Category Archives: Associations/Breeds

Budweiser Clydesdales Will Lead Military Bowl Parade Once Again in 2021

The Military Bowl Foundation announced that the world-famous Budweiser Clydesdales will continue their tradition of headlining the gameday Military Bowl Parade from Downtown Annapolis to Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium, prior to the 2021 Military Bowl presented by Peraton, benefiting the USO, on Monday, December 27.

This year’s Military Bowl Parade steps off at City Dock at 10 a.m. ET and proceed through historic downtown along Main Street and West Street en route to the stadium. Admission to the parade is free.

The parade annually attracts thousands of spectators lining the streets of Annapolis to view a wide variety of groups participating in the parade. The parade also features several Recipients of the Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest military honor presented for personal acts of valor above and beyond the call of duty.

A color guard will lead the procession, followed by the Budweiser Clydesdales, musical groups, civic organizations, military-themed groups, and youth clubs, including Anne Arundel Youth Football Association (AAYFA) championship teams. (The Bowl invites AAYFA championship teams to participate in the parade and receive complimentary game tickets each year.) Each team participating in the Military Bowl will be represented by its marching band and spirit squad.

“The Military Bowl Parade is an annual tradition bringing together residents who live nearby and football fans who travel to the National Capital Region to cheer on their teams,” Military Bowl President & Executive Director Steve Beck said. “It is a special moment when the Parade starts and groups begin making their way through historic downtown to the stadium. The Military Bowl is very appreciative of our partners at Katcef Brothers Inc., who arrange the participation of the Budweiser Clydesdales.”

This year’s Military Bowl presented by Peraton, benefiting the USO, will be held on Monday, December 27, kicking off at 2:30 p.m. ET and televised on ESPN. The game once again will match teams from the Atlantic Coast Conference and the American Athletic Conference. Proceeds from the Bowl benefit the USO and Patriot Point, the Military Bowl Foundation’s retreat for wounded, ill and injured service members, their families, and caregivers.

About the Author – EOA Staff

Eye On Annapolis is a community-based site focusing strictly on Anne Arundel County. These staff postings are general news postings made by our team of bloggers throughout the day and are not attributed to any one particular staff person.

www.eyeonannapolis.net

Breeders Uncovered with Keeley Durham

(Photo: Keeley Durham)

What is the proudest moment of your career so far, either in riding, equestrian, or breeding?

I have been fortunate to have had some amazing moments in my career thus far. In terms of my riding career, I have a few proudest moments, including winning the Young Riders class at the Horse of the Year Show in 1991 and being part of the Young Rider Team that won gold at the 1992 European Championships in San Remo on Welham. As an owner, Welham was an amazing horse; after my career with him, he went on to compete with John Whitaker and won so many classes. His biggest achievement was winning the Grand Prix at CHIO Aachen. Then as a breeder, it definitely has to be breeding Argento.

How did you get into the breeding side of the sport?

When John [Whitaker] was riding Welham, we were once down at Nick Skeleton’s yard and he suggested that I should get a broodmare and start producing more young horses. I thought this was a great idea, but I did not really act upon the idea until about two months later when John asked me to go and collect something for his cattle from a local farmer, and I ended up coming back with a two-year-old mare named Flora May. We bred from her aged three, before we broke her in and it all really started from there. After her first foal we jumped her for a little while before she had her second foal – which ended up being Argento.

Did anyone mentor you on how to breed successfully?

I never really had a mentor – I go mainly off instinct and gut feeling. But now, I spend more time looking at the pedigree of the horses than I used to when I first started.

Read more here.

© 2021 Rolex – Rolex Grand Slam

OS and Holsteiner Mares Claim 2021 Titles

Kevin McNab and Cute Girl. (FEI/Libby Law)

Mares topped both divisions at this year’s FEI WBFSH Eventing World Breeding Championships for Young Horses 2021 at Lion d’Angers in France, where Germany’s Anna Lena Schaaf steered the OS studbook’s Lagona 4 to victory in the 6-Year-Olds, while Australia’s Kevin McNab and the Holsteiner, Cute Girl, topped the 7-Year-Old category.

The hugely popular event, which is designed to help develop future stars, attracted a massive 40,000 spectators along with many of the world’s best Eventing athletes and super-talented young horses once again.

6-Year-Olds

Anna Lena Schaaf only turned 20 in August, but she already has a reputation for producing quality horses, and with Lagona 4 (Lavagon/Ile de Cartina/Cartani 4) she led the 6-Year-Olds from start to finish. Posting 25.8 in the Dressage phase, the pair had a narrow advantage of just 0.7 penalties over Thomas Carlile and the mare Fair Lady des Bourcks in second.

Fellow Frenchman Nicolas Touzaint was lying third with another Selle Francais, the gelding Fibonacci de Lessac HDC, who was awarded a score of 26.8 by judges Nice Attolico Guglielmi (ITA), Xavier Le Sauce (FRA) and Nikki Herbert (GBR), while newly-crowned Olympic individual Eventing champion Julia Krajewski from Germany was lying fourth with the Hanoverian gelding Chintonic 3 on a score of 27.9 going into Saturday’s cross-country phase.

