All posts by Associate Editor

Guerdat Gallops Them All into the Ground at Stuttgart

Photo: Steve Guerdat and Hannah. (FEI/Cara Grimshaw)

On a day when a host nation win seemed all but a given, Swiss superman Steve Guerdat (35) and his flying machine Hannah galloped the opposition into total submission with a whirlwind jump-off round at the fifth leg of the Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping 2017/2018 Western European League at Stuttgart, Germany. Never a man to flinch against the clock, the 2012 Olympic champion and winner of the Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping title in both 2015 and 2016 was third-last to go of the 16 that made the cut into the deciding second round. And to the disbelief of almost everyone including long-time leader Philipp Weishaupt, he shaved more than a half-second off the German rider’s scorching-fast target time to clinch it.

“You have to really believe you have a chance, especially when you are going at the end of a jump-off. I’ve been five times second in the Grand Prix here in Stuttgart and I really wanted to win it one day. I would have preferred to have one down in the fastest time than not to be fast enough today, so I really went for it!” — Steve Guerdat SUI (1st)

There were 11 German contenders on the 40-strong start-list so the result seemed heavily weighted in favour of a home victory. But in the end the best they could do was line up behind the speedy Swiss partnership, Weishaupt in runner-up spot with Asathir ahead of Christian Ahlmann with Epleaser van’t Heike in third and Simone Blum and DSP Alice in fourth.

Guerdat is delighted with his 10-year-old mare. “Hannah has been amazing all season. She never jumped indoors before we went to the first World Cup leg in Oslo last month and she wasn’t perfect there, but she was much better in the next round at Helsinki, and here in the big Stuttgart arena it’s more like jumping outdoors so she was very happy with that,” he explained.

“She feels like she really loves her job – as soon as she sees a fence she really wants to jump it and it’s lovely to compete with a horse that loves so much what she does. I think she has fantastic times ahead!” — Steve Guerdat SUI (1st)

Guerdat now tops the Western European League table and, with 43 points, is already qualified for the Longines 2018 Final in Paris next April.

Next stop in this thrilling series is Madrid, Spain on Saturday 25 November.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Richard Spooner and Chatinus Claim Longines Victory

Photo: Richard Spooner and Chatinus (FEI/Amy McCool)

The old adage claims that “What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas,” but it will be hard to keep secret the talent of Richard Spooner’s (USA) new equine star, Chatinus. Spooner piloted the 10-year-old Hanoverian to the gelding’s first World Cup qualifier victory in the $100,000 Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping Las Vegas (USA).

“I’m just very optimistic for the future with this horse. It’s just absolutely blowing my mind!” — Richard Spooner (USA)

Spooner defeated Alison Robitaille (USA) and Serise du Bidou to claim the top check, outpacing that duo’s time by nearly three seconds. First to go in a select jump-off field of three, Robitaille and her mount crossed the timers in 40.20 seconds; Spooner and Chatinus finished in 37.30 seconds. Karrie Rufer (USA) and Georgie d’Auvray EC, the only other combination to advance to the shortened track, finished in the third position. Last to go and Spooner to catch, Rufer elected to retire after her mount pulled a rail, but it was still a career-best finish for the amateur rider, who was competing in just the second World Cup qualifying competition of her career.

The course designed by Oscar Soberón (MEX) made for great show jumping, as the crowd on hand was on the edge of their seats waiting for a clear round. They did not get one until 21 horse and rider pairs had competed, but they did not have to wait much longer for a second: The west coast audience showed their appreciation when fan favorite Spooner, 24th to go, guaranteed a jump-off. A total of 29 competitors jumped in Round 1.

“I stuck with my plan. I walked the course and just did what my original plan was, and it worked out!” — Richard Spooner (USA)

Spooner now sits atop the standings of the west coast sub league of the Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping North American League with 58 points. Robitaille leads the east coast sub league standings; she has 52 points.

