Category Archives: FEI

Giacomo Casadei Claims Individual Gold in Fantastic Five Way Jump Off

Giacomo Casadei (ITA) with his mount Darna Z (FEI / Liz Gregg)

A day of fantastic sport capped off the equestrian events of the Youth Olympic Games Buenos Aires 2018 with a last decisive dash for the individual medals in a five-way jump off.

Having produced clears all week, Giacomo Casadei (ITA) sailed through the six fences of the jump off and did so at an impressive pace to claim gold, followed by UAE’s Omar Almarzooqi and La Corina Lala producing the only other clear of the jump off in silver. The bronze went to Pedro Espinosa from Honduras riding Llavaneras Genquina who was quickest of them all, but picked up four faults on his way around.

Five-way jump-off

USA’s Mattie Hatcher was first to enter the arena for the jump-off, as she set out an impressive pace with her mare Santa Rosa Valery but knocked two fences along the way. Next into the arena was the UAE’s Omar Almarzooqi, who successfully produced the first clear at a very reasonable pace of 34.37s to pick up silver, followed by Italy’s Giacomo Casadei, who went and produced the second and final clear round of the jump-off beating Almarzooqi’s time by nearly three seconds at 31.79. The pressure was on for Argentina’s home-grown hero Richard Kierkegaard as he entered the arena to huge acclaim, and under pressure to secure a clear and fast round. It was unfortunately not to be for the local hero, with a refusal and two fences down, but the crowds nonetheless gave him a standing ovation as he exited the arena, knowing they would see him again soon. Last to enter the arena, team gold medallist Pedro Espinosa gave it all he had, producing the fastest round but knocking one rail down and picking up four faults to claim the bronze.

Click here to view the final results.

About the new Youth Olympic Games gold medallist

When speaking to Giacomo via an interpreter, he explained that he did not expect to win at all, and it was clearly the highlight of his equestrian career so far. Having won team silver and individual gold, he clearly exceeded all his expectations. From an equestrian family, Giacomo lives in Bologna, Italy and started riding at four years of age under the watchful eye of his father who is a riding instructor. Before the Youth Olympic Games competitions began, we asked Giacomo what his strengths were, and he said “against the clock competitions,” which clearly is true, and he went on to say he sincerely hoped one day to compete at the senior “Olympic Games,” so Giacomo Casadei is one to watch.

National champions

Both UAE’s Omar Almarzooqi with his individual silver and Pedro Espinosa from Honduras with his team gold and individual bronze are currently the sole medallists for their nations at the Youth Olympic Games Buenos Aires 2018.

They have also secured the first ever equestrian medals at the Olympic and Youth Olympic Games.

Click here to view video highlights throughout the Youth Olympic Games Buenos Aires 2018.

For more information, go to: www.buenosaires2018.com.

FEI Media Contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager, Media Relations and Media Operations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Olga Nikolaou
Media Relations Officer
olga.nikolaou@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 56

Historic Gold for Team North America at Youth Olympic Games Buenos Aires 2018

USA’s Mattie Hatcher on Santa Rosa Valery. (FEI / Liz Gregg)

Round 2 of the equestrian team competitions at the Youth Olympic Games Buenos Aires 2018 had everyone on the edge of their seats, as Team North America and Team Europe battled for the gold medal in a nail-biting jump off, whilst Team Africa settled for the bronze.  Full results can be found here.

Victory was no easy feat, with both teams fighting and producing the three clear rounds, which would count towards their final score of 0. It was all down to the speed with which the five riders from each team tackled the jump-off course. Both teams showed tremendous calm under pressure, but at the end of the day Team North America made the difference with some very speedy and precise performances, relegating Team Europe into a very respectable second place.

The five nations making up the North American team – Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Panama, and USA – were clearly over the moon. On the one hand, they had won gold, and on the other, this was the first time North America claimed the team gold following consecutive wins from Team Europe in 2010 and 2014. For Haiti and Honduras, this was their very first gold medal ever won at Olympic and Youth Olympic level across all sports since the reinstatement of the modern Olympic Games in 1896!

