All posts by Associate Editor

EAF Salutes Julie Ross for Her Longstanding Commitments to the Equestrian Community

Photo: Julie Ross with her son Robert Ross.

Wellington, Fla. – July 5, 2018 – As the mother of a professional rider who worked his way up through the ranks, Julie Ross has a keen understanding of the equestrian community from her view at the periphery. She knows about the drive and dedication of the equestrian community.

Ten years ago, Julie Ross, mother of Equestrian Aid Foundation co-founder and board member Robert Ross, made a commitment to the equestrian community. “I asked my son what he wanted for Christmas.  He said he would love it if I made a donation to the Equestrian Aid Foundation,” said Julie. “So I did, and I have not stopped as it feels pretty good to give and contribute to the Equestrian Aid Foundation.”

Through her unwavering monthly commitment, Julie has singlehandedly funded over 100 doctors’ visits for horsemen whose lives and livelihoods depended on the care they received during times of medical and financial crisis.

“Her contributions help ensure Equestrian Aid Foundation has the funds to get critically ill and injured equestrians back on their feet and, in most cases, earning a living by doing the work they love,” said board member Scot Evans.

Julie is the motivation for the Equestrian Aid Foundation’s Change Rein Monthly Giving Program, an initiative that encourages members of the equestrian community to donate on a monthly basis.

“Each month your spare change can effect a huge change for an equestrian struggling to become self-sufficient again,” said Janise Gray, Director of Grant Recipient Services. “As one of our recipients told me, you’re not giving a hand-out; you’re giving a hand up.”

For questions about the Change Rein Monthly Giving Program or help setting up your donation, please contact Janise Gray at Janise@EquestrianAid.org.

For more information, please visit EquestrianAidFoundation.org.

Little and Clearwater Conquer $35,000 1.50m Welcome Stake CSI 3* at TIEC

Marilyn Little and Clearwater. Photo Credit ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – July 5, 2018 – Marilyn Little (USA) and Clearwater scooped up a win in the $35,000 1.50m Welcome Stake CSI 3* to officially open FEI Tryon Summer IV competition at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC), sweeping through the short-course timers in 31.617 seconds. Aaron Vale (USA) and Major, a 2007 Danish Warmblood gelding (Carmargue x A’khan Z), claimed second place after clearing the jump-off in 32.701 seconds, while Samuel Parot (CHI) and Thriller P, a 2004 Swedish Warmblood stallion (Cardento x Lucky Light) finished third on a fast, four-fault round of 31.416 seconds.

A total of 39 entries contested the first-round track set by Alan Wade (IRL), with seven pairs welcomed back for the short test. After watching both Parot and Vale’s performances, Little and the 2007 Holsteiner gelding (Clearway x Come On) put in a quick and clean round that could not be beat.

“It’s always exciting to ride one of Alan’s courses,” said Little of the competitive class. “He does an incredible job and they’re always extremely technical and challenging. I think he usually evaluates the field that he has very well. Today’s was a well-planned course and there were not too many clear. It’s a step up for the 3* week, which was nice and it was a lot of fun.”

Little further elaborated about the course’s technical nature, which plays to Clearwater’s strengths. “There was a center line that was quite difficult – [Wade] included three doubles today and he does that somewhat regularly. It really allows the course to be even more technical. The doubles really caught a lot of people out, but my horse is very technically able. He’s really easy to ride and when I see those kinds of lines in a course, it’s definitely to his advantage,” she explained. “He’s a very quick horse in the jump-off.”

“I knew that with that group of people, whether some had rails or not, I’d have to put in a personal best to win,” Little described, noting the day’s stiff competition. “Clearwater is very fast, and he was really excited to be here, too, since it’s his first week here this summer. He’s had a lot of good rounds in this ring, so we’re looking forward to Saturday’s [Grand Prix].”

Little has been keeping things light with Clearwater in the Jumping discipline while she focuses on preparing her FEI World Equestrian Games™ (WEG) mount, RF Scandalous, after the duo was recently being named to the Land Rover USA Eventing Team Short List for the event.

“I was last here for The Fork. But recently, I took Clearwater to Upperville in June and then to a small national show to give him an easy round. He won that and so we haven’t been doing a ton, but I’m just trying to choose well-planned, well-timed shows and not push it leading up to September.”