A total of 46 starters set off over the 22-fence cross-country track and three were eliminated while one retired, but the top six places remained unchanged.

Schaaf said, “It’s still a really crazy feeling being in the lead in such a good competition! It was great riding the cross-country today; my horse was really focused and I had the feeling she really enjoyed the crowd so I’m super excited for tomorrow! Usually she is a great showjumper but we have to see… maybe she will be a little bit tired after the cross-country but I’m looking forward to it.”

As it happened, Lagona was foot-perfect once again to leave the final result beyond doubt. But three fences down saw Thomas Carlile and Fair Lady des Broucks plummet to 17th place, so when Touzaint was clear, he rose to runner-up spot. Meanwhile, a single error saw Krajewski and Chintonic drop from fourth to fifth and two new names appeared at the top of the final leaderboard.

Bounced up

Rebecca Chiappero was lying 14th with the Irish Sport Horse Bonmahon Chelsea after dressage, but bounced up to tenth on Saturday after a brilliant cross-country clear. When the pair collected just 0.8 for time in an otherwise flawless showjumping round, their final tally of 31.7 saw the Italian rider stand on the third step of the podium. Fourth went to Australia’s Isabel English and the ACE-bred Cil Dara Dallas who were ninth after dressage, eighth after a clear cross-country run, and who moved up four places when collecting just two time faults.

This win adds yet another gold medal to the collection Schaaf has already accumulated. It’s only five years since she won double-gold at the FEI Eventing European Pony Championships in 2016; she was a double-gold medallist again in Juniors in 2019 and she claimed team gold and individual silver at this summer’s Young Riders European Eventing Championships in Sweden.

She was delighted for her winning mare: “Like yesterday, she was focused and concentrated, and in the end she really enjoyed the galloping around after the prizegiving and listening to everybody screaming. I think she felt ‘Yes! I’m the best!’”

Also happy was Schaaf’s former trainer at Junior level, Julia Krajewski, who sees big things ahead for her former student. “Anna Lena is an excellent rider as she has proven this weekend, and last weekend when she won her first 4* event. The German team always needs new talent, particularly those who are capable of training young horses,” said the Olympic champion.

7-Year-Olds

In the 7-Year-Old division Australia’s Kevin McNab and Cute Girl (Coventry/Caligula/Clearway) also took the early lead and didn’t let go. Judges Emmanuelle Olier (FRA), Katarzyna Konarska (POL), and James Rooney (IRL) scored their test at 26.9, and they added nothing over the following two phases.

Also competing on their dressage score were second-placed Laura Collett and the Trakehner, Outback, whose dressage mark of 27.2 left them only fractionally ahead of British compatriot Hayden Hankey and Heads Up on 27.4, while yet another of the British contingent, Selina Milnes, was lying fourth with the Irish-bred Cooley Snapchat on 27.5 going into cross-country day – just 0.6 penalty points separating the leading four.

It was a star-studded line-up after dressage, 43-year-old McNab a member of the Australian silver medal winning team at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games where 32-year-old Collett claimed team gold, while 42-year-old Hankey is one of the best-known and successful show-horse competitors on the British circuit.

His versatile Irish Sport Horse, Heads Up, was Working Hunter champion at the Horse of the Year Show in 2019 and finished second in the British 7-Year-Old Eventing Championship at Osberton this year. But the pair paid a big price when just over the cross-country optimum time of 9’ 04”, which left them with two time penalties and dropped them to overnight ninth place.

A total of 58 combinations headed out on the cross-country track in the 7-Year-Old championship and five were eliminated, while three retired and just 13 made it home within the optimum time.

McNab had every reason to get it absolutely right. A year ago, he and Cute Girl were eliminated in the 6-Year-Old Championship when missing a fence, but this time the pair cruised home and maintained their lead.

Surprised

“I was actually surprised I didn’t lose more time towards the end, so I came in a little bit quicker than I’d planned. But the round felt really good; she was really solid and she’s matured a lot from last year,” he said.

Collett was equally pleased after her cross-country run. “I’m very, very happy; he was a bit scared of the crowds, but he stayed very honest and kept answering the questions. It’s an awful lot for them to come here if they don’t have much experience and to see so many people and the fences. They are very beautiful and well-built but they are quite spooky for the horses, so it was a very educational day and I’m delighted with him,” she said after galloping home comfortably within the time with Outback.

“It’s such a big atmosphere here and tomorrow is another day and hopefully he comes out feeling well. He’s already exceeded all our expectations this week; he has performed brilliantly and fingers crossed he can do the same tomorrow.” And he did, leaving all the poles in place in the final phase while McNab’s Cute Girl did likewise.

Milnes added 0.8 time penalties to her tally, but still held on for third ahead of compatriots Gemma Tattersall with Johan-Some in fourth and Hankey who climbed back up to fifth when adding only 0.4 for time. British riders filled all the places from second to seventh, and the most prolific studbook in the top-seven was the ISH, taking third, fifth, sixth, and seventh spots.