For USA’s Mattie Hatcher, the YOG experience so far is second to none with her horse Santa Rosa Valery delivering everything and more:

“Well you know we only had 4 days (to get to know each other) but it went really well. She was easy to click with and she was so willing with everything, so great.”

In silver medal position, and literally seconds behind Team North America, the all-male Team Europe put on a great performance. For Great Britain’s Jack Whitaker, who was also celebrating his 17th birthday, this silver medal came 34 years after his father Michael Whitaker won team silver at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic Games alongside his uncle John Whitaker. A family affair which clearly keeps on giving.

Team Africa was delighted with their bronze medal on 1 penalty point. Chance would have it that Zimbabwe’s Youth Olympic Games Young Change Maker Yara Hansen was nominated to hand out the gifts to the bronze medal winning team. Yara had been in their very shoes eight years prior, when Team Africa had won the equestrian bronze team medal at the Youth Olympic Games Singapore 2010.

All in all, it was a wonderful day of sport: exciting, full of suspense, and impressive! But beyond the sport in the field, what was truly remarkable was the team spirit around the field. The teams – which are made up of five separate nations brought together by the pure coincidence of qualification and geography – have clearly bonded. Athletes, coaches, parents, and all the accompanying persons have built relationships in a matter of days. Everybody has come together for a unique experience and unique Games here in Buenos Aires.

For more information, go to: www.buenosaires2018.com.

FEI Media Contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager, Media Relations and Media Operations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Olga Nikolaou
Media Relations Officer
olga.nikolaou@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 56

Vote Today for Your Equestrian Heroes in the FEI Awards 2018

The public vote for the FEI Awards 2018 is now open! For a second consecutive year the public gets to vote and celebrate its equestrian heroes following publication of the shortlisted nominees.

A record of outstanding achievements on the field of play, horsemanship, commitment and behind-the-scenes dedication are just some of the qualities of the 20 nominees selected across the five categories.

The shortlisted nominees for the FEI Awards 2018 are:

Longines Rising Star – for the young stars aged 14 to 21 who demonstrate outstanding sporting talent and commitment.

  • Felix Koller (AUT), Jumping
  • Esmee Donkers (NED), Dressage
  • Victor Levecque (FRA), Eventing
  • Bunty Howard (ZAM), Jumping

Best Athlete – paying tribute to some incredible performances during the year, notably at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon 2018 and the Asian Games, which took the sport to a new level.

  • Simone Blum (GER), Jumping
  • Yoshiaki Oiwa (JPN), Eventing
  • Lambert Leclezio (FRA), Vaulting
  • Stinna Kaastrup (DEN), Para Dressage

Best Groom – for the behind-the-scenes hero who ensures the horses he or she looks after are given the best possible care.

  • Lucy Miles (NZL), Eventing, groom for Jonelle and Tim Price
  • Alex Tyler-Morris (GBR), Jumping, groom for Harrie Smolders
  • Lee McKeever (USA), Jumping, groom for McLain Ward
  • Steffi Wiegard (GER), Dressage, head groom for Isabell Werth

Against All Odds – for an inspiring individual who has pursued their equestrian ambitions and overcome challenges and obstacles along the way.

  • Sammie Fritz (USA), Dressage
  • Leila Malki (PLE), Jumping
  • Sara Morganti (ITA), Para Dressage
  • Kate Shoemaker (USA), Para Dressage

FEI Solidarity – for an FEI Solidarity or equestrian development project, an individual or organisation that has demonstrated skill, dedication and energy in expanding the sport.

  • Julie Battams and Equine Pathways (AUS)
  • The Horsemanship charity programme (CHN)
  • Riders of Hope (BIH)
  • Mercedes Campdera (MEX)

Make sure you have your say and vote here!

The online public vote will be open from 5 to 15 October and will count for 50%, with a panel of expert judges deciding the remaining 50%.

The winners will be announced at the FEI Awards 2018 Gala presented by Longines in Manama, Bahrain on 20 November. Presenters on the night of this prestigious ceremony will be five-time Paralympic gold medallist Natasha Baker (GBR) and young Dressage star Juan Matute Guimón (ESP). “I am beyond excited and honoured to have been asked to host the awards with Juan!” Natasha Baker said. “I can’t wait to meet all of the deserving award winners and hear their stories and celebrate our fantastic sport.”