In addition to preparing and maintaining her horses, Little is also still mindful of an older, but serious foot injury and has recently completed a six-month stint in a boot, she added. “It’s pretty good. I expected by now to have had surgery. I did spend six months in the boot, which had I known I was going to be in it for that long I would have tried something different, but in the end, it really let it heal. I won’t say it feels normal now, but it’s certainly manageable and I don’t notice it when I’m riding.”

Earlier in the week, the $5,000 1.40m Power & Speed Stake CSI 3* congratulated Javier Fernandez (MEX) and End Good All Good, a 2009 Dutch Warmblood gelding (Mr. Blue x Caretino) for their victory, stopping the short-course timers in 29.316 seconds to best the field of 32.

Kristen Vanderveen (USA) and Bull Run’s Almighty, a 2008 Hanoverian gelding (Caspar x Quidam De Revel) slid into second place after their 29.569-second jump-off performance, while third place honors went to Mattias Tromp (USA) and the 2009 Dutch Warmblood mare (Harley VDL x Orthos), Eyecatcher, after they completed the short-course in 30.964 seconds.

Please visit www.tryon.com or call (828)-863-1000 for more information.

ASPCA Maclay Championship Regional Qualifiers Rapidly Approaching

Lexington, KY – July 3, 2017 – With the horse shows well underway, the all-important regional qualifiers for the ASPCA Maclay Horsemanship Championship is rapidly approaching.

The ASPCA Maclay National Championship, to be held this year November 4 in the Alltech Arena at the Kentucky Horse Park, is one of the most prestigious equitation championships in history. Past winners include some of the biggest names in the equestrian sport, including William Steinkraus (1941), Frank Chapot (1948), George Morris (1952), Leslie Burr Howard (1972) and Nicole Shahinian Simpson (1992). Equestrians from all around the country prepare year-round for this highly anticipated event, and the NHS has officially announced the 2018 dates and locations for each of the eight regional qualifying competitions.

Both ASPCA Maclay Regionals for Region 1 (Northeast – CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT) and Region 2 (East – NJ, NY, PA) will be held at Old Salem Farm in North Salem, New York Saturday, September 22, 2018. For further details, 914-669-5610 or mary@mmg.management.com.

Region 3 (Southeast – AL, DC, DE, FL, GA, MD, MS, NC, SC, TN, VA, WV) Sunday, September 23, 2018. Southeast Fall Classic Horse Show in Tampa, Florida. For further details, 407-619-0891 or devita124@aol.com.

Region 4 (Midwest – IL, IN, KY, MI, OH) Saturday, September 22, 2018 at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, Kentucky. For further details, 615-838-7560 or wldwoo@aol.com.

Region 5 (Central – IA, KS, LA, MO, MN, ND, NE, OK, SD, TX, WI) Saturday, September 15, 2018, at the St. Louis Charity Horse Show in Lake St. Louis, Missouri. For further details, 314-308-1162 or stlnchorseshow@aol.com.

Region 6 (Mountain – AZ, CO, NM, UT) Sunday, September 16, 2018 at the Colorado Horse Park in Parker, CO. For further details, 303-841-5550 or email mmaybank@coloradohorsepark.com.

Region 7 (Northwest – AK, ID, MT, OR, WA, WY) Saturday, September 15, 2018 at the The Northwest Autumn Classic in Monroe, Washington. For further details, 360-805-6711 or DIANJNSN@aol.com.

Region 8 (West – CA, HI, NV) Saturday, September 15, 2018 at the Blenheim Fall Tournament in San Juan Capistrano. For details, 949-443-1841 or showpark@aol.com.

Entries for the Regional Maclay Championship classes will close, and must be received by 5 p.m. Eastern time September 1, 2018, at the NHSAA’s office.  If you wish to change your region, you must notify the NHS in writing by August 15, 2018, using the official form provided by the NHSAA that can be found at www.nhs.org.

First Coast Classical Dressage Brings Unique “Showposium” to Jacksonville Equestrian Center

Shelley Van den Neste. (Photo courtesy First Coast Classical Dressage Society)

Jacksonville, FL (July 3, 2018) – With top tier arenas, an indoor coliseum like no other in the area and over 400 permanent stalls, the Jacksonville Equestrian Center provides everything a dressage rider needs to enjoy competing with their equine partner. First Coast Classic Dressage landed at the Jacksonville facility to learn and improve their dressage knowledge when First Coast Classical Dressage hosted a “Showposium” with FEI 4* judge William ‘Lee’ Tubman.