But the Holsteiner, Cute Girl, was the golden girl, and after numerous attempts to make the podium at this prestigious fixture, McNab was plenty pleased with his result.

Great event

“Le Lion is one of those events we always love coming to, and it’s great when you are at this step of the podium, but at the same time it’s always a great event regardless. It’s great for the horses looking towards their future and even if we weren’t winning, we still enjoy it,” he said.

Collett said that in the final showjumping phase, “The time was very tight and the atmosphere in there was like a Championship, like a Badminton; these young horses haven’t experienced that, so I’m so proud of my horse!”

She echoed the sentiments of many when showering praise on the event organisers. “A massive thank you to the team at Le Lion. Every year they put on a phenomenal event and it’s so important for these young horses to bring them to a place like this – it’s a real honour to be here,” she said.

Results here

by Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager, Media Relations & Media Operations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Dutch and Danish Stallions Steal the Show

The KWPN stallion Jovian with Denmark’s Andreas Helgstrand on board. (FEI/Leanjo de Koster)

Stallions from the KWPN studbook claimed both the 6 and 7-Year-Old titles while a Danish Warmblood was crowned 5-Year-Old champion at the FEI WBFSH Dressage World Breeding Championship for Young Horses, which returned to Verden in Germany for the 2021 edition from 24 to 29 August.

6-Year-Olds

Tokyo 2020 Olympic team bronze medallist, Great Britain’s Charlotte Fry, posted 94.000% in Wednesday’s 6-Year-Old qualifier with the KWPN stallion Kjento (Negro x Jazz), earning 10s for both trot and canter, and the pair never looked back. In Saturday’s Final they shone even brighter, with judges Peter Storr (GBR), Adriaan F. Hamoen (NED), Maria Colliander (FIN), and Jean-Michel Roudier (FRA) awarding them gold with a score of 96.000. Kjento earned 10s for trot, canter, submission, and perspective.

Silver went to the Rheinlander stallion Escamillo (Escolar x Rohdiamant) ridden by Spain’s Manuel Dominguez Bernal who posted 93.4%, while the Hanoverian gelding For Magic Equesta (For Romance OLD x Jungle Prince) scored 86.4 for bronze with Poland’s Beata Stremler in the saddle.

Fry is no stranger to success in these Championships, taking the 7-Year-Old title with Glamourdale in Ermelo (NED) in 2018, and in Gert-Jan Van Olst’s Kjento she has found another exceptional ride. “When I got all those 10s, I got very emotional, and it is thrilling to see that everyone sees the same quality as we do. He felt his best ever, and I don’t know how to describe this horse – if you look up the word power, he is it!” she said.

Judge Jean-Michel Roudier praised the quality of both the horses and horsemanship he witnessed.

“The improvement in breeding and riding is incredible over the last years. The winner Kjento was a happy horse like all the three medallists – a happy horse means wonderful training and it gives a wonderful willingness in the horse.” — Jean-Michel Roudier

5-Year-Olds

Germany’s Eva Moller had a sensational day in the 5-Year-Old Qualifier on Thursday when steering the Hanoverian stallion, Danciero 7 (Dancier x Fuechtels Floriscount), into pole position and the Oldenburg stallion Global Player OLD (Grand Galaxy Win T x Blue Hors Don Schufro) into third. Sandwiched in between these two was the KWPN mare Lightning Star (Ferguson x De Niro) ridden by The Netherlands Kristen Brouwer.

Danciero 7, owned by Helgestrand/Schockemohle, scored 96.600, Lightning Star posted 95.200% and Global Player OLD was awarded 95.000%.

But in Sunday’s medal decider it was the Danish Warmblood stallion Hasselhoej Down Town (Hasselhoej Donkey Boy x Blue Hors Zack), ridden by Sweden’s Jeanna Hogberg, who grabbed the gold with an amazing score of 97.000%. The pair had finished fourth in the opening competition three days earlier, but with 10s for trot and perspective, and 9.5s for walk, canter, and submission, this time they left the rest in their wake. Danciero 7 had to settle for silver with 96.600% while Lightning Star took the bronze with 92.8%. Moller’s second ride, Global Player OLD, just missed out on the podium when earning a mark of 92.600%.

Hasselhoej Down Town was real crowd pleaser. “When I got him, everyone said he’s so cute and he really is, but he’s also a really fantastic horse!” Hogberg said. “I have a great team behind me and I have a lot of support from Andreas (Helgstrand), and I think today it was a matter of riding a really solid test without faults and at the same time showing the best of the horse, and he really stayed with me,” she explained.

“He was a bit surprised by the environment on the first day, but today he was much more relaxed,” Hogberg said. However, she pointed out that the young stallion is no pushover. “He’s also the only horse at Helgstrand that I have fallen off!” she added with a laugh.