Vote for your equestrian heroes and stay tuned to learn everything about the FEI Awards 2018 on fei.org.

FEI Media Contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager, Media Relations and Media Operations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Olga Nikolaou
Media Relations Officer
olga.nikolaou@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 56

Laura Graves and Verdades First Americans to Top FEI Dressage World Rankings

Photo: Laura Graves (FEI / Martin Dokoupil)

Lausanne (SUI), 1 October 2018 — Olympic bronze medallist duo and American sweethearts, Laura Graves and Verdades (a.k.a. Diddy), have topped the FEI World Dressage rankings thanks to their double silver medal placings last month at the FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon. The famous combination has become the first American partnership to be ranked world number 1, as they took home silver in the Grand Prix Special and the Grand Prix competitions, boosting their ranking points to 2714 points, and placing them one point ahead of Germany’s Isabel Werth and Weihegold Old.

Isabel Werth (GER) and Weihegold OLD have held the number one position for almost two years, when they took over from fellow German Kristina Bröring-Sprehe in November 2016. This ground-breaking change to the top spot has now pushed them back to second place with a total of 2713 points. Isabel Werth can be found in three more positions in the ranking list, at the third with Emilio 107 (2680 points, previously ranked 2nd), at the fourth with Bella Rose 2 (2586 points, previously ranked 51st) and at the 11th with Don Johnson FRH (2291 points, previously ranked 8).

The FEI World Equestrian Games™ were an opportunity for several combinations to move up in the rankings, with Charlotte Dujardin (GBR) and Mount St John Freestyle moving from 10th to 6th place (2416 points), whilst Kasey Perry-Glass (USA) and Goerklintgaards Dublet jumped from the 20th to the 14th position (2267 points).

A number of other well-known combinations have soared into higher ranking positions this month, with Jessica Von Bredow-Werndl (GER) and TSF Dalera BB moving from the 53rd to 22nd position (2148 points) and Great Britain’s Carl Hester and his mount Hawtins Delicato made an enormous leap from the 130th to 23rd spot (2145 points). Hans Peter Minderhoud (NED) with Glock’s Dream Boy N.O.P. previously ranked 211th managed to get to 41st place (1891 points), and Sönke Rothenberger (GER) with Cosmo 59 jumping to 43rd place from 256th (1884 points).

As the FEI Dressage World Cup™ Western European League starts on 17 October in Herning (DEN), we will no doubt see some dramatic changes throughout the season, as these top international Dressage riders give good chase and maintain their world ranking positions.

The FEI Dressage World Ranking list can be found here.

Back-to-Back Win for Brilliant Belgians Puts Them Top of Division 1

Photo: Pieter Devos and Espoir. (FEI/Arnd Bronkhorst)

Germany finishes second in classic contest at Rotterdam; hosts share third place with USA and Switzerland

On a day of doubles, Team Belgium posted a back-to-back win in Europe Division 1 when coming out on top in the Longines FEI Jumping Nations Cup of The Netherlands in Rotterdam. There were seven double-clears in the gripping competition over a really testing course set by Ireland’s Alan Wade. And the man who clinched it for the Belgian side, 22-year-old Jos Verlooy riding Igor, had already scooped the honours in Friday’s Longines Grand Prix with his other top horse Caracas.

However, perhaps the most important double of all was the fact that this was only the second time in the 70-year history of CSIO Rotterdam for a Belgian side to take the Nations Cup honours. Their only previous victory was back in 1950, and they did it in great style, under pressure in front of a packed stadium, and under the watchful eye of Dutch royal family member, and former Queen, Princess Beatrix, when posting a zero scoreline.

The Belgians are the form team right now, and they know it. “Our horses and riders are very strong this year – we are working towards the WEG (FEI World Equestrian Games) in September and I think we can produce a great result there!” said Verlooy. And his Chef d’Equipe Peter Weinberg was thinking even further down the line, to the Longines FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ 2018 Final in Barcelona (ESP) in October.

“I have a team of unbelievable fighters and we are high on the points table now so we are looking good for the final!” — Peter Weinberg (Chef d’Equipe Team Belgium)

Alan Wade will be course designer at the WEG and the world’s best are very happy to get experience over his tracks. As always it was built to maximum height and he tested riders more than horses, demanding straightness, balance, control and complete concentration from start to finish.

