Category Archives: FEI

Prohibited Substance Case under FEI Anti-Doping Rules

Lausanne (SUI), 6 July 2017 – The FEI has announced an adverse analytical finding involving a prohibited substance.

The new case involves the use of Stanozolol, an anabolic steroid, which is a Banned Substance under the FEI’s Equine Anti-Doping and Controlled Medication Regulations (EADCMRs).

Horse: Shiners Chic (FEI ID 103DF20/GBR)
Person Responsible: Jessica Sternberg (FEI ID 10055844/GBR)
Event: CRI3* – Katy, Texas (USA), 20-21.04.2017
Prohibited Substance: Stanozolol

The athlete has been provisionally suspended from the date of notification (5 July 2017) until the FEI Tribunal renders a decision. The horse has been provisionally suspended for two months.

FEI Media Contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager Press Relations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

FEI Tribunal Issues Final Decisions on Banned Substance Cases

Lausanne (SUI), 29 June 2017 – The FEI Tribunal has issued its Final Decisions on three banned substance cases under the FEI’s Equine Anti-Doping and Controlled Medication Regulations (EADCMRs).

Samples taken on 4 September 2015 from the horse Houkoumi G (FEI ID 104XV97/BEL), ridden by Evelyne Stoffel (FEI ID 10128731/BEL) at the CEI1* 100 in Virton (BEL), tested positive for the opioid analgesic O-Desmethyl-Tramadol. The FEI Tribunal has imposed a 15-month suspension on the athlete with a fine of CHF 2,500 and contribution of 1,000 CHF towards legal costs.

Samples taken on 29 August 2015 from the horse Felix Van De Mispelaere (FEI ID 104JQ57/RSA), ridden by Jonathan Clarke (FEI ID RSA/10020663) to win a class at CSI1*-W in Polokwane (RSA), tested positive for the vasodilator Minoxidil.

The athlete had been provisionally suspended from 21 October 2015 until 18 May 2016. The FEI Tribunal found that while the EADCMRs were contravened, the athlete did not bear fault for the rule violation, so there was no further period of suspension imposed. He was ordered to contribute 1,000 CHF towards legal costs.

Samples taken on 14 October 2016 from the horse La Petite Fleur 6 (FEI ID 103TN40/MEX), ridden by Andres Arozarena (FEI ID MEX/10094207) at the CSI4* in Coapexpan (MEX), tested positive for the anti-inflammatory Piroxicam.

The FEI Tribunal has imposed a six-month suspension. The period of provisional suspension, effective from 20 December 2016, has been credited against the period of ineligibility imposed in this Decision. The athlete was therefore ineligible through to 19 June 2017. The athlete will also be fined 2,000 CHF and contribute 1,000 CHF towards legal costs.

Athletes have 21 days to appeal decisions to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) from the date of notification.

FEI Media Contact:

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145

US Dressage Team Prepares for FEI Nations Cup CDIO5* Rotterdam

Dawn White-O’Connor and Legolas 92. Photo: SusanJStickle.com.

Rotterdam, Netherlands – Continuing their European Nations Cup tour, The Dutta Corp. U.S. Dressage Team will compete at FEI Nations Cup CDIO5* Rotterdam, June 22-25. The U.S. team, led by Chef d’Equipe Robert Dover, includes Dawn White O’Connor, Kasey Perry-Glass, Laura Graves, and Olivia LaGoy-Weltz. Additionally, U.S. combinations Charlotte Jorst with Kastel’s Nintendo, Adrienne Lyle with Salvino, and Shelly Francis with Doktor will compete individually in the CDI3* competition. The Dutta Corp. U.S. Dressage Team will ride in the following order.

Dawn White-O’Connor with Legolas 92: White-O’Connor (Cardiff, Calif.) and Legolas 92 make their first Nations Cup appearance together. White-O’Connor and Four Winds Farm’s 2002 Westphalian gelding posted back-to-back victories in the Grand Prix and Grand Prix Special at the Dressage Affaire CDI3* in San Juan Capistrano in March. The combination then went on to win the $2,000 FEI Grand Prix Special at the Del Mar National Horse Show.

