Category Archives: Show Jumping

From Wildfire to the World Stage: David Broome

David Broome and Mister Softee on their way to individual bronze at the Olympic Games in Mexico in 1968. (FEI archive)

When I called David Broome last Tuesday, he had been haymaking at Mount Ballan Manor near Chepstow in South Wales which, apart from being the family farm, is also home to the hugely popular Wales and West showgrounds.

The legendary British showjumping rider is deeply rooted in his home place. His parents, Fred and Millie, moved to Mount Ballan in 1947, and all four of their children – David, Liz, Mary, and Frederick – had a passion for horses from an early age. David’s grandfather worked for a veterinary surgeon in Pembroke (Wales) and his father, Fred, was an experienced horseman and a well-known pony dealer. David recalls his introduction to the saddle and his first, very early, retirement.

“Father had me riding when I was about two years old, using a harness out of a pram with a buckle in front, a buckle behind and buckles on both sides. As time went on the buckles were removed and I became number one jockey when he was breaking Welsh Mountain ponies, but I got bucked off so often that I retired from the sport when I was five!”

However, two years later everything changed with the arrival of a pony called Beauty. “I took a fancy to her so I started again, and my career kind of went from there!” he says.

Ponies

Fred was always on the lookout for talented ponies for his children. “The ones we kept were good, like Ballan Lad who had a run of 28 clears. Every one of them cost 60 quid (GB Pounds) and I had a great career in 14.2s. There were about five shows in which I jumped three clear rounds on all three ponies in the same class. We only had one saddle, so I could have a little breather while the saddle was being changed over!”

David told his teachers at Monmouth Grammar School that he wanted to be a veterinary surgeon, but it wasn’t true. Working on the farm and riding horses was what really appealed to him but he knew they wouldn’t approve of that. “I left school when I was 17 and the horses were there and one thing seemed to follow another,” he says.

“My first year in seniors I had a couple of horses my father used to ride. And then we bought one called Wildfire from the Monmouthshire Hunt that was next door to us – also for £60. He was stopping (refusing at fences) but he had competed Eventing. We straightened him out and he was a hunter hireling in the winter and then we started jumping the following spring. I’ll always remember our first show at Glanusk, there was a triple bar away from the collecting ring and we got eliminated. If ever there was a fence to test a stopper that was it. So my father said, ‘that fellow has just one more chance’. We went to Stowell Park the following week and on the second day he won three classes out of three!”

I’m loving how this man still treasures these early achievements in a career that was nothing less than glorious.

Wildfire

I ask him to describe Wildfire. “A 16.1hh bay gelding with a swishy tail, ears pinned back, and a sour look, but he and I had a great relationship and he busted a gut for me,” David says. A rule-change worked to the advantage of the partnership because when time was introduced into the sport then Wildfire really came into his own.

“It used to be that three clear rounds decided the result, but when we started jumping against the clock I was made up. Wildfire was really sharp, a thoroughbred with plenty of speed and a beautiful bouncy canter you could adjust. Against the clock he was just heaven! He put me on the road, he was Leading Horse in Britain in 1959, and then he got me on the Olympic team until Sunsalve came along,” David explains.

His ability to get along with tricky horses is well-documented, and when I ask David about that he says he owed a lot to the experience he gained during his pony-riding years. “I had three ponies and they all went entirely differently. One galloped on and scotched up (shortened) when he got to a fence, he just couldn’t do a one-striding double in one stride so he always took two so I always had to milk my way through a combination. The second one was a very old-fashioned one, you set him up and you had three strides to get your bumph (distance) to it, and the third was a short-tailed cob called Chocolate who just went on an even keel the whole way around. I was so lucky because it trained me to ride three different ways,” he points out.

Big names

So who were the big names in showjumping when David was moving up the ladder in his career? “Pat Smythe, Harry Llewellyn, and Alan Oliver, and then I eventually ran up against Harvey (Smith) when I was 19.”

The tough Yorkshireman Harvey would become one of the most popular and colourful characters in the sport in years to come and the perfect foil to the quiet but determined Welshman. So how was it when they first met at a show in Northampton? “I felt total respect really; he was self-made, hardworking, and we became great friends outside the arena. But inside it was bloody hellfire!”

What was their rivalry like? “He made me better, and hopefully I made him better as well. With a lot of good sportsmen, you need two of them in the game at the same time so they push each other.

“He was one of best losers I ever came across because if he was having a bad time, then five minutes after he left the ring he was absolutely normal again. But when he was a winner it was a very different story because he was the biggest pain you’ve ever come across – he’d say we were all useless and that none of the rest of us could ride!” David says with big laugh.