Belgium and Germany shared the lead on a zero score at the end of the first round, with Switzerland and USA close behind each carrying just four faults and the hosts and Great Britain next in line with eight apiece. Sweden couldn’t recover from a 15-fault first-round effort, but although the French completed with 16 they, like the British, showed evidence of the development of a very exciting string of newcomers.

Mistakes from Marcus Ehning (Comme Il Faut) and Markus Beerbaum (Cool Hand Luke) undermined German chances, but a double-clear from pathfinder Nicola Philippaerts (24) with H&M Chilli Willi got the Belgians off to a great start in the second round. Niels Bruynseels’ (34) lovely mare Cas de Liberte was one of several horses to misinterpret the triple bar at fence three in round one, and they went on to collect an uncharacteristic 13 faults. But second time out they were pure perfection, so when Verlooy also left the course fully intact it was game over and Belgium’s second win in a week following success in Sopot (POL) last Sunday. Pieter Devos (32) who had stepped in to rescue the situation with a brilliant first-round clear from Espoir didn’t have to jump again.

Verlooy was thrilled to have been the one to seal this historic success and was quick to thank his long-time trainer and current world no. 1 rider, Dutchman Harrie Smolders.  “Harrie told me: don’t think about the result; think about jumping every fence correctly and only look at the result when you are over the finish line – stay focused on what you are doing all the way!” Verlooy explained.

Belgium has now overtaken Switzerland on the Europe Division 1 leaderboard with Germany in third, France in fourth, Spain in fifth and Sweden in sixth place. Italy, Ireland, Great Britain and Netherlands are sitting at the bottom of the table but they all have three more chances to dramatically improve their positions at the remaining Europe Division 1 legs in Falsterbo (SWE) and Hickstead (GBR) next month and in Dublin (IRL) where the last qualifier will take place on 10 August.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145

FEI Tribunal Issues Final Decisions on Autumn Crocus Cases

The FEI Tribunal has issued Final Decisions in two cases involving the prohibited substance Demecolcine after hearing that the presence of this substance can be the result of contamination due to the ingestion of the flower Colchicum Autumnale, commonly known as autumn crocus.

These cases involve the horses Inception 2 (FEI ID 105CF31) ridden by German athlete Felix Etzel (FEI ID 10031843) at the CCI1* in Wiener Neustadt, Milak (AUT) and Finest Quality V&K (FEI ID 105DG03) ridden by Lebanese athlete Emile Karim Fares (FEI ID 10005907) at the CSI3* in Eindhoven (NED). Samples were taken from both horses in May 2017.

Demecolcine, which was previously a Banned Substance* on the FEI Equine Prohibited Substances List, was reclassified as a Specified Substances** on 1 January 2018. There is no known use for Demecolcine in veterinary medicine and the alkaloids of the autumn crocus are all highly toxic.

The athletes were able to prove to the FEI Tribunal that the substance had entered the horses’ systems through ingesting hay that had been contaminated by autumn crocus.

The athletes also established that they bore no fault or negligence for the rule violation and, as a result, the Tribunal ruled that no further sanctions should be imposed, other than the automatic disqualification of the horse and athlete from the competitions.

The athletes have 21 days to appeal these decisions to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) from the date of notification, 20 July 2018.

FEI Prohibited Substances

The FEI’s Prohibited Substances List is divided into two sections – Controlled Medication and *Banned Substances. Controlled Medication substances are those that are regularly used to treat horses, but which must have been cleared from the horse’s system by the time of competition.

Banned (doping) Substances should never be found in the body of the horse. In the case of an adverse analytical finding for a Banned Substance, the Person Responsible (PR) is automatically provisionally suspended from the date of notification. The horse is suspended for two months.

**Specified Substances

The FEI introduced the concept of Specified Substances in 2016. Specified Substances should not in any way be considered less important or less dangerous than other Prohibited Substances. Rather, they are simply substances which are more likely to have been ingested by horses for a purpose other than the enhancement of sport performance, for example, through a contaminated food substance. In the case of a positive for a Specified Substance, provisional suspension is not automatic.

