”

And dressage suits Eloise well, the young rider says. “I guess you could say this about pretty much every equestrian sport, but it’s the connection between the horse and the rider,” Eloise said. “But, for some reason, in dressage it seems so different. One day I watched a video of Charlotte Dujardin riding Valegro, and I don’t know why, but I just started crying. That’s when we knew I had to do dressage. Everything feels like it’s in slow motion, and there’s almost a kind of telepathy, where we’re reading each other’s minds in slow motion.”

Faye, meanwhile, also began training in dressage on a 25-year-old Welsh Pony named Jack — short for M.E. Don’t Come Back Jack — that the Calloways previously leased from Bryce Quinto at Lehua Custer Dressage.

“It felt like Jack and I were connected, like we were one person,” said Faye. “When I rode him, everything felt like I was in a different, perfect world. It was an amazing feeling. I recently had to end my lease with Jack because our training program has changed, but I will always have a special place in my heart for Jack. He taught me so much, and I’m very grateful.”

Today, the family rides with Tim Keeling at Quiet Canyon at the LAEC.

“I know I’m a mom who is proud of her children,” said Carlyn, “but even back when they were riding rented horses around Griffith Park, Eloise and Faye were constantly connected to the horses. Even if they were talking to each other, they were constantly aware of their horses and communicating with them.”

Carlyn recently acquired an 18-year-old Andalusian, too. “After Dixie’s passing, Amadalusian Farm trainer Sandy Shields offered to have me take over her beautiful horse Centello H,” Carlyn explained. “He has had many years on the show circuit. Having a disability like multiple sclerosis, it’s very important to be able to feel confident and safe around horses. Centello is kind, well-behaved, and a true gentleman to me. He and the kids and I are beginning to bond with one another similarly to the way Dixie did when we first laid eyes on her. He came from heaven, really, thanks to Sandy Shields.

“I ride for pleasure,” she added. “I go out on a hack, and I just love being around the horses.”

That bond between horse and human — and among family, too — is something Carlyn believes will continue to carry on through her daughters, thanks to the experiences they’re all sharing now.

“I like being their cheerleader, and I like being there on days when they feel helpless or despair or when they feel challenged,” she said. “We are sharing our joy together. If they didn’t want to ride, that would have been fine, and I wouldn’t want to be the mom who made them ride if they didn’t want to — it’s not fair to the horse if you’re not committed to them. But I’m glad they did.”

The kids seem glad, too, and they’re appreciate the character-building and the happiness people derive from working with horses.

“When I’m at the barn there are times when I’m doing things and thinking, ‘Oh, why am I having to do this? It’s so irritating!’ or ‘This bucket is so heavy!’” said Eloise. “But then I think to myself, ‘When you get older and have the money to pay for your own things, sure, you can think that. But, right now, you’re not the one who’s doing this for you. Everyone else around you is making this possible: your mom and dad, you sister, your grandmother, your aunts and uncles.’ The reason I’m getting to any of this is because of my family. They’re sacrificing things in their life to make this possible for me.”

Whether you’re a mom or not, Carlyn and family recommend a little barn time. It’s not just for holidays, after all.

“If you’ve got the chance to be with a horse, you’ve got to make it count, because it’s not often you get to interact with one of God’s most majestic creatures at that level,” said Carlyn. “It’s like your soul is entwined with theirs, and that’s so special.”

by Glenye Cain Oakford
© 2018 United States Equestrian Federation

Real-Life Horse in Line at Charity Movie Screening Fills More UNBRIDLED Seats Than All Other Films Combined

Mt. Pleasant, Michigan (May 6, 2018) — A real life horse named Blaze upstaged the charity film screening of UNBRIDLED at Celebration Cinema in Mt. Pleasant, MI on April 25, one day before National Help a Horse Day (April 26) during the special 7:00 pm Eastern Time charity movie screening.

Moviegoers were intrigued and amused as they walked up to the ticket box office only to brush up against Blaze, who was also waiting in line to see the movie based on real-life stories of horse centers, including benefactor HopeWell Ranch of Weidman and Remnant Fields of Midland, MI, that pair abused women with rescued horses, resulting in mutual healing.

The screening was preceded by remarks by HopeWell Ranch director Jodi Stuber to the overflow crowd in the packed auditorium that drew more patrons than all other films combined. Ms. Stuber talked about HopeWell Heroes including horses and human volunteers.

UNBRIDLED, set for nationwide release this summer, stars Eric Roberts (The Dark Knight), T. C. Stallings (War Room), Rachel Hendrix (October Baby), Jenn Gotzon (Frost/Nixon), and introduces sex-trafficked teen Sarah, played by Tea McKay, whose “journey of healing evokes tears that transcends into heartfelt joy,” says the film’s producer Christy McGlothlin.  UNBRIDLED Trailer

Unbridled Executive Producer Troy Buder also produced Queen of Katwe with Lupita Nyong’o. Producer Christy McGlothlin & HopeWell Ranch Director Jodi Stuber.