The unique event featured lessons, classes with feedback sessions and a lecture.  Heather Rodney the show manager said, “It was a treat to have an FEI 4* judge for the weekend. In addition, an FSU production student who is making a video piece about First Coast Classical Dressage Society attended and captured footage for the video.”

The “Showposium” is focused on educating and promoting horse/rider progression in their training and knowledge base. In addition to their packed schedule First Coast also added a new class opportunity at the “Showposium” allowing riders to bring a video of a test they have ridden previously and the corresponding score sheet to be reviewed by the judge in attendance. The recent “Showposium” offered riders an extraordinary opportunity to have an FEI 4* judge of Mr. Tubman’s caliber review their tape and test and offer a judges’ perspective on how to make improvements.

Lisa Beardsley, Vice President of the First Coast Classical Dressage Society, said, “We have been having shows at the Jacksonville Equestrian Center since 2014. Our first year, we held 3 shows.  Since then, we have put on 5 shows a year; all but one have been held at the Equestrian Center.”

The staff at the equestrian center also greatly enjoys hosting First Coast Classical Dressage events. “First Coast Dressage is always a pleasure to have at the Equestrian Center. We look forward to having them back for another rated show in September,” said Alexis Newman, Business Development Manager at Jacksonville Equestrian Center.

For more information and to find out about other upcoming events, please visit www.jaxequestriancenter.com.

Jacksonville Equestrian Center
Tim Jones
904-255-4225
timjones@coj.net
13611 Normandy Blvd.
Jacksonville, FL 32221

What Causes Racehorse Lungs to Bleed?

Photo: Gun Runner. Keith Luke @lukephotography.

Ever heard of a horse that collapsed after a thirty-minute race? Exercise induced pulmonary hemorrhage could be one of the reasons behind such a tragedy. EIPH is common in most racehorses and those used in equine sports like barrel racing or polo. The term EIPH is a term for an equine who experiences blood moving into the lungs and airways during an extended period of exertion like racing.

Types of Exercise Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage

EIPH is divided into two categories, mainly bleeding from the nose and bleeding from the lungs. The bleeding from the nose involves blood vessels in the nasal airways. Approximately 5% of horses experience this type of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage.  Bleeding from the lungs occurs when blood flows from the capillaries in the lungs. You might notice blood coming from the nostrils when your horse has this type of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage. Estimates indicate that bleeding from the lungs affects over 70% of racehorses.

Causes of Exercise Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage in Horses

Although there is no definitive cause for pulmonary hemorrhage condition, experts believe that specific processes inside the lungs could be the reason for the bleeding. For the horse to get maximum strength and endurance for a race, it requires an increase in blood volume and in the pumping function of the heart. The increased pumping creates pressure within the blood vessels, which in turn raises the horse’s blood pressure. There’s an assumption that the extra pressure could cause the capillaries to burst, allowing hemorrhages to get into the air sacs, which gets into the airways, and further into nasal passages. All these responses are due to the circularity response of the stress exerted during extreme exercise.

Treatment of Exercise Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage in Horses

Reducing the recurrent episodes is the best way to treat exercise-induced hemorrhage in horses. The more times the bleeding occurs, the higher the chances of scarring which could interfere with the horse’s productivity and performance. A qualified vet may give Lasix, which is a diuretic used before a race, which helps to lower the blood pressure. You might need to allow plenty of rest for your horse and avoid keeping the horse in a stall for many days.

While there isn’t a single treatment for exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage, it’s a condition that can be managed. Speak to an experienced vet to find out what other measures could help reduce these recurrences.

What are the Symptoms of EIPH in Horses?

Your horse may exhibit certain symptoms if he has exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage. The symptoms may be auditory and visual. Some of the symptoms to watch out for include weird choking sounds after exercising for long periods, mucous tinged with blood, abnormal breathing noises like whistling or roaring, the flow of blood from one or both nostrils, and recurrent swallowing within 30 minutes after finishing a race. You’ll also notice how uneasy and distressed the horse looks.  Also, you might notice some other things that could indicate the presence of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage. You’ll notice that the horse may fall back and may not be able to sustain higher speeds like before. Furthermore, you may notice a hesitation to engage in regular activities. During this time, the horse will display extreme exertion, and you may notice unusual stride rhythms.