Olivia LaGoy-Weltz with Lonoir:  In 2016 and 2017, LaGoy-Weltz (Haymarket, Va.) and her own 2004 Danish Warmblood gelding placed inside the top ten at every major competition. Already in 2017, LaGoy-Weltz and Lonoir accomplished eight top-ten finishes, including first place titles in the Grand Prix and Grand Prix Special during the Stillpoint Farm FEI Nations Cup CDIO3* at the 2017 Adequan® Global Dressage Festival (AGDF) in Wellington, Fla.

Kasey Perry-Glass with Goerklintgaards Dublet: Perry-Glass (Wellington, Fla.) and Goerklintgaards Dublet, Diane Perry’s 2003 Danish Warmblood gelding contributed to the team bronze medal at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. They then went on to achieve a top-ten finish at the 2017 FEI World Cup™ Dressage Final in Omaha, Neb. and recently won the USEF Grand Prix Dressage National Championship at The Dutta Corp. U.S. Dressage Festival of Champions.

Laura Graves with Verdades: Graves (Geneva, Fla.) is a well-known face on the U.S. dressage landscape. She and Verdades, her own and Curt Maes’s 2002 Dutch Warmblood gelding, placed second at the 2017 FEI World Cup Dressage Final in Omaha, Neb., in April. The duo also contributed to a team bronze medal in Rio and were part of the team silver medal efforts at 2016 CDIO5* Rotterdam.

Find out more about FEI Nations Cup CDIO5* Rotterdam and watch it live on FEI TV.

By US Equestrian Communications Department

Working Group Agrees Key Recommendations on Jumping Invitation Rules and Event Requirements

Lausanne (SUI), 21 June 2017 – The Working Group put in place to review the Jumping Invitation Rules and CSI/CSIO requirements met at FEI Headquarters in Lausanne (SUI) on 20 and 21 June, and has produced a series of recommendations which will be passed on to the FEI Jumping Committee to draft proposed rule changes.

The Jumping Committee will now work on drafting formal proposals that will be sent to National Federations and stakeholders by 6 July for their input. Following that process, further modifications can be considered prior to a vote on rule changes at the FEI General Assembly in Montevideo (URU) in November.

The working group is made up of representatives from:

  • National Federations – Marco Fuste (ESP), Quentin Simonet (FRA), Soenke Lauterbach (GER), Emile Hendrix (NED) and Murray Kessler (USA)
  • European Equestrian Federation – Hanfried Haring and Henk Nooren
  • Organisers – Ian Allison, Peter Bollen, Stephan Conter, Tom Struzzieri, Fred Van Lierop and Volker Wulff
  • Athletes – Abdel Said and Henrik Von Eckermann
  • Owners – Dominique Mégret
  • Officials – Stephan Ellenbruch
  • FEI – John Madden, Jack Huang, Sabrina Ibáñez and John Roche

The two sessions were moderated by Tom O’Meara (USA) and Janice Shardlow (GBR).

FEI President Ingmar De Vos opened Tuesday session, underlining the importance of the meeting for the future of the sport and the clear need to come to well-balanced conclusions that respect the interest of all stakeholders, while keeping the sport accessible to all.

“We have had very constructive debate over the past two days and I am confident that the recommendations that have come out of our frank and open discussions will ultimately result in consensus on the way forward on the Jumping Invitation Rules and CSI/CSIO requirements,” John Madden said.

Amongst the recommendations on the invitation rules as agreed by the Working Group are varying percentages at different star levels and that an invitation system needs to be implemented for CSIs at all levels except for CSI1*.

On CSI/CSIO requirements there was an agreement that no drastic changes are needed, but that the services that an organiser has to provide and that are covered by the applicable entry fees must be clearly defined. There was also consensus that the level of the entry fee can vary according to the region.

The FEI’s online invitation system, which is currently in development and which will guarantee the correct application of the invitation rules, will be fully operational as of 1 January 2018 to coincide with the implementation of the new Jumping Invitation Rules.