Brouwer was delighted with bronze for the mare Lightning Star. “I’ve been riding Lily a long time and know her well but of course with Corona I didn’t get the chance to show her a lot. But she makes me every day happy, also here; she’s always fresh and willing to work. Today maybe there was a bit more tension because there was a lot of applause when you were warming up. But she’s only five and has a great future. I hope I can ride her a lot longer,” the Dutch athlete said.

7-Year-Olds

The last Championship to be decided was the 7-Year-Olds, and Danish riders completely dominated the podium, but it was the KWPN stallion Jovian (Apache x Tango) who claimed the title with Andreas Helgstrand on board.

The Helgstrand name was all over these Championships as owners, sponsors, riders, and producers of top-class Dressage horses, and in Friday’s qualifier, Andreas steered Jovian to victory ahead of the Danish Warmblood stallion Elverhøjs Raccolto (Sezuan 2 x Sandro Hit) ridden by his wife Marianne Yde Helgstrand.

The Hanoverian stallion Quando Unico (Quantensprung 3 x Fidertanz 2), partnered by Australia’s Simone Pearce, lined up in third while Andreas Helgstrand also finished fourth with the Danish Warmblood mare Queenpark Wendy (Sezuan 2 x Blue Hors Soprano). But in Sunday’s final, only Jovian stood his ground.

A mark of 89.136 from judges Sharon Rhode (RSA), Ulrike Nivelle (GER), Maria Colliander (FIN), Mariette Sanders van Gansewinkel (NED), and Kurt Christensen (DEN) gave Jovian the title, while silver went to the Danish Warmblood gelding Blue Hors Touch of Olympic L (Don Olymbrio x Fidermark) who posted 83.965 with Denmark’s Nanna Skodborg Merrald on board. And the third Dane on the podium was Anne-Mette Strandby Hansen, who steered the Westphalian gelding Eternity 75 (Escolar x Sir Donnerhal) to a score of 83.75% to pin Pearce and Quando Unico back into fourth place.

“To win with Jovian is special; he is my favourite horse. He is a PR machine for us, and he will have a lot of very nice foals coming up,” said Helgstrand.

Nanna Skodborg Merrald was very pleased to take silver for the Danish Warmblood studbook. “We have had so many good horses for DWB and it is good to give back,” she said. She’s been riding Blue Hors Touch of Olympic L since he was a four-year-old and is looking forward to watching him develop. “I will go into small tour shows with him now, I think he is a future Grand Prix horse,” she added.

And Anne-Mette Skodborg Hansen had every reason to be pleased with Eternity 75 because she’s only been riding him for two months. “Cathrine Dufour trained him and this is my first competition with him!” she said after collecting 7-Year-Old bronze.

Reflecting on another great FEI WBFSH Dressage World Breeding Championship for Young Horses, German judge Ulrike Nivelle commented that this year “we saw huge quality and the level is much better than before, both in breeding and riding. We saw more harmony and softer riding,” she concluded.

Results here.

by Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager, Media Relations & Media Operations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46+

Whistle Stop Cafe Is Named 2020 World Champion Racing American Quarter Horse

Whistle Stop Cafe has been named the 2020 World Champion Racing American Quarter Horse, joining only Laico Bird before her as a 2-year-old filly who earned the world champion title.

Laico Bird earned her title in 1967. This past year, Whistle Stop Cafe was undefeated in six starts, earning $1,974,986. She was also the champion 2-year-old and champion 2-year-old filly.

Owners Whitmire Ranch of Sallisaw, Oklahoma bought her for a mere $42,000 as a yearling, and trainer Blane Wood and jockey Ricky Ramirez guided the filly to win her Heritage Place Futurity (G1) trial and the Heritage Place Juvenile. She then travelled to Ruidoso, where she won her trial and the final of the $1 million Rainbow Futurity (G1), and went on to win her trial and the final of the $3 million All American Futurity (G1).

Whistle Stop Cafe was bred by Bobby D. Cox and is by Freighttrain B and out of the Mr Jess Perry mare Sinuous.

The champion 2-year-old colt is Dulce Sin Tacha, who won five of six starts and earned $518,403 for breeders and owners Bob and Jerry Gaston. Dulce Sin Tacha is by Jess Good Candy and out of the Tempting Dash mare Prissy Sin Tacha. Trained by Heath Taylor and ridden by Rodrigo Vallejo, his year was led by a victory in the $1,031,211 Texas Classic Futurity (G1).

Apollitical Gold took his run everywhere he went to earn his champion 2-year-old gelding title. Racing for breeder Grant R. Cox Revocable Trust, the son of Apollitical Jess out of SRC Gold by PYC Paint Your Wagon won four of nine starts, with two seconds and three thirds. He earned $972,659. His key efforts included a victory in the Golden State Million Futurity (G1) and third-place finishes in the All American Futurity (G1) and Los Alamitos Two Million Futurity (G1). He was trained by Eddie Willis and was ridden by Justine Klaiber, Jimmy Brooks, and Cody Smith.