How New Technology Is Making an Impact in the Equine World

There is no aspect of our lives that is not being affected and influenced by technology. Whether we are looking at smartphones, driverless cars, or cryptocurrencies, advances in technology are everywhere. This is especially the case of even when looking at the horse racing industry and the equine world as a whole. We have found some very interesting and, frankly, fascinating developments which will blow your mind.

Robots

We now have robots that are capable of safely lifting a horse by controlling weight distribution, which reduces the chance of life threatening injuries. The University of Saskatchewan and RMD Engineering have designed an equine lift that demonstrates this.

Robots are also helping with equine medicine and CT scans. Scanning an animal as large as a horse is seen is very challenging, especially when the horse has an injury and is distressed. Robotic devices, such as the one created by 4DDI Equine, manoeuvre around the horse and don’t require the horse be sedated.

Sensors

Wearable sensor technology is widely available for horses. This is having a great impact on the industry in assessing health and performance.

Seaver is a wearable girth capable of measuring the heart and breathing rate and can determine the horse’s movement when jumping to measure vertical and horizontal aspects. Riders are able to access this information immediately on the smart phone app.

Another type of sensor technology is the smart saddle by Voltaire. The Blue Wing saddle contains a chip that collects information on the horse such as the number of jumps, time spent in each gait and quality of the horse’s symmetry. Like the girth, this information is easily accessible by the rider and can be used to assess performance.

3D Printing

CSIRO in Australia has developed 3D printing for horseshoes. Imaging software analyses the hoof and prints shoes that are the safest most viable fit for the horse. 3D printing can also be used for horses with injuries. Horses are often put down when they break a bone; however, prosthetics, casts, and splints can be printed for the ones with injuries. Hopefully in the future, veterinarians will simply print off a component within minutes that will help an injured horse, allowing them to trial a number of potential solutions without the need for the horse to be put down.

Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence automatically gathers data from sensors and other collection devices and interprets it to help make decisions. The automated process means a lot of mistakes are eliminated that could occur with humans.

Equimetre can be worn on the girth, measure the heart rate and breathing, but also collect data on the temperature, humidity, and conditions of the track. These data provide analysis that helps trainers determine what will best suit the horse. Combining this with machine vision technology, we could soon see insights into the management and routine of horses on a daily basis. This allows better, more accurate training and would be excellent for monitoring health.

Virtual Reality

Virtual Reality allows anybody wanting to work with horses to experience this without any complications and risks. Difficult surgery can be practiced in a classroom, allowing students and teachers to build up experience before doing this for real. Technology has also been developed to re-create the experience of a beginner riding a horse for the first time. Whilst rather expensive, it can help the industry become more ergonomic going forward. We all are aware that Virtual Reality is already being employed in the gaming world; however, it also has the potential to be used in other markets like horse race betting. There may come a time when progressive bookmakers such as Unibet will be offering their members the chance to bet and experience the thrill of the race via Virtual Reality, which would definitely heighten the entire experience.

Nicole Bellissimo & Casino Top $35k 1.45m Sunday Classic CSI 2* at Tryon Summer III

Nicole Bellissimo and Casino. Photo Credit ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – July 1, 2018 – Competition concluded on Sunday, July 1, at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC), with a swift victory for Nicole Bellissimo (USA) and Casino. The duo rounded out a successful week by finishing first in the $35,000 1.45m Sunday Classic CSI 2*, crossing through the jump-off timers in 42.762 seconds. Second place honors went to Tracy Magness (USA) and John Bartko’s 2008 Belgian Warmblood mare, Intenz Van HD (Elvis Ter Putte x Nabab de Reve), completing their fast-track round in 46.075 seconds, while third place was awarded to Samuel Parot (CHI) and his own Atlantis, a 2003 Zangersheide gelding (Andiamo x Royal Bravour L), after achieving a time of 78.95 seconds in the first round.

The win was the second podium placing of the week for Bellissimo and the Bellissimo LLC’s 2007 Holsteiner (Cassini II x Carano), as the 24-year-old also guided the stallion to a second-place award in Friday’s Tryon Resort $5,000 1.40m Speed Stake CSI 2* class. Of her mount, she explained: “I got him at the end of his nine-year-old year, and he was doing the high-jumper classes out in California. We slowly moved up; I’ve ridden him in several CSI 2*s at this point, and he’s just been a really excellent horse for me. He’s exceptionally careful, and I always have to think a little bit more when it comes to time allowed with him, but he’s gotten quicker about that.”