UNBRIDLED MOVIE PRODUCER CHRISTY MCGLOTHLIN has nine children, including a special needs child, yet still finds time to make movies and host her online TV Talk show, Mommy Talk Live! Her first film, A LONG WAY OFF (Robert Davi, Jason Burkey), was a modern re-telling of the Prodigal Son story.

Her latest movie, UNBRIDLED, has won numerous film festival awards including the prestigious EQUUS WINNIE Award. Christy lives in Raleigh, NC with her husband Jerry and their children.

For NBC Television coverage of Unbridled Director John Ware, go to:
https://www.facebook.com/jdware2/videos/10214908146519624/

CONTACT: To schedule an interview, contact co-Executive Producer Gerald McGlothlin at 919-437-0001 or email jerry@specialguests.com or HopeWell Ranch Directory Jodi Stuber at 989-289-0465 info@hopewellranch.org.

Press Link, Diana De Rosa, 516-848-4867, dderosa1@optonline.net

Old Friends 14th Annual Homecoming, May 6, 2018

GR1 winner Special Ring (Photo by Laura Battles)

GEORGETOWN, KY – APRIL 24, 2018 – Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement Farm in Georgetown, KY, will host its 14th Annual Homecoming event, sponsored by NTRA Advantage, Daily Racing Form, Hagyard Pharmacy, and Red Brand Fence, on Sunday May 6, 2018 from 1 pm to 5 pm.

Tickets are $30 for the general public and $15 for Old Friends “Clubhouse” members (children 12 and under are free).

Reservations can be made online by visiting the Old Friends website at www.oldfriendsequine.org and following the “News” link. Reservations can also be made by phone by calling (502) 863-1775.

The day will include a barbecue buffet by Proud Mary, farm tours, live music by the Stormin’ Norman Band, and live and silent auctions of racing memorabilia, prime collectible stallion halters, equine photography and artwork, jewelry, books, and more.

Painter Robert Clark will once again be creating an on-site portrait of this year’s newly minted Derby winner. The canvas will be live auctioned at the end of day.

Also on hand this year will be Old Friends artist-in-residence Dagmar Galleithner-Steiner, who will be accepting pre-orders for her new book, The Art of Old Friends, and author Rick Capone, who will be signing copies of his books The History of Old Friends and Celebrating Old Friends.

Old Friends, a non-profit organization, is home to such retired luminaries of the turf as Kentucky Derby – Preakness champions Silver Charm and War Emblem, Belmont Stakes winners Touch Gold and Sarava, 1996 Breeders’ Cup Classic winner Alphabet Soup, and three-time Santa Anita Handicap star Game On Dude.

Look also for the hot pink Spotz Gelato truck. The dessert vendors will be selling homemade, small-batch gelato in custom flavors.

Old Friends is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization that cares for over 175 retired racehorses. Its Dream Chase Farm, located in Georgetown, KY, is open to tourists daily by appointment. Old Friends also has a satellite facility in Greenfield Center, New York, Old Friends at Cabin Creek: The Bobby Frankel Division, which is also open to visitors. For more information on tours or to make a donation, contact the main farm at (502) 863-1775 or see their website at www.oldfriendsequine.org.

MEDIA CONTACT: Cynthia Grisolia, (347) 423-7322, cindy@oldfriendsequine.org

Savonna Adell Joins Forces with JustWorld International as Newest Ambassador

Savonna Adell and Sportin Around. Photo by: SportFot.

Wellington, Fla. – April 12, 2018 – Up-and-coming junior rider Savonna Adell is passionate about equestrian sport, and now she is excited to be giving back to the sport and the community by joining JustWorld International as their newest ambassador. JustWorld International is dedicated to breaking the cycle of poverty by funding local partners around the world helping children thrive. JustWorld’s involvement in the equestrian community provides unique resources for fundraising and a unique network for raising awareness.

“I am very excited to join the team of ambassadors at JustWorld International,” expressed Adell. “I understand the importance of giving back to the community and I am happy to be helping other children around the world. I am looking forward to volunteering at events and representing JustWorld at horse shows around the country.”

As an ambassador, Adell will act as a spokesperson for JustWorld in her local community, among friends, and at horse shows. She has also pledged to make an annual donation to benefit JustWorld, in addition to volunteering time to JustWorld events. JustWorld ambassadors can also choose to host fundraising efforts such as bake sales and Horseless Horse Shows. All proceeds from an ambassador’s event will go directly to a JustWorld project.

JustWorld International was founded in 2003 by equestrian, Jessica Newman. “I started to realize that there was a lot more out there and that I was living in a very privileged circle,” said Newman. “I’d done everything I wanted in the sport as a competitor and it was time to dedicate my life to doing something for others.”

For the past fifteen years, hundreds of Rider Ambassadors and supporters, including juniors, amateurs, and professionals from around the world, have changed thousands of children’s lives by helping with fundraising efforts and spreading awareness.