Supreme Race Horse Danjer was named the champion aged horse and champion aged gelding after a year that saw him win four of six starts and earn $326,061. The 4-year-old gelding, by FDD Dynasty and out of the Take Off Jess mare Shez Jess Toxic, was bred by Dean Frey and is owned by Frey, Downtime Enterprises LLC, and Billy Smith. Danjer’s Grade 1 wins include The Downs at Albuquerque Championship and the Bank of America Challenge Championship. He was trained by Dean Frey and ridden by Cody Smith.

The champion aged stallion is Eagles Fly Higher, a 4-year-old stallion by One Famous Eagle and out of the First Down Dash mare Lone Bet. Bred by V. H. Harman Jr. and Robert Moudy III, he is owned by Darling Farms, and won three of eight starts, with three additional placings and earnings of $209,973. He won the Sooner State Stakes (RG1), Eastex Stakes (G2), and Bank of America Prairie Meadows Championship Challenge (G2), in addition to two additional Grade 1 placings. He was trained by Casey Black and Jaime Gomez, and was ridden by Mario Delgado, Cristian Esqueda, Agustin Silva, and Jesus Ayala.

Michael Pohl and Martin Stacy’s homebred Curls Happy Wagon is the champion aged mare. She won half of her six starts during the year, earning $145,822, and won the Mildred N. Vessels Memorial Handicap (G1), Las Damas Handicap (G2), and Decketta Stakes (G2). The 5-year-old mare is by PYC Paint Your Wagon and out of the Spit Curl Jess mare Eye A Spit Curl Girl. She was trained by Stacy Charette-Hill and Juan Aleman and ridden by Armando Cervantes and Jorge Torres.

Tell Cartel made the most starts of any champion during the year, winning half of his 10 starts, with three additional placings, and earning $717,751 while earning the titles of champion 3-year-old and champion 3-year-old colt. Racing for breeder and owner Martha Wells, the Favorite Cartel colt out of the Chicks Beduino mare Chicks Tell won the Los Alamitos Winter Derby (G1), Los Alamitos Super Derby (G1), and El Primero Del Ano Derby (G3), and he was second in the Champion of Champions (G1). He was trained by Matt Fales, and ridden by Ruben Lozano, Eduardo Nicasio, and Jesus Ayala.

CERs Final Try honors the memory of his late breeder, Charles E. Robinson, as he is named the champion 3-year-old gelding. Racing for Christina Robinson, CERs Final Try won four of seven starts and earned three additional placings, earning $581,182. His achievements include a victory in the Rainbow Derby (G1) and placings in the Ruidoso Derby (G1) and All American Derby (G1). He is by One Dashing Eagle and out of the Corona Cartel mare BP Shes All Corona. He was trained by Tony Sedillo and ridden by Alfredo Sigala and Manuel Gutierrez.

The daughter of Apollitical Jess out of the First Down Dash mare Shesa First Ratify, Ratification is the champion 3-year-old filly. She races for her breeder Bobby D. Cox and won five of seven starts with one second-place finish and earned $327,308. She won the $315,739 Rainbow Oaks and $421,326 All American Oaks. She was trained by John Buchanan and Juan Vazquez, and was ridden by Francisco Calderon, Esgar Ramirez, and Agustin Silva.

The 2014 gelding Madewell is honored as the 2020 champion distance horse. He is a homebred for Ray L. and Davy Madewell, and won four of seven starts, with two additional placings, and earnings of $102,618. He is sired by Jess Jones and out of the A Streak Of Cash mare Streakin Peacock. His wins include the Cox Ranch Distance Challenge Championship (G1) and the AQHA Downs at Albuquerque Distance Challenge (G2). He was trained by Bernard Baca, and ridden by Benito Baca, Jorge Bourdieu, and Stormy Smith.

Freshman Eyesa Timber is the Canadian champion. Bred and raced by Wesley T. Oulton, the Alberta-bred gelding is by First Timber and out of the Mr Jess Perry mare Eyesa Perry. He began his year racing in the United States before returning home, where at Century Mile he won the Alberta-bred Futurity and Canada Cup Futurity (G3). He won four of seven starts, with two second-place finishes, and earned $56,491. The horse was trained by Wesley Oulton and Durk Peery, and ridden by J. Botello, Jose Rocha, and Jose Vega.

Cuadra La Presita saw its homebred Juanito Y Danny win three of four starts, earning $152,310, to be named the Mexican champion. The 2018 gelding by Danny Cartel is out of the Ought To Be First mare Toles. He won the Subasta Selecta Futurity (RG3) and was third in the Garanones Futurity (RG3). The horse was trained by Ismael Ayala and ridden by Yair Daniel Baez, L. Vidana and Jose Angel Ambrosio.

The South American champion is Fantastic Fly Apollo, a 2017 colt racing for breeder Ademir Jose Rorato. The horse won six of eight starts, with two seconds, and earned $66,861. His wins include the Campeao Dos Campeoes, Brasil II Triplice Coroa, and Sorocaba Futurity. He is by Fantastic Corona Jr and out of the Eyesa Special mare Flyapolloeyesa BR. He was trained by Rivail Rosa and ridden by B. Guimaraes and J. Santana.