It was a twist of fate that saw Wildfire being replaced by Sunsalve for the 1960 Olympic Games in Rome. “We had one of our Olympic training sessions at Ninian Park Football Club in Cardiff and Pat Smythe had just been given the ride on Sunsalve. She won the class and I think I was second, and on the way home my father said, ‘Pat won today, but that horse will never go for her again.’ It was a strange thing to say after someone has won, but he was a real horseman and he’d seen something and he was right. From there we went on a European tour to Wiesbaden (GER) and Lucerne (SUI), and Sunsalve never did go again for Pat.

Sent it back

“So the Olympic Committee said the horse was useless and sent it back to the owner, Mr Anderson in Norfolk. As it happened, in our pony trade we had a lady in Newmarket called Ann Hammond – we sold her 465 ponies over the years. And when we were at her place a couple of weeks later, my father asked if she knew Mr Anderson and she said she did. She agreed to introduce us; we borrowed her car and set off for his little farm and father and he got on like a house on fire! Mr Anderson had bred the horse and his daughter had ridden it and won the Queen’s Cup with it. In ten minutes, over a cup of tea, he had given Sunsalve to us,” David explains.

It wouldn’t be all plain sailing to begin with. “Ten days later we went to a show and he went well, but at the next event I took both Sunsalve and a little horse called Discutido and they were both eliminated in a £20 class! So my father asked if the organisers would leave the jumps up after the Musical Chairs (a novelty class always staged at the end of horse shows in those days) and we schooled both of them afterwards.

“Four days later Sunsalve won the King’s Cup (King George V Gold Cup) at the White City, the following week Discutido won the National Championship and the next week I won the Grand Prix in Dublin with Sunsalve,” David recalls.

That was followed by the Olympics in Rome where the individual competition was staged at the beautiful Piazza di Siena where David and Sunsalve clinched individual bronze while host-country heroes Raimondo and Piero d’Inzeo took gold and silver.

Team final

The team final took place at the Olympic Stadium a few days later, and Great Britain was among eight countries to be eliminated while Germany, USA, and Italy topped the podium.

David remembers that day well because he learned something he’d never forget. “When I jumped the first round in the morning there were about 8,000 spectators, but when we came back for the second round in the afternoon there were about 120,000 and I couldn’t believe it! When the bell went, I cantered down to the first fence and missed it (got the stride on approach wrong) because I was all nerves. But luckily the horse got me out of it and I pulled myself together and he went clear after that. I decided that day that nerves don’t do you any good, and apart from getting a few butterflies an hour before the King’s Cup or something like that, nerves never affected me again. I decided when you go in the ring the only thing you have to worry about is how your horse is going, nothing else will help you; the occasion has nothing to do with it. That stood with me for the rest of my career,” he says.

The King’s Cup, the Grand Prix trophy in Dublin, and the Olympic bronze medal in Rome were already in the bag when David and Sunsalve headed for the World Championships in Venice (Italy) where they also claimed individual bronze.

“I was so lucky to have Sunsalve when I had him. I was just 20 at the time and when I rode him, I let him gallop on, and the horse thought he was doing it his way. If I’d had him later in my life, I would have tried to change him and he probably wouldn’t have been a tenth of the horse that he turned out to be. I’ve ridden a lot of horses, but he was THE Olympic horse. He jumped like a deer; his jump was unbelievable,” says the Welshman.

Sports Personality

There’s a wonderful YouTube clip of David being presented with the BBC Sports Personality of the Year Award for his 1960 achievements in which, clearly to David’s astonishment, Sunsalve is brought into the studio and he is legged up onto the horse in front of the equally astonished audience. Showjumping was prime-time viewing in Britain at the time, and this award gave the sport an even bigger boost.

David’s CV is beyond staggering. He claimed individual bronze again at the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico riding Mister Softee and World Championships individual gold with Beethoven in 1970, as well as team gold with Philco in 1978. His European Championship record includes a double of golds with Mister Softee in 1967 and 1969, team silver with Philco in 1977, team gold in 1979 riding Queensway Big Q, and team silvers again in 1983 and 1991 riding Mr Ross and Lannegan.

And then there is the coveted King George V Gold Cup which he scooped six times on six different horses. “In the ‘50s and ‘60s, it was the ultimate class to win, and it’s such a beautiful trophy,” David says. The first time he won it with Sunsalve he kept it for six months on a shelf just inside the front door of his house. But as the years went by it became near-priceless so by the time he claimed it for the final time in 1991 he handed it over to his patron, Lord Harris, “because his security was a bit better than mine!” David says.