“For me, it’s unfamiliar ground to have a horse that just kind of goes in the ring and is just like an ATM machine at this point!” Spooner said of Chatinus, whom he has only had since the summer. Chatinus also posted top five finishes in World Cup qualifiers at Sacramento (USA) and Del Mar (USA) this season.

The next event on the North American League will take place in Guadalajara (MEX) on Saturday, 27 January 2018.

By Catie Staszak

FEI Media Contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Manager Press Relations
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Racing Warrior Midnight Secret Euthanized

Midnight Secret at Cabin Creek (Photo: Connie Bush)

GREENFIELD CENTER, N.Y. – NOVEMBER 17, 2016 – Racing warrior Midnight Secret was euthanized November 16 due to injuries sustained in a paddock accident.

The 20-year-old gelding was pensioned at Old Friends at Cabin Creek, the Thoroughbred Retirement Farm based in Greenfield Center, NY, an official satellite to the Old Friends Farm in Georgetown, KY.

Bred in New York by Flying Z Stables, Midnight Secret (Key Contender – Flannel Sheets, Triocala) raced almost exclusively at Finger Lakes and earned $212,749.  In 111 starts the game gelding had 14 wins and hit the boards and additional 51 times.

Debuting as a 2-year-old under trainer David Donk, Midnight Secret moved to Gregory Martin, then as a 4-year-old entered the barn of Oscar S. Barrera, Jr., who trained him for the rest of his career. Barrera transferred him to Finger Lakes, which was to remain his home track. There, he had a rivalry with fellow Old Friends at Cabin Creek resident Karakorum Patriot – from several square-offs, they scored about even. But few can beat Midnight Secret’s hardihood.

Barrera retired the horse at Cabin Creek in 2009.

As Barrera once noted: “You never read stories about horses like this, but they’ve got something special in their heart. For a 12-year-old, he was like a 2-year-old. I walked him every day and he’d be prancing.”

“He may not have been a stakes winner, but he was a champ to us,” said Cabin Creek farm manager Joann Pepper.  “He will be deeply missed.”

Old Friends is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization that cares for 175 retired racehorses. Its Dream Chase Farm, located in Georgetown, KY, is open to tourists daily by appointment. Old Friends also has a satellite facility in Greenfield Center, New York, Old Friends at Cabin Creek: The Bobby Frankel Division, which is also open to visitors. For more information on tours or to make a donation, contact the main farm at (502) 863-1775 or see their website at www.oldfriendsequine.org.

MEDIA CONTACT: Cynthia Grisolia, (347) 423-7322, cindy@oldfriendsequine.org; Joann Pepper, (518) 698-2377, cabincreek4@hotmail.com

Werth and Weihegold Head Home-Side Whitewash at Stuttgart

Photo: Isabell Werth and Weihegold FRH. (FEI/Cara Grimshaw)

With style, panache and the greatest of ease, defending series champions Isabell Werth (48) and her wonderful 12-year-old mare Weihegold cruised to victory at the third leg of the FEI World Cup™ Dressage 2017/2018 Western European League on home ground in Stuttgart, Germany. And in a feast of fabulous performances it was fellow-countrywomen Dorothee Schneider (Sammy Davis Jr.) and Helen Langehanenberg (Damsey FRH) who slotted into second and third places.

Sweden’s Tinne Vilhelmson Silfven (Paridon Magi) finished fourth, but only fractionally ahead of Germany’s Fabienne Lutkemeier (Fabregaz) and Jessica von Bredow-Werndl (Zaire-E) in fifth and sixth spots. There was nothing fractional about Werth’s win, however, her score of 87.575 percent leaving her well ahead of Schneider who posted 82.805. And it was a particularly satisfying result for the phenomenal athlete who this year alone claimed her third FEI World Cup™ Dressage title along with triple-gold at the FEI European Championships in Gothenburg (SWE).