The first-place result also happened to be the pair’s second blue ribbon of the Tryon Summer Series, with both victories taking place on the Derby Field at TIEC. “The grass is really fantastic,” said Bellissimo. “I think that the most important thing that you can say about a grass field is that you can’t feel that you’re riding on grass. Not once, during either of the weeks, did I feel him slip out there. He jumped really solid rounds. Sometimes when they’re on grass, as they leave the ground they may slip, but with the security of this field, it’s like you’re riding in a sand ring.”

The partnership between the two has grown over the past few years, and getting to know the stallion has given Bellissimo an appreciation for his minimal antics. “He is a stallion,” she elaborated, “so he can be a bit fresh on the ground. But he has an amazing groom, Alex Mullen, and she does an incredible job with him. However, for the most part he’s pretty sweet, and really isn’t too bad. He’s just a really special horse.”

Bellissimo plans to give Casino some time off over the next week, and then will return to the show ring ready to tackle the Tryon Summer V CSI 2* competition. She concluded, “He’ll get his break, and then we will come back for week five and hope for the same result then!”

Elizabeth Smith and Double Gold Come Up with Blue in $10,000 Pony Hunter Classic

Tryon Summer III competition boasted the Pony Spectacular, with pony classes featured throughout the week and many hosted in the George H. Morris Arena to help competitors prep for USEF Pony Finals later in the summer. Friday’s highlight class, the $10,000 Pony Hunter Classic, saw a win for Elizabeth Smith of Spartanburg, SC piloting her own Double Gold after their two-round score of 164. Just behind in reserve was Maddie Tosh aboard Smallwood Mystic for Peacock Ridge LLC out of Milton, GA, scoring 163, while Lauren Lomel (Ocala, FL) and Woodlands Lightning Thief, owned by Megan Galloway, achieved a score of 158 to finish third.

Smith has been riding “Nugget” for three years, but was a first-time competitor at Tryon’s Pony Spectacular. One of 12 called back for a second round, Smith knew she had a lead and said that she knew she had to take advantage of the arena’s space with her trustworthy mount:

“I just wanted to have fun and do what my trainer told me. I didn’t want to panic – I wanted to make sure I was relaxed,” said Smith. “I knew that going into the second round I had to carry a forward pace because the lines were riding a little forward. My trainer always tells me to take a deep breath and have fun no matter what, so I knew I had to give my pony leg, and then stay out of his way and he would take care of me.”

Smith didn’t seek out a palomino pony, she revealed, but fell in love with him and his steadfast nature. “My favorite thing about Nugget is his personality. He’s the same pony every day and he loves me so much, and he’ll get me out of anything I put him in,” said Smith. “But he hates having his tail braided.”

Despite the big atmosphere, Smith commented on Double Gold’s tolerance for the arena’s size and energy, as well as his talent contributing to the win, saying, “In this big arena, I can open up his stride more and he doesn’t get too antsy, so he’s good for this ring. Yes, I’m excited for the win, but it’s all my pony,” she concluded.

Please visit www.tryon.com or call (828)-863-1000 for more information.

Two California Para-Drivers Earn Their East Coast Debuts at the Southern Pines CDE

Ginny Leal, Groom Howard Leal, Navigator Leslie Berndl, Photo: Pics Of You.

Southern Pines, NC – July 1, 2018 – Para-Equestrian drivers Ginny Leal (Grass Valley, CA) and Stefanie Putnam (now based in Louisville, KY) recently participated in the Southern Pines CDE in North Carolina.  Leal had the opportunity to drive the advanced level pony “Zoobie” owned by Teressa Kandianis in the April 12-15, 2018 event in one of the first Para-Driving Intermediate classes held in the United States modeled after the FEI Para-Driving World Championship.  A previous para-driving event was held in California at Sargent’s CDE in May to prepare para-equestrian drivers for the “World’s” to be held at Kronenberg, The Netherlands, August 28 – September 2, 2018.  Team USA finalists will be announced in the near future.