FEI Media Contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Press Relations
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 787 506 142

Shannon Gibbons
Manager Press Relations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

FEI Campus – Get e-Learning Anytime, Anywhere!

Lausanne (SUI), 19 June 2016 – The FEI has launched FEI Campus, a unique and free e-learning gateway for everyone with a love of horses and equestrian sport, wherever they are in the world.

FEI Campus is an FEI Solidarity project and the online resource – https://campus.fei.org – is expected to become the virtual reference point for millions of equestrian fans globally, as well as athletes and FEI Officials.

FEI Campus content and courses have been carefully crafted by equestrian experts and are designed for everyone, including those looking for invaluable horse training and stable management tips to educational programmes on veterinary needs, equine behaviour and also for judging certification.

The platform is designed to give the equestrian community an immersive experience, with all courses and connection with tutors and peers just a click away from any device.

FEI Campus will be constantly enriched with up-to-the-minute and wide-ranging information to reflect the global interests of the rapidly growing international equestrian community, which now includes over 41,000 athletes, 7,500 officials and 750 million fans around the world.

One of the key goals of this important development tool is to make it less expensive for current and future FEI officials from across the world to get education, meaning that they will be able to follow courses without the costs of travelling and accommodation. Although FEI Campus cannot replace practical courses, it will also help reduce education costs for our National Federations.

“FEI Campus is a real milestone for equestrian sport,” FEI President Ingmar De Vos said.

“We’re connecting to millions of fans by sharing invaluable content on a sport and hobby we all love, and we’re modernising the way we educate our officials and athletes with the natural efficiencies that come with e-learning.

“We’ve focused on making strong, memorable and attention grabbing content that is easily accessible for our international equestrian community that is always on the go.

“This is just the beginning for FEI Campus, with new information and courses being added throughout 2017 and beyond.”

Sign up now to FEI Campus and get learning!

FEI Media Contact:

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145

IOC Confirms Equestrian Sport in 2024 Olympic Programme and Approval of Tokyo 2020 Formats

Lausanne (SUI), 9 June 2017 – The FEI President has welcomed the confirmation by the IOC that equestrian sport will be in the Olympic programme for the 2024 Games and approval of the Olympic formats submitted by the FEI for the Tokyo 2020 Games. The quota for equestrian at the 2020 Games remains unchanged.

“The IOC’s confirmation of equestrian on the Olympic programme for the 2024 Games and approval of the new formats for Tokyo 2020 is a direct acknowledgment of our willingness to adapt and modernise our sport, so all the work to drive change and increase universality has been worthwhile,” FEI President Ingmar De Vos said.

“Approval of the formats for Tokyo means that we can now increase the number of flags in equestrian sport in line with the Agenda 2020 recommendations. With more than 30,000 athletes registered to compete in our three Olympic disciplines – and the numbers are growing every year – our new formats mean that athletes from more countries than ever before will now have the opportunity of one day realising their dream of representing their country at the Olympic Games.”

The new formats include teams of three and no drop score across the Olympic disciplines (Eventing, Dressage and Jumping) and the use of reserve athletes (horses and riders) for medical reasons. The format changes were approved by the FEI’s member National Federations at last year’s FEI General Assembly in Tokyo (JPN) following almost two years of consultation.

“It wasn’t easy for our community to make such drastic changes to our Olympic formats, but the National Federations knew the importance of this decision and ultimately supported the proposed changes. Their willingness to embrace this change is without any doubt the reason we have got this fantastic news from the IOC today.”

Ingmar De Vos also welcomed the confirmation of the IOC Executive Board’s unanimous approval of a working group recommendation that both the 2024 and 2028 Games be awarded later this year. The recommendation will be voted on at an IOC Extraordinary Session in Lausanne (SUI) next month and, if passed, the two Games will then be allocated at the IOC Session in Lima (PER) in mid-September, with Paris (FRA) and Los Angeles (USA) as the two candidate cities.