“Weihe has had such a great year, and after Gothenburg we gave her a long break but we thought it would be lovely to bring her to Stuttgart for the home crowd to see her and it was really nice. She’s only been working lightly for the last few weeks so we didn’t take the full risk like we did in Aachen or Gothenburg this summer, but I’m very happy with how she went; it was a great day!” — Isabell Werth (GER)

The Freestyle test wasn’t perfect – “the mistake in the two-tempis was all mine!” Werth admitted, but it was still nothing short of spectacular. Taking “the full risk” in Dressage terms means chasing down marks by challenging the horse to produce each movement to the maximum, although when it doesn’t come off it can prove expensive. The fluency of Werth’s work with Weihegold was so exquisite, however, that even an error couldn’t prevent their absolute supremacy.

Schneider’s 11-year-old stallion Sammy Davis Jr. continues to impress in his first season at Grand Prix level and this pair posted some massive artistic scores, while Langehanenberg’s 15-year-old stallion Damsey FRH produced breath-taking extended trot on his way to earning a score of 79.615 for third place. “He was super-fresh but really happy to be out competing and really keen to perform. He really came to life in his test and it’s great for an older horse like him to be still enjoying competition so much!” said the 2013 FEI World Cup™ Dressage champion.

Werth doesn’t earn points in the Western European League series and only has to line out in the qualifiers with whichever horse she chooses to defend her title at the 2018 Final in Paris, France next April. She has three to choose from, Don Johnson taking runner-up spot at the opening qualifier in Herning, Denmark last month before Emilio came out on top in Lyon two weeks ago, and then Weihegold followed suit. She’s spoiled for choice, and her next outing will be at the sixth leg in Amsterdam, The Netherlands in January.

Before that, however, the rest of those chasing down a much-coveted place at the Final will be battling it out in round four at Salzburg (AUT) and the fifth qualifier at London Olympia (GBR) in December. Sweden’s Patrik Kittel continues to top the league table by a considerable margin ahead of Switzerland’s Marcela Krinke Susmelj in second place, Spain’s Morgan Barbancon Mestre in third and Germany’s Dorothee Schneider who has moved up from 13th to fourth spot thanks to her runner-up finish.

Watch Isabell Werth and Weihegold take the win in front of the home crowd here on YouTube.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Leanne Williams
Media Relations and Communications Manager
leanne.williams@fei.org
+41 79 314 24 38

Hunter News from the Atlanta Fall Classics

Holly Shepherd and Kodachrome [Alison Hartwell Photography]

Seasoned derby riders, Holly Shepherd of Grand Bay, Alabama and Tim Maddrix of Leeds, Alabama, battled it out for the top placings in the $10,000 USHJA International Hunter Derby over a course designed by Paul Jewell of Lambertville, New Jersey.

Twenty-five horse and rider teams took to the oval arena and it was Derby Queen Holly Shepherd of Grand Bay, Alabama and Nina Moore’s Kodachrome who took home the blue ribbon for their overall score of 375.

Special, owned by Missy Nolen and ridden by Tim Maddrix of Leeds, Alabama, earned a second place ribbon with their overall score of 363, and Shepherd returned for a third place ribbon in the irons of Belle Rolfe’s Cesar De Lison Z for their overall score of 362. Maddrix returned to the winner’s circle for the fourth place ribbon, this time aboard Margaret Camp’s Cascaron, for their overall score of 349.

Michael Leon of West Hollywood, California took the fifth, sixth, and seventh placings with Kelly Sims’ True Enough [348.50], his own Nil Du Buffan [347.50], and Sims’ True Story [347].

Sarah Milliren of Athens, Georgia and Liddy Strickland’s Valentine placed eighth, ninth was awarded to Allison Reichenbach’s High Life, ridden by Danielle Grice of Northfield, Tennessee, and tenth went to Vick Russell of Columbus, North Carolina and his own Tall Paul. Eleventh and twelfth were awarded to West Meadow Farm, LLC’s Fergus, ridden by Daniel Geitner of Aiken, South Carolina, and Wimberly Debono’s Indecision, ridden by Maddrix.

“It was great to see so many compete in the International Hunter Derby,” commented Bob Bell, President of Classic Company. “We’ve had a strong showing in the hunter divisions both weeks I and II.”