American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame horseman Bobby D. Cox earns his third champion breeder title, as his horses earned more than $2.4 million more than any other breeder. Included among them are world champion Whistle Stop Cafe and champion Ratification. California horsewoman Martha Wells saw her horses, which include champion Tell Cartel, win at a 14% clip, and she is named the champion owner. Trainer Eddie Willis earned his first nod as the Blane Schvaneveldt champion trainer, with earnings of more than $2.7 million in the year, including champion Apollitical Gold. James A. Flores is the champion jockey for the second consecutive year, with earnings of more than $3.5 million.

For more information on AQHA racing, visit www.aqha.com/racing.

Racing Special Achievement Winners

Each year, the American Quarter Horse Association recognizes the hard work of several individuals in the racing industry. For 2020, the John Andreini Special Recognition Award goes to Dr. Charles Graham of Elgin, Texas; the Mildred N. Vessels Special Achievement Award to Betty Raper of Norman, Oklahoma; and the Gordon Crone Special Achievement Award to Matt Vance of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Dr. Charles Graham is a member of the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame. The respected Texas horseman is known as a veterinarian, a horseman, and an influential voice in governance and political matters that benefit the horse industry.

He founded the Elgin Veterinary Clinic and Southwest Stallion Station, is a co-owner of Heritage Place Sale Co., and has numerous other businesses, including a 30,000-head feedyard. He was influential in getting Texas pari-mutual legislation passed, and in 2019 was instrumental in assisting with the passage of Texas legislation that boosted purses and significantly benefitted Quarter Horse racing in the state.

Dr. Graham is an AQHA director-at-large and has served on the AQHA Equine Research Committee.

Mildred N. Vessels Special Achievement winner Betty Raper has dedicated herself to the industry and is best known as the co-owner of Belle Mere Farm at Norman, Oklahoma. She and husband Dee stood legendary stallions Easy Jet, Mr Eye Opener, and Bully Bullion. Belle Mere was inducted into the Oklahoma Quarter Horse Association Hall of Fame in 2019.

As the vice president of racing operations at Remington Park, Matt Vance was instrumental in helping the Oklahoma City racetrack operate during the earliest months of the COVID-19 pandemic. For that, Vance earns the Gordon Crone Special Achievement Award. The racetrack not only operated through its season; it also shattered records with a 271.8 increase in pari-mutual handle and helped introduce people all over the world to American Quarter Horse racing.

For more information on AQHA racing, visit www.aqha.com/racing.

Racing Identification and Tattooing Fee

The American Quarter Horse Association is the largest single-breed association in the world and strives for excellence as a breed registry. As part of this endeavor, the AQHA Executive Committee and AQHA leadership are committed to maintaining financial transparency and making important business decisions that are essential to current and future business needs, while delivering the best services to our members and horse lovers around the world. AQHA must continue to reduce expenses, maximize resources, and drive efficiency, and fees must reflect the services provided to our members. These factors are essential to continue to be a financially healthy Association.

As part of this process, the Executive Committee has approved a fee increase for racing identification and tattooing that will go into effect on January 15. The updated rate is $120.

Racing identification via permanent tattoo is an effective way to ensure integrity at the racetrack and identify horses. Trained professionals identify the animals and apply the tattoo, which is duly recorded by AQHA. This tattoo is checked before every race to protect both horsemen and the wagering public.

All fees are kept as low as possible in order to be cost effective for AQHA members. These fees are used to help the Association maintain its commitment for recording the pedigrees and performance records of its horses, promotion of the breed and its sports, and maintaining the integrity of the horse.

For more information on AQHA racing, visit www.aqha.com/racing.

IHSA Western Riders Shine at APHA World Championships

Nigel Lancaster aboard Tinselena Spark during the run-off round. Photo by EQ Media.

Fairfield, Conn. – Oct. 01, 2020 – Twelve Intercollegiate Horse Shows Association (IHSA) Western High-Point Open riders took to the world stage in the IHSA Invitational Class held Sept. 29, during the American Paint Horse Association (APHA) World Championship Horse Show in Fort Worth, Texas. Nigel Lancaster from Hilliard, Ohio came away as champion after showcasing his skills in both the reining and horsemanship phases.

“The IHSA High Point Rider Versatility Championship was a huge success today just because it gave us a chance to highlight the best of the best that were shortchanged during the 2020 season,” said Amanda Ellis, IHSA Western Committee chair. “Not only did we have great horses given to us by the exhibitors at the World Show, but the caliber of riding was phenomenal.”

Ellis explained that with many member schools in the country not able to compete now due to COVID-19, she hopes they were able to watch the live stream and are excited and inspired for spring.

The class began with each of the 12 riders performing the reining pattern. The judges rewarded consistent riding on two different mounts and scores were tight after the initial round of competition, with the top three spots bringing in scores above 145.00 points. Lancaster and Ashton Knerr from Plain City, Ohio secured the top two spots with a tied score.