“We have visited the equestrian venues at Paris and Los Angeles and we’re really excited to know that they will be hosting the next two editions of the Games after Tokyo 2020, as they both offer a fantastic opportunity to showcase our sport. We will have an iconic venue in Paris, as equestrian will be staged in the grounds of Versailles, with the chateau as a truly spectacular backdrop not only for the stadium, but also for the cross country. And for Los Angeles we will be in the beautiful Sepulveda Basin, just 15 minutes from the Athletes Village, on the site of an existing golf course.

“Both venues provide us with a great opportunity to deliver the Games in a cost-effective way and, as France and the United States have a long and successful equestrian tradition, there will be huge public support for our sport.”

FEI Media Contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Press Relations
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 787 506 142

Leanne Williams
Manager Press Relations
leanne.williams@fei.org
+41 79 314 24 38

FEI Clean Sport on www.inside.fei.org

Lausanne (SUI), 31 May 2017 – In order to make all information about FEI Clean Sport more easily accessible, we have aggregated everything about Clean Sport for Humans and Clean Sport for Horses under one roof.

The Clean Sport button at the top of the home page on inside.fei.org now takes you directly to all the FEI Clean Sport information, together with details about testing, test results (both positive and negative) and FEI Tribunal cases and decisions.

Once you’ve accessed the landing page: http://inside.fei.org/fei/cleansport, you can choose between Clean Sport for Horses: http://inside.fei.org/fei/cleansport/horses and Clean Sport for Humans: http://inside.fei.org/fei/cleansport/humans.

We hope this will make your FEI Clean Sport journey more user-friendly.

FEI Media Contact:

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145

FEI Endurance Forum 2017: Welfare, Education and the Future

FEI Endurance Director Manuel Bandeira de Mello speaks at the 2017 FEI Endurance Forum, with panellists (L-R) Brian Sheahan, FEI Endurance Committee Chair, elite athlete Valerie Kanavy (USA), and Stephane Chazel (FRA), who is an event organizer, athlete and trainer. (FEI/Morhaf Al Asaaf)

Lausanne (SUI), 26 May 2017 – Welfare, education and the future direction of the sport were prominent topics at the FEI Endurance Forum 2017, which took place this week in Vic, Barcelona (ESP). A total of 100 delegates from over 30 countries gathered together at a pivotal time for the discipline of Endurance, which is seeing massive growth year on year across the globe.

Scientific presentations on Endurance risk factors, bone fatigue and risk management set the scene, providing a data-based approach for the Forum’s further discussions on education, rules revisions and the future of the sport. Key topics including horse welfare, speed, athlete education and how the elite level of the sport could look in the future were debated in an open and honest dialogue by representatives from across the Endurance community.

“This growth of the sport is remarkable and brings great opportunities but also presents challenges to the global endurance community,” FEI Secretary General Sabrina Ibáñez said in her opening address. “Endurance is clearly appealing and has potential, but as we grow we need to secure the integrity of the sport with correct processes, and maintain the highest standards of horse welfare. We are all here because we want to ensure that Endurance continues to develop and thrive around the world. And we are also here because we want to ensure the very best for our horses, for our athletes and for the greater Endurance community.”

First presented at last month’s FEI Sports Forum 2017, Dr Euan Bennet from the University of Glasgow took delegates through the highlights and main results of the first year and a half of the FEI’s Global Endurance Injuries Study, and Professor Chris Whitton from the University of Melbourne presented data on bone fatigue. Both reiterated the message that speed and non-compliance with mandatory rest periods are the key risk factors, highlighting that an increase of seven days on the mandatory rest periods established in 2014 could potentially prevent 10% of the failed-to-qualify statistics and that small reductions in speed have large beneficial effects on bone fatigue for the fastest horses. It was unanimously agreed that key to injury reduction is a combination of rules revisions and education for athletes, trainers and all involved in the sport.

Diarmuid Byrne and Sam Watson from equestrian data science company EquiRatings, presented a potential model for an athlete index in Endurance, aimed at identifying those at higher risk of non-completion and following a similar concept to the ERQI model in Eventing. This was received with interest and generated discussions on data collection in the future to enhance this tool, possible applications to reward positive performance and good horsemanship, and potential application to trainers, and horse/athlete combinations.