Julie Curtin and Cheryl Rubinstein’s Capisce Victorious in the $2,500 USHJA National Hunter Derby

Julie Curtin of Woodstock, Georgia took the top two placings in the $2,500 USHJA National Hunter Derby, presented by Kruse Cushion Ride, besting a field of 23 horse and rider teams over a course designed by Paul Jewell. Curtin and Cheryl Rubinstein’s Capisce took the class with their combined score of 179.5, but beating Curtin’s second ride, Rebekah Warren’s Cassico, by only half a point.

“In the Handy round, Capisce and I had a couple of options. We took the inside turns and he was really smooth and extremely handy which made for a good trip. He just edged out my other horse, so it was really close,” she said.

Final results had Holly Shepherd of Grand Bay, Alabama taking the third and fourth placings with Belle Rolfe’s Boure and Micaela Kennedy’s Magnus Hermes, respectively, with overall scores of 175 and 174.

Kelly Sims’ Eleventh Hour, ridden by Michael Leon of West Hollywood, California, placed fifth with their overall score of 171.5, and Eleese Shillingford’s Odyssey, ridden by Carolyn Bell of Alpharetta, Georgia, placed sixth with their overall 171.

Sabina Holtzman of Clayton, Missouri and her own Jerez Mail earned a seventh place ribbon and Cassino Royale, owned by Anna Huggins and ridden by Clay Alder of Germantown, Tennessee, placed eighth. Shanna Beyer’s Lacoste, ridden by Mary Mielenz of Collierville, Tennessee, earned a ninth place finish, and Curtin returned for a tenth with Select Sport Horses’ Hudson for a tenth place ribbon. SLF Bellarena, ridden by Daniel Geitner of Aiken, South Carolina and owned by Helen Byrd, placed eleventh, and Hannahlea, owned by Kelly Sims and ridden by Maggie Diehl of Alpharetta, Georgia, wrapped up the class with a twelfth place.

“I’ve ridden Cheryl’s horse before, but I rode him as a Pre Green. I was excited when Phoebe and Cheryl asked me about a week ago to ride him,” said Curtin. “He’s [Capisce] has really matured and grown up a lot and we just clicked right away. He’s a wonderful horse and I felt so comfortable on him.

“Paul used the same course for us as the International Hunter Derby and it rode really well for both heights,” she added. “It was open, flowing and there were lots of single jumps. Because the arena is very long, but not as wide, he did a great job on making it flow. He put a couple of jumps at the end of the ring because it was so long he had to use some of the width. The very first jump was on the end of the ring and the horses had to pay attention at Jump 1,” she commented. “But Paul let us finish with a nice long run to an oxer for our last jump which was really nice.

“It was so nice to see both the International and National Hunter Derbies with big numbers, especially now at the end of the year,” she added. “I’m looking forward to Gulfport this winter and plan on doing four weeks there.”

ClassicCompany.com
GulfCoastClassicCompany.com
Phone/Fax: (843) 768-5503
Post Office Box 1311, Johns Island, SC 29457

Freedom for Sale: Wild Horses to Be Slaughtered

The wild horses and burros of the American West, symbols of American freedoms and values we share and hold dear, are under threat of losing the federal protections that keep them alive.

Protections defined by the Wild and Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act are at tremendous risk since the Act was unanimously passed by Congress in 1971. The House Appropriations Committee has voted to allow the Bureau of Land Management, the federal body responsible for the care and stewardship of these animals, unlimited sales of captive wild horses and burros as part of the proposed 2018 budget. Now the Senate Appropriations Committee, followed by a joint House-Senate conference, will decide their fate. We have reason to believe that America’s mustangs are already being shipped for slaughter to Canada and Mexico – and as far afield as Japan where they are butchered and served as sushi.

It’s inexcusable. Unconscionable! And unless we press our lawmakers, the nightmare scenario of mass horse slaughter will become reality.