FEI Media Contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Press Relations
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 787 506 142

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145

Equestrian Driving Boosted with Allocation of Five Major Events

Photo: FEI/Richard Juilliart.

Equestrian Driving, the sport that combines athletic horses, daredevil drivers and state-of-the-art carriages, has been given a valuable boost today with the allocation of five major events over the next three years.

The showdown for the FEI Driving World Cup™ Final 2019, the culmination of tough global qualifiers broadcast on more than 40 television channels in 19 countries, will take place in the elegant French city of Bordeaux following allocation by the FEI Bureau.

“Driving is an exciting, high-octane sport and the crowds just love it,” FEI Driving Director Manuel Bandeira de Mello said. “Driving requires spectacular skills, the horses are clever and fast – the ultimate horsepower. This is all about precision at speed; it’s adrenaline-fueled and unbelievably electrifying.”

The FEI Bureau, the body responsible for the general direction of the International Equestrian Federation (FEI), also allocated four Driving Championships at World and European level in 2020 and 2021 to venues in the French Pyrenees and the Loire Valley, Mezőhegyes – home to Hungary’s state stud farm – and to Kronenberg in The Netherlands.

Close to nature

Nine other events were allocated by the FEI Bureau, including the FEI European Endurance Championship 2019, which will take place at Great Britain’s 200-acre Euston Park venue, set in Thetford Forest – the UK’s largest lowland pine area.

2019

  • FEI Driving World Cup™ Final – Bordeaux (FRA), 7-10 February
  • FEI European Endurance Championship – Euston Park (GBR), 15-18 August
  • FEI European Championships for Ponies (Jumping, Dressage & Eventing) – Strzegom (POL), 15-18 August

2020

  • FEI Jumping European Championship for Young Riders, Juniors and Children – Vilamoura (POR), 21-26 July
  • FEI Jumping European Championship for Veterans – Fontainebleau (FRA), 24-27 September
  • FEI Dressage European Championship for Young Riders & Juniors – Hartpury (GBR), 27 July – 2 August
  • FEI Eventing European Championship for Young Riders & Juniors – Hartpury (GBR), 27 July – 2 August
  • FEI Driving World Championship for Singles – Pau (FRA), 21-26 October
  • FEI Driving World Championship for Young Horses – Mezöhegyes (HUN), 10-13 September
  • FEI Driving European Championship for Young Drivers, Juniors & Children – Lamotte Beuvron (FRA), dates TBC
  • FEI Endurance World Championship for Young Horses – Madrid (ESP), 21-24 May or 4-7 June
  • FEI Endurance European Championship for Young Riders & Juniors – Vic (ESP), 25-27 September
  • FEI Vaulting European Championship for Juniors – Flyinge (SWE), 28 July – 2 August

2021

  • FEI Driving World Championship for Ponies – Kronenberg (NED), end August – mid September

Media contact:

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145

FEI Tribunal Issues Final Decision

Lausanne (SUI), 8 June 2018 – The FEI Tribunal has issued its Final Decision in a case involving Ergonovine, a *Banned Substance under the FEI’s Equine Anti-Doping and Controlled Medication Regulations (EADCMRs).

Uruguayan Endurance athlete Victoria Goñi (FEI ID 10042167) has been suspended for two years following the adverse analytical finding in samples taken from the horse El Mate (FEI ID 104XI43/URU) at the CEI2* 120 in Trinidad (URU) on 4 February 2017.

The athlete has been provisionally suspended since 5 April 2017, the date of notification of the positive result and, following the Final Decision, the period of ineligibility will run through to 4 April 2019.

The athlete has also been fined 3,000 CHF and will contribute 1,500 CHF towards the cost of the judicial procedure.

The Decision can be appealed before the Court of Arbitration for Sport within 21 days from the date the decision was rendered/notified (7 June 2017).

FEI Prohibited Substances

The FEI’s Prohibited Substances List is divided into two sections – Controlled Medication and *Banned Substances. Controlled Medication substances are those that are regularly used to treat horses, but which must have been cleared from the horse’s system by the time of competition.