Then and now

I ask David to compare the sport back then to the way it is now. “Jumps are nowhere near as big nowadays. We had one oxer in Mexico – the front pole was about 5ft 4ins (1.64m), it was a 6ft 6ins (2.1m) spread, and the back pole was 5ft 8ins (1.76). Only two horses jumped it in the whole of the Games. I’ve never seen a fence like it before or since! When Olaf Petersen came along, he changed the sport so it became more technical, and that saved it in a lot of ways. The only thing is we’ve now gone away from testing a horse’s bravery and I think something needs to be done about that. In showjumping the narrowest fence is 8 feet (2.43m) wide, but in eventing it’s four feet (1.2m) so why not have some narrow fences and test riders’ control of their horses,” he suggests.

David was hugely influential in the establishment of the FEI Jumping World Cup™ series. “I won the Grand Prix in ’s-Hertogenbosch (NED) – there were only six or eight indoor shows in those days – and I thought we need to have a final for all these indoor shows.

“We had formed the International Jumping Riders Club around that time and Prince Philip was President of the FEI and thought it was a great idea. He invited us to send two representatives every year to the Bureau Meeting at the General Assembly to air views and make suggestions which was a great breakthrough, so I went along with Eric Wauters. I spoke to Paul Schockemohle and he said I know a man that will sponsor the series, Mr Gyllenhammar from Volvo, and then Max Ammann jumped on the bandwagon and took it over and that’s how it all started,” he says.

Favourites

When asked to name some of his favourite venues and events, David replies, “I always love the day of the Aga Khan Cup (Nations Cups) in Dublin, Rome just because of where it is, Olympia (London) because it’s probably the best indoor show, but Aachen these days is the number one venue in the world. If they had the World Championships there every year, I don’t think anyone would complain!” he answers.

Who were the opponents he most admired during his career? “Well Harvey because he was always the man to try to beat because he never gave up. Alwin Schockemohle because he was the ultimate professional. He would be second-last to go in the jump-off and go into the lead, but when he came out of the ring, he’d give his horse two or three minutes settle-down work while the last horse was jumping. Everyone else would be jumping off their horse to watch the last one go and hope they didn’t beat you. But not Alwin: he’d quietly school his horse ready for tomorrow. He was a real horseman. His technique for having horses leg-to-hand, having them supple, well mannered – he was superb. I always admired him and he is the loveliest man.

“And Rodney Jenkins – I watched him warm up Idle Dice at Madison Square Gardens in New York and he trotted down to a 5ft 6ins rail and the horse just popped it. The Americans’ position in the saddle was always fantastic. We started off in our careers doing acrobatics, but the Americans were always perfectly balanced. Bill Steinkraus – his legs never moved, and you only get that style if you have the horse going correctly,” he points out.

Proudest moment

David’s proudest moment comes as a bit of a surprise, “when I won the Foxhunter (Novice Championship) with Top of the Morning jumping the only the clear round at Wembley,” he says. And what’s his advice to competitors in the sport today? “Remember that you don’t necessarily win more the more often you jump.”

In recent years David’s attention has turned to the Wales and West showground at Mount Ballan Manor which hosts many events throughout the year including a hugely popular Home Pony International. “It has been the second part of my life,” he says. “My father wanted to build the Welsh version of Hickstead, so he started about five years after Hickstead was created and I like to think we’ve been successful. We run a happy show; it’s now organised by my sons James and Matthew and they do a great job and I’m proud of them.”

Reflecting on his sparkling career, David concludes, “I was a farmer’s son and horses have taken me around the world. I’ve been lucky in so many different ways. I was very lucky to meet Lord Harris who supported me from when I was 30 onwards and I’ve had some wonderful horses and some great sporting days. For all that I can only be eternally grateful.”

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Lillie Keenan Captures First and Second in $24,999 Wellington Agricultural Services Grand Prix

Lille Keenan aboard Cazaan. ©Anne Gittins Photography.