Taxpayer dollars would be used to fund and facilitate the roundup and sale of these animals from federal lands to a vicious and cruel slaughter. Federally funded horsemeat inspections and programs would pave the way for the return of barbarous horse slaughter to US soil.

If the proposed budget moves forward in its current form, as many as 96,000 captive and wild horses would be deemed “excess,” as if they were mere objects to get rid of. Mustangs and burros who are not already languishing in holding pens would potentially be gunned down on the very lands that were promised to sustain them decades ago.

To save America’s horses and burros from export and certain slaughter, we need your help and your donation of any amount to In Defense of Animals Wild Horse Campaign today.

In Defense of Animals has joined with the National Academy of Sciences and 40 other national organizations to propose humane, sustainable solutions for managing wild horses and burros on public lands. We are countering the ridiculous claims made by the Bureau of Land (mis)Management to smear the horses. Wild horses and burros have been made into scapegoats by the extractive and cattle industries which the BLM allows to exploit the very lands that were legally mandated to nurture our nation’s mustangs over 45 years ago – and all at taxpayer expense!

Your donation today will help In Defense of Animals fund and support practical solutions for the continued peaceful existence of our nation’s majestic mustangs.

Urgent action is needed! Our voices must be heard, and your donation today makes that happen.

Marilyn Kroplick, MD
President, In Defense of Animals

P.S. Our democratic process is being hijacked by wealthy special interests, and wild horses and burros are paying the price! More than 45 years ago, we promised as a nation to be stewards of these symbols of freedom. If we do not act soon, that promise will be broken and these living, feeling, majestic animals will be gone forever. Please fight for our nation’s horses and burros with your contribution to our Wild Horse Campaign now.

In Defense of Animals is involved in many projects to protect animals’ rights, welfare, and habitats. Money contributed to In Defense of Animals supports ALL of our worthy programs and gives us the flexibility to respond to emerging needs. Thank you for your support and consideration.

In Defense of Animals
3010 Kerner, San Rafael, CA 94901
Tel. (415) 448-0048 Fax (415) 454-1031
idainfo@idausa.org

Eric Lamaze Ends Global Champions League with Team Victory

Eric Lamaze and Chacco Kid. Photo by Stefano Grasso for Global Champions League.

Doha, Qatar – Canada’s Eric Lamaze, riding alongside Harrie Smolders, led the Hamburg Diamonds to the overall victory in the final event of the Global Champions League held November 10 and 11 in Doha, Qatar.

The 2017 Global Champions League saw 18 teams participate, with the majority named for stops on the Global Champions League tour.  Heading into the final event of the season, the Hamburg Diamonds held a narrow lead over Valkenswaard United, with the final rankings to be decided over two days in Doha.

Lamaze incurred nine faults in Friday’s opening round, hindered by two broken ribs suffered days earlier, while his teammate, Harrie Smolders of The Netherlands, jumped a clear round to keep hopes of an overall victory alive.  On Saturday night, Lamaze delivered when it counted most, producing a clear round aboard his 2016 Rio Olympic bronze medal partner, Fine Lady 5, a 14-year-old bay Hanoverian mare (Forsyth x Drosselklang II) owned by Andy and Carlene Ziegler’s Artisan Farms in partnership with Lamaze’s Torrey Pines Stable.  When Smolders matched his fault-free performance riding Don VHP Z, the Hamburg Diamonds secured the 2017 Global Champions League title with a total of 312 points over Valkenswaard United, who kept the pressure on right until the end and finished runner-up with 308 points.  The Mexico Amigos finished a distant third with 250 points.

The Hamburg Diamonds won a total of €2,269,614 in prize money throughout the 2017 Global Champions League season.  Lamaze, Smolders, and six-time British Olympian John Whitaker were joined by Audrey Coulter of the United States and Jos Verlooy of Belgium, both two-time World Cup Finalists, in representing the Hamburg Diamonds over the course of the 2017 season for owners Copernicus and Euro Horse.  Two riders from each team are selected to compete in each of the 15 Global Champions League events held around the world.