EquiRatings founder Sam Watson explained: “It is about changing psychology and attitude. We need to create awareness and provide a tool that can guide the level of responsible horsemanship and help maintain a standard for the sport around the world.”

The new Endurance Education System for Endurance Officials was presented and received widespread support, with unanimous agreement on the benefit and importance of rewarding excellence and increasing experience. The introduction of job descriptions, promotional courses for top level Officials, horsemanship education for all Endurance Officials, requalification every three years and the introduction of a new 5* level of Officials were all on the agenda.

Wrapping up the first day’s proceedings, FEI Endurance Director Manuel Bandeira de Mello led delegates in discussion around potential rule revisions aimed at improving horse welfare and based on the scientific findings relating to areas such as qualifications, speeds, rest periods and weight regulations.

There was widespread support for the creation of a new 5* level of elite competition, with further consultation needed on what form it will take, and a general consensus that there should be clear and increased qualification criteria for entry to 1* level and for progression onto 4* and 5*; however, further work is needed to flesh out proposals for the introduction of completion rates for Championship qualifications.

Discussions also covered the need for any potential changes to mandatory rest periods to be clearly based on welfare and not as sanctions for speed. The extensive feedback will be discussed by the FEI Endurance Committee as the next step in this rules revision process.

Inspiration for the second day’s discussions on the future of the sport covered everything from event promotion, sponsorship, innovation in promotion, and what the sport could look like in the future, with presentations from across the spectrum of the sport: athlete Valerie Kanavy, Organiser Nick Brooks-Ward from Hpower Group, athlete and trainer Stephane Chazel and Spanish Chef D’Equipe Ignasi Casas.

Athlete education was again central to the debate as discussion turned to how speed relates to the future of the sport. Delegates noted that ultimately this is a sport against the clock, but this cannot be to the detriment of the horse; however, as the sport progresses then speeds will get higher with better training, breeding, feeding, riding etc. However, all acknowledged that speed contributes to injury, which is not acceptable for horse welfare and has a negative effect on the perception of the sport. Minimum weights and course design were discussed as examples of how to regulate speed but ultimately conversation came back to athlete responsibility and training, a key theme throughout the Forum.

FEI Secretary General Sabrina Ibáñez closed the forum with a commitment to continue organising these types of discussion forums for Endurance on a regular basis, commending the “productive and exciting meeting of such a wide group of people, with very diverse views yet working together and allowing each other to speak, with a real community feel for open dialogue.”

FEI Media Contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Press Relations
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 787 506 142

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145

Ireland Pips Belgium in Ferocious Battle at Norwegian Fixture in Drammen

Captain Geoff Curran and Ringwood Glen. (FEI/Hannah Stærkebye)

On another day of drama and intrigue, Ireland pipped Belgium by a slim one-fault margin to win the second leg of the FEI Nations Cup™ Jumping Europe Division 2 series in Drammen, Norway. When the best eight of the 13 competing nations returned for the second round it all came down to the last man into the ring, Irish army captain Geoff Curran (37), to decide the result, and it was like walking a tight-rope.

He could afford a single mistake, but an additional time fault would draw his team level with the crack Belgian side, and any more than that would see victory slip from Ireland’s grasp. So when his 13-year-old gelding, Ringwood Glen, put a toe in the water a tense silence descended on the arena.

“I had a feeling that I might have been in the water and I knew I was tight enough on time, but I kept the same plan of doing eight strides down to the last fence. It worked in the first round and thankfully again in the second, but I didn’t plan on being quite that tight to the time allowed!” — Captain Geoff Curran (Team Ireland)

Crossing the line with just 0.21 seconds to spare he clinched it, however. And it was a gutsy result for the side that was already in the lead at the halfway stage despite a shaky start when Alexander Butler (Hallowberry Cruz) retired at the triple combination, but bolstered by solid performances from Cameron Hanley (Quirex) and Mark McAuley (Utchan de Belheme).