Lancaster rode to duplicate scores of 73.5, aboard Gunnataxya, owned by Deb Oneguard, for a total first-round score of 147.00 points. Knerr piloted Tinselena Spark to scores of 75.5 and 71.5, tying Lancaster’s score of 147.00. Hart Daniels, hailing from Vaughan, Mississippi, took third place on Starlight Driver (Hydrive Cat x Starlights Lynn), owned by Kelsey Delaplaine, just one point behind with 146.00 points.

Then it was time to switch mounts for the horsemanship phase. Riders showcased their abilities on the flat at the walk, jog, and lope both with and without stirrups. Competitors then piloted their mounts through a pattern demonstrating a smooth, effortless ride.

Grand Island, Nebraska native Matthew ‘Matt’ Graves rode to the win in the horsemanship phase. His consistent and polished riding aboard the 17-year-old paint gelding He Thinks He’s Special or “Eddy,” (Special Invitation x Zippos Gold Model), owned by Ryan Urech, stood out among the field. Travis Fortune from Booneville, Indiana took the second spot with A Krymsun Legacy (One Hot Krymsun x Zippos Satin N Lace), owned by Darcie Winiewicz, and Lancaster on Sensational Effects, owned by Amanda Bennet, rounding out the top three.

Knerr and Lancaster, who grew up riding together at Ollie and Debbie Griffith’s Autumn Rose Farm in Delaware, Ohio, rode the reining pattern once more to determine the overall class champion.

“Those two riders have been riding reining horses since they were 7 years old and they’re best of friends, they live within 15 minutes of each other,” said Ollie Griffith, IHSA National Associate Steward. “They’re just amazing. One went to the University of Findlay. One went to Ohio State. And it just couldn’t be better for us.”

Aboard Tinselena Spark (Tin Tin), Lancaster rode the final pattern in beautiful style earning the high score of 148.50. Lancaster’s third-place performance in the horsemanship phase helped secure the championship title.

Lancaster’s winning mount Tin Tin, an 11-year-old Quarter Horse mare (Tinsel Nic x Smart Sparkalena) owned by John McDaniel and handled by Cathy Luse, was awarded the High Point Horse title.

“I love how the two organizations came together and collaborated on this,” said Lancaster. “It’s really nice because we had to cancel the fall season and it was a great way to come and show together.”

Knerr rode the 5-year-old Quarter Horse gelding Gunnataxya (Gunnatrashya x Sannie Shine) for her run-off round. Her consistency in the saddle earned her a run-off score of 146.5 and a fourth place in horsemanship aboard Original Barbie, owned by Chris Russell, taking home the overall reserve call.

For more information, go to IHSAinc.com or contact media@IHSAinc.com.

Paso Finos Keep This 80-Year-Old Amateur Rider in the Competition Ring

Dick Miller and Torbellino de Madrigal at the 2020 PFHA Grand National Championship Show (Cody Parmenter Photography)

Dick Miller, the Paso Fino Horse Association’s newest Hall of Fame inductee, was first introduced to the Paso Fino breed in the 1980s when he saw a sign on Interstate 80 in Nebraska advertising the “SMOOTHEST RIDING HORSE IN THE WORLD.” Nearly 40 years later, Miller (Fort Myers, Fla.) is not only still riding, but is also competing at top horse shows around the country, thanks to these unique horses and the tight-knit community of people who love them.

Though he grew up riding working ranch horses, Quarter Horses, Missouri Fox Trotters, and off-the-track Standardbreds, Miller was hooked on the spirit and smooth, lateral gait of the Paso Fino breed almost immediately. He visited the farm advertised on the highway sign and purchased the very horse he rode that day, Merodeador El Prim.

“I just bought the horse. I don’t really know why; I just bought him,” said Miller. “I was impressed by Merodeador’s personality, plus he had done well in a recent national show. So I bought him and rode him in as many classes as possible. The only thing this horse couldn’t do was jump!”

Miller credits the Paso Fino’s natural lateral, four-beat gait with his ability to still compete and ride. “Riding is not as hard on the body with the Paso Fino because you don’t have to post. The gaits are super-smooth. I have had a bad back since I was about 25 years old because of some injuries I got playing football as a kid. So not having to post is hugely helpful in my ability to keep riding,” said Miller. “They’re a smaller horse, too, which makes getting on and off easier as you get older. But don’t let their size fool you — they are little powerhouses.”

A few years, after purchasing Merodeador El Prim, Miller added another black gelding to his herd, Artillero Arroyo Maraca. The Paso Fino is described as having brío, the Spanish term referring to the horse’s spirited personality, and Artillero had it in spades.

“He was a horse of a lifetime,” Miller said of Artillero, a Paso Fino Hall of Fame horse. “You learn pretty fast what you like and what you don’t like. It all depends on the rider’s personality. For me, I like a show horse with a big personality. My horses are not great trail horses like many Pasos are, but that spirit is what I like in a horse, even today as an 80-year-old man. The breed can be intimidating to someone at first, but feeling that energy and power is incredible as a rider.”