“Thank you to Axel Verlooy and the Coulter family for including me on their team this season,” said Lamaze, 49, who rode alongside Smolders, Coulter, and Jos Verlooy during his 2017 season appearances.  “When Axel first approached me, I didn’t hesitate to join such a strong team.  It took the best riders to win the championship title.

“I would also like to thank my owners, particularly Andy and Carlene Ziegler, for allowing me to ride their horses in the Global Champions League this year,” added Lamaze.

Lamaze competed in four Global Champions League events riding his 2016 Rio Olympic mount, Fine Lady 5.  He also made three appearances with Chacco Kid, an 11-year-old chestnut Oldenburg gelding (Chacco Blue x Come On) owned by Andy and Carlene Ziegler, Rick and Sara Mershad, and Ludi and Carol Sollak, who, collectively, form The Chacco Kid Group.

Lamaze has two competitions left on his 2017 schedule.  The three-time Canadian Olympic medalist will compete at the CSI5* Paris Masters in France from November 30 to December 3 before heading to Switzerland for the CHI Geneva from December 7 to 10.  In Geneva, Lamaze will defend his title in the innovative Rolex IJRC Top Ten Final, which offers 475,000 Swiss francs in prize money to the top ten ranked riders in the world, on Friday night, December 8, as well as contest the Rolex Grand Prix, part of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, on Sunday, December 10.

For more information on Eric Lamaze, visit www.EricLamaze.com.

Media Contact:  Jennifer Ward
Starting Gate Communications
Cell: (613) 292-5439
www.startinggate.ca

Celso Ariani and Dali T Best Competition in $25,000 November Grand Prix

Celso Ariani aboard Dali T. Photo Credit ©AnneGittinsPhotography.

Wellington, FL – November 15, 2017 – The ESP November competition concluded on Sunday, November 12, at Palm Beach International Equestrian Center (PBIEC), with a steadfast victory for Celso Ariani of Wellington, FL aboard Rodrigo Padilla and Ricardo Romero’s Dali T, in the $25,000 November Grand Prix. The pair bested the competition, stopping fast-track timers in 40.941 seconds, and ultimately clinched the first place position.

Second place was awarded to Elisa Uribe of Ft. Lauderdale, FL aboard her own Havana De La Lande, after completing the course, designed by Hector Loyola of Wellington, FL in 41.585 seconds. Third place honors were captured by Kevin Mealiff of Flemington, NJ, piloting Maarten Huygens Audi’s Dimple to a finish of 43.602 seconds.

The $10,000 TackNRider Welcome Stakes saw Jimmy Torano of Wellington, FL and Armageddon, owned by Cenci Jumper, LLC, take first place with a jump-off time of 43.497 seconds. Second place honors were awarded to Emanuel Andrade of Wellington, FL aboard his own Cortina 186 with a jump-off time of 44.092 seconds, while third place was secured by Rebecca Conway of Wellington, FL and Cornwall 9, owned by Blue Hill Farm, LLC, with a fast-track time of 45.166 seconds.

The Child/Adult Jumper Classic was won by Emmanuelle Greenberg of Boca Raton, FL and her own Curacao, completing the jump-off in 42.486 seconds. Brielle Biggins of Palm Beach Gardens, FL slid into second place after the jump-off with a time of 41.551 seconds and with four additional faults, aboard Good Boy H M, owned by Equine Equities and Investments LLC. Third place was also awarded to Emmanuelle Greenberg and her own Carlos G, after adding four faults to their jump-off time of 48.854 seconds.

Caroline Donnally of Wellington, FL won the $2,500 Low Junior/Amateur Owner Jumper Classic aboard her own Reve Du Razzy, after stopping the jump-off timers at 44.31 seconds. Second place was earned by Dolores Funes of Wellington, FL aboard Samuel Parot’s Chantilly, finishing with a jump-off time of 44.702 seconds. Teri Kessler of Lexington, KY took third place with Skribbelino, owned by Kessler, on a jump-off time of 45.448 seconds, and also adding four faults to their score.