Wellington, FL – June 22, 2020 – The ESP June Spring Series concluded with a final day of Equitation competition on Wednesday, June 17, and four days of USEF “A” National & Jumper 4* competition. The feature class of the weekend was the $24,999 Wellington Agricultural Services Grand Prix, which took place on the Derby Field Annex and saw a total of 36 exhibitors contest the track, designed by Andy Christiansen. Ultimately, it was New York, NY’s Lillie Keenan who came out on top, capturing both first and second place. Wearing the blue ribbon was Chansonette Farm LLC’s eight-year-old Cazaan who stopped the jump-off timers at just 41.674 seconds. Earlier in the class, Keenan piloted Agana Van Het Gerendal Z, also owned by Chansonette Farm LLC, to a 43.52-second finish for second place, while Hilary McNerney of Lake Forest, IL and her mount Captain Cooper secured third in 49.595 seconds. The only other pair to put in a double clear effort was Alejandro Karolyi of Wellington, FL aboard Monica Carrera’s Lincourt Gino.

“I got Cazaan a little less than a year ago,” commented Keenan after her double win. “He is phenomenal, but we’ve never gone fast, so that’s something I’ve really tried to work on in these last three weeks. Sometimes I’m too much of a perfectionist, so I rarely really give the horses a chance to jump out of a gallop in the jump-off, I’m always trying to set them up too much. So, I really tried to use these few weeks here to push myself out of that comfort zone. Today I really asked everything of [Cazaan] and he completely delivered, so I couldn’t be happier. I’m very grateful for the ESP staff for making this happen because it’s an amazing setting for us to get a great experience with young horses and try some things.”

Originally, Keenan planned to return to her home state of New York after the winter season in Wellington, but had to change plans once the pandemic began. “We were going to go back so I could continue training with McLain Ward, but my home up there is right in New York City so it was a tumultuous time to go back there, and I’m glad we stayed. This series at PBIEC gave me the opportunity to grow in my own riding and push my younger horses. Normally these horses would never have had the opportunity to jump at this level on a grass field, so I think that’s a silver lining to all this and having these shows. I think it’s something we’ll consider for next year’s competition schedule as well.”

For more information and results, please visit www.PBIEC.com.

Aiken Summer Classic Wraps Up

Daniel Geitner and November Hill’s Cilia M rode away with the win in the $25,000 Aiken Saddlery Grand Prix, presented by Purina Animal Nutrition Week II of the Aiken Summer Classic, besting a field of twenty-eight horse and rider teams over a course designed by Steve Stephens of Palmetto, Florida.

The course proved to be challenging with only three horse and rider teams turning in clear first rounds. Doug Payne of Aiken, South Carolina in the irons of Jane Dudinsky’s Quintessence was the first pair to post a clear first round in a time of 78.431 seconds. Four rides later ensured a jump off when Hanna Toering of Waterford, Virginia piloted her own Balou Moon BHF through the timers after a clear first round in a time of 76.779 seconds.

Four rides later, Geitner and Cilia M added themselves to the jump-off roster with their clear first round in a time of 78.703 seconds. “It was a very technical course and definitely big enough,” said Geitner. “Since I had rails with my earlier rides, I was able to use that to my advantage to help navigate that first round. Cilia is still a little inexperienced and hasn’t had nearly the mileage the other horses have. She jumped really well in the first round and handled those technical questions pretty easily,” he said.

Stephens set the jump off round with a time allowed of 44 seconds. Payne and Quintessence were the first to go but a heartache rail at the last fence gave them four jump faults in a time of 39.814 seconds. Toering and Balou Moon BHF followed in the order and turned in a clear round with a time of 36.055 seconds. The heat was on for Geitner and Cilia M.

The pair turned in clear round and galloped through the timers in 34.804 seconds. “She was on her game,” said Geitner, “and to be honest, she’s been a bit of a hard luck story and I’m glad she pulled through,” he added.

Madeline Reich of Birmingham, Alabama and Lyons Creek Sporthorses, LTD’s Harakiri Z placed fourth with their first round performance with one time fault in 83.070 seconds.

Geitner and Oak Ledge Farm’s Fazous also picked up the fifth place as the fastest of the four-fault first rounds with their time of 75.012 seconds and also earned a sixth place with November Hill’s Vesta De Lavardin for their four fault first round in a time of 75.734 seconds.

Tom Foley of Wellington, Florida rode Carson Grisham’s Blaze of Glory II to a seventh place finish with their four fault first round in a time of 75.737 seconds. Eighth place was awarded to Sydney Long of Atlanta, Georgia and her own Take Two for their four fault first round in a time of 77.528 seconds.

Catogi, owned and ridden by Grant Seger of Aiken, South Carolina, finished in ninth place for their four fault first round in a time of 78.330 seconds. Tenth place was awarded to Kris Killam of Naples, Florida aboard Empire Show Stables’ Boreale De Talme and eleventh went to Kyle Dewar of Ocala, Florida and Joan Burke’s F Gunsmoke RHF. Jamie Gibson of Ocala, Florida and Lucky Horses, LLC’s Caddie R wrapped up the class with a twelfth-place finish.