Stefanie Putnam drove her own “Shadow” at the event taking the Preliminary Single Horse Championship.  Putnam has moved to Louisville, Kentucky permanently where she is working with the Frazier Institute and Research Center as the eleventh human, the first woman, in the ground-breaking Spinal Cord Injury “Victory over Paralysis” epidural stimulation implant research study. Putnam will not be applying to be considered for Team USA in 2018. Putnam explained, “My part in the Frazier study is funded for another year, and they have invested enormous time, energy, and resources in me.  We are beginning to make history that will benefit not only the Spinal Cord Injury community, but also other disabling conditions such as Parkinson’s, Multiple Sclerosis, cardio vascular issues, and more. Where there was no hope, there now is hope. To be a part of such a gift to humanity is more than I could possibly ask for.”

For more information about the USPEA, please visit www.USPEA.org or contact USPEA President: Hope Hand by e-mail: hope@uspea.org or by phone: (610)356-6481.

Official Prize List Available for US Dressage Finals and USDF Dressage in the Bluegrass

The 2018 US Dressage Finals presented by Adequan® and USDF Dressage in the Bluegrass are to be held at the Kentucky Horse Park, November 8-11. Start making plans to attend and view the official 2018 prize list, along with other information, at www.usdressagefinals.com.

Declarations are now being accepted for the 2018 US Dressage Finals presented by Adequan®. There is no fee to declare, but horse and rider combinations must declare at the level(s) and eligible division(s) they intend to compete in at the US Dressage Finals. Declare now at www.usdressagefinals.com.

Copyright © United States Dressage Federation
Phone: (859) 971-2277 Fax: (859) 971-7722
Email: usdressage@usdf.org

Shulman Glides to First in $70,000 Adequan Grand Prix CSI 2* at Tryon

Sydney Shulman and Ardente Printaniere. Photo Credit ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – June 30, 2018 – The $70,000 Adequan® Grand Prix CSI 2* congratulated Sydney Shulman (USA) and Ardente Printaniere for their victory Saturday night after completing the jump-off test in 37.765 seconds at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC), highlighting Tryon Summer III CSI 2* competition at the venue. Jack Hardin Towell (USA) and Ann Thompson’s 2006 Holsteiner gelding (Casall x Landlord), Carlo, claimed second place honors, stopping the jump-off timers in 38.602 seconds, while Luis Pedro Biraben (ARG) and his own 2009 Westfalen gelding (Coronas 2 x Lenardo), Colorado 210, received the yellow rosette for their efforts, finishing on a time of 39.513 seconds.

Thirty-eight horse-and-rider pairs tested the Ken Krome (USA)-designed track, with seven pairs returning to prove themselves over the short course. Shulman and the 2006 Belgian Warmblood mare (Joyeux Ardent x Ramiro) owned by Jill Shulman have been partnered for a year and a day.

“I got her from McLain Ward exactly a year ago yesterday, actually,” Shulman said of the mare, whose barn name is “Prima” for her talent. “She’s a fantastic horse. She knows her job. She’s extremely unconventional, but she tries every way to do her job and do it right. And it doesn’t bother me at all,” she continued. “She’s a bit long and low, and of course the other horse I have is really short and high, but again, she uses herself to the best of her ability, and she’s super quick. I love her.”

The course was predicted to be more ideal for her second mount of the night, Jill Shulman’s 2009 Warmblood mare (Diamant de Semilly x Kasina) Villamoura, Shulman admitted, due to the mare’s smaller build and quick stride. “The course was really good – it was actually better suited for my smaller horse [Villamoura] rather than her [Prima], because the lines were a bit short, but she jumped beautifully. The jump-off was made for her, really, to leave out the strides and kind of take a chance at the in of the double and the steady line, so she performed perfectly.

“The more you dare her, the better she jumps,” Shulman said of her jump-off strategy with the brave mare. “I had added one more stride to the wall, which was the second jump, and then also one more stride to the Spy Coast vertical than I had planned, so then I thought, ‘Okay, gallop over, and take a shot at the Horseware line, she’ll come back,’ and she did it beautifully. And then the last jump I also took a shot – she’s super brave, and I knew she wouldn’t back off the liverpool.”

Shulman plans to return to Grand Prix competition with Ardente Printaniere in next week’s $132,000 Horseware® Grand Prix CSI 3* following this week’s momentum, and complimented her mount’s effort. “It was as hard as I expected, to be honest, for her. It’s a lot of work to jump a first round clear with her, since she’s really a good speed horse. So it was quite a lot of work, but she responded well,” Shulman concluded.

Please visit www.tryon.com or call (828)-863-1000 for more information.