Banned (doping) Substances should never be found in the body of the horse. In the case of an adverse analytical finding for a Banned Substance, the Person Responsible (PR) is automatically provisionally suspended from the date of notification. The horse is suspended for two months.

FEI Media Contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Press Relations
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 787 506 142

Ruth Grundy
Manager Press Relations
Email: ruth.grundy@fei.org
Tel: +41 787 506 145

Settlements Agreed in Three Human Anti-Doping Cases

Lausanne (SUI), 28 May 2018 – The FEI Tribunal has ratified agreements in three human anti-doping cases between the athletes and the FEI, global governing body for equestrian sport.

The three US athletes, who were tested at the Ocala-Reddick CCI in Florida (USA) last November, were provisionally suspended from 21 December 2017, the date of notification of their adverse analytical findings under the FEI Anti-Doping Rules for Human Athletes (ADRHA).

Samples taken from the athletes – Alyssa Phillips (FEI ID 10047498), Hannah Burnett (FEI ID 10007210), and Jennie Brannigan (FEI ID: 10013055) – all returned positive for Amfetamine. In addition, Alyssa Phillips’ sample contained Canrenone, and the sample taken from Jennie Brannigan also included Methylphenidate and Ritalinic Acid.

Under the terms of the settlements, a one-year period of ineligibility will be imposed on the athletes from the date of sample collection, 18 November 2017. The athletes will each pay a fine of CHF 1,500, and their results from the competition will be disqualified. Each of the parties will bear their own legal costs.

Additionally, the athletes are required to support the FEI in its anti-doping campaign and to actively engage in athlete education, including providing testimonials for FEI education material. And the athletes must complete an anti-doping education course within one year of the FEI Tribunal’s final decision.

“All three athletes were able to prove no significant fault or negligence and the circumstances of the cases show that none of them had the intention to dope,” FEI Legal Director Mikael Rentsch said. “In light of this, and the fact that the athletes have subsequently been granted Therapeutic Use Exemptions for these medications, the parties agreed that the period of ineligibility should be reduced to 12 months, and the FEI Tribunal has approved that.”

In accordance with the WADA Code, the FEI has notified WADA and the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) of the FEI Tribunal decisions.

The full decisions are available here.

The FEI is part of the collaborative worldwide movement for doping-free sport led by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). The aim of this movement is to protect fair competition as well as athlete health and welfare.

WADA’s Prohibited List identifies the substances and methods prohibited in- and out-of-competition, and in particular sports. The substances and methods on the List are classified by different categories (e.g., steroids, stimulants, gene doping).

The List comes into effect on 1 January of each year.

As a WADA Code Signatory, the FEI runs a testing programme for human athletes based on WADA’s List of Prohibited List of Substances and Methods and on the Code-compliant FEI Anti-Doping Rules for Human Athletes (ADRHA).

For further information, please consult the Clean Sport section of the FEI website here.

Media contacts:

Grania Willis
Director Communications
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 42

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Oliver Townend Is New Number One in FEI World Eventing Rankings

Photo © Michelle Dunn.

Oliver Townend (GBR) is eventing’s new world number one, taking over from longtime leader Michael Jung (GER).

Jung, reigning Olympic champion, has held top spot since the middle of 2015, but he has now been replaced by 35-year-old Townend following his thrilling victory at the Lexington (USA) CCI4* last weekend.

Townend (35) was briefly world number one in 2009 – a stellar year for him when he won the Badminton (GBR) CCI4* and Burghley (GBR) CCI4* titles – and he now reclaims top spot.

And it comes on the eve of this year’s Badminton, where a Townend victory would see him emulate Jung and Pippa Funnell (GBR) in winning the Rolex Grand Slam for consecutive victories at Burghley, Kentucky and Badminton.

“It’s very good. I like the sound of that!” said Townend, following release of the latest FEI World Eventing Rankings.

“It has been a while. I only had a fleeting spell as number one once upon a time, and especially to knock someone off who has been there for so long is very, very good.”

Jung, who was runner-up to Townend at Lexington, is now at number two, just one ranking point behind, with Tim Price (NZL) third, Gemma Tattersall (GBR) fourth and Ros Canter (GBR) fifth.

FEI Media Contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager Press Relations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46