For more results, please visit horseshowsonline.com.

Maikel van der Vleuten Dominates Grimaud – Saint-Tropez

The HUBSIDE JUMPING in Grimaud’s CSI 4* Grand Prix played host to what could be called the cream of the discipline: 45 competitors, among the best riders in the world, Olympic champions, European champions, show jumping legends, and the two best riders in the current World rankings. It’s true that after three months of sport being at a complete standstill, the riders were keen to go back to the showgrounds, and all of them are aware that there will not be many shows to go to this year.  The Netherlands’ Maikel van der Vleuten riding Dana Blue was victorious on the course designed by Andrea Colombo, the Italian course designer, ahead of Belgium’s Jos Verlooy and Italy’s Emilio Biocchi.  Simon Delestre, the best French rider was fourth with Berlux Z.

“It was a fabulous jump-off!” cried out van der Vleuten. “And I must admit that all week the jump-offs have been great to ride! On Friday, I was already qualified for the jump-off of a big class with Dana Blue, but I made a mistake in a turn because I was over confident. So today I really wanted to ride well for my mare who really deserves this. She is naturally very fast and all she needs is to be ridden well. It’s my first time competing at the HUBSIDE JUMPING and I’m delighted! The facilities are great, they are very spacious, there are lots of places where you can train in the shade, the ring is huge, and it’s always very sunny. I am really pleased that I’m staying for two more weeks, and that I’ll be taking part in the CSI5* show in July.”

Full results here.

Daniel Koroloff – E-mail: daniel@blizko-communication.com

Rowan Willis and Diablo VII Win $75,000 Tryon Resort Grand Prix under the Lights

Rowan Willis and Diablo VII ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – June 21, 2020 – Rowan Willis (Ocala, FL) and Diablo VII sped through the jump-off in a time of 34.045 seconds to take the win in Saturday evening’s $75,000 Tryon Resort Grand Prix – the venue’s first night class of 2020 and first evening contest on the recently fully-engineered Tryon Stadium footing. Kristen VanderVeen (Wellington, FL) and Bull Run’s Risen, a 2006 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Utopie x Indoctro) owned by Bull Run Jumpers Inc., claimed second place after their 35.185 second jump-off round, while third went to Amanda Derbyshire (Wellington, FL) aboard Cornwall BH, a 2008 Holsteiner stallion (Con Air x Cambridge) self-owned with Gochman Sport Horse LLC, combining efforts to put in a clear jump-off round in 40.484 seconds.

Twenty horse-and-rider pairs tested the Michel Vaillancourt (Aiken, SC) designed course, with seven combinations returning for the jump-off in front of nearly empty stands while horse shows are still closed to the public. Willis and the 2008 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Douglas x Cavalier) owned by himself and Lucinda Huddy managed to shave seconds off the leading time with a few speedy riders behind them in the order of go, ultimately holding onto the lead, he explained.

Kristen VanderVeen and Bull Run’s Divine Fortune Earn $25,000 Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake Win

Kristen VanderVeen (Wellington, FL) and Bull Run’s Divine Fortune were the fastest pair of the day in Thursday’s $25,000 Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake in Tryon Stadium, stopping the short-course timers in 27.668 seconds for the win. Todd Minikus (Lake Worth, FL) took both second and third place aboard Todd Minikus LTD entries, riding Juju VDM, a 2009 Belgian Warmblood mare (Toulon x For Pleasure), to a time of 28.934 seconds and piloting Calvalou, the 2007 Oldenburg gelding (Calvaro F.C. x Baloubet du Rouet), to a clear round in a time of 29.897 seconds for third.

Todd Minikus and Amex Z Collect $25,000 Wednesday Classic Win

Todd Minikus (Lake Worth, FL) and Amex Z, the Bit By Bit Groups’ 2009 Zangersheide mare (Andiamo Z x Landaris), stopped the jump-off timers in 27.027 seconds to take the win in Wednesday’s $25,000 Wednesday Classic. David Blake (Wellington, FL) and Don’t Touch Du Bois, a 2009 Belgian Sport Horse mare (Kashmir Van Schuttershof x Indoctro) owned by Pine Hollow Farm, put in a 28.907-second round to claim second, while third went to Gavin Harley (Wellington, FL) and Very Chic du Tillard, a 2009 Selle Francais gelding (Diamant De Semilly x Quidam De Revel) owned by E2 Showjumpers, stopping the timers at 30.666 seconds.