Adell is a 12-year-old junior athlete who is quickly climbing the ranks in equestrian sport, having recently been named Reserve Circuit Champion in the Large Children’s Pony Hunter division with Spellbound, after winning the championship honors during World Champion Hunter Rider week at the Winter Equestrian Festival. A Bloomfield Hills, Michigan native, Adell shows under the tutelage of trainers Gary and Kelsey Duffy of Little Brook Farms, based in Wellington, Florida.

www.justworldinternational.org

Contact: Rebecca Walton
phone 561.753.3389 fax 561.753.3386
rjw@phelpsmediagroup.com
PhelpsMediaGroup.com

Equestrian Aid Foundation Helps Eventer Kim Meier Cope after Life-Altering Injury

Kim Meier with Bart (top) and Test Run. Photos courtesy of Kim Meier.

Wellington, Fla. – Apr. 9, 2018 – Kim Meier reached the pinnacle of eventing before tragedy struck. In 2007 she was paralyzed from the shoulders down in a freak accident. For Kim and horse people like her facing catastrophic injury and illness, life becomes a struggle.

Kim carved her career in classic eventer fashion, riding homebreds and doing all the work herself. She developed her work ethic at the summer camp her family owned, fell in love with the horses and was determined to be an eventer. Largely self-taught, she also worked with Denny Emerson, Ralph Hill and Donnan Sharp.

Test Run or “Merle” was her ticket to the big time. She had bred his sire and his sire’s dam. In 2002, Kim and the gray Thoroughbred finished Bromont. Then in 2003, they competed at Foxhall Three Day Event, their first three star, then Fair Hill. At the Rolex (now the Land Rover Kentucky Three Day Event) Four Star Event in 2004, they had a top-10 finish out of 72 starters. They competed at Burghley and finished. She was 45 and looking forward to great things.

In 2005, Merle was sidelined due to an injury. Then, Kim’s barn endured a frightening and emotional experience with the EHV-1 virus. Merle got through it and they got back to work.

“I did three Intermediates that year in the summer and fall, planning my big comeback at Rolex in 2007,” Kim said in an article she wrote for Eventing Nation. “We did one Intermediate, and that next Tuesday I was doing a jumping school when IT happened. On the way to a vertical, he stepped on his bell boot and went down on his knees. I slid down his neck and caught the rail on the base of my head.”

As a result of her fall, Kim suffers from paralysis from the C5 vertebra down. Despite extensive rehabilitative therapies, Kim’s doctors said she could never ride, stand or walk again and would forever be wheelchair bound.

“It’s great how the Equestrian Aid Foundation jumped right in to help from the very beginning right after I got hurt,” Kim said.

The Foundation provided financial assistance to help Kim with basic living expenses. Her daughter and friends help her with daily activities and make certain she has the care she needs.

Though it’s been a long, tough road, Kim remains resilient and has the courageous spirit to stay as active as possible. She works judging unrated horse shows when she can, gives some lessons and does the occasional clinic.

Your donation to Equestrian Aid Foundation provides much-needed support for horse people like Kim facing catastrophic injury and illness.

For more information, please visit EquestrianAidFoundation.org.

IHSA National All-Academic Award Recipients Named

National Qualifiers Announced for Teresa L. McDonald Challenge

Fairfield, Conn. – April 5, 2018 – The IHSA announced the list of nearly 800 recipients for their National All-Academic Award. The National All-Academic Award recognizes academic achievement for an IHSA undergraduate or alumni member based on their fall 2017 semester grades. All the recipients competed in at least one IHSA competition during the academic year.

Students who achieved a grade point average of 3.8 or higher received First Team honors and students who earned a grade point average of 3.5 or higher received Second Team honors.

Click here for a list of recipients.

The IHSA announced the 16 national qualifiers for the Teresa L. McDonald IHSA Scholarship Challenge. These students achieved the highest scores from their zones on the online test. They will compete in a practicum phase at the 2018 IHSA National Championship Show in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, May 3-6.

Teresa L. McDonald IHSA Scholarship Challenge is sponsored by EQUUS. The challenge is a free online test covering non-discipline-specific, general horsemanship topics and is open to all IHSA undergraduate members. The timed test consists of 50 questions from the United States Hunter Jumper Association (USHJA) Study Guide.

The test was available online for two weeks on the IHSA website. The participants with the top-two scores from each Zone are invited to compete in a practicum phase at the 2018 IHSA Nationals in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The top-10 scorers win scholarships.

Teresa L. McDonald taught at Virginia Tech and was an active IHSA board member for many years. McDonald was a founder of the Intercollegiate Dressage Association. She was known for her sense of diplomacy and nicknamed “Madeline Albright.”

Click here for a list of qualifiers.

The IHSA was founded in 1967 by Robert Cacchione while he attended Fairleigh Dickinson University in Teaneck, New Jersey. The organization was established so that any full-time college student could participate in equestrian competition regardless of economic status, gender or riding level and offers Hunter Seat and Western competition at eight levels from Walk-Trot through Open divisions for both male and female college athletes. The IHSA emphasizes learning and sportsmanship and fosters teamwork. The organization has grown to include 400 member teams and 10,000 members encompassing 39 Regions, 8 Zones and 45 states and Canada. College or university teams, individuals, alumni and coaches may become members.

For more information, go to IHSAinc.com or contact media@IHSAinc.com.