The experienced Belgian foursome of Olivier Philippaerts (H&M Legend of Love), Niels Bruynseels (Gancia de Muze), Pieter Devos (Dream of India Greenfield) and Gregory Wathelet (Coree) were firm favourites to win this leg of the seven-round series, but 17 faults left them lying in a surprising sixth place after the first round. They re-grouped with only four to add second time out, but couldn’t overtake the fighting Irish when finishing with 21 faults.

Team France lined up third with 24 faults, bolstered by the only double-clear of the entire competition from anchor partnership Alexis Deroubaix and Timon d’Aure. Neither Ireland nor France were competing for points, however, as they both belong in the Europe Division 1 series, so Belgium maintains the lead in Division 2.

Captain Geoff Curran – Team Ireland (winners), talking about his horse Ringwood Glen: “I am absolutely delighted. Ringwood Glen is a real favourite in the Army Equitation School and he deserves this win. I am really happy to be part of this great team.”

Chef d’Equipe Michael Blake – Team Ireland, talking about his team’s performance: “I knew coming here to Drammen that this was going to be tough but I also knew we had a good team. I said to Geoff going in, you can have a time fault or a fence but you can’t have both. He was under a lot of pressure going in last. I don’t think he knew for sure he was in the water and he got home just inside the time allowed – he did a brilliant job.”

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145

FEI Tribunal Lifts Provisional Suspensions

Lausanne (SUI), 10 May 2017 – The FEI Tribunal has lifted the provisional suspensions of 11 athletes – two Jumping, two Dressage and seven Endurance – and three Endurance trainers.

Under the FEI’s Equine Anti-Doping and Controlled Medication Regulations (EADCMRs) athletes have the opportunity to request a lifting of the provisional suspension in front of the FEI Tribunal.

Two international Jumping athletes, Brazil’s Marlon Modolo Zanotelli (Sirene de la Motte, FEI ID 103RA62) and Great Britain’s Henry Turrell (Blaze of Glory II, FEI ID 103LD21), whose horses tested positive for the banned substance Sparteine after competing at separate events in Vilamoura (POR) last month, have both had their provisional suspensions lifted as of midnight CEST on 27 April. Sparteine, an antiarrhythmic used to treat cardiac arrhythmia, is found in the lupin flower, which grows in many parts of Portugal.

The FEI Tribunal’s decision to lift the provisional suspensions was mainly based on scientific evidence presented by the two athletes which suggests the likelihood of food contamination. Additionally, the FEI List Group, which reviews the FEI Equine Prohibited Substance List annually, has recommended to the FEI Bureau that Sparteine should be reclassified as a Controlled Medication and Specified Substance from 1 January 2018.

Similarly, the provisional suspensions imposed on seven Endurance athletes and three trainers in the UAE were lifted as of midnight on 30 April 2017, also due to reclassification of a prohibited substance.

Samples taken from seven horses that competed at four different events in Al Wathba (UAE) between the end of November 2016 and mid-January of this year tested positive for Caffeine and a number of metabolites, including the substance Paraxanthine.

Caffeine is already listed as a Specified Substance and the FEI List Group has recommended that Paraxanthine should be reclassified as a Controlled Medication and Specified Substance from 1 January 2018.

Separately, two US Dressage athletes – Adrienne Lyle (Horizon, FEI ID 105FJ02) and Kaitlin Blythe (Don Principe, FEI ID USA41197) – had been provisionally suspended since 5 April, the date they were notified that their horses had tested positive to the banned substance Ractopamine in Dressage competitions in Wellington (USA) in February 2017.

Their provisional suspensions were lifted at midnight on 28 April following evidence provided by the two athletes that a feed supplement given to the horses had been contaminated.

The FEI Tribunal maintained the provisional suspensions of the two horses on horse welfare grounds and in order to ensure a level playing field, however both athletes applied to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Lausanne (SUI) for provisional measures to request the lifting of the suspensions of both horses so that they could compete at the US Dressage Festival of Champions (18-21 May). The CAS granted the provisional measures this week (8 May), but still has to rule on the merits of the case.

FEI Media Contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Press Relations
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 787 506 142

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145