Santiago Lambre and Doloris Finesse $25,000 Sunday Classic

Santiago Lambre (Wellington, FL) and Doloris, a 2008 Dutch Warmblood mare (Harley VDL x Colorado D) owned by Aurora Rangel De Alba, claimed the $25,000 Sunday Classic win in a time of 30.103 seconds, while second place went to Wellington’s David Blake aboard Don’t Touch Du Bois, Pine Hollow Farm’s 2009 Belgian Sport Horse mare (Kashmir Van Schuttershof x Indoctro), on a time of 30.814 seconds. Third was awarded to Zoubair Bennani (Ocala, FL) and Vishnou Un Prince, Leah Garlan’s 2009 Selle Francais gelding (Banboula Du Thot x Galoubet A), stopping the jump-off timers in 31.504 seconds.

To learn more, visit www.Tryon.com.

Tanner Korotkin Joins Sweet Oak Farm

Tanner Korotkin and Deauville S at Tryon. Photo by Angela Vogel.

June 19, 2020 — Rising young professional Tanner Korotkin has joined the staff at Sweet Oak Farm, working under Shane Sweetnam this summer in Tryon, NC, Lexington, KY, and Traverse City, MI.

A highly decorated junior rider while riding for his family’s Castlewood Farm, as well as Missy Clark and John Brennan’s North Run operation, Korotkin earned the prestigious Junior Jumper Championship at the Devon Horse Show in 2019 and concluded his junior career with ribbons at the Platinum Performance/USEF Show Jumping Talent Search Finals – East, the Lindsay Maxwell Charitable Fund WIHS Equitation Final, and the ASPCA Maclay National Championship. Taking up professional status in December, he joins Sweet Oak Farm with his two international mounts, Country Boy and Deauville S.

“I’m beyond excited for this opportunity, to the point where it’s hard to explain,” said Korotkin, 18. “I have my own big dreams, like most riders, and to have the opportunity to learn from Shane, one of the best riders on the Irish squad, is a huge opportunity that most don’t get. There are countless things that I know I’ll learn, both on and off of a horse, and I’m ready for every bit of it.”

Korotkin has gotten off to a strong start with his new team, riding Castlewood Farm’s Deauville S to a top 10 finish in the $75,000 Grand Prix at Tryon Spring, the pair’s first competition stateside after debuting this winter on the Sunshine Tour in Spain. Korotkin also got back in the ring aboard Sandalwood Farm’s Country Boy, another new partnership that debuted in February at the Winter Equestrian Festival in Wellington, FL, and logged rounds aboard Sweet Oak Farm’s Indiana Twin and 8-year-old FLB Lux Inclusive.

“Tanner has been with us two weeks now, and he fit right in straight away,” said Sweetnam, a veteran of the 2018 World Equestrian Games and a member of the Irish squad that took top honors at the 2017 European Championships in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. “He’s working very hard and has already put in some good rounds. He comes with a good education from his parents at Castlewood and also with Missy and John. I think it’s going to be another step in the learning process for his career.

“He’s a talented rider and can be a real plus to the team here at Sweet Oak Farm,” he added.

Korotkin and Sweetnam continue their summer tour at Split Rock Jumping Tour’s Lexington International CSI2*, the Great Lakes Equestrian Festival in Traverse City, and Kentucky Summer Horse Shows.

“So far, everything’s going great,” Korotkin said. “Deauville S and Country Boy both jumped absolutely incredible their first show back post-quarantine. I have already learned so much from Shane, and I am getting the opportunity to ride great horses. I definitely think it has been helping me in the show ring.”

© 2020 Catie Staszak Media, Inc.

Andy Kocher Sport Horse Auctions Launches the Eighty-Dollar Champion Contest

Photo: Damokles.

June 18, 2020 — Inspired by the legendary story of Harry DeLeyer and Snowman, which was made into Elizabeth Letts’ popular book, The Eighty-Dollar Champion: Snowman, the Horse That Inspired a Nation, Andy Kocher is bringing show jumping’s greatest investment tale to life in modern day.

In the 1950s, DeLeyer purchased Snowman for just $80, when the horse was bound for slaughter. The pair would go on to become legends of the sport, eventually being inducted into the United States Show Jumping Hall of Fame in 1992. Understanding how expensive sport horses are in the industry, Kocher wants to give a lucky equestrian an opportunity to have a future star of his or her own for just $80.