The Low Child/Adult Jumper Classic awarded first place to Lisa Moore of Boca Raton, FL and Royal Equines, LLC’s Jester Van De Gerkenberg, after completing the jump-off in 36.123 seconds. Laura Piedrahita of Wellington, FL rode her own Funoranchi to second place with a jump-off time of 38.147 seconds. Third place was captured by Ella Hess of Boca Raton, FL and Susanne Richey’s All’s Well, finishing the jump-off in 43.078 seconds.

The Accuhorsemat Marshall & Sterling Child/Adult Jumper Classic was won by Emmanuelle Greenberg aboard Curacao, with a jump-off time of 35.462 seconds. Second place saw Paige Myers of Plantation, FL riding her own Klyde’s Getaway complete the jump-off in 38.903 seconds to finish in the top two. Third place went to Ava Tarone of West Palm Beach, FL aboard Isabel Sanchez’s Chino, after a jump-off round that stopped the timers in 41.03 seconds.

Karen Walcott of Wellington, FL captured the victory in the Pilates Rock Low Adult Hunter division on KEQ, LLC’s Charm City. Walcott also took the reserve champion finish aboard Right On Q, owned by Walcott.

The Equitation 14 & Under Division awarded champion to Chloe Watrous of Evanston, IL and her own Quintus Rubin. Isabel Beltran of Jupiter, FL took reserve champion, piloting Alleala, owned by Beltran.

The Adult Amateur Hunter Division saw Kira Telford of Chicago, FL take top honors aboard Calistoga Gold, owned by Telford ahead of Francis Kruel of Wellington, FL and State Of Play, who captured reserve champion.

The Children’s Hunter Division was topped by Lily Beatty of Stuart, FL and Long’s Stable LLC’s Amoroso Z as the pair took divisional honors, while Isabel Beltran of Jupiter, FL and her own Alleala finished with reserve champion honors.

The Equitation Adult Amateur Division saw Alexandra Davidson of New York, NY and her own Tyruso take top divisional honors, while Zachary Gellman of Delray Beach, FL and Waterfall Z took reserve champion.

For more information, please visit www.pbiec.com.

Motivation from Moshi, by Jane Savoie

Lots of people talk to their horses, but not many actually listen in return. Have you noticed that?

I have a way I talk to my farrier. When the leg I’m standing on gets tired, I asked him to give back the one he’s held up. I tug the foot a little bit against his hands to let him know. He’s smart enough to listen to me, and he gives me my leg so I can put it down and rest. I’m not being belligerent or stubborn. I’m simply talking to him in the only language I have. I’m grateful that he listens.

Has your horse ever tried to tell you something, but you didn’t listen? Has your horse ever told you he or she was tired, or hurt, or scared, but you decided it was defiance or laziness? Do you tend to use force when your horse says no?

Figuring out what your horse is trying to tell you is part intuition, part observation, and part faith. If you’ve struggled with this, try taking a step back and using a different part of your brain than usual. If you normally go by your gut feeling, try looking at the situation through intense and unbiased observation of the physical evidence. If you normally use only your logical mind and five senses, try using your feelings and intuition to assess the situation.

You can expand your skills by acknowledging what you normally do, and then adding something else. You have the time. You have the ability. Why not give it a bit of practice?

Jane reads me pretty well. She usually knows when I don’t feel good and when I’m just being lazy. She doesn’t just assume that I’m being belligerent, and knows that to push me when I’m not feeling my best would be counter-productive.

Give yourself and your horse a break now and then. Remember, all living creatures have good days and bad days. Sometimes we just need a little respect for how we are feeling in the moment. Of course, if your horse really does become belligerent or stubborn for no reason, a little pushing may be just want he needs. The key is learning to recognize the difference.

Love, Moshi

Jane Savoie
1174 Hill St ext.
Berlin, VT 05602
Jane’s Website
DressageMentor.com

FEI World Ranked Para-Dressage Rider Katie Jackson Earns Top Accolades in 2017

Katie Jackson and Royal Dancer. Photo by Susan J Stickle.