Miller began competing in local shows, building up to some of the most prestigious Paso Fino shows in the world. He has owned more than 130 Paso Finos, competed in more than 3,000 classes, and won more than 85 national titles. He competed in the Mundial World Championships four times and showed all over the U.S., England, Germany, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic.

This year, Miller rode three horses and competed in eight classes at the PFHA Grand National Championship Show. He won one championship and two reserve championships. He and his wife, Sandy, own Mid-Iowa Paso Fino, a training and breeding facility, with Jorge Suarez and Ramon Cintron as their trainers.

“It’s amazing what this breed has given me. I didn’t even know about disciplines growing up; we just rode. Never went to a horse show. Now I’m telling stories about being in Germany for a Paso Fino competition and how I competed in international competitions like the Mundial,” said Miller.

After four decades of being in the Paso Fino industry, Miller is grateful for the relationships he has developed within this community. He has consistently given back through service on the PFHA Board of Directors, the Paso Fino Horse Foundation, and sponsorship and other support for the U.S. teams competing in the Youth Mundial over the years.

“I am grateful to have had the opportunity to ride so many talented Paso Fino horses and to cultivate friendships that will last a lifetime,” said Miller. “It was a steep learning curve when I started with these horses in the 1980s, but people were so supportive and helped me along the way. Every day that I ride and every show that I participate in is a testament to the incredible enjoyment this breed gives us!”

by Ashley Swift
© 2020 United States Equestrian Federation

Vote for Interagro Lusitanos in the Finalists of “Best Covers Contest” for Revista (Horse) Magazine

Since July, the Brazilian Horse Magazine “Revista Horse” has been engaging Instagram users across the world with their “Best Magazine Covers” contest. Over a hundred covers were selected to participate and divided into four categories: Breeds, Sports Disciplines, General, and Miscellaneous.

Interagro was directly represented by a number of these covers, including Edition 99, highlighted by the Lusitano stallion Perdigueiro (MAC). Bred by Assunção Coimbra Stud Farm in Portugal and photographed by Tupa, Perdigueiro cover was the winner of “Breeds” category representing the Purebred Lusitano on August 13th with over a thousand votes.

Interagro also had three other Lusitanos of its brand competing at this contest: Jackpot Interagro, driven by Interagro’s Antonio Souza, won the Sports Discipline category representing the carriage driving, photographed by Heleno Clemente for the cover of Edition 115.

Having been a part of Team Interagro for almost 2 decades, Antonio trained in Portugal with Jorge Sousa in 1994 and took a Driving Course at the Coudelaria de Alter in 1998. In 2014, Antonio was trained by Mr. Rui Quintino de Oliveira from Portugal and in 2016 attended clinics with Mr. Jorge Baixo from Portugal at Larissa Farm in Brazil. He dedicates himself to the whole range of Driving activities, from breaking youngsters to the most advanced training. His first test in Brazil was a four-in-hand, but these days on the farm he harnesses 6, 8, and 10 animals together. He now also gives tutoring courses to coachmen and horses and is a great wealth of knowledge and information for Interagro.

Antonio won the prizes “Hipismo Brasil” in 2017 and 2018 in the Single Professional division with Jackpot who was sold in 2019 to Monsanto Stud Farm in the 1st Ares Lusitanos Auction promoted by Virtual Stables.

Antonio’s partner for the Sport Discipline cover, Jackpot Interagro, is the last son of the highly decorated Nirvana Interagro and the black mare Naranja do Mirante, who scored 80 points at her revision and is the mother of Varanja Interagro and Zampano Interagro, who were sold to the US, as well as Apache Interagro who was sold to Canada.

In the General category, the Lusitano Bailos Interagro reached the finals with the cover of Edition 88. published originally in December 2015. Photographed by Fagner Almeida at Haras Godiva, located in Jose Ignacio, Uruguay, Bailos is owned by Mr. Mauricio Delucchi who lived in Itapira for years as Interagro’s head trainer. When Mauricio returned to his home country of Uruguay, he took with him the young grey stallion sired by Noblíssimo Interagro and Dona (RC), beautiful mare bred by beloved Architect Arsênio Raposo Cordeiro, by Venturoso III (MV) and Saloia II (MV), a daughter of Guerrita (MV) the mother of the mythological Novilheiro (MV) with Nilo (MV). In addition to Bailos, Dona (RC) also produced the International Working Equitation Champion Xaveco Interagro, sold at the auction Leilão Coleção Interagro 2006.

The final is scheduled for September 29th starting at 2 pm Brazil time (1 pm Miami time). Voting is at @revistahorse story on Instagram and it stays active for 24 hrs. only (as all stories do). Please join us in voting for Interagro’s fabulous horses and the gorgeous covers of Revista (Horse).

For more information on Interagro Lusitanos, Interagro’s horses for sale, or the Lusitano bloodlines, visit Interagro’s website at www.lusitano-interagro.com.

Media contact:
Equinium Sports Marketing, LLC
Holly Johnson
holly@equinium.com
www.equinium.com