Through a very unique contest, Pippa, a 2020 filly by Damokles out of Belaquador, by Equador, will be awarded to a participant of the Eighty-Dollar Champion Contest. Entry into the contest costs just $80. On July 13, 2020, an entry will be drawn to determine the winner of the contest.

“I grew up idolizing the story of Harry DeLeyer and Snowman,” Kocher said. “I’ve wanted to do something like this for quite some time. I hope this contest can give someone a great opportunity that they might not otherwise have.”

Pippa is by Damokles, who has recorded placings at the five-star level. In 2018, the stallion jumped the Longines FEI Jumping World Cup™ New York at the American Gold Cup within two months of debuting at the international level. In 2020, Damokles won the National Western Grand Prix in Colorado. He is by Ukato, one of the most talented and successful sons of the great Stakkato. His dam is the KWPN mare Orindy, a productive broodmare who has produced no less than three internationally competing offspring, all by Ukato. Second dam Dorinda (Tangelo XX) produced another 1.60m performer, Justin, by Emilion.

Pippa’s dam, Belaquador, was campaigned by Meagan Nusz, who herself grew up going to local shows at Harry DeLeyer’s son John DeLeyer’s farm. Belaquador is now a member of Kocher’s broodmare band at Windwood Equestrian in Pelham, AL. She is by Equador, a son of the legendary stallion Voltaire, out of Elansa, who has produced the 1.60m performers Melansa (Edwig) and Q’s Charm (Burggraaf) as well as the 1.50m performer Delansa (Equador) and Teun (Lux Z), who competed at 1.45m. Second dam Wulensa (Gag XX) produced the 1.50m-performing Landvoogd (Burggraaf). Belaquador’s sister Jelansa also produced the highly successful 1.60m performer Vesuvius, who with Nusz in the irons, was a venerable five-star performer, recording wins and placings at top events around the globe.

Pippa will be registered KWPN N.A. and is set to be weaned on June 18, 2020.

Kocher has partnered with William Upton’s Windwood Equestrian for the Eighty Dollar Champion Contest. Based out of Pelham, AL just 28 miles from the Birmingham airport, Windwood Equestrian has built up a state-of-the-art equestrian facility and is home to an accomplished sport horse breeding program, where Damokles stands at stud. The beautiful property has also become a popular event venue, regularly hosting weddings. In July 2020, Windwood Equestrian will present the young prospects, ages 5 and under, for the second Andy Kocher Sport Horse Auction, which will run at Auction.AndyKocher.com, July 22-25.

In order to submit a complete entry, participants must also complete a participant application. Kocher will review the applications and contact references, including a veterinary reference, to make sure that the winner is able to provide a suitable home for a horse. Participants may purchase multiple tickets to increase their chances.

The Eighty-Dollar Champion Contest will benefit the Snowman Rescue Fund, which supports Omega Horse Rescue & Rehabilitation Center. Omega gives other slaughter bound horses the same chance that Snowman had to become a part of a loving family, placing more 1,200 horses since its founding in 1997. Omega also rescues slaughter bound horses from the New Holland Auction, the same auction where Harry deLeyer rescued Snowman in 1956. Omega saves, rehabilitates, re-trains and prepares horses for adoption into new homes.

For more information or to enter the Eighty-Dollar Champion Contest, click here.

A Star-Studded Line-Up in the Gulf of Saint-Tropez

A CSI-4* show has seldom had such an amazing line-up of riders. It’s true that after three months of being at a standstill, everyone, including the 5-star riders, who won’t be competing at the Olympics this summer, were keen to go back to showgrounds. On June 18, the Haras des Grillons de Grimaud will play host to the best that world show jumping has to offer, during the launch of the second season of the HUBSIDE JUMPING. Among them will be those who are loyal to Sadri Fegaier’s competitions… but there will also be a few “newbies.”

As international shows get underway again in Europe, the HUBSIDE JUMPING will take place behind closed doors (at least for the first weekend). All of the classes will be broadcast live on https://grandprix.tv/fr. The track of the courses will be designed by Italy’s Andrea Colombo, with three levels of competition on offer (CSI 1, 2, and 4*), boasting prize money totalling 290 000 euros, of which 100 000 euros will be for Sunday’s CSI 4* Grand Prix.

Daniel Koroloff – E-mail: daniel@blizko-communication.com

FEI Tribunal Dismisses Athlete Appeals on Villeneuve-Loubet Decision

An appeal against the FEI decision to annul results from competitions held in France where Olympic and Longines Ranking points were on offer has been dismissed by the FEI Tribunal.

The appeals by Sri Lanka’s Mathilda Karlsson and Romanian athlete Andrea Herck, which were consolidated by the FEI Tribunal, resulted from the international governing body’s decision in February of this year to retrospectively remove six competitions from three FEI Jumping Events held in Villeneuve-Loubet in December 2019 and a further six competitions from three events at the same venue in January 2020.

The decision was based on the findings from an investigation launched by the FEI after concerns were raised about the integrity of these events. The investigation established that, contrary to the FEI Rules (Article 110.2.3 of the FEI General Regulations), two competitions counting for the Olympic and Longines Rankings were added at each of the three December 2019 events after the respective Definite Entries deadlines. The updated Schedules for these events were submitted by the French National Federation and were mistakenly approved by the FEI.

As a result, and in accordance with Article 112.3 of the FEI General Regulations, the FEI retrospectively removed these additional competitions, meaning that athletes who participated lost their ranking points from these competitions. The decision meant that the Olympic and Longines Rankings were updated, resulting in Mathilda Karlsson dropping from second to seventh in the Group G Olympic Rankings and Sri Lanka losing its Olympic individual quota slot.

Additionally, the FEI established that three of the six events at Villeneuve-Loubet in January 2020 also had two classes counting for Longines Rankings points added after the Definite Entries deadline, again contrary to the FEI Rules. As a result, these additional competitions were also removed retrospectively and athletes that participated lost their ranking points for these competitions. Andrea Herck’s appeal was based on the loss of Longines Ranking points following the removal of the additional competitions at Villeneuve-Loubet.

In its Final Decision, the Tribunal found that the integrity of the sport had been jeopardised and therefore ruled that “justified circumstances” existed which allowed the FEI Secretary General to make the decision to remove the competitions and annul the Olympic and Longines ranking points from these competitions.

The FEI Tribunal, which is an independent body, ruled that the FEI’s decision of 17 February 2020 to remove the competitions was “rightfully taken” and dismissed the appeals. Each party will pay their own costs in the proceedings.

“This is an important decision to ensure the integrity of the sport, and particularly the Olympic and Longines Rankings,” FEI Secretary General Sabrina Ibáñez said.

The parties have 21 days from the date of notification (16 June 2020) to appeal the decision to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

The full Decision is available here.

FEI media contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Communications
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 787 506 142

Olga Nikolaou
Media Relations Officer
olga.nikolaou@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 56

Kent Farrington and Kaprice Best the Field in $24,999 Osphos Grand Prix at ESP June II

Kent Farrington aboard Kaprice. ©Anne Gittins Photography.

Wellington, FL – June 15, 2020 – The ESP June Spring Series continued last week with a day of Equitation competition on Wednesday, June 10, and four days of USEF “A” National & Jumper 4* competition. The $24,999 Osphos® Grand Prix (plus $600 in add back money) on the Derby Field was the highlight of the weekend, with Kent Farrington of Wellington, FL clinching victory aboard Kaprice, owned by Haity McNerney. The pair crossed through the jump-off timers in 36.17 seconds, besting the field of 43 competitors and pushing Canada’s Erynn Ballard out of the top position. However, Ballard still held on to both second and third place. Capturing the red ribbon aboard Diableur, owned by Emma Waldfogel, in 38.303 seconds and the yellow rosette with Skymaster LLC’s Judge Hof Ter Zeedycke in 38.379 seconds.

Farrington and Kaprice have been competing at the Equestrian Village facility since the May Schooling Shows began and have had a positive experience amidst the ‘new normal’ of horse show competition. “These are crazy times, but I think they’re doing an amazing job here. To be honest, I think we couldn’t ask for any better,” commented Farrington after his win. “Getting to ride out on this field is great. It’s not often we get to train younger horses on a field like this. For me, I have a bunch of young horses here, so I’m just trying to maximize their time by giving them that experience. I’m very grateful for ESP’s efforts.”

As the ESP June Spring Series winds down, Farrington plans to continue working his younger horses at his home base in Wellington: “We’re taking it one step at a time. For right now, it’s too hard to say if we’ll travel for the fall season. I think we’re lucky to have nice farms down here to work out of. It’s a little hot, but all things considered it’s not too bad. Hopefully sometime in the future, the world returns more to normal.”

It was lucky number thirteen again for the number of competitors returning for the second round. Brazil’s Guilherme Jorge designed a challenging course that tested competitors around the field. Natalie Dean of Palo Alto, CA and Paul O’Shea of Wellington, FL completed the podium, finishing in fourth and fifth places, respectively.

For more information and results, please visit www.PBIEC.com.