Austin, TX – November 13, 2017 – International Para-Dressage athlete Katie Jackson from Austin, Texas has been working hard in 2017 topping Grade V Para-Dressage with scores in the mid 70’s and recently earning her USDF Silver Medal and High Point Award in the Fourth Level Open Division in able-bodied Dressage. Only two years ago Jackson was just out of surgery and barely even walking after she was diagnosed with a rare, aggressive form of soft tissue cancer. Amputation of her right leg, above her knee, was the only option to make sure all of the cancer was removed from the area. Jackson made a commitment to herself to continue to do the sport she loved and aim for the world stage. With talent, hard work, and a strong support system Jackson and Royal Dancer, now owned by Jackson and her husband Yancy thanks to the generosity of Rachel and Julia Handt, have become a top duo on the Para-Dressage stage. Jackson’s list of accomplishments in two years include earning the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF) Lloyd Kramer Annual Sportsmanship Trophy, United Stated Dressage Federation (USDF) Grade IV Para Equestrian National Champion Number One Rider of the Year, helping to win four gold medals at each Nation’s Cup for Team USA in Florida and California, Awarded Women’s Sports Foundation 2017 Travel & Training Grant, and currently she is the third ranked FEI World Para-Dressage Grade V athlete. In September, Jackson topped Grade V at the US Equestrian 2017 Para-Equestrian Dressage National Championships and CPEDI3* in Tryon, NC. In October 2017, Jackson rode at the GAIG/USDF Region 9 Championships, Southwest Dressage Championships and Houston Dressage Society Autumn Classic where she earned her USDF Silver Medal and High Point Award in the 4th Level Open Division. Finishing off the year, Jackson was presented the Grade V 2017 Adequan®/USDF Para-Dressage Grade V Rider of the Year in addition to the All Breeds Para-Dressage Rider of the Year from the Westfalen Horse Association, for her accomplishments with Royal Dancer.

In Summer 2015, Jackson could only imagine where she would be weeks, months, and years down the road. In 2016, she was a brand new Para-Dressage rider and one year amputee competing at her first international Dressage competition. Jackson stated, “It has been an incredible year and I am so thankful to be able to be on this journey.  I have learned so much about myself, my riding, and what it takes to be a top competitor.  It is very rewarding to challenge my body and my mind to see what I can accomplish, especially now, as an amputee.”

Jackson has been a horse woman and athlete since she began riding at six years of age focusing on Dressage. She continued her riding even after graduating from the University of San Diego with a Bachelor in Arts and then from the UCLA School of Dentistry, beginning her dental practice in Austin, TX in 2007. She noted, “Earning my silver medal has been on my bucket list of goals. Even as a little girl I always dreamed about getting to wear the pretty shadbelly coat and riding at the FEI level.  I just never imagined I would be earning it so soon.  Earning this medal now, as a para-equestrian, makes it even more meaningful and special for me.”

Jackson is thankful to all of her support including her husband Yancy. She is also thankful to Austin Prosthetic Center who has helped to tell her story and keep her mobile so Jackson can continue living a life without limits. Jackson added, “I am extremely grateful to Kai Handt of North Texas Equestrian Center as well for believing in me and challenging me to ride at this level.   Kai’s support and coaching have aligned me for these successes and I am very thankful to be able to ride under someone with his knowledge and experience.”

Jackson is now aiming at the 2018 World Equestrian Games in Tryon, North Carolina and the 2020 Paralympic Games in Tokyo.

For more about Jackson’s story, please visit https://www.austinprostheticcenter.com/single-post/2017/10/21/Riding-toward-the-2020-Paralympics.

By: Lindsay Y. McCall

For more information about the USPEA, please visit www.USPEA.org or contact USPEA President: Hope Hand by e-mail: hope@uspea.org or by phone: (610)356-6481.

To view an online version of this press release, please visit: http://uspea.org/category/recent-uspea